Dog Brothers Public Forum

HOME | PUBLIC FORUM | MEMBERS FORUM | INSTRUCTORS FORUM | TRIBE FORUM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 27, 2016, 03:18:59 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the Dog Brothers Public Forum.
96689 Posts in 2320 Topics by 1081 Members
Latest Member: Concerned Citizen
* Home Help Search Login Register
  Show Posts
Pages: 1 ... 204 205 [206] 207 208 ... 277
10251  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: May 22, 2010, 04:41:34 PM
http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/05/20/not-just-their-big-fat-greek-funeral/

Own it, Obama voters.
10252  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism: on: May 22, 2010, 03:45:53 PM
You are free to have any opinion you want, so long as it's leftist.

By the way, don't all the arguments that are used to justify anti-smoking laws work just as well to justify banning gay male sexual behavior?
10253  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 22, 2010, 03:41:25 PM
To answer the worries of converting back to gold standard:
It seems to me if you linked the dollar to an ounce of gold it would be 1 dollar to 0.000909091ounce of gold. (1ounce/1100 dollars =0.000909091 oz to $)  I guess the question would be how much gold and how many dollars are there?  Maybe the solution would be to start another currency, 1 buck = 1 oz gold, then let it compete with the us dollar.  The dollar would be phased out via market forces while the new currency takes over.  With our electronic currency technology fractions of a "buck" would be easier to deal with and make the transactions  more feasible. 


We have a ballpark figure of 288 billion dollars worth of gold and the amount of money owed to China and others is about 3.88 TRILLION. Do we just toss China the keys to Ft. Knox and the west coast? Do we tell everyone who bought a t-bill "whoops"? What of every American who holds dollars, most of which only exist in cyberspace?
10254  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 22, 2010, 09:40:05 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6qEQ-KnitQ&feature=player_embedded

10255  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 22, 2010, 08:53:04 AM
The US Treasury Department reported Monday that China's holdings of US Treasury securities rose 2 percent to $895.2 billion in March , the first increase since last September.

Total foreign holdings of Treasury securities rose 3.5 percent to $3.88 trillion.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/06/AR2009110604799.html?hpid=topnews

Aren't we sitting on a gold mine?
The price isn't right, but it doesn't matter -- all that glitters won't be sold
 

By Martha C. White
The Big Money
Sunday, November 8, 2009

Buried in the Treasury's International Reserve Position report is an intriguing bit of math. The document details the total amount, by weight, of the Treasury's gold reserves, plus a dollar value for said metal. But some fast division reveals something interesting: The Treasury marks the value of its gold at $42 an ounce, the price settled on in 1973, two years after the United States scrapped the Bretton Woods System, which had held gold at $35 an ounce for decades.

Wait -- what? Spot gold is heading toward $1,100 per ounce, and the Treasury is embracing a Cold War relic of a price? If the Treasury's bling were valued at the spot price, we'd be sitting on a literal gold mine of nearly $288 billion.
10256  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 05:08:36 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/21/gaffetastic-rand-paul-cancels-sunday-meet-the-press-appearance/

FAIL.
10257  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Humor/WTF on: May 21, 2010, 11:20:34 AM
I'm glad you were able to work ham in there.
10258  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 10:58:04 AM
Doug,

I hope the Pauls are better at medicine than they are at politics. Much like the French love for Jerry Lewis, I cannot begin to understand how the Pauls attract such a cultish following.
10259  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 08:59:22 AM
Let me be sure I understand the Libertarian stance on these issues:

1. The civil war was about states right's and Lincoln was a horrible dictator and it wasn't about slavery at all, and slavery would have gone away on it's own.

2. Racially segregated businesses are ok, federal legislation forbidding such is again a violation of personal liberties/property rights.


