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1  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America (and pre-emptive dhimmitude) on: January 19, 2017, 11:33:19 PM
CAIR and MAS are wings of the Muslim Brotherhood, as is Al Qaeda.
2  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Judge Napolitano on: January 19, 2017, 11:50:52 AM
Another midnight move from the corrupt Obama DOJ under Lorreta Lynch , one of the most corrupt officials we have ever had hiding behind her grandmother looks:

"Now, because of the Lynch secret order, revealed by The New York Times late last week, the NSA may share any of its data with any other intelligence agency or law enforcement agency that has an intelligence arm based on -- you guessed it -- the non-standard of governmental need."

"All these statutes and unauthorized spying practices have brought us to where we were on Jan. 2 -- namely, with the NSA having a standard operating procedure of capturing every keystroke on every computer and mobile device, every telephone conversation on every landline and cellphone, and all domestic electronic traffic -- including medical, legal and banking records -- of every person in America 24/7, without knowing of or showing any wrongdoing on the part of those spied upon.

The NSA can use data from your cellphone to learn where you are, and it can utilize your cellphone as a listening device to hear your in-person conversations, even if you have turned it off -- that is, if you still have one of the older phones that can be turned off."




http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/01/19/andrew-napolitano-attorney-general-loretta-lynch-and-parting-shot-at-personal-freedom.html

They said if I voted for Romney, the US government would end all 4th amendment protections, and they were right!
3  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: January 18, 2017, 11:47:31 PM
I am more interested in the before and after Presidency photos.  We always hear about how much they have aged from the stress of the job.  Truthfully I think that is BS and if you took photos of a lot of people over 8 yrs at those times in their lives one would see a big difference:

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/18/before-and-after-obama-10-signs-of-a-diminished-america/

He was what 47 in '08 and he is 55 now.  So sure he looks older.

I know that America looks seriously damaged by the last 8 years. Faces of meth level damaged.
4  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: setting himself up for '20 on: January 17, 2017, 06:02:15 PM

Stop sucking up Marco.
5  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness, Back of the queue, Front of the queue on: January 16, 2017, 10:01:36 PM
Nothing says Glibness like when President Obama told Great Britain it "could get in the back of the queue", parenthesis, go to hell, regarding new trade deals while he lost another, after his Netanyahu loss, foreign elections that he tried to interfere with.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/apr/22/barack-obama-brexit-uk-back-of-queue-for-trade-talks

That verbal atrocity went by largely unnoticed but really should go in his top ten gaffe list right along side of 'tell Vladimir I'll have more flexibility after my reelection'.

Even trade-skeptic Donald Trump recognizes the value of relations with our closest ally, the United Kingdom, a nuclear power and ally in almost every war.  Front of the queue, says his successor, "I think we’re gonna get something done very quickly".
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/trump-to-meet-uk-prime-minister-may-about-u.s.-u.k.-trade-pact/article/2611932

Guess which one they call immature...

Foreign policy isn't all rocket science (or wishful thinking).  Some of it is common sense.





Doing a better job than the affirmative action president isn't a high bar.
6  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Trump and the deep state on: January 16, 2017, 06:45:13 PM
http://ace.mu.nu/archives/367908.php

January 16, 2017
The Intel Community "Deep State" Is Conducting Political Warfare inside the US

They do this a lot -- ineffectually -- in foreign countries.

Now they're doing the same thing here, and just as ineffectuality.

Video at the link, but here are some quotes:

    "It cast doubt, not on CNN, but on the intelligence community and what they're doing exactly," Hemingway said. "Obviously they're leaking like sieves in an ongoing war against the president [elect]. So BuzzFeed kind of pulled the curtain back, showing how the intelligence community -- particularly the more partisan brass, not the intelligence officers who do the good work -- how they use the media to punish or destroy their political enemies."

    "That is a very important journalistic story, and one that I think should be covered as journalists are sort of cooperating with this intelligence community campaign against the president [elect]," she said. "As we take this information from them we should also apply skepticism."

    Asked if she thought intelligence officials were pushing these stories, Hemingway said U.S.Director of National Intelligence James "Clapper is a guy who lied to Congress about whether he was spying on them, he lied under oath about whether he was collecting information on hundreds of millions of Americans. We've had the intelligence community get in trouble for some political decisions about releasing information on Syria, creating an echo chamber to push the Iran deal. So as we take this information from them, we should also be applying skepticism and that’s something that’s not just right now but really going back decades. It's a lesson we keep failing to learn."

What scares me here is not the sinisterness of this -- but the gross incompetence, clumsiness, and obviousness of it.

This is the agency "covertly" attempting to influence foreign nations to our advantage? Using this level of deftness of touch? Hiding their hands to this extent?

I always thought Idiocracy was both a plausible and unsettling end-of-days scenario. It was unsettling because there was no heroism in humanity's last stand, just a pitiful stupidity. Other apocalypse scenarios at least give you the mercy of a powerful and capable villain -- so that even if you die, you die nobly and heroically, battling a worthy foe.

This entire episode is revealing our IC to not be some sinister and capable organization, but instead to be sinister and incompetent, incapable, and impotent.

But very energetic -- in a spastic, fumbling way -- in their determination to make their lurching presence felt.

It's frightening to think that the world is controlled by powerful unseen forces -- but it's terrifying to think the world is clumsily manipulated by borderline retards who imagine themselves to be kingmakers and kingbreakers.
7  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Biden! on: January 14, 2017, 11:41:41 PM
https://static.pjmedia.com/instapundit/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/BIDENGREENLANTERN-600x428.jpg



Always good for a laugh.
8  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / To survive the hacking of a power grid, it’s time to stockpile food, water and on: January 14, 2017, 08:52:50 PM
http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/columns/paul-harasim/survive-the-hacking-power-grid-it-s-time-stockpile-food-water-and-medicine


To survive the hacking of a power grid, it’s time to stockpile food, water and medicine
Paul Harasim

LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

Heather Murren, the wife of Jim Murren, chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International, doesn’t fit the stereotypical image of a survivalist or prepper.

Her hair and makeup is just so. Instead of fatigues, she prefers designer wear. She lives in a mansion, not a cave or a shack in the forest.

But when she talks about what she learned as a member of the Commission on Enhancing National Cyberesecurity, what she has to say often sounds much like something we’ve generally thought of as coming from the lips of a backwoods, paranoid, tobacco chewin’, gun totin’, doomsday conspiracy theorist.

It’s time, she says, for Americans to stockpile food, water, medical supplies and other essential everyday items. She says she’s talked to representatives with the American Red Cross and urged them to get the word out to people.
 

The reason is simple: The nation’s electric power grid is susceptible to cyberwarfare.

Should hackers shut down much of the electrical grid and the critical infrastructure accompanying it, we would have to live for an extended period of time without much of what we now take for granted.

Murren notes experts believe Russia hacked Ukraine’s power grid twice in the past year.

Forget having heat or air conditioning. Water couldn’t be pumped into most homes. ATMs, debit and credit cards wouldn’t work. There would be no banking or air traffic control or traffic lights or Internet. Pharmacies couldn’t dispense medicine. Gas stations couldn’t pump. Say adios to commerce for days or weeks or even months.

“Hacking of the power grid is a significant concern,” said Murren, appointed last year by President Obama to the commission that recently released its report to the nation.

“We can recover from a natural disaster faster than a cyberattack, ” she said. ” When Hurricane Sandy hit we could bring people from throughout the country to help out. But if there’s a cyberattack on the grid in that same region we couldn’t send people from other places because they all use other computer systems. They won’t know the system, what to do.”

