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10151  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 25, 2010, 06:15:20 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2010-08-25-1Anresponsecops25_ST_N.htm

The de-policing of America.
10152  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Articulating our cause/strategy against Islamic Fascism on: August 25, 2010, 02:15:48 PM
Moderate muslim= One that hasn't finished taking his flying lessons/building the device.  evil
10153  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: August 25, 2010, 08:11:41 AM
**My favorite part:

Daily Bell: What do you think of Congressman Ron Paul?

George Gilder: Like many movement libertarians, he always prefers the quixotic ideal (radical spending cuts) to the feasible improvement of lower tax rates. By opposing defense spending and American power he has become a shill for the enemies of capitalism and freedom.
10154  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Officially a depression now? on: August 24, 2010, 05:14:12 PM
http://www.cnbc.com/id/38831550
10155  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: August 24, 2010, 04:51:15 PM
**Wow, it's almost like he's trying to lose this war....**


WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is focused on meeting its July 2011 deadline to begin withdrawing U.S. troops from Afghanistan, but it has no political strategy to help stabilize the country, current and former U.S. officials and other experts are warning.

The failure to articulate what a post-American Afghanistan should look like and devise a political path for achieving it is a major obstacle to success for the U.S. military-led counter-insurgency campaign that's underway, these officials and experts said.



Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/06/16/96019/experts-us-has-no-long-term-political.html#ixzz0rAPDYoRF


http://hotair.com/archives/2010/08/24/marine-corps-commandant-obamas-withdrawal-timetable-is-giving-sustenance-to-the-taliban/
10156  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 24, 2010, 04:45:04 PM
You did? You voted for Obama with this in mind?  rolleyes
10157  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America and the rest of the western hemisphere on: August 24, 2010, 02:48:16 PM
http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=38673

Glad he's doing "outreach" on our dime. Thanks Obama!
10158  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Dow faces bumpy ride to 5000 on: August 24, 2010, 11:47:10 AM
http://www.cnbc.com/id/38826988

Strap in.
10159  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama's war on jobs on: August 24, 2010, 07:39:14 AM
http://hotair.com/greenroom/archives/2010/08/24/the-phantom-priority/

The Phantom Priority
posted at 1:05 am on August 24, 2010 by Doctor Zero


After the passage of his massive health-care plan, President Obama promised a “hard pivot” to dealing with our flagging economy.  Job creation was said to be his new “top priority.”  Politicians make a habit of declaring lots of top priorities.  Mark Knoller of CBS News recently put together an amusing list of thirteen items the President has declared to be his top priority.  The promise to put the economy first was repeated loudly and often.  It will still be ringing in the ears of voters when they clean Democrats out of Congress with an electoral leaf blower this autumn.

In reality, job creation and economic growth are nowhere to be found on this Administration’s list of priorities.  The “hard pivot” was actually the feeble ring of ruby slippers clicking together.
10160  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 10:49:48 PM
NYPD is the only one with unlimited sick time. Keep in mind though, you have to really be sick to use it. NYPD has an IA unit that places officers on sick leave under surveillance and verifies medical documentation.
10161  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Housing/Mortgage/Real Estate on: August 23, 2010, 10:27:30 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38811725/ns/business-the_new_york_times

**Real estate as an investment is dead.**
10162  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 09:56:13 PM
http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/killed/2008/officersassaulted.html

http://www.policeone.com/off-duty/articles/2026720-Off-duty-in-rural-America/

Couple of points to consider.
10163  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 09:31:09 PM
You aren't counting the injury rate, or attempted murders/assaults on officers. Lumberjacks don't have to worry that a tree will follow him home to ambush him and his family in his driveway.
10164  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: August 23, 2010, 08:07:16 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38790670/ns/technology_and_science-security/

Disturbing aviation security news.
10165  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 07:03:04 PM
**Most jobs, public sector or private don't have things like this as potential threats:

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/21227694/detail.html

PUEBLO, Colo. -- A man suspected of trying to blow up a Pueblo police officer's home was in jail Wednesday, following an extensive manhunt across the city.

Officers arrested Robert Howard Bruce, 47, at a Kmart in Pueblo on Tuesday evening.