Is this correct?
10260  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 20, 2010, 07:38:21 PM
Just keeping up the Paul family tradition of making the general public think Libertarians are fringe loons.
10261  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Happy Draw Mohammed Day! on: May 20, 2010, 06:42:06 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZw7ps886aI&feature=player_embedded
10262  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 20, 2010, 06:14:09 AM
I tend to agree with the second article, however we can't have political correctness/identity politics undercut "one people out of many". Seemingly, when wearing/displaying the American flag on "Cinco de Imaginary" is seen as offensive, then we are heading to a place where this country falls apart.
10263  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: China on: May 19, 2010, 08:26:17 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/19/world/main6498069.shtml

If this demonstrates a shift from isolated loners attacking children to groups of "have nots" against the "haves", then this could be a "Archduke Ferdinand" moment that really will shake the world.
10264  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud (ACORN et al), corruption etc. on: May 19, 2010, 07:22:43 PM
Good to see progress here.
10265  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 19, 2010, 05:34:12 PM
http://www.cis.org/articles/2004/back604.html

State and Local Authority to
Enforce Immigration Law
A Unified Approach for Stopping Terrorists

June 2004

By Mr. Kris W. Kobach

Download the .pdf version


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Enforcing our nation�s immigration laws is one of the most daunting challenges faced by the federal government. With an estimated 8-10 million illegal aliens already present in the United States and fewer than 2,000 interior enforcement agents at its disposal, the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE) has a Herculean task on its hands � one that it simply cannot accomplish alone.

The assistance of state and local law enforcement agencies can mean the difference between success and failure in enforcing immigration laws. The more than 650,000 police officers nationwide represent a massive force multiplier.

This Backgrounder briefly summarizes the legal authority upon which state and local police may act in rendering such assistance and describes the scenarios in which this assistance is most crucial. It does not cover the provisions of Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (that is, Section 133 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRAIRA) of 1996 titled "Acceptance of State Services to Carry Out Immigration Enforcement"), since the scope of such delegated authority is evident on the face of the Act. Rather, this Backgrounder describes the inherent arrest authority that has been possessed and exercised by state and local police since the earliest days of federal immigration law.

It has long been widely recognized that state and local police possess the inherent authority to arrest aliens who have violated criminal provisions of the INA. Once the arrest is made, the police officer must contact federal immigration authorities and transfer the alien into their custody within a reasonable period of time. Bear in mind that the power to arrest � and take temporary custody of � an immigration law violator is a subset of the broader power to "enforce." This is an important distinction between inherent arrest authority and 287(g) authority to enforce � which includes arresting, investigating, preparing a case, and all of the other powers exercised by BICE agents.

Where some confusion has existed in recent years is on the question of whether the same authority extends to arresting aliens who have violated civil provisions of the INA that render an alien deportable. This confusion was, to some extent, fostered by an erroneous 1996 opinion of the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) of the Department of Justice, the relevant part of which has since been withdrawn by OLC. However, the law on this question is quite clear: arresting aliens who have violated either criminal provisions of the INA or civil provisions that render an alien deportable "is within the inherent authority of the states."1  And such inherent arrest authority has never been preempted by Congress.

This conclusion has been confirmed by every court to squarely address the issue. Indeed, it is difficult to make a persuasive case to the contrary. That said, I will proceed to offer my personal opinion as to why this conclusion is correct. I offer this legal analysis purely in my private capacity as a law professor and not on behalf of the Bush Administration.


State Arrest Authority
The preliminary question is whether the states have inherent power (subject to federal preemption) to make arrests for violation of federal law. That is, may state police, exercising state law authority only, make arrests for violations of federal law, or do they have power to make such arrests only insofar as they are exercising delegated federal executive power? The answer to this question is plainly the former.