What makes Murren’s comments all the more compelling is that they are delivered in the crisp, authoritative, unemotional tone of a Wall Street financier, which she was before moving to Las Vegas.

“Americans should be very concerned,” she stressed.

More people seem to be with each passing day. You can even find directions on the Internet about how to make the water in a swimming pool safe for drinking in an emergency.
 

While what commission members have to say is in the spotlight today because Russian hacking to influence the presidential election has dominated the news, the observations made on cybersecurity four years ago by then-U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta are no less riveting.

“We know foreign cyberactors … are targeting the computer control systems that operate chemical, electricity and water plants … We know of specific instances where intruders have successfully gained access to these control systems. We also know they are seeking to create advanced tools to attack these systems and cause panic, destruction and even loss of life.”

Murren said more urgency is needed toward cybersecurity, both in government and private industry.

“Technology tends to be viewed by business management as a silo,” she said. “But cyber now touches everything. New board guidelines suggest that at least one board member should have cybersecurity knowledge and that the full board should receive a presentation annually on the subject of cybersecurity. Most businesses don’t do this.”

On the other hand, she said government has too often made businesses go it alone and not played a critical role in coordinating a well-thought-out national digital security system.

She said an appropriate response by the American government to foreign-sanctioned cyberware must be worked out.

“When does it constitute an act of war?” she said.

Murren said the country can’t wait any longer to enact a workable security system.

“Failures in cybersecurity leading to theft of intellectual property are extraordinarily costly … Left unchecked, it can cost us our economic strength and global leadership. Some estimates put the theft of intellectual property — airplane schematics, drug formulas, etc., at $300-$350 billion per year.”

Paul Harasim’s column runs Sunday, Tuesday and Friday in the Nevada section and Monday in the Health section. Contact him at pharasim@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-5273. Follow @paulharasim on Twitter
9  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Biden the Great wins award from no less Obama on: January 12, 2017, 09:10:00 PM
Does an award mean much when given to you in this fashion/  And the only one "with distinction" WOW.  More self congratulations from the *ONE " to his  right hand guy:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-biden-presidential-medal-of-freedom_us_5877ea9ee4b0b3c7a7b05958



He had to give him something after this...



Pols given the award:
From wikipedia  (32 of 46 given out by Clinton and Obama since 1964); Ethel Kennedy - LOL

Politics and government[edit]
Activism
Recipient   Year   President   Notes
Arnold Aronson       1998   Bill Clinton   
Roger Nash Baldwin   1981   Ronald Reagan   
Oscar Elias Biscet   2007   George W. Bush   
Joseph Robinette Biden, Jr.   2017   Barack Obama   Awarded with Distinction.
James Chaney           2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
César Chávez           1994   Bill Clinton   Posthumously
Elouise Cobell           2016   Barack Obama   Posthumously[9]
Justin Whitlock Dart, Jr.   1998   Bill Clinton   
Evelyn Dubrow           1999   Bill Clinton   
Marian Wright Edelman  2000   Bill Clinton   [43]
James L. Farmer, Jr.   1998   Bill Clinton   
Billy Frank, Jr.           2015   Barack Obama   Posthumously[21]
Hector Garcia           1984   Ronald Reagan   [44]
Andrew Goodman   2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
Suzan Shown Harjo   2014   Barack Obama   [16]
Dorothy Height           1994   Bill Clinton   
George G. Higgins   2000   Bill Clinton   
Gordon Hirabayashi   2012   Barack Obama   Posthumously [26]
Benjamin Hooks           2007   George W. Bush   
Dolores Huerta           2012   Barack Obama   [26]
Rev. Jesse Jackson   2000   Bill Clinton   
Millie Jeffrey           2000   Bill Clinton   
Helen Keller           1964   Lyndon B. Johnson   
Ethel Kennedy           2014   Barack Obama   [16]
Martin Luther King, Jr.   1977   Jimmy Carter   Posthumously
Fred Korematsu       1998   Bill Clinton   
Mary Lasker           1969   Richard Nixon   
Rev. Joseph Lowery   2009   Barack Obama   [15]
Sylvia Mendez           2011   Barack Obama   [4]
Harvey Milk           2009   Barack Obama   Posthumously [15]
Clarence M. Mitchell   1980   Jimmy Carter   
Mario G. Obledo           1998   Bill Clinton   
Rosa Parks                   1996   Bill Clinton   
Esther Peterson           1981   Jimmy Carter   
Bayard Rustin           2013   Barack Obama   Posthumously [29]
Ginetta Sagan           1996   Bill Clinton   
Michael Schwerner   2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
Natan Sharansky           2006   George W. Bush   
Gloria Steinem           2013   Barack Obama   [29]
William C. Velasquez   1995   Bill Clinton   Posthumously
Cordy Tindell "C.T." Vivian   2013   Barack Obama   [29]
Lech Wałęsa           1989   George H.W. Bush   
Roy Wilkins           1967   Lyndon B. Johnson   
Minoru Yasui           2015   Barack Obama   Posthumously[21]
Andrew Young           1981   Ronald Reagan   

10  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I still hope they try... on: January 12, 2017, 08:59:28 PM
Why California’s Silly Secession Scheme Can’t Succeed
Kurt Schlichter
http://townhall.com/columnists/kurtschlichter/2017/01/12/why-californias-silly-succession-scheme-cant-succeed-n2269854

Kurt Schlichter
|
Posted: Jan 12, 2017 12:01 AM
Why California’s Silly Secession Scheme Can’t Succeed


America’s dopey adolescent California is sulking because Hillary lost, so now it’s talking big about moving out of Mom’s house. According to one local bison, who presumably speaks for much of the proggy herd, the rest of America is unworthy of the Golden State’s glorious presence anyway.

I’m a resident of California, and I say, “Great – pack your crap and get out.” As tempting as it is to keep you in the Union as a cautionary example of what happens when liberals run everything, the pain you would suffer running away from home would be so overwhelming that it might even teach you hapless denizens of this ridiculous state a much-needed lesson. So, go for it.

Now, I’ve previously explored the whole idea of America breaking up both here in Townhall and in my new novel People’s Republic, which features the M4-oriented hero infiltrating blue America and finding Venezuela without the charm (This spring, look for its even more proactive prequel Indian Country). But now that the local nimrods seem to be at least semi-serious about putting the question of whether the Golden State should stay or go on the 2018 ballot, perhaps this is as good a time as any to do something that liberals really, truly hate.


Let’s confront them with facts by walking through how their stupid secession idea would actually work in the real world.

Now, let’s assume the separation would be peaceful. It would have to be – I’m thinking that the declining number of the kind of people who pick up rifles still living here would not be psyched to die so San Franciscans can ensure that illegal alien hobos are able to defecate on the street unmolested and that people who misgender via their pronoun use can be incarcerated. The typical California social justice warrior would make a poor warrior warrior. It would have to be an amicable divorce. So, California is an independent country with about 40,000,000 people. What now?

Well, let’s talk about food. Where’s it going to come from? The Central Valley is a remarkably fertile area. All sorts of stuff will grow there – except, it doesn’t anymore because California has decided to stop stockpiling water and has prioritized flushing what water it does have out into the sea for the benefit of bait fish. The California water system was sufficient when we had 20 million folks, but decades ago we stopped building dams and reservoirs because of Gaia or something. So, to eat, California would need to change its priorities from tadpoles to people, or become a net importer of food.