Police had been actively looking for him since Pueblo police officer Nathan Pruce found a 30-pound propane tank on Tuesday morning, rigged to pump the explosive gas into his home.
10166  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 06:52:21 PM
Las Vegas Metro Police pays better and given that NV has no state income tax, you actually see more and 1000 dollars a month rent doesn't have you living next to the projects. Look at what a tiny apt in NYC goes for and factor in the federal, state and city taxes and overall cost of living for NYPD, even after 5 years, it's pretty brutal.
10167  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 23, 2010, 06:31:45 PM
Privacy takes effort and caution. There is no absolute privacy as there is no absolute security. I'm less concerned with a big corp like AA having my personal info than what can be gained by private investigators working for criminal cartels.
10168  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 23, 2010, 05:52:19 PM
Your name and DOB are probably out there from a variety of sources. Your SSN is much more important when it comes to identity theft.
10169  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 23, 2010, 05:47:25 PM
I'm not offended. I may end up getting out of law enforcement for a variety of reasons, at least on a full time basis anyway.
10170  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 23, 2010, 10:23:11 AM
All airlines must now get DOBs for passengers when tickets are purchased. The Name and DOB gets passed on to the TSA.
10171  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 22, 2010, 09:50:37 AM
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/acceptable_documents.shtm

ID Requirements for Airport Checkpoints

Airtravel
Identity Matters

Effective June 21, 2008, adult passengers (18 and over) are required to show a U.S. federal or state-issued photo ID that contains the following: name, date of birth, gender, expiration date and a tamper-resistant feature in order to be allowed to go through the checkpoint and onto their flight.

Passengers who do not or cannot present an acceptable ID will have to provide information to the Transportation Security Officer performing Travel Document Checking duties in order to verify their identity. Passengers who are cleared through this process may be subject to additional screening. Passengers whose identity cannot be verified by TSA may not be allowed to enter the screening checkpoint or onto an airplane.
10172  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 22, 2010, 09:36:04 AM
Your birthdate as well as legal name is obtained by the airline to be given to the TSA for prescreening prior to your flight. If your name, birthdate doesn't match when you attempt to board your flight, you won't be allowed to fly.
10173  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: August 22, 2010, 09:33:00 AM
The muslim world is up to it's neck in crazy conspiracy theories.
10174  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 22, 2010, 09:31:07 AM
It would be nice if police/fire/EMS/military got compensated like pro athletes, but it isn't going to happen. The taxpayers can only pay what is affordable. Most of us in those careers got into the job to protect society, not to contribute to public debts that work to destroy our society.
10175  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 06:08:58 PM
http://www.city-journal.org/2009/nytom_nypd.html

Heather Mac Donald
New York’s Indispensable Institution
The NYPD’s crime-fighting sparked the city’s economic revival and is essential to its future.
10176  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 05:00:18 PM
http://salary.nytimes.com/CostOfLivingWizard/layoutscripts/coll_start.asp

Interesting tool for comparing the cost of living from place to place.
10177  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 04:15:35 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/12/nyregion/12recruits.html?_r=2&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin

Sorry that this is 3 years old, but I doubt that the pay increase since then has made the financial burdens much easier.
10178  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 03:51:07 PM
Doug,

If you look at the base rate for academy training they posted, no one would have any shift differential or OT or step increases. Even once the academy is completed, getting paid overtime is unlikely, usually comp time is given instead.
10179  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 12:50:55 PM
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=news/investigators&id=6133543

NYPD loses recruits to better paying agencies.
10180  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 12:14:25 PM
http://gothamist.com/2008/02/17/more_nypd_recru.php

More NYPD Recruiting Trouble as Exam Takers Decline

The NYPD's recruiting woes appear to be continuing through 2008, with a sharp drop-off in the number of candidates applying to sit for the Police Officer Exam, which is the first step to qualifying to enter the Police Academy. According to the New York Post, the number of test takers is down 20% from number of people who took the exam at the same time last year. "Slightly fewer than 20,000 have applied for the Feb. 23 test, down from the roughly 25,000 who filed last year. In October 2004, more than 35,000 registered for the test."