The source of this authority flows from the states� status as sovereign entities. They are sovereign governments possessing all residual powers not abridged or superceded by the U.S. Constitution. The source of the state governments� power is entirely independent of the U.S. Constitution. See Sturges v. Crowninshield, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 122, 193 (1819). Moreover, the enumerated powers doctrine that constrains the powers of the federal government does not so constrain the powers of the states. Rather, the states possess what are known as "police powers," which need not be specifically enumerated. Police powers are "an exercise of the sovereign right of the government to protect the lives, health, morals, comfort, and general welfare of the people�" Manigault v. Springs, 199 U.S. 473, 480 (1905). Essentially, states may take any action (consistent with their own constitutions and laws) unless there exists a prohibition in the U.S. Constitution or such action has been preempted by federal law.2

It is well established that the authority of state police to make arrests for violation of federal law is not limited to those situations in which they are exercising delegated federal power. Rather, such arrest authority inheres in the States� status as sovereign entities. It stems from the basic power of one sovereign to assist another sovereign. This is the same inherent authority that is exercised whenever a state law enforcement officer witnesses a federal crime being committed and makes an arrest. That officer is not acting pursuant to delegated federal power. Rather, he is exercising the inherent power of his state to assist another sovereign.


Abundant Case Law. There is abundant case law on this point. Even though Congress has never authorized state police officers to make arrest for federal offenses without an arrest warrant, such arrests occur routinely; and the Supreme Court has recognized that state law controls the validity of such an arrest. As the Court concluded in United States v. Di Re, "No act of Congress lays down a general federal rule for arrest without warrant for federal offenses. None purports to supersede state law. And none applies to this arrest which, while for a federal offense, was made by a state officer accompanied by federal officers who had no power of arrest. Therefore the New York statute provides the standard by which this arrest must stand or fall." 332 U.S. 581, 591 (1948). The Court�s conclusion presupposes that state officers possess the inherent authority to make warrantless arrests for federal offenses. The same assumption guided the Court in Miller v. United States. 357 U.S. 301, 305 (1958). As the Seventh Circuit has explained, "[state] officers have implicit authority to make federal arrests." U.S. v. Janik, 723 F.2d 537, 548 (7th Cir. 1983). Accordingly, they may initiate an arrest on the basis of probable cause to think that an individual has committed a federal crime. Id.

The Ninth and Tenth Circuits have expressed this understanding in the immigration context specifically. In Gonzales v. City of Peoria, the Ninth Circuit opined in an immigration case that the "general rule is that local police are not precluded from enforcing federal statutes," 722 F.2d 468, 474 (9th Cir. 1983). The Tenth Circuit has reviewed this question on several occasions, concluding squarely that a "state trooper has general investigatory authority to inquire into possible immigration violations," United States v. Salinas-Calderon, 728 F.2d 1298, 1301 n.3 (10th Cir. 1984). As the Tenth Circuit has described it, there is a "preexisting general authority of state or local police officers to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws," United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez, 176 F.3d 1294, 1295 (10th Cir. 1999). And again in 2001, the Tenth Circuit reiterated that "state and local police officers [have] implicit authority within their respective jurisdictions �to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws.�" United States v. Santana-Garcia, 264 F.3d 1188, 1194 (citing United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez, 176 F.3d 1294, 1295). None of these Tenth Circuit holdings drew any distinction between criminal violations of the INA and civil provisions that render an alien deportable. Rather, the inherent arrest authority extends generally to both categories of federal immigration law violations.
10266  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 03:08:40 PM
Often in the booking process, the info entered is supplied by the subject being booked. When I was a state C.O. many years ago, we had several juveniles who were illegals from Guatamala housed in our facility for several days until it was figured out that they were adults. Whoops! Luckily, they didn't assault/sexually assault any other inmates in that time period before they were move to an adult facility.
10267  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:36:28 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/18/az-utility-board-member-responds-to-la-boycott-over-sb1070/

I'd rather he just flip the switch off, but still, this is good.
10268  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:27:12 PM
**The Hong Kong Police must be racist or something.....**   rolleyes

Hong Kong's highest court in a1999 decision allowed 8,000 mainland-born Chinese whose parents had permanent resident status to move to Hong Kong. This "right of abode" was overturned by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress in Beijing at the request of the Hong Kong government, threatening the judicial independence of Hong Kong's highest court. In January 2002, Hong Kong's highest court affirmed the Chinese government's reversal of its earlier ruling, and the Hong Kong government moved to deport the children of some Hong Kong residents.