Oh, and that Colorado River water that quenches LA’s thirst? Yeah, the United States is probably going to need that. But you can still get some of that H2O – in the form of food grown in the USA that you now have to import. Except grapes. We have lots of grapes. Can’t make bread with them though.

And then there’s fossil fuels. We know you want to go green because of your bizarre weather panic religion, but that’s a lot of infrastructure to build (and, as we will see, you’re going to be short on cash), so for now you’re stuck with dino juice. Since you’ve pretty much banned fracking and limited oil production (and I bet you’ll be shutting down those rigs off the Santa Barbara coast because rich libs hate looking at them), you’ll need to import oil. A lot of oil. The good news is the USA will have plenty to sell you.

In fact, the USA will have plenty of everything to sell you since you’ve largely driven manufacturing out of California with your regulations and taxes. Who makes cars in California? Well, Tesla, sort of – except its big new battery plant is in Nevada. And generating power? The USA will be happy to oblige since your climate change scam laws will essentially require you to outsource your greenhouse gas emissions – and the USA will be delighted to let you pay it for the privilege.

But hey, California still has entertainment and technology! Except much of the entertainment industry has already been driven out of SoCal by costs and regulations – wonder why the credits on all the TV shows you watch tell you they are filmed in Vancouver, Georgia, New Mexico, or somewhere other than Hollywood? Even the porn industry is hitting and quitting Cali! But you still have the tech companies that are stubbornly clinging to California; I hear Twitter is doing great. Oh, right. And those companies hire what – a few thousand genderfluids named Kaden? They may make rich punks richer, but other than that, nada. Well, perhaps you can still partially offset your stunning trade deficit with exports of karma and synergy.

Let’s talk spending. Don’t think California gets to just leave behind its >10% share of the $20 trillion dollar Obama-enhanced national debt. Here’s an invoice for $2 trillion. And we already talked about the California military – with >10% of the population, will it pick up 10% of the current $582.7BN defense budget? That’s $58BN on top of the current $167BN budget – ouch. Now, California might be tempted to free ride on the more martial USA, but that is going to engender some bad blood. Do you really want to tick off the people who feed and fuel and defend you?

Now, those 40 million California citizens are also going to be expecting their Social Security and Medicare and government federal pensions and all the rest of the goodies they think they’ve earned. Guess who gets to scratch that itch? Let’s not forget California’s own existing bond and pension debt – the rest of America won’t be around to help you with that. Plus, the all-Democrat legislature is going to be hard-pressed to turn down any deadbeat constituency looking for a handout, and a third of America’s deadbeats live in California now. It’s already well on its way to becoming America’s dead weight.

Not wanting to be oppressive to people who shouldn’t be there in the first place, California is going to want to legalize all the zillions of illegals currently living here. And when it does, since immigration laws are racist or something, more uninvited folks will be showing up as California becomes Mexico’s Spare Bedroom. Even if it keeps all the income taxes its residents pay to the feds now, California is still going to have to come up with a lot more dough. Sure, an independent California can run a deficit, but after Greece, who is going to lend tens of billions to Sacramento – except at crushingly high interest rates?

So taxes get to go up. California’s income tax on the wealthiest (who aren’t actually that wealthy when you realize a shack a couple miles from the beach costs $1 million plus) is something like 11%. The current top federal rate is about 39% (with no state tax deduction anymore!), so assuming that dough goes to Uncle Moonbeam, you are at a 50% rate before local taxes and without considering payroll/self-employment taxes. That’s still not enough to pay for California’s progressive utopia.

Taxes need to rise. Of course, the really rich can suck it up (or, more likely, shelter their income), and the poor don’t pay income taxes anyway. So that leaves the already depleted middle class to pick up the tab. But the few remaining middle class Californians are more likely to pick up and leave – after all, plenty of their pals from California are in Austin already and at least there they can afford a house outside the ghetto. Guys like me – a lawyer who prospers because of the state’s idiotic regulatory regime – will milk this Cal until it’s dry and then take off to sunny, low-tax Florida with our loot. So, California will become, even more than it already is, a place consisting of a few really rich people and a lot of poor ones. Not really a recipe for long term stability and prosperity – sure you want to forgo an army?

And then there are the substantive changes the extreme lefties left in charge would make. Bathroom antics and mandatory cake baking are just the beginning. Does anyone think a California unrestrained by the Constitution will retain unchanged any of the liberties enumerated in the Bill of Rights? Think of an independent California as a giant college campus that is a country – who in Sacramento will resist the inevitable call to criminalize “hate speech” and “racism” and “sexism?” Of course, those words simply mean anything progressives dislike – look for censors in the form of “Bias Review Commissions” and the like scrutinizing every word you utter.

Freedom of religion? Come on. Do you think they won’t legislate the content of religious teachings? You’ve met liberals, right? They’re aching to destroy the alternate pole of power that religion represents. Watch “hate churches” – by which they mean ones that actually follow Jesus’s teachings – get stripped of their tax exemptions. The bankruptcies and tax sales that follow will not be bugs – they will be features.

And as for the Second Amendment – don’t make me laugh. Crime will run rampant (hell, it already is) because the left sees criminality as a valid expression of oppressed peoples, and opposition to it as pure bigotry. But fear not – the rich will still be safe behind their walls and armed guards. Everyone else? Too bad, so sad.

But for all the big talk, California will never try to secede. It’s dumb, but not that dumb. The clowns in Sacramento fully understand that the folly and foolishness that flourishes on the left coast is an indulgence of, and made possible only by, the patience of better Americans in the rest of the country. California is just lucky that Mom has so much patience with its nonsense, and that she will let it keep crashing on the futon down in the basement in the likely vain hope that someday it will get its stuff together and grow the hell up.
11  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: America's Inner City, Chicago Homicides 2016: 812 on: January 12, 2017, 08:49:48 PM
The city posted a decades-high homicide count of 812 in 2016, per the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office.
https://aminewswire.com/stories/511071497-chicago-homicides-even-higher-than-reported

Where is this happening?
http://crime.chicagotribune.com/chicago/shootings/
Who is doing this?
Why?
What should be done about it?


I blame Doug. I bet if I showed Doug's picture to a BLM activist, they'd blame Doug too!

12  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: I dunno on: January 12, 2017, 08:47:32 PM
This last week Colorado got so much snow two ski resorts couldn't operate.



Here in NJ it was 198 degrees 3 days ago and today it hit 68.

That is one hell of a swing in January.

I don't recall this growing up but perhaps I am just taught to think about it more............... undecided
13  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: January 12, 2017, 08:45:41 PM
The MSM is a dinosaur stupidly thrashing in a tar pit, too stupid to yet realize how it caused it's own demise.


Rsh was excitedly calling Trump's handling of CNN brilliant.  That a Republican is finally standing up to them instead of the decades old cowtowing with tail between legs.
One could argue that Trump will never win the MSM over with this strategy however one could also argue there is no way he can ever win them over.  CNN's MO is not to report on Trump but to "take him down".  To destroy him and to get him impeached.  So why should Trump grant them carte blanche questions?  No matter what he says and no matter how he says it, CNN is going out of their way to make him look as bad as they can.

