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10351  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: January 19, 2010, 07:20:57 AM
As I like to point out, MLK was a republican.
10352  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 18, 2010, 01:51:43 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/18/us/18intel.html

Review of Jet Bomb Plot Shows More Missed Clues
By ERIC LIPTON, ERIC SCHMITT and MARK MAZZETTI
Published: January 17, 2010
This article is by Eric Lipton, Eric Schmitt and Mark Mazzetti.

 

The White House press secretary, Robert Gibbs; the homeland security secretary, Janet Napolitano; and the White House homeland security adviser, John O. Brennan, in a recent briefing on the security review of the Christmas Day bombing attempt.

WASHINGTON — Worried about possible terrorist attacks over the Christmas holiday, President Obama met on Dec. 22 with top officials of the C.I.A., F.B.I. and Department of Homeland Security, who ticked off a list of possible plots against the United States and how their agencies were working to disrupt them.

In a separate White House meeting that day, Mr. Obama’s homeland security adviser, John O. Brennan, led talks on Yemen, where a stream of disturbing intelligence had suggested that Qaeda operatives were preparing for some action, perhaps a strike on an American target, on Christmas Day.

Yet in those sessions, government officials never considered or connected links that, with the benefit of hindsight, now seem so evident and indicated that the gathering threat in Yemen would reach into the United States.
10353  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Housing/Mortgage/Real Estate on: January 15, 2010, 09:31:35 AM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/01/15/video-moral-hazard-and-the-root-of-the-financial-collapse/

Moral hazard and economics 101.
10354  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: January 14, 2010, 08:54:19 AM
Israel is on it's own. Barry ain't doing shiite to the mullahs.
10355  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: January 14, 2010, 08:36:28 AM
I had always theorised that the Iraqis stung him and flipped him.
10356  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 13, 2010, 09:57:01 PM
No worries.
10357  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 13, 2010, 09:49:01 PM
http://globalnation.inquirer.net/news/breakingnews/view/20100112-246948/Saudi-Arabian-posing-as-pilot-held-at-Manila-airport

Saudi Arabian posing as pilot held at Manila airport

Agence France-Presse
 
First Posted 19:24:00 01/12/2010
 
Filed Under: Police, Air Transport
 
MANILA, Philippines—A 19-year-old Saudi Arabian man dressed as a pilot was arrested Tuesday after he illegally entered a restricted area in the main airport in the Philippines, an airport official said.

"He was able to elude our security by misrepresenting himself as a pilot of Saudia," said airport general manager Alfonso Cusi, referring to the Saudi Arabian flag carrier.

The incident at Manila airport comes after officials in the Philippines and around the world said they would boost security after the botched attempt to blow up a US-bound airliner on Christmas Day.

The detained Saudi, identified by the local authorities as Hani Abdulelah Bukhari, told airport police he was there to meet his father, a retired Saudia pilot who later arrived on a flight from Saudi Arabia.

He was wearing a pilot's uniform from Saudia Airlines when airport security personnel noticed him lining up at the immigration section of the passenger terminal, Cusi told ABS-CBN television.
10358  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 13, 2010, 09:32:48 PM
GM,
The below article was long on conjecture and short on facts.

Did you scroll down on the snopes article  to the picture on the same night of the Salhis and McCain. Are they also best friends with him too?

I know a lot of people who have pictures of themselves and Obama.  I personally have much better picture of that than myself and Giuliani.

Obama  knows how to work a room.  When he spoke at a pro Israel Event I attended he  shook everyones hand included the wait staff and was the only politician present  to do so.   Would you mind sticking to legitimate criticism of Obama so I don't have keep defending him. It is annoying.



I thought it was interesting and asked for your comment. That's all.
10359  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 13, 2010, 09:28:43 PM
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/dpp/news/unruly-passengers-disrupt-northwest-flight-243-

Unruly Passengers Disrupt Northwest Flight 243
Updated: Tuesday, 12 Jan 2010, 5:26 PM EST
Published : Tuesday, 12 Jan 2010, 2:15 PM EST

Dennis Kraniak

MyFoxDetroit.com - Sources tell Fox 2 that a flight from Amsterdam into Detroit Metropolitan Airport was held on the tarmac after landing because of unruly behavior by some of the passengers.

((Watch the video to get passenger reaction from Fox 2's Simon Shaykhet.))

The source says four men from Saudi Arabai were saying something in Arabic that alarmed four on-board Federal Air Marshals. The Marshals speak Arabic.  A decision was made to stop the plane  on the tarmac away from the passenger terminal and remove the men from the plane.
10360  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: January 13, 2010, 01:27:44 PM
Stratfor says the guy published regularly as an academic, but did not seem to be involved in nuke production , , , AND that he was supporting the opposition?