Chinese-born children with at least one parent who is a permanent Hong Kong resident are permitted to live in the territory, but only if they were born after the parent received legal resident status.

The court gave the 7,300 "unlawful migrants" from the mainland who were in Hong Kong at the time of the ruling until March 31, 2002 to leave. Only 3,000 left; some 4,300 "abode seekers" defied the order to leave and became unauthorized residents. The abode-seekers made a last-ditch legal effort to stay, but their effort to obtain legal aid, the government ruled, does not entitle them to stay while they appeal.

Hong Kong police began searching for the mainlanders who were to leave Hong Kong in a manner that critics called "wufa wutian" (without law, without heaven)". On April 7, 2002, the first migrant was forcibly sent back to the mainland, and police continued to intercept and return the remaining 4,300 in April and May. Some of the migrants camped out at a park in central Hong Kong, hoping that their large numbers and the presence of reporters and photographers would keep the police away. Hong Kong's security secretary, Regina Ip, said "Our position is very clear. [The mainlanders] shouldn't be sneaking around in Hong Kong and wasting time but should return quickly to rebuild their lives."

In one story widely reported in Hong Kong, a Chinese father was allowed to bring only one of his twin daughters to Hong Kong in 1979. The then 12-year old girls played "paper, scissors, stone" to determine who would go to Hong Kong. The daughter in China was granted a tourist visa in 1999, and has lived illegally in Hong Kong since. The now 19-year old twin was told to report to immigration authorities for deportation in April, but at the last minute, she was allowed to stay because of her exceptional circumstances.

Most Hong Kong residents are not sympathetic to the migrants being removed. Many believe that the latest arrivals have fewer skills and impose more of a burden on society than previous migrants. The Hong Kong government has warned that, if it is not tough on mainland migrnats, densely settled Hong Kong will receive several million more migrants. The director of Hong Kong's external investment bureau blamed Chinese migrants for Hong Kong's seven percent unemployment rate.

Hong Kong allows 150 mainland Chinese a day, or 54,750 a year, to immigrate, and allows mainland Chinese to visit Hong Kong relatives for two three-month periods a year. Many of them are poor: 18 percent of new mainland migrants in Hong Kong are on welfare- the 60,127 account for one percent of Hong Kong residents, and 15 percent of Hong Kong welfare recipients. Of the 173,212 immigrants aged 15 and older who settled over the past seven years, 70 percent did not advance beyond Form Three secondary school education. Some 43 percent of new immigrants earned less than $HK6,000 a month, compared to 19 percent of all Hong Kong residents.
10269  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:18:27 PM
Dating back to 2003, Hernandez has been arrested for mostly misdemeanor offenses 16 times by police officers in Denver, Longmont, Aurora, Westminster, Lakewood and Broomfield and sheriff's deputies in Boulder, Gilpin and Arapahoe counties, according to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records. His charges have included forgery, assault, theft, fraud and driving under restraint.
Sopranuk said Friday that Hernandez was born in California and is a U.S. citizen.

**He claimed to be a US citizen. He, in fact was an illegal alien from Guatamala. I can tell you from first hand experience that lots of illegals have numerous aliases in the system and bogusly claim to be citizens and ICE doesn't have the manpower to vett every arrestee. This is why local/state law enforcement needs to do it as well.**
10270  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 12:15:15 PM
**If Colorado had AZ's law in place, could this have been avoided?**

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_10401431

ICE holds driver in crash
Aurora hit-run killed 2 women in pickup, 3-year-old in ice cream shop
By Kirk Mitchell and Ann Schrader
The Denver Post
Posted: 09/07/2008 12:30:00 AM MDT
Updated: 09/07/2008 09:41:17 AM MDT


Aurora— As new questions arose about the man police say is responsible for the tragedy, several hundred friends and relatives gathered Saturday night outside an ice cream shop to mourn three lives suddenly lost.