This fits the concept there is no compromise with the LEFT.  Maybe just short term compromise because they don't hold the cards ,but we know that is only till the following day when the mob is back out again shoving all their shit in our faces:

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/11/trump-trolls-fake-news-organizations-at-great-news-conference-on-twitter/
14  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Biden the Great wins award from no less Obama on: January 12, 2017, 08:43:35 PM
Does an award mean much when given to you in this fashion/  And the only one "with distinction" WOW.  More self congratulations from the *ONE " to his  right hand guy:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-biden-presidential-medal-of-freedom_us_5877ea9ee4b0b3c7a7b05958

Pols given the award:
From wikipedia  (32 of 46 given out by Clinton and Obama since 1964); Ethel Kennedy - LOL

Politics and government[edit]
Activism
Recipient   Year   President   Notes
Arnold Aronson       1998   Bill Clinton   
Roger Nash Baldwin   1981   Ronald Reagan   
Oscar Elias Biscet   2007   George W. Bush   
Joseph Robinette Biden, Jr.   2017   Barack Obama   Awarded with Distinction.
James Chaney           2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
César Chávez           1994   Bill Clinton   Posthumously
Elouise Cobell           2016   Barack Obama   Posthumously[9]
Justin Whitlock Dart, Jr.   1998   Bill Clinton   
Evelyn Dubrow           1999   Bill Clinton   
Marian Wright Edelman  2000   Bill Clinton   [43]
James L. Farmer, Jr.   1998   Bill Clinton   
Billy Frank, Jr.           2015   Barack Obama   Posthumously[21]
Hector Garcia           1984   Ronald Reagan   [44]
Andrew Goodman   2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
Suzan Shown Harjo   2014   Barack Obama   [16]
Dorothy Height           1994   Bill Clinton   
George G. Higgins   2000   Bill Clinton   
Gordon Hirabayashi   2012   Barack Obama   Posthumously [26]
Benjamin Hooks           2007   George W. Bush   
Dolores Huerta           2012   Barack Obama   [26]
Rev. Jesse Jackson   2000   Bill Clinton   
Millie Jeffrey           2000   Bill Clinton   
Helen Keller           1964   Lyndon B. Johnson   
Ethel Kennedy           2014   Barack Obama   [16]
Martin Luther King, Jr.   1977   Jimmy Carter   Posthumously
Fred Korematsu       1998   Bill Clinton   
Mary Lasker           1969   Richard Nixon   
Rev. Joseph Lowery   2009   Barack Obama   [15]
Sylvia Mendez           2011   Barack Obama   [4]
Harvey Milk           2009   Barack Obama   Posthumously [15]
Clarence M. Mitchell   1980   Jimmy Carter   
Mario G. Obledo           1998   Bill Clinton   
Rosa Parks                   1996   Bill Clinton   
Esther Peterson           1981   Jimmy Carter   
Bayard Rustin           2013   Barack Obama   Posthumously [29]
Ginetta Sagan           1996   Bill Clinton   
Michael Schwerner   2014   Barack Obama   Posthumously[16]
Natan Sharansky           2006   George W. Bush   
Gloria Steinem           2013   Barack Obama   [29]
William C. Velasquez   1995   Bill Clinton   Posthumously
Cordy Tindell "C.T." Vivian   2013   Barack Obama   [29]
Lech Wałęsa           1989   George H.W. Bush   
Roy Wilkins           1967   Lyndon B. Johnson   
Minoru Yasui           2015   Barack Obama   Posthumously[21]
Andrew Young           1981   Ronald Reagan   


César Chávez           1994   Bill Clinton   Posthumously

I'm a big fan of his opposition to illegal aliens. Note that the left has cut this from it's official history, like the Soviets used to trim purged officials from pictures.

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/cesar-chavezs-rabid-opposition-to-illegal-immigration-not-covered-in-new-movie-6643666
15  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / War with Russia and China? on: January 11, 2017, 09:05:29 PM
https://readfomag.com/2017/01/09/09-january-2017-war-with-russia-and-china-here-are-two-new-indicators/

 War with Russia and China? Here Are Two New Indicators

A US Army (USA) Soldier assigned to the 1st Infantry Division, mans a .50 caliber M2HB machine gun mounted atop a High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), during a patrol along Logistics Support Area (LSA) Anaconda, near Balad Air Base (AB), Iraq. The area is being cleared of threats so Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) personnel can call in an air strike. The image is silhouetted against the setting sun.

In an Executive Intelligence Summary from last month, I pointed out two additional indicators that bolster the case for a potential conflict with China and Russia.  I didn’t see these two stories reported anywhere other than in military channels, and certainly not through the mainstream media.  But they’re significant and I want you to know about them.

The potential for conflict with both Russia and China are scenarios I’m watching closely, because a war with either of these “near peer” competitors would likely involve cyber activity which could absolutely target us here at home.  Although cyber attacks would likely focus on military command and control targets, we can’t rule out the possibility that our internet and other critical infrastructure won’t be targeted in the process.  I’ve explained why and in greater detail in previous EXSUMs.  Now on to the indicators…

The first is that the US Navy will be unveiling a new strategy for surface combat as early as today, which is just two years after their move to what’s called distributed lethality.  That means that Navy ships, instead of operating in one mass formation, will break up into several smaller formations.  This focus on splitting a large formation into small groups and increasing lethality means that adversaries will have more numerous target groups as opposed to one mass formation.  And given electronic warfare and the capability to present decoy targets to adversary targeting systems, the US Navy is betting that they’ll be harder to hit as a result.  The carrier strike groups will remain operational, but will launch aircraft and missiles from the rear of a sea battle, while distributed formations stay closer to the fight.  This is most likely in response to recent Chinese weapons developments, which includes a series of upgrades to anti-ship missiles, and the expectation that a naval conflict is growing more likely.  China’s strategy is to use long-range air-to-air and anti-ship missiles in what’s called an anti-access/area denial strategy.  I’ll be paying close attention this week to see what comes of the Navy’s new strategy in response.

And the second is that the Army announced that Fort Stewart, Georgia’s 3rd Infantry Division will be changing the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, which is light infantry, into an armored brigade combat team equipped with Abrams tanks.  After 15 years of fighting in mostly irregular wars, leaders at the Pentagon and their concept of reality has been quickly hurtling back to earth.  For years, there was a Pentagon battle over force structure and becoming lighter, faster, and more lethal to respond to small, global contingencies, or maintaining the ability to fight large scale conventional wars.  Some leaders didn’t see the need for maintaining conventional readiness because up until about four years ago, few people were ringing alarms about conventional threats.  But now that a conventional war in Europe looks like a growing possibility, the Army is renewing focus on military readiness and increasing conventional warfighting capabilities, while playing catch up to electronic and cyber warfare; both of which will undoubtedly play a role in the next war.  2nd BCT’s sister brigade, the 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team, and other units from the 3rd Infantry Division completed several rotations to Europe in 2015 as a part of Operation Atlantic Resolve.  Operation Atlantic Resolve is part of the $3 billion package called the European Reassurance Initiative, which is meant to bolster the defense of Europe against Russian aggression.

Having an additional armored brigade at 3rd ID is directed at one problem: conventional, force-on-force warfare, specifically against Russia.  I expect President-Elect Trump’s defense policy regarding Europe to be wrought with fragmentary changes (FRAGOs for the military folks).  Trump’s desire to pursue better relations with Russia must be weighed against Russia’s regional policy goals concerning eastern Europe.  What NATO wants is bad for Russia, and what Russia wants is bad for NATO.  While Trump is cooling on war rhetoric with Russia, our European allies are engaging in the regional arms race in lock step with Russia in preparation for war.  The US military defense posture in Europe is nearing a war footing as well, and Trump will be forced to make a decision on whether to pursue a high-risk friendship with Russia or continue the strategy of being Europe’s backstop.  On the current trajectory, Trump will have to choose and he’ll likely alter history.
16  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Why do these converts get so confused about islam's peaceful nature? on: January 10, 2017, 09:07:56 PM
http://www.judicialwatch.org/blog/2017/01/airport-shooter-converted-islam-identified-aashiq-hammad-years-joining-army/?utm_source=t.co&utm_campaign=corruption+chronicles&utm_medium=social

Not terrorism-The FBI

I'm sure the MSM will be all over this story!
17  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cognitive Dissonance of the left, Global Warming killing the children on: January 10, 2017, 08:39:20 PM
Gaia be praised!

http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/01/09/california-storms-fill-drought-parched-reservoirs/

It's a Global Warming miracle!