The decline is not for lack of trying either. The NYPD has been casting its net far and wide in search of recruits.
10181  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Government Programs, spending, budget process on: August 21, 2010, 10:24:03 AM
NYPD gets pay raise

Newsday

NEW YORK CITY — Police officers got the award they were looking for when an arbitration panel yesterday awarded them a pay raise and hiked by more than $10,000 the starting salary that the NYPD felt had significantly hampered its recruitment efforts.

Rookie cops who had been paid a starting salary of $25,100 will now earn $35,881, with the hike retroactive to January 2006.

**NYPD has a union, and this pay is horrific, especially in NYC.**
10182  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 20, 2010, 07:12:34 PM
Quote
**The NSA doesn't have that now?**

The folks at Fort Meade play stuff close to the chest so it's pretty hard to know in general, though it's clear the most the congresscritters charged w/ oversight couldn't shake a transistor out of their shoe. "The Puzzlepalace" is a good read about those folks.

The NSA is an awful small slice of the intelligence gathering pie and someone with your googlefu ought to be able to drum up story after story of alphabet agencies that fail to share timely intelligence due to chain of command, turf considerations, and so on. Are you arguing that a system as vast, ad hoc, and territorial as the one the US has built cannot be subject to misuse? Look at the battles between the Air Force and the Navy over which refueling tanker nozzle should be used and then multiply it by each intelligence agency and gathering technique and you'll have an approximation of the scope of the issue. My experience running much smaller and less complex organizations suggests that when that much gray area exists gross pathologies are a given.


Anything is potentially subject to misuse. My concern is that the system has become so big, it's utterly impossible to be used effectively.
10183  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 20, 2010, 12:37:43 PM
No one forces you to go on the web or use websites or software with those loopholes. Aren't libertarians supposed to believe in the rights of individuals to freely make choices in terms of commerce?
10184  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism: on: August 19, 2010, 05:07:25 PM
Boyo,

State schools normally have campus police that have police powers, while private schools normally have security forces that do not hold any law enforcement authority. Campus police normally answer to the college/university administration, which might explain why Ann Coulter or Michelle Malkin might not get the level of protection needed to be allowed to speak uninterrupted.
10185  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 19, 2010, 10:21:19 AM
How much transparency do you want for the NSA and other intel agencies?
10186  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: August 19, 2010, 10:18:14 AM
I know the M-1 is California legal, I'm guessing the M-1 Carbine is legal there too. It's a pity that the Obama thugs won't let these in.
10187  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 18, 2010, 10:17:07 PM
Oversight and accountability with a sensible chain of command.

**The NSA doesn't have that now?**
10188  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism: on: August 18, 2010, 09:45:03 PM
The state's job is to balance everyone's rights, not just the protesters.
10189  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cops, Crime, and the Economy on: August 17, 2010, 10:44:28 AM

Cops, Crime, and the Economy

Economic recovery on a local scale, whether in Los Angeles, Oakland, or St. Louis, is largely dependent on the willingness of citizens to live and spend money there.
August 16, 2010 - by Jack Dunphy

http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/cops-crime-and-the-economy/?singlepage=true
10190  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud, SEIU/ACORN et al, corruption etc. on: August 17, 2010, 09:31:47 AM
http://hotair.com/greenroom/archives/2010/08/16/facts-obama-doesnt-want-you-to-connect/

Very good work here.
10191  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Gurkhas and their Kukris on: August 17, 2010, 09:10:05 AM
I know that some EP/bodyguard work is done by Gurkhas in Hong Kong.
10192  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 17, 2010, 08:22:17 AM
Still waiting for some sot of concrete policy position......
10193  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: August 17, 2010, 07:25:26 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Homeland-Siege-Tactics-Police-Military/dp/0981865917/ref=pd_sim_b_1

Looks relevant.
10194  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: August 16, 2010, 09:47:38 PM
Most cops in this country work for small agencies with small budgets. The LAPD does better than most, and Cali agencies from cities with deep tax bases have real nice pay and bennies, although for how long as California implodes?
10195  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 16, 2010, 09:44:03 PM
So shut down the NSA? Get the US out of the intelligence business?
10196  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: August 16, 2010, 08:32:25 PM
http://www.policeone.com/careers/

http://officer.com/jobs/

Let me know how impressive the pay and benefits look.
10197  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: August 16, 2010, 08:25:34 PM
The panopticon prisons were failures and almost all in the US are no longer in use.
10198  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: August 16, 2010, 08:17:52 PM
I'm amazed at what some cops get paid in places like California. In my state, outside of the metropolitan areas, the police wages are very low and the benefits are far from impressive. In much of the state, a entry level officer with a wife and 2 kids is eligible for food stamps.
10199  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: August 16, 2010, 12:32:21 PM
http://formerspook.blogspot.com/2010/08/unsustainable.html