"It hurts now," said Vito Kudlis, surrounded by friends as he and his wife, Enely, wept for their 3-year-old son, Marten. "It is freaky. It is crazy."

Marten, Patricia Guntharp, 49, of Centennial and Debra Serecky, 51, of Aurora all died when a Thursday night collision caused vehicles to careen into the Baskin-Robbins at the corner of South Havana Street and East Mississippi Avenue.

Saturday night, they were remembered in a candlelight vigil. Small children held glow sticks as others added stuffed animals —

The mother of a boy killed while eating ice cream at a Baskin Robbins Thursday night brings his toy to the scene Friday morning at 1155 S. Havana St. in Aurora, Colorado. She left it at the scene, as well as a photograph of her son. (THE DENVER POST | Brian Brainerd)especially bears — to a memorial.
Francis Hernandez, the man being held for suspicion of vehicular homicide in the deaths, is now being detained by federal immigration officials.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials sent a faxed detainer on Hernandez, 23, at 12:04 a.m. Saturday, indicating his U.S. citizenship is under question, according to Arapahoe County jail officials and federal authorities.

Hernandez has been arrested 16 times in five years in Colorado but apparently has never been deported, according to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records.

On Friday, Aurora authorities had indicated they believed he was a U.S. citizen.

Hernandez had been arrested in Denver as recently as July 18 on a traffic stop and charged with numerous crimes, including resisting police, CBI records say. Had he been held on an ICE detainer at that time, he would have been jailed until his case was completed and his sentence served and then deported, a time-consuming process.

Hernandez is now being held on the ICE detainer and for investigation of three counts of vehicular homicide, reckless driving and hit and run in Thursday night's accident, Aurora police spokesman Lt. John Sopranuk said.

His bail was

Marten Kudlis' father, Marat, is consoled as he visits the scene Friday where the 3-year-old was killed Thursday night. (Brian Brainerd, The Denver Post )raised Friday from $10,000 to $100,000, according to Sgt. Lisa Grosskruger of the Arapahoe County jail.
Sopranuk said Hernandez was driving a Chevy Suburban rapidly and erratically south on South Havana shortly after 8 p.m. Thursday. Police said he ran a red light at the intersection of Mississippi and Havana.

The SUV hit a northbound white Mazda pickup carrying Guntharp and Serecky, which was turning into the Good Times burger outlet. The impact sent the truck more than 100 feet into the corner of the Baskin-Robbins in the Market Square shopping center.

The two women were killed by the impact and Marten suffered fatal injuries from flying debris.

Dating back to 2003, Hernandez has been arrested for mostly misdemeanor

A photo of the child and his stuffed toy were left at the scene of the accident Friday morning at 1155 S. Havana St. in Aurora, Colorado. (THE DENVER POST | Brian Brainerd)offenses 16 times by police officers in Denver, Longmont, Aurora, Westminster, Lakewood and Broomfield and sheriff's deputies in Boulder, Gilpin and Arapahoe counties, according to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records. His charges have included forgery, assault, theft, fraud and driving under restraint.
Sopranuk said Friday that Hernandez was born in California and is a U.S. citizen.

But he added that detectives could find no indication that he had ever held a driver's license in California or Colorado.

Also according to CBI records, Hernandez, who has 11 aliases and two listed birth dates, has four listed birth places, including Mexico.

ICE placed a detainer because of indications he was born outside the country, said

The scene Friday morning at 1155 S. Havana St. in Aurora where three died when a small pickup crashed into a Baskin Robbins ice cream shop Thursday night, Sept. 4, 2008. (THE DENVER POST | Brian Brainerd)ICE spokesman Carl Rusnok. Officers are currently investigating his citizenship, he said.
When ICE did not place a hold on Hernandez following his July 18 arrest, he was released and has since been listed as a fugitive, according to CBI records.