It's causing flooding in Nevada and California right now. Is there anything Climate Change can't do?

Right, a lot like the dogs saying the Russians pooped in the hallway.


If you live on an island in a global economy more than 2000 years after the invention of desalination and die of a drought, your cause of death is poverty, not someone else's prosperity.
18  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / A professional journalist! With credentials! On guns! on: January 10, 2017, 08:23:48 PM
Remember, they have layers of fact checkers and editors!


http://thefederalist.com/2017/01/10/washington-post-reporter-doubles-down-on-fake-news-about-guns/


 Washington Post Reporter Doubles Down On Fake News About Guns

Instead of just admitting and correcting a simple reporting error about the .22 LR rifle caliber, Washington Post reporter Mike Rosenwald doubled down on his ignorance.
January 10, 2017 By Sean Davis

It’s bad enough when a newspaper like the Washington Post publishes fake news, but it’s even worse when its own reporters double down on their ignorance and refuse to correct the record when blatant journalistic errors are brought to their attention.

Washington Post reporter Mike Rosenwald published a lengthy attack on efforts to remove suppressors–mufflers for firearms that can reduce the report of a gunshot by approximately 30 decibels–from the list of highly regulated items covered by the National Firearms Act of 1934. Although actual firearms can be purchased easily following an instant background check, the process of legally purchasing a suppressor, which is not a firearm and is incapable of shooting any projectiles, can take more than a year and cost hundreds of dollars above and beyond the price of the actual suppressor. Hearing protection advocates say the suppressor regulations not only make little sense, but they also lead to the infliction of needless hearing damage on those who regularly use firearms.

Instead of providing an accurate reflection of the suppressor debate and the facts surrounding it, Mike Rosenwald chose to glibly dismiss the legitimate claims and concerns of those who actually understand how firearms and suppressors work while elevating the specious claims of gun controllers who oppose any efforts to make it easier for law-abiding citizens to purchase and use suppressors for hearing protection. The most shocking assertion by Rosenwald, and one which cast significant doubt on the rest of his reporting, was that a .22 LR rifle–far and away the smallest and weakest readily available rifle caliber on the market–was actually a “high-powered rifle”:

    But gun-control activists say silencers are getting quieter, particularly in combination with subsonic ammunition, which is less lethal but still damaging. They point to videos on YouTube in which silencers make high-powered rifles have “no more sound than a pellet gun,” according to one demonstrator showing off a silenced semiautomatic ­.22LR.

Firearms experts reacted with shock that a reporter for the Washington Post would make such an outrageous and obviously absurd claim, and that the claim would somehow survive editorial scrutiny:

The .22 LR caliber is so weak that it’s considered cruel and inhumane to hunt anything but varmints with it. Just to give you some perspective, in the picture below showing dozens of different rifle cartridges side by side, the .22 LR round is the tiny one at the very far left of the top row:

rifle-caliber-comparison

International gun control advocates don’t even go so far as to claim that .22 LR is “high-powered.” GunPolicy.org, a global gun control outfit that was run by the University of Sydney, says the term “high-powered rifle” is “used to differentiate larger-calibre (centrefire), factory-made repeating long guns from single-shot shotguns, .22 calibre rimfire rifles, and home-made firearms.”

Rather than being a “high-powered” round, .22 LR is so low-powered that it’s what many parents and instructors use when teaching young children how to shoot. That doesn’t mean it’s harmless, but there is simply no planet on which .22 LR comes even close to resembling a “high-powered” rifle cartridge. It is a nonsensical claim that instantly discredits anyone who makes it. But rather than admit error and issue a correction, Mike Rosenwald doubled down. And he doubled down in the most absurd way possible: by mocking anyone who corrected him, and then by refusing to provide any source or data to back up his absurd claim:

Nothing says journalistic integrity and trustworthy reporting like making an absurd claim, mocking everyone who called it absurd, refusing to provide any source information to back up the claim, and then telling everyone else to do the reporter’s research for him.

Unfortunately for Rosenwald, it appears that Google is actually too “high-powered” for him to use and fully understand. By his own veiled admission, Rosenwald apparently based his claim that .22 LR is a “high-powered rifle” on the fact that the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) sometimes utilize the caliber in limited circumstances (there’s no evidence of any other modern military on the planet issuing .22 LR rifles for any purpose beyond varmint control or plinking). Had Rosenwald followed his own advice to use Google to verify simple facts, he would’ve learned that IDF sometimes issues .22 LR rifles in extremely limited circumstances not for combat purposes, but to kill small animals and injure violent protesters. The only reason the IDF turned to the .22 LR in the first place was because it wanted something less lethal than the standard military-issue 5.56mm round and which could be deployed at greater distances than non-lethal rubber bullets. Nothing says “high-powered” like a rifle that’s only used to injure protesters, amirite?

So to review: Washington Post reporter Mike Rosenwald made an outrageous claim with no basis in reality, mocked everyone who pointed out that his claim was absurd, doubled down on his ignorance, made another outrageous claim to support his original outrageous claim, and then promptly stepped on a rake because he was too lazy to do the simple research he snidely demanded that everyone else do on his behalf.

Earlier this week, Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan wrote a long article demanding that conservatives stop using the term “fake news” to criticize coverage from outlets like the Washington Post. I’ve got a better idea: we’ll stop using the term “fake news,” especially fake news about guns, when the Washington Post stops publishing it.

Sean Davis is the co-founder of The Federalist.
19  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Mexico-US matters on: January 09, 2017, 11:58:25 PM
Too bad they don't get this upset about mass graves or systemic corruption.
20  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US-China (& Japan, South China Sea-- Vietnam, Philippines, etc) on: January 09, 2017, 10:52:04 PM
Interesting move by Cruz.  I'm thinking Trump could put it to "good cop bad cop" effect.

Once we have an American as president, come the 20th, we might be able to build a real alliance among China's unhappy neighbors.
21  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The Cognitive Dissonance of Meryl Streep on: January 09, 2017, 08:56:39 PM
http://amgreatness.com/2017/01/09/meryls-bad-memory/

Meryl’s Bad Memory

January 9, 2017 by Boris Zelkin

“I am a righteous bitch, aren’t I?” –Meryl Streep as Kate Mundy in “Dancing at Lughnasa”

Meryl Streep on Sunday brought all her righteousness to bear at the Golden Globes where she excoriated President-elect Trump and passionately spoke to the necessity of a free and brave press in order to fight, what I can only imagine she sees as an impending Fourth Reich.

She said:

    OK, this brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call him on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in the Constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the Committee to Protect Journalists, because we’re gonna need them going forward, and they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.”

Streep is a symbol of American greatness. She is a national treasure, a woman whose acting ability is considered by most to be second-to-none in the entertainment industry. But it’s curious. Given her immense accomplishments and body of work, she must—just as an empirical matter—have a keen memory. Yet here we see that she appears unable to remember a great many things.