I'd think the mullahs would be better off with an arrest and show trial in that situation rather than stage a bombing.  huh
10361  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: January 13, 2010, 09:22:03 AM
I wonder how you say Mossad in Farsi.
10362  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 13, 2010, 09:04:42 AM
Oh! This is very interesting! Comment Rachel?
10363  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Intel Matters on: January 13, 2010, 08:51:57 AM
In other words, the ISI, or a jihadist element within.
10364  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: January 13, 2010, 08:46:24 AM
Or, Israel hit him and this is disinfo.
10365  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: January 12, 2010, 08:58:05 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/12/opinion/12brooks.html

Op-Ed ColumnistThe Tel Aviv Cluster

Jews are a famously accomplished group. They make up 0.2 percent of the world population, but 54 percent of the world chess champions, 27 percent of the Nobel physics laureates and 31 percent of the medicine laureates.

Jews make up 2 percent of the U.S. population, but 21 percent of the Ivy League student bodies, 26 percent of the Kennedy Center honorees, 37 percent of the Academy Award-winning directors, 38 percent of those on a recent Business Week list of leading philanthropists, 51 percent of the Pulitzer Prize winners for nonfiction.

In his book, “The Golden Age of Jewish Achievement,” Steven L. Pease lists some of the explanations people have given for this record of achievement. The Jewish faith encourages a belief in progress and personal accountability. It is learning-based, not rite-based.

Most Jews gave up or were forced to give up farming in the Middle Ages; their descendants have been living off of their wits ever since. They have often migrated, with a migrant’s ambition and drive. They have congregated around global crossroads and have benefited from the creative tension endemic in such places.
10366  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam the religion on: January 12, 2010, 12:57:00 PM
Nothing new there. The Saudi ulema does what the Saudi royals wish.
10367  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin on: January 12, 2010, 11:44:47 AM
This is an ideal "teachable moment" to illustrate the racism and hypocrisy of the left.
10368  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 12, 2010, 05:16:57 AM
http://www.sfexaminer.com/opinion/columns/james_carafano/Predicting-the-next-bomb-plot-81103217.html

Predicting the next bomb plot
By: James Carafano
Examiner Columnist

January 11, 2010 Muhammad bin Nayef is Saudi Arabia’s chief counterterrorism official. A member of the royal family, he’s in charge of fighting terrorists. That is why they tried to kill him.

Last August, a known terrorist ­— Abdullah Hassan Taleh al-Asiri — declared he wanted to surrender personally to the prince. Saudi officials regarded the announcement as a small victory in the war on terror.

Their policy is to actively encourage extremists to return home, turn themselves in and enter a rehabilitation program. Abdullah, they thought, was coming back to the fold. He waltzed through security and presented himself to the prince.

Unfortunately for the prince, Abdullah had a bomb on (or perhaps in) his body. The weapon was supplied by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, which operates out of Yemen and Saudi Arabia (the same group responsible for the Christmas day attack on the Detroit-bound flight). A cell phone triggered the device, hurling body parts in all directions. Luckily, the prince was only slightly injured.

The near-miss illustrates how al-Qaida often operates:

1. Rely on familiar tactics
2. Introduce a new wrinkle or two to improve the tactics and keep them “fresh”
3. Be patient, wait and attack again

The attack on the prince followed an old tradition in East Asian assassinations: Turn a royal audience into a suicide attack. Recently, the Taliban used the same trick to kill seven CIA agents in Afghanistan. Three days before 9/11 they used the tactic to assassinate an anti-Taliban warlord, Ahmad Shah Masood.

These attacks offer lessons for homeland security in the U.S. Combined with the 2006 London-based plot, they reveal a lot about what one kind of threat to expect in the future.

First, news flash: The terrorists will continue to target passenger aviation. Gravity works. Any successful attack on an airplane will likely have catastrophic results.

Moreover, when you attack a plane, you attack a network. Bring down one plane, and the whole worldwide system of passenger aviation goes into shock.
10369  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 11, 2010, 04:04:33 PM
http://www.pjtv.com/v/2930?utm_source=pjm%2Btop%20nav%20bar&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=pjtv

The enemy within.
10370  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 11, 2010, 03:06:08 PM
http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5gWPwM0vfFzmcs_AdWye-k1j3Bf2Q

Boston airport official says US failed to learn lessons of shoe bomb
By Glen Johnson (CP) – 4 days ago

BOSTON — The top security consultant at Logan International Airport in Boston says the United States has failed to learn the security lessons raised when a man tried to blow up a U.S.-bound airliner in 2001 with explosives in his shoes.