There were multiple warrants for his arrest when the fatal accident happened Thursday, Sopranuk said.

Sopranuk could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Rusnok said it is possible that if Hernandez is in the country illegally that his status was not checked or identified previously despite numerous arrests.

He said in some instances suspects are arrested for minor offenses and they are released on bail or serve short sentences before a citizenship check is done.

ICE places a priority on deporting illegal immigrants who have been arrested for crimes, Rusnok said. Sometimes ICE agents make regular visits to jails checking for suspects illegally in the country, he said.

Back at the ice cream shop on Saturday night, the family announced that Marten's funeral will be 10 a.m. Wednesday at Fairmont Cemetery. Arrangements for Guntharp and Serecky are pending.

A "Memory of Marten Fund" has been established at Bank of the West.

Kirk Mitchell: 303-954-1206 or kmitchell@denverpost.com
10271  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 12:03:43 PM
Crafty,

I was going for a more simplistic point, meaning that the generational divide on illegal immigration is similar to the generational divide on other topics. What makes sense in one's late teens/early 20's often doesn't survive contact with actual adulthood. The bio is interesting though.
10272  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 11:40:58 AM
http://www.slate.com/id/2226509/

What do Timothy McVeigh, Ted Bundy, David "Son of Sam" Berkowitz, and 9/11 ring-leader Mohammed Atta have in common? They're all murderers, yes, but another curious detail uniting them is that they were all also brought to police attention by "routine" traffic violations.

While living in Florida, for example, Mohammed Atta ran afoul of traffic law on numerous occasions. An arrest warrant was even issued after he skipped a court appearance (related to not having had a valid driver's license during a traffic stop), which raises the haunting possibility that his fatal path might have been interrupted had these transgressions been linked to other legal violations, such as overstaying a visa. (In fact, at least two of the other 9/11 hijackers had been pulled over for speeding, too.)

**Wouldn't it have been nice if the 9/11 hijackers had gotten arrested as the result of an AZ type law?**
10273  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 11:21:40 AM
The law doesn't target one group or another. It applies to Illegal Aliens from Pakistan, Mexico and Ireland and all other parts of the globe. My wife, who is a Lawful Alien must carry her "Green Card" with her at all times and present it upon demand, per federal law. She likes AZ's law and would be more than happy to provide the green card along with her driver's lic to any LEO who cared to ask.

Most cops are well aware that there are plenty of Americans of hispanic ancestry. Many cops, especially in the southwestern US are hispanic. The idea that the AZ law will fuel some ethnic pogrom is not based in anything but hysteria and the left playing their favorite race card.
10274  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 09:47:31 AM
Crafty,

Where would you have been on the immigration issue, were you back in your hippy-dippy days?
10275  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 17, 2010, 05:37:15 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/17/palin-hits-huntsman-for-dumping-on-arizonas-immigration-law-in-front-of-china/

Thank god for Sarah!
10276  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: May 17, 2010, 05:28:34 PM
http://michellemalkin.com/2006/01/30/support-denmark-why-the-forbidden-cartoons-matter/
10277  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America and the rest of the western hemisphere on: May 17, 2010, 04:26:34 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/slideshow/entertainment/2010/05/10/miss-usa-topless-lingerie/#slide=4

The muslim woman I can really support!   evil
10278  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: May 17, 2010, 01:07:27 PM
http://hotair.com/greenroom/archives/2010/05/17/the-shrine-of-multiculturalism-now-sacrificing-lives-in-the-name-of-appeasement/

10279  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America and the rest of the western hemisphere on: May 17, 2010, 12:46:15 PM
http://www.newsrealblog.com/2010/05/16/jumanah-imad-albahri-speaks-and-im-not-buying-it/

Jihad much?
10280  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 17, 2010, 12:31:53 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/17/obama-administration-to-china-sorry-about-that-racist-az-law/

It gets even better.