For instance, while touting freedom of the press, she seems to have forgotten that time when current Secretary of State John Kerry defended the rationale of the Charlie Hebdo killings in contrast to other, in his view, less “justifiable” types of terrorism. Perhaps it is similar for Streep to the time her friend Whoopie Goldberg dismissed the sexual assault charges against director Roman Polanski by noting that his 1977 hot-tub episode with a 13-year-old girl whom he drugged and sodomized wasn’t rape-rape. In any case, Streep either forgets, or is somehow fine with, a cabinet-level representative of the U.S. government saying, essentially, that killing journalists who mock a religion isn’t really terrorism-terrorism.

Speaking of Polanski, it’s telling that in 2003 when Polanski received an Academy Award for “The Pianist,” Streep gave the convicted child-rapist a standing ovation, showing that, as far as she’s concerned, art trumps rape—especially when it’s not rape-rape.

Streep also seems to have forgotten that journalists such as former CBS News reporter Sharyl Attkisson and Fox News’s James Rosen were bullied, tracked by the administration, and even hacked. In 2013, CBS confirmed that Attkisson’s computers were hacked before she left the network. Rosen’s whereabouts were monitored by Obama’s Department of Justice and his questions during news conferences were edited out by the government. Federal agents even obtained Rosen’s personal emails (all of this without the help of the Russians and despite the fact that his password was probably not “password”). Rosen later opined that the Obama administration had an “authoritarian impulse” that he hadn’t experienced in other administrations. “There’s no doubt,” Rosen wrote, “that the Obama administration has maintained an animus towards Fox News and specifically towards me across the two terms.”

Streep also seems to forget about the Obama Administration’s ruthless strong-arming of journalists to reveal sources. In 2014 the Committee to Protect Journalists—the group that Streep endorsed in her speech on Sunday—wrote a scathing report on the Obama Administration’s relationship with the press:

    U.S. President Barack Obama came into office pledging open government, but he has fallen short of his promise. Journalists and transparency advocates say the White House curbs routine disclosure of information and deploys its own media to evade scrutiny by the press. Aggressive prosecution of leakers of classified information and broad electronic surveillance programs deter government sources from speaking to journalists.”

That same report quotes David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent of the New York Times as having said, “This is the most closed, control freak administration I’ve ever covered.”

The most egregious of her memory lapses, however, is her seeming inability to recall Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, the immigrant filmmaker who made a small movie called “Innocence of Muslims.” This was the movie that Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama blamed for the Benghazi massacre of September 11, 2012. Streep seems not to be able to recall—maybe on account of his skin color, or immigrant status…who knows?—a man who the administration would eventually see jailed on a technicality. Namely that Nakoula, who was barred by parole from using pseudonyms, used one while making a movie critical of Mohammed and Islam. Considering Streep can’t be bothered to remember Charlie Hebdo or even Theo Van Gogh, and seems to forget what happens to people who mock Mohammed, we shouldn’t expect her to understand why someone would want to use a pseudonym to make such a movie. But surely Obama and Clinton and law enforcement might reasonably be expected to understand that motivation.

Sunday’s awards ceremony and Streep’s speech centered on filmmaking, free speech, and freedom of the press. Streep in her speech noted, “Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ’em all out, you’ll have nothing…”

Yet this great American actor couldn’t be bothered to think about the fact that a sitting president, his whole administration and the State Department brought all their power to bear on an immigrant filmmaker to give themselves political cover. Nakoula is living in a homeless shelter now, earning $300 a month, his life destroyed by the powerful in government—and Meryl Streep has the temerity to worry about the possibility of a maybe during the next administration.

A dogged and committed press corps with an adversarial relationship to the powerful is something we all want. But maybe instead of projecting her fears into the uncertain future with a president-elect who has yet to actually do anything with respect to policy or the press, Streep might do well to examine the premises under which she and much of the media have operated these past few years—fawning over those in power which has led her to stay silent during some of the most egregious abuses of government power with regards to free speech and the press by one of the most opaque administrations in modern history. She might come to some self-realization that she’s been duped and that she didn’t actually speak truth to power on Sunday night, but rather she acted as a megaphone for the powerful to preach to their choir.
22  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Ted Cruz Snubs China, Meets with Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen on: January 09, 2017, 08:46:00 PM
Things are fragile in China. If Trump did use tariffs to punish China, it's might bring them into line, or it might cause things to spiral out of control.


https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/01/09/ted-cruz-snubs-china-meets-with-taiwan-president-tsai-ing-wen/

A one China policy could mean we only recognize the Republic of China, not the PRC. Although that really could lead to war.

It could lead to war, but why?  They haven't shown any sign of caring what we think on anything else.

[And why is Ted Cruz re-starting his campaign.  Someone appoint him to the Supreme Court!]
23  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Ted Cruz Snubs China, Meets with Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen on: January 09, 2017, 08:03:42 PM
https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/01/09/ted-cruz-snubs-china-meets-with-taiwan-president-tsai-ing-wen/

A one China policy could mean we only recognize the Republic of China, not the PRC. Although that really could lead to war.

24  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cognitive Dissonance of the left, Global Warming killing the children on: January 09, 2017, 07:59:14 PM
It's causing flooding in Nevada and California right now. Is there anything Climate Change can't do?

NY Times, surely you jest! 

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/06/opinion/sunday/as-donald-trump-denies-climate-change-these-kids-die-of-it.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

Global warming caused the drought in Madagascar.

Let's back track.  Burning fossil fuels is causing global warming aka climate change because carbon dioxide emitted in combustion is a trace element greenhouse gas.  See the octane combustion equation:

2 C8H18 + 25 O2 = 16 CO2 + 18 H2O

More water vapor is emitted than CO2. 

Adding water vapor to the atmosphere (in the US) is causing droughts worldwide.  Good f'g grief.
25  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Trump and the Disabled Reporter on: January 09, 2017, 03:33:05 PM
I did not know this:

http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2016-08-31.html


politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2009/03/20/obama-makes-late-night-gaffe/

8 years of a special olympics president.
26  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US-China (& Japan, South China Sea-- Vietnam, Philippines, etc) on: January 09, 2017, 03:13:42 PM

Chinese consumers really want American products.
27  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / → This is why gun ownership remains a political controversy on: January 09, 2017, 10:17:50 AM


http://olegvolk.net/gallery/d/52226-2/henry45-70_sunflowers_D6A5236web.jpg



All other concerns — hunting, sport, even self-defense — are secondary considerations to people who do not wish to be ruled…and to the fiends whose self-worth depends on ruling others.
28  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Build that wall! on: January 09, 2017, 10:02:28 AM
http://www.truthrevolt.org/news/imagine-obamas-new-home-have-wall-around-perimeter

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2016/09/obama-slams-trumps-wall-final-un-speech-paid-75-million-build-mexicos-wall/

Obama jabs at Trump at the UN: "Today, a nation ringed by walls would only imprison itself"
29  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Drones/UAV/UAS/Bots on: January 08, 2017, 03:32:17 PM
I would note that if one were to examine the historical record of genocides, humans are pretty good at overcome limiting factors of violent behavior.
30  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: NYC crime stats on: January 08, 2017, 01:54:22 PM
I apologize for not having the citation, but recently I read/saw something about crime stats this past year in NYC actually showing pretty good trends.  Given DeBlasio's policies and feuds with the police, this surprised me quite a bit.  Does anyone have the actual data?


http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Violent-Crime-on-the-Rise-in-NYC-Parks-389500602.html

Keep in mind most crime stats are cooked for political purposes. From ground truth sources, the NYPD is out of the proactive policing business these days.
31  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: F 35 boon doggle is putting it mildly on: January 08, 2017, 01:46:45 PM
From this article it is clear that 56 years after Eisenhower's warning - no one listened to him

Yeah let's get ripper off spending trillions while china and russia rip off the designs for peanuts on the dollar to copy them for stuff that doesn't work

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/443612/f-35-donald-trump-should-cancel-failed-f-35-fighter-jet-program

It is one tiger tank vs 100 T 34s.

http://nsnetwork.org/cms/assets/uploads/2015/08/F-35_FINAL.pdf

Well, it's provided China with low cost R&D for their much less costly fighters that they produce at much greater numbers.