Saturday, August 14, 2010
The Problem With Petty Officer Gurney


Petty Officer First Class Ethan Gurney will retire from the Navy this fall, after 20 years of service. Critics of the military retirement system say that's too soon, creating long-term fiscal problems for the Defense Department (Stars and Stripes photo).


According to a Pentagon advisory board, Navy Petty Officer First Class Ethan Gurney represents what's wrong with the military retirement system.

Petty Officer Gurney joined the Navy out of high school, and has served honorably as an electronics technician for almost two decades. This fall, after reaching 20 years of active duty service, Gurney will retire from the Navy and begin drawing a retirement check--at the ripe old age of 38.

From the board's perspective, that's too soon. With advances in medicine and increasing longevity, Gurney and his fellow military retirees will live for decades after leaving active duty, collecting billions of dollars in pensions, health care and other benefits.

The Defense Business Board, tasked by Defense Secretary Robert Gates to find ways to cut Pentagon spending, says the current retirement system is "unsustainable" and must be fixed. Without reforms, payments for military retirees will grow from $47.7 billion this year, to just under $60 billion by 2020.

As Stars and Stripes recently reported:

The 25-member group of civilian business leaders suggests that the Defense Department look at changing the current system, even hinting at raising the number of years troops must serve before being eligible for retirement pay.

The current system “encourages our military to leave at 20 years when they are most productive and experienced, and then pays them and their families and their survivors for another 40 years," committee chairman Arnold Punaro told board members at their quarterly meeting late last month.

Among the "reforms" being suggested by the advisory panel: delaying payments to retirees, in exchange for earlier "vesting" in the program. One proposal being studied by the board would provide a limited retirement benefit for military members who serve as little as 10 years. Those personnel would receive their pension at age 60 under the reform plan, while those with 20 years of service would begin receiving checks at age 57--almost 20 years after some of them leave active duty.

The hypocrisy of the "reformers" is almost laughable. Board chairman Arnold Punaro worries about a system that "encourages [military members] to leave when they're most productive and experienced, then pays them, their family and their dependents for the next 40 years."

But Punaro hasn't declined his military retirement check. Turns out that Mr. Punaro is also a retired Major General in the Marine Corps. According to Forbes, he currently works as an executive Vice President at defense contractor SAIC, where his total compensation in 2009 topped $2.7 million. That's almost three times what Petty Officer Gurney will collect in military retirement pay, even if he lives to age 80. And we didn't include Punaro's USMC pension in that total, either.

Fact is, the typical military retiree is a lot closer to Gurney than General Punaro. When he leaves active duty later this year, Petty Officer Gurney will receive a gross monthly pension of just over $1,800. By the time you deduct federal and state taxes and allotments for such items
as the Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP), dental insurance and other expenses, Gurney's "rich" pension will be closer to $1,400 a month.

Indeed, the average person retiring from the military at the 20-year point is an E-6, the same rank as Petty Officer Gurney. Most are married, with kids in school, and (if they're lucky) that $1,400 pension will cover their mortgage payment. Compare that to say, the average annuity for a state employee in New York, New Jersey or California, and tell us
who's getting rich in retirement.

Punaro's critique also misses a pair of critical points. There are two primary reasons the military has always embraced an early retirement system. First, it's a powerful recruiting and retention tool, particularly for mid-level officers and NCOs, who form the backbone of our armed forces. Allowing retirement at the 20-year point keeps a lot of mid-level officers and non-commissioned officers in uniform, ensuring an adequate supply of experienced personnel.

By comparison, if the military allows individuals to earn delayed benefits after only 10 years of service, it would only accelerate the exodus of skilled troops. Individuals with highly marketable skills (including intelligence, nuclear power, special forces and contracting, to name a few) would leave at the first opportunity, further eroding experience levels at the most critical ranks.