BTW, After 9/11, China banned all muslims from flying for a period of time. Remember the outrage and boycotts? Me either.
10281  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 17, 2010, 09:40:27 AM
Well, I do confess that for me that taken in their totality they are holy verses; I think our FF were divinely inspired.

I think if they had stood up and freed their slaves against their own economic best interest, you'd have a stronger arguement for divine inspiration.
10282  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 17, 2010, 09:37:05 AM
"gravitating toward the tools and tactics employed by the armed forces as there's no reason to reinvent that wheel."

Law enforcement has been structured under a paramilitary model since Sir Robert Peel founded the London Metropolitan Police, which was the model for police forces in the US. Law enforcement has always adopted the tools and tactics employed by the armed forces, subject to the needs of policing and the appicable laws and policies governing their use.

Read up on Graham v. Connor. You'll find that no matter how a LEO is dressed, or exactly how they are armed, the legal standards in using force are identical. There is no "SWAT" exemption in the law or caselaw.
10283  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 17, 2010, 07:33:51 AM
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2010/05/026310.php

US State Dept. apologizes to China for Arizona. Seriously.
10284  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: May 16, 2010, 12:12:25 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/16/rahm-we-screwed-up-the-messaging-on-israel/

Chickens come home to roost.
10285  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Communicating with the Muslim World on: May 16, 2010, 08:44:42 AM
I have a newfound respect for Allen Ginsburg.
10286  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 10:23:44 AM
And unless/until the general public changes it's collective mind on the topic, the WOD will continue. Even if every drug became legal, there would still be drug enforcement, just as there is still enforcement of laws related to alcohol, tobacco and pharmaceuticals.
10287  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 09:36:46 AM
I can assure you that most everyone in law enforcement spends a huge amount of time and energy worrying about the civil and criminal liabilities that come with the job. The vast majority of people that get into this job do it to do the right thing. We do what we do because we want to get the job done and go home at the end of the shift in the same condition we reported for duty in. I have been injured in the line of duty more than once and as I type this I have fresh, open wounds obtained in a struggle that wasn't going to end with us being friends at the end of the day.

I don't want to shoot someone's pet, but I don't want to be someone's pet's chew toy even more. When I first pinned on a badge at 22, I wanted action. Now, I just want to make sure that me and everyone I'm responsible for goes home safe, with as little drama and paperwork as possible.

No one in their right mind says "I want to go out and fcukup so profoundly that I get IA'ed, named in hostile press reports, sued and potentially investigated and prosecuted at the state and local levels.
10288  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 09:05:39 AM
There is nothing cavalier in my response, just a statement of fact. Just as innocents and friendlies die of "friendly fire" in combat. As an example, no one bust their hump to become a military aviator just so years down the line, they can accidentally drop a bomb on troops they are trying to support in a firefight with the enemy. I remember seeing footage from Desert Storm where If I recall correctly, a Apache crew chewed up what they thought was a column of Iraqi armor, just to find out they were Bradley fighting vehicles filled with our troops.  I recall the pilot of the helo saying "Oh god" as the vehicles burned. Can you imagine living with that? Do you think cops want to kick in doors in the wrong house and give an elderly woman a heart attack? Do you think there are no consequences for these officers, both formal and informal?
10289  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 14, 2010, 11:02:09 PM
Okay, so you've dismissed the whole of Balko's work because of some confidential informant/anonymous informant verbiage issue. Think his work is sourced and so stands on it's own despite any semantic dispute. Yes he takes a strong Libertarian stand every bit as ardent as your Authoritarian stand. Perhaps the truth lies somewhere in the middle, but I find value in the data he presents.