So, we got that going for us.

http://www.atimes.com/article/chinas-spies-gain-valuable-us-defense-technology-report/
32  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: California on: January 08, 2017, 01:44:46 PM
As I understand it the argument is so that they can buy car insurance.


Yeah, Illegals love them some car insurance!  rolleyes

33  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Drones/UAV/UAS/Bots on: January 08, 2017, 01:43:37 PM
Konrad Lorenz was very eloquent about how technology that enables killing from a distance makes it hard for the victor from seeing the defeated as real and by so doing enabled bypassing limiting behaviors.

I'm cool with that.
34  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Chuck Schumer makes a good argument for gutting federal agencies! on: January 08, 2017, 01:43:00 PM
http://nypost.com/2017/01/08/democrats-wage-anti-trump-offensive-for-their-own-gain/

"The leaks came after Trump expressed doubts about Russia’s role and any election impact. Lest the rookie miss the message, Chuck Schumer, the Dems’ man in the Senate, made like a Soprano in a TV interview: “Let me tell you: You take on the intelligence community — they have six ways from Sunday at getting back at you.”

Going public with classified information, which the leakers did, is a crime, but these days it’s acceptable if it serves the left’s political purpose.
Is Schumer suggesting CIA analysts would stay silent about a terrorist plot? Would they feed Trump misinformation to get back at him?"

Schumer needs to explain this statement up front and center!

I'm sure the MSM will press him on this.  rolleyes
35  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: WaPo takes on Breitbart on: January 07, 2017, 12:43:21 PM

I' d vett everything from Brietbart, it's as untrustworthy as the Washington Post.
36  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cyberwar, Cyber Crime, and American Freedom on: January 06, 2017, 09:06:30 AM
See my Reply #397.


Lots of conjecture, nothing resembling evidence.
37  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cyberwar, Cyber Crime, and American Freedom on: January 05, 2017, 10:40:44 PM
If someone, somewhere actually has something that actually resembles evidence, I'd sure like to see it.
38  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Ishmael Jones: From Russia with doubt on: January 05, 2017, 09:59:23 PM
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2017/01/ishmael-jones-from-russia-with-doubt.php

 Posted on January 5, 2017 by Scott Johnson in Intelligence, Russia

Ishmael Jones: From Russia with doubt

The pseudonymous Ishmael Jones is a former CIA case officer and author of The Human Factor: Inside the CIA’s Dysfunctional Intelligence Culture. He writes with a timely comment on the current intelligence controversy that is reaching a fever pitch. Mr. Jones advises that his commentary has been reviewed and approved by the CIA’s publications review board. He writes:

CIA intelligence reporting stating that the Russian government hacked the presidential election in order to elect Donald Trump is false. It is merely a political attack against Donald Trump with the goal of delegitimizing his presidency.

The depth and quality of the CIA reporting are too good to be true. A December 16 NBC report states, for example: “Putin personally directed how hacked material from Democrats was leaked and otherwise used.” Everyone knows that a great deal of hacking comes out of Russia. But evidence of hacking does not lead to the conclusion that there was a Russian government conspiracy to get Mr. Trump elected.

Such a conclusion would require access to Putin’s inner circle and knowledge of Putin’s plans and intentions. Any spy that close to Putin would be one of the best intelligence sources of all time.

If such a source existed, he doesn’t exist any more. The leaked reporting would have put him in grave danger, and he would already have been imprisoned or executed.

The reporting instead reflects the political opinions and agendas of bureaucrats. CIA bureaucrats are a big blue voting machine with a long record of creating information harmful to Republican presidents. The danger to Mr. Trump is ratcheted up because the recent election influenced many people at the CIA to believe that Trump is the second coming of Hitler. And to stop Hitler, anything is ethical, even treason. CIA bureaucrats have chosen to attack Mr. Trump before he even takes office.

The CIA is meant to spy upon foreign countries. The secrets we seek are located in foreign countries. Yet the bloated CIA bureaucracy exists almost entirely within the United States. CIA bureaucrats appear to find foreign service disagreeable. They enjoy their lifestyle and will fight with aggressive passivity to keep it that way. More than 90% of CIA employees spend their careers living and working entirely within the United States.

James Bond would periodically come in from the field to report to the chief of British intelligence, “M.” On the way into M’s office he would joke around with M’s secretary, Miss Moneypenny.

When I reported to CIA Headquarters, there were thousands of these people – thousands of M’s and thousands of Miss Moneypennys. The CIA cafeteria looks like a great herd grazing peacefully upon the plains.

The incoming CIA chief, Mike Pompeo, will be astonished by how many of his senior leaders have not had an overseas assignment in decades. Brief junkets and TDY’s to foreign countries do not count. CIA boss John Brennan’s 40-plus years of CIA service have occurred almost entirely within the Headquarters building. During a 20-year career, the Left’s favorite spy, Valerie Plame, spent less than two and a half years in foreign operational assignments, mostly during an initial tour in Europe.

The CIA has a military origin, and in the military, huge staffs are required for planning and logistics. There are relatively few actual fighting infantrymen – at the point of the spear – because to send that infantryman to combat requires support from tanks, artillery, aircraft and so on, which need massive expenditure and meticulous planning. The CIA has the massive expenditure and the huge staffs, but the CIA’s equivalent of the infantryman is the case officer, and the best case officers require only a passport and an airline ticket to get half a world away and produce.

Michael Morell, author of the New York Times op-ed column “I Ran the CIA. Now I’m Endorsing Hillary Clinton” inhabited the Washington, D.C., area for nearly all of his 33 years in the CIA. In the article, he writes: “I will do everything I can to ensure she is elected.”

While at the CIA, Morell’s top goal was to promote greater inclusiveness and diversity. The CIA has come a long way since the days of the polygraph question, “Have you ever held another man’s penis in your hand?” Today we have more employees working in encouraging diversity and, as of recently, more transgender employees than we do case officers operating under cover in Russia, China, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Iran, and North Korea combined. We should try to do both. Let’s be dedicated to diversity and also spy on our enemies.

Mr. Pompeo’s staff may wish to contact the staff of former CIA chief Porter Goss. Goss was the last Republican appointee to attempt change at the CIA and his staff will be able to provide valuable insights, especially former staffer Patrick Murray

Gritty foreign countries with their strange ways and pungent smells are not the only reason for bureaucrats to live in the United States. CIA Headquarters is also the place to make deals. Fighting fraud will be a real challenge to Mr. Pompeo. Most bureaucrats retire and become contractors, wheedling contracts from their pals still at the CIA. I hear many tales from colleagues about waste, theft, and great riches accruing to phony contractors. The CIA paid $40 million to contractors to review documents to help prepare the Senate torture report, according to ABC News on December 10, 2014, for example. Had Hillary won, Michael Morell’s support may have put him on track to be a billionaire. Forty million here and forty million there really starts to add up.