Rafi Ron, who once headed security at Ben Gurion Airport in Israel, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the attempted bombing of a Detroit-bound plane on Christmas Day shows the U.S. still relies too much on technology to prevent attacks.

Ron says there needs to be more personal screening of passengers, specifically at the point where a Transportation Security Administration officer compares their boarding pass and identification. Anyone deemed suspicious should receive an extended interview and more weapons screening, he said.

"We felt so comfortable with the use of technology, which is so politically safe for everybody, that we failed to see that we are not really fulfilling the role and providing a good level of security," said Ron.
10371  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy on: January 11, 2010, 11:49:31 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/11/business/11drone.html?pagewanted=all

Military Is Awash in Data From Drones
By CHRISTOPHER DREW
Published: January 10, 2010

HAMPTON, Va. — As the military rushes to place more spy drones over Afghanistan, the remote-controlled planes are producing so much video intelligence that analysts are finding it more and more difficult to keep up.

Daniel Rosenbaum for The New York Times
Col. Daniel R. Johnson, right, in the intelligence center at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va., where analysts watch every second of drones’ video footage live as it is streamed there.

Daniel Rosenbaum for The New York Times
Airmen received a pre-mission briefing at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va. They meld information from Predator drones, U-2 spy planes and other sources from Afghanistan and Iraq.

 
Air Force drones collected nearly three times as much video over Afghanistan and Iraq last year as in 2007 — about 24 years’ worth if watched continuously. That volume is expected to multiply in the coming years as drones are added to the fleet and as some start using multiple cameras to shoot in many directions.

A group of young analysts already watches every second of the footage live as it is streamed to Langley Air Force Base here and to other intelligence centers, and they quickly pass warnings about insurgents and roadside bombs to troops in the field.

But military officials also see much potential in using the archives of video collected by the drones for later analysis, like searching for patterns of insurgent activity over time. To date, only a small fraction of the stored video has been retrieved for such intelligence purposes.

Government agencies are still having trouble making sense of the flood of data they collect for intelligence purposes, a point underscored by the 9/11 Commission and, more recently, by President Obama after the attempted bombing of a Detroit-bound passenger flight on Christmas Day.
10372  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 11, 2010, 11:35:26 AM
As a matter of fact, he was against the Muslim clerics! In the Iran-Iraq war the Iranian Ayatollahs used children as mine sweepers, they were made to roll on the minefields to clear them. Children were of much less value than military equipment and much more fun to replace. The scenes, as you can imagine, were gruesome. Picking up pieces of blown up children is not a pleasant task. To improve things, they wrapped the children in blankets so the bodies would not fly apart as badly. What a bright idea!

So let me get to my point. The crotch bomber's dad probably figured that his son was not expendable as a suicide bomber  but he could not publicly stop him, that would give the game away. One way to save his son was to have him put on the no-fly list. He gets brownie points with the CIA and he saves his son without actually stopping his son from stupidly suiciding himself. That the crotch bomber messed up the job just shows that he was not all that bright. Had he been bright, he would have sent some other poor bastard to blow himself up.

**Above is a viable scenario that could explain the eunuchbomber's father's actions. It's fun to mock the eunuchbomber, but he didn't lack in intelligence, just training. He was probably seen as not useful as an upper level operative due to some emotional/psych issues, so he was used like Richard Reid as a proof of concept rather than part of the signature AQ synchronized attack.**


General George Patton is reputed to have said: "A good soldier does not die for his country. He makes sure the other poor bastard dies for his." Islamic leaders know this perfectly, they send disposable assets to the front line making them believe in 72 sex slaves for eternity. For Islam, women are disposable assets as well.

Denny Schlesinger
10373  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 11, 2010, 11:17:58 AM
Suicide bombers are disposable assets. The way they breed, it makes sense. Saddam Hussein used to give ten or fifty thousand dollars to the families of Palestinian suicide bombers but he never suicided himself for Allah.

**Saddam was a baathist and to my knowledge never religiously observant. He did try playing the allah akbar card at the end, but doubtful he believed in anything but himself.**

10374  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 11, 2010, 11:11:10 AM
Quote
Flight 253 jihadist's father "leader of Sharia movement in Nigeria"

In that case why would he report his son to the American authorities? I think you need to think convoluted:

First of all, Islamic leaders don't suicide themselves, they send lower level soldiers to die for their god. They might talk loud about being willing martyrs but they only become martyrs when someone else blows them away.