Additionally, there's the matter of who's best suited for certain military jobs. No offense to General Punaro, but jobs like Marine rifleman, Army ranger, Air Force combat controller and Navy fighter pilot (to name a few) are best handled by the young. True, experience does improve with age, but reflexes, vision, hearing and physical conditioning tend to deteriorate as we get older. And sometimes, experience is no substitute for the strength, speed and stamina found in younger troops.

Another critic of the current system, Nathaniel Fick of the left-leaning Center for a New American Security, has wondered "Why we're paying 38-year-olds" as they embark on their second full career. Fick, a former Marine Corps officer, made the comment in a recent article published at the Foreign Policy website.

We think the best rejoinder to that argument comes from Petty Officer Gurney, a man who is (supposedly) the poster boy for problems in our military pension system. For 20 years of dedicated and faithful service, Gurney simply expects the Navy to meet the promise it made to him. And he observes that (relatively) few people are willing to meet the demands for that 20-year pension:

"No rational person would put up with 20 years of the hardships that you’re forced to endure if it wasn’t for the brass ring at the end of it all called instant retirement,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Gurney.

[snip]

“The continuous deployments, living conditions, remote and hazardous duty stations are unique to the military,” he said. “This isn’t a civilian company, so any civilian model that you use to compare to the military is impertinent. To do so is irresponsible at best.”

Bravo Zulu, Petty Officer Gurney. Couldn't have said it better ourselves. Unfortunately, Secretary Gates now views the military retirement system as Fiscal Problem #1, so some sort of reforms appear inevitable. Never mind that the current system has served the military well, and payments will eventually decline, as retirees from Korea, Vietnam and the Reagan eras pass on.

One more thing: we find the current fixation on military retirement rather curious, for other reasons. The Pentagon has suddenly discovered that its payments for retiree medical coverage are out-of-control, just months after the Obama Administration pushed through national health care coverage. Gee...doesn't DoD have the option of potentially pushing military retirees into the national plan, saving billions of dollars each year--and creating more "urgency" for preserving the new system? Coincidence? You decide.

Likewise, Secretary Gates (and his bosses in the White House) would like to find other ways to save money at the Pentagon. If they can put off pension payments for years after military retirees leave active duty, so much the better. I'm sure that DoD's actuaries have already calculated the number of personnel who will die during that "gap" between their retirement ceremony and the age of 57 or 60, when the first retirement check rolls in. How much would DoD save using that approach, and where will that money goes? So far, Dr. Gates hasn't answered that one.

Equally galling is the growing demand for the reform of military retirement benefits, while the "big" entitlement programs (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid) just keep on growing. Even at the inflated totals cited in the Stars and Stripes article, military pensions represent only a fraction of our annual Social Security payments--and that system will go broke long before the armed forces retirement system. But it's (apparently) more important to fix military pensions, with little regard for the long-term impact on retention and experience levels in the ranks.

Go figure.
10200  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: August 16, 2010, 11:38:56 AM
I can't comment on firefighters, but for police officers the expectation is that it takes about 3-5 years working patrol (after the academy and field training) to be fully proficient at the job. Working special details, detectives also has a long learning curve involved. There is also such a thing as institutional knowledge from veterans on patrol, but patrol like the combat arms of the military, is a young man's game. You would be fine having a 60 year old detective working a case, but you don't want a 60 yr. old patrol officer trying to run down a mugger.

I've seen conflicting stats on police life spans, but it's not just the line of duty deaths you have to factor in, it's the physical and psychological stressors related to the job. It's the cumilative injuries that add up. Just wearing 20-30 pounds of duty gear every day on your waist results in long term back pain for most everyone. No matter where you work, you see the worst of humanity, you learn the sights, sounds and smells of the ugliest things that can possibly happen. I just finished another series of blood tests for all the wonderful things commonly floating around, having had my forearm torn open by the fingernails of a career offender at work.

The realities of the job are far from glorious, and these days the job just gets worse and worse. The only thing that keeps a minimally acceptable amount of recruits coming in is the bad economy and the fact that there are fewer LE jobs these days.
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