It may be possible to make great progress in draining the swamp by firing or prosecuting just one leaker – just a single one. And by imprisoning just one phony contractor – just one. Word will spread that there’s a new sheriff in town and Mr. Pompeo may be pleasantly surprised to see that the swamp starts to drain itself.

39  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Corruption, Skullduggery, and Treason on: January 05, 2017, 08:01:59 PM
IF true, this is annoying.  Aren't these people for some reason exempt from insider trading laws?

If so why?

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-presses-democrats-obamacare-calls-bipartisan-fix-132820781.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kylesmith/2011/06/01/insider-trading-rules-that-dont-apply-to-congress/print/

Insider Trading Rules That Don't Apply To Congress


You want strict ethics rules? Start at the top — with the shining example of the noble knights of the House of Representatives, which bans all gifts from lobbyists and imposes a $50 limit on gifts from anyone else. And no, you can’t give an infinite number of $49 gifts to Larry Lawmaker. Sayeth the holy rulebook.

The general provision goes on to state that a member, officer or employee may accept from any other source virtually any gift valued below $50, with a limitation of less than $100 in gifts from any single source in a calendar year.  Gifts having a value of less than $10 do not count toward the annual limit.

Okay, so maybe you can give an infinite number of $9.99 gifts, and meals are specifically designated as such. Feel free to make your case to Rep. Portentous over a daily lunch at Arby’s. But still: pretty tight rules, eh?

Except that one thing you can do as a member is study pending legislation and regulatory changes, call up your broker and instruct him to trade on that nonpublic information. Do this as often as you want; you will suffer no penalty. There is no limit to how much money you can earn on insider trading in the House or Senate. Lawmakers and their staffers are specifically exempted.

As you might expect, those who work in the hallowed halls are not shy about availing themselves of the opportunity. A Wall Street Journal analysis published more than six months ago that has thus far provoked no particular sense of shame on Capitol Hill found that at least 72 Congressional aides in both parties had recently traded shares of companies that their bosses helped regulate. In 2009, while Senate Banking Committee member Mike Crapo, a Republican from Idaho, was involved in discussing “stress tests” on banks such as Bank of America, his aide Karen Brown traded the company’s stock on several occasions in the weeks before May 7, 2009 — when BofA surged thanks to a press release on its stress-test result, assuring Ms. Brown a nifty profit.

Asked by the Wall Street Journal to explain, Sen. Crapo’s office said the trades weren’t really made by Karen Brown but by her husband, who had no knowledge of what was going on in the banking committee. Would you go to your compliance officer, much less the SEC, with that line? True, these folks do need a good laugh now and again, and the SEC has to be in a jolly mood after the jury in the Galleon case all but repeated the verdict from The Producers: “We find the defendants incredibly guilty.”

Last week a study of some 16,000 stock transactions carried out by House members was published in the journal Business and Politics. This detailed analysis showed that the investment portfolios of House members beat the market by about six points a year. (Democrats did especially well, outperforming by some nine points a year, while Republicans topped the average investor by only two percent annually.) Senators apparently do even better: “their portfolios show some of the highest excess returns ever recorded over a long period of time, significantly outperforming even hedge fund managers,” noted the journal, citing a previously published study.

In a surprising twist, the study found that there tended to be an inverse relationship between the lawmaker’s seniority and the insider-trading profits pocketed by him and his minions. The authors speculated that “Whereas Representatives with the longest seniority (in this case more than 16 years), have no trouble raising funds for campaigns, junkets and whatever other causes they may deem desirable owed to the power they wield, the financial condition of a freshman Congressman is far more precarious. His or her position is by no means secure, financially or otherwise. House Members with the least seniority may have fewer opportunities to trade on privileged information, but they may be the most highly motivated to do so when the opportunities arise.”

Doesn’t that give you a cozy feeling, knowing that nonpublic securities info is helping make your friendly local politician more secure as he daydreams new ways to prevent, limit, or appropriate for his own reelection purposes – sorry, the needs of the Republic!– your financial success?

It’s not an accident that Congressionalites are expressly exempt from insider-trading laws. The reasoning is that, were the situation otherwise, “it might tend to “insulate a legislator from the personal and economic interests that his/her constituency, or society in general, has in governmental decisions and policy,” says the House ethics manual.

This is entirely beside the point: no one would object if lawmakers placed their assets in ETFs, in which case they’d still have an interest in the overall performance of the market. Or why not be simple and allow Congressional trading on everything except nonpublic information?

In what must be treated as more of a practical joke than a serious effort at legislation, every so often a group of lawmakers typically numbering in the high single digits proposes that Congress be subjected to the same insider-trading laws as you or me. Said proposal is always swiftly ignored — it has yet to reach the House floor and hasn’t even been bandied in the Senate. Then everyone goes out to their Spartan lunches of baloney and Cheez Curls, comfortable in the knowledge that they have improved on the Golden Rule: He who makes the rules pockets the gold.
40  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cognitive Dissonance anyone? on: January 05, 2017, 06:28:53 PM

If it doesn't fit their narrative, it's irrelevant.



41  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: January 05, 2017, 12:04:26 PM
I stopped paying for health insurance and broke out my Tribal ID card and went to the local tribal health clinic. The prescription I used to pay 30 bucks a month for now costs one dollar.

Indians are exempted from Obamacare!
42  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: California on: January 04, 2017, 10:58:11 PM
I am available to adopt any California prohibited firearms and magazines!  grin

In the event of an emergency, coup, war, insurgency, nuclear fallout, terror attack or tsunami, can we all agree to meet at GM's place?   )

There are a few who are welcome. Crafty, Doug and CCP are on the list.

43  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Male Vulnerability is not virtue on: January 04, 2017, 10:32:31 PM

Anyone with a son nearing college age should be scratching any College/University with these type of programs off the list.

44  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: LGBTQIAGNC on: January 04, 2017, 10:28:48 PM
LGBTQIAGNC stands for ‘Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex, asexual and gender-non-conforming’.

Let's get up to speed on this.    )

Whatever became of private staying private?  Now it's got to be a billboard and a parade.

http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2017/01/the-trans-train-trolls-on.php

I though LBTQWTFBBQ was the best version.
45  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: California hires Eric Holder on: January 04, 2017, 10:27:33 PM

Thankfully his career and elevation to AG has been based on the color of his skin and not his ability as an attorney, so not a big deal.
46  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Res ipsa loquitor on: January 04, 2017, 10:23:02 PM

Well, at least it's as well deserved as his Nobel Peace Prize.  rolleyes

I guess he couldn't figure out how to award himself the medal of honor.

#DEVALUED_AWARDS
47  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Reciprocity Bill on: January 04, 2017, 10:19:11 PM

Glad I have multiple revolvers, as California wants to soon outlaw all semi-automatic firearms. Yes, say goodbye to your Glocks, Crafty.
48  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: January 04, 2017, 10:17:07 PM
A fair question, but let me bounce it back at you:

As a customer, how would you feel if the supermarket charged you more for a given food item than someone else?


Can I go to another supermarket?
49  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: January 04, 2017, 03:50:02 PM
Good article.

The final paragraphs get to what I have been saying here for a very long time.  Prices need to be knowable.

I would like to explore the notion that prices need to be the same for everyone, be they insured or uninsured.



If I as the seller of a good or service decide to set the price differently for different customers, who is to tell me otherwise?

50  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: California on: January 04, 2017, 11:10:57 AM
angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry angry

I am available to adopt any California prohibited firearms and magazines!  grin
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