**The law is all about the specific use of words with specific definitions. When alarmists such as Balko misinform the public with the idea that a single phone call from an unidentifed person can cause a search warrant to get issued, it's untrue and damaging to both law enforcement and the public. He is the Al Gore of this topic with an agenda that won't let the facts get in the way of emotional propaganda.**
10290  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: May 14, 2010, 10:25:58 PM
Well said, Doug.
10291  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 13, 2010, 11:02:59 PM
I wish I had the money to air spanish language ads in AZ pointing out all the wonderful sanctuary cities in CA and subsidize bus tickets to those places. See how Ah-nold likes that.
10292  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 10:58:37 PM
I'll never say never, but it's very doubtful that any search warrants are being issued/served anywhere for personal use quantities of marijuana. I'd also note that I doubt very many, if any originalist scholars would interpret the 9th to mean that weed smoking was an inherent right.

The WOD will continue until you see a serious shift in numbers from what this polling says: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-20002941-503544.html
10293  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 13, 2010, 10:19:36 PM
I'm boycotting CA. and will deliberately spend money in AZ.
10294  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 10:16:32 PM
I don't dispute that point, I just disagree with citing quotes from the founders as if they are holy verses. I doubt they intended them to be taken as such.
10295  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 03:49:50 PM
So exactly what is your policy suggestion for search warrants?


I'll bet a keg of Guinness that next year and the year after that tactical teams are still shooting the occasional dog and even kicking in the wrong door every so often to serve search warrant.

I quoted Radly Balko from the article you posted and then showed how he deliberately placed confidential informant in with anonymous informant for propaganda purposes. Either that, of he knows less on the topic than anyone who read this thread and half-way paid attention. Either scenario does not lend credibility to his writing on the topic. Call that an ad hominem if you want.
10296  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 03:22:03 PM
No, I am placing ideas expressed by TJ in the proper context. He was a flesh and blood human with flaws and a lack of insight demonstrated by his ownership of slaves while advocating ideals of freedom. The constitution wasn't delivered on tablets from a burning bush, and no matter how much hemp might have been consumed by the founding fathers, I doubt very much they could envision issues related to search and seizure for the US in 2010.

This does not mean that I endorse that the constitution means what ever the agenda is for a left wing jurist's personal political viewpoints at any given moment. Rather than worshipping idols with feet of clay, understand that the big picture is the balance between the greater good and individual freedoms based on pragmatic realism, not ivory tower dreams of a golden past that never was.
10297  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 02:41:11 PM
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/jefferson/true/
10298  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 02:38:30 PM
It's not a liberal tactic to point out the flaws in individuals such as the slave owning founding fathers. So then if TJ wasn't screwing his slaves, then the slavery bit isn't that big of a deal?
10299  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 01:21:12 PM
TJ's rant would carry a bit more weight if he hadn't written this in between trips to the slaves' quarters. Where does fcuking your slaves fall into the continuum of despotism?
10300  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 01:15:22 PM
"In many other cases, such raids transpire based on little more than a tip from an anonymous or confidential informant."

Ok, first of all, there is a big difference between an anonymous and a confidential informant. I'm sure Mr. Balko understands the difference, but he doesn't want the truth to get in the way of stirring the the uninformed into a hysterical froth.

I know that reading all the real case law and police procedure I post isn't nearly as satisfying as getting upset that the hemp that our first president grew is now geting sad-faced doggies shot, but if you want to make a reasoned arguement you're going to have to employ logic rather than waving bloody dog collars.

Ok good info on CIs: http://www.lawofficer.com/news-and-articles/articles/lom/0311/establishing_informant_reliability.html

Now on using anonymous informant for a search warrant: http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/Abstract.aspx?id=172539

Intended for police training, this report summarizes the facts and reasoning that led to an appellate court decision that a court was not justified in issuing a search warrant based solely on information provided by an anonymous informant to a law enforcement officer.

Pages: 1 ... 204 205 [206] 207 208 ... 277
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!