**Some may cynically voice approval of becoming a shaheed while seeking power and status in this life, but don't ignore that martyrdom is a mainstream element of both sunni and shia islamic theology. I might roll my eyes as I eat a bacon double cheeseburger at an observant jew keeping kosher, but the observant jew is worried about god and not my modern, jaded western perspective. The same applies to the jihadist, who often has lived in the west. We might roll our eyes at 72 virgins and rivers of milk, wine and honey in the afterlife, but that is to orthodox muslims as real as, if not more real than the material world.**


 

10375  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Corrections and Prison on: January 11, 2010, 12:34:08 AM
The Forgotten Cop



What would the average citizen say if it were proposed that Police Officers be assigned to a neighborhood which was inhabited by no one but criminals and those Officers would be unarmed, patrol on foot and be heavily out numbered? I wager that the overwhelming public response would be that the Officers would have to be crazy to accept such an assignment. However as you read this, such a scenario is being played out in all areas of the country.

We are Correctional Officers. Not Guards (who are people that watch school crossings). We work at minimum, medium, and maximum security Correctional Facilities. We are empowered by the State to enforce its Penal Laws, rules, and regulations of the Department of Correctional Services. In short we are Policemen. Our beat is totally inhabited by convicted felons who, by definition, are people who tend to break laws, rules, and regulations. We are out numbered by as many as 50 to 1 at various times of our work day and contrary to popular belief, we work without a side arm. In short, our necks are on the line every minute of every day.

A Correctional Facility is a very misunderstood environment. The average person has very little knowledge of its workings. Society sends it's criminals to Correctional Facilities and as time passes, each criminals crime fades from our memory until the collective prison population becomes hordes of bad people being warehoused away from decent society in a place where they can cause no further harm. There is also the notion that prison inmates cease to be a problem when they are incarcerated.

Correctional Facilities are full of violence perpetrated by the prison population against the prison population and facility staff. Felonies are committed daily but are rarely reported. They are called "unusual incidents" and rarely result in criminal prosecution. Discipline is handled internally and, as a rule, the public is rarely informed of these crimes. In the course of maintaining order in these facilities, many Officers have endured the humiliation of having urine and feces thrown at them. Uncounted Correctional Officers have been kicked, bitten, stabbed and slashed with home made weapons, taken hostage, murdered and even raped in the line of duty, all while being legally mandated to maintain their Professional Composure and refraining from any retaliation which could be the basis for dismissal from service.

In addition to these obvious dangers, Correctional Officers face hidden dangers in the form of AIDS, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis B and C. Courts are now imposing longer sentences and the prison population is increasing far beyond the systems designated capacity. As the public demands more police on the street, governments everywhere are cutting police in prison where violence reigns supreme, jeopardizing all those working behind prison walls.

Although you will never see us on "911" or "Top Cops" we are Law Enforcement Professionals. We are the "FORGOTTEN COP," hidden from public view, doing a dangerous beat, hoping someday to receive the respect and approval from the public who "WE SILENTLY SERVE."



Written by Donald E. Premo, Jr.
New York State Corrections Officer
10376  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Intel Matters on: January 09, 2010, 10:10:06 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/6956806/Could-the-CIA-have-achieved-what-al-Qaeda-did.html

Could the CIA have achieved what al-Qaeda did?
The audacious al-Qaeda attack in Khost, Afghanistan and the failures to detect the Detroit bomb plot are indications of a broken CIA, writes Toby Harnden in Washington
10377  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 09:59:17 PM
Keep in mind the CIA bomber was feeding us good intel we were using to kill Talibs/AQ until he gutted our Af-Pak operation.

When you play chess, are you willing to trade pawns for a checkmate?
10378  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 09:54:22 PM
GM:

That Jihad Watch piece is interesting, but it would carry more a lot more weight if it were more identifiable.

Agreed
10379  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 08:23:53 PM
http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=NTE3NTI1MWViMzRjYWI5ODY1OTI0YWNiNWNkOTMxZTg=

As usual, Mark Steyn is brilliant.
10380  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 08:06:59 PM
A disagreement over methods instead of goals? Damage control?

http://www.jihadwatch.org/2010/01/flight-253-jihadists-father-leader-of-sharia-movement-in-nigeria.html
10381  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 04:33:00 PM
I see the "Eunuchbomber's" attempt as a "proof of concept" test rather than a serious attack. I would cite it as the Philippine Airlines Flight 434 of this version of the Bojinka attack. The real attack will surge multiple attacks on multiple transatlantic/pacific flights with a higher loss of life than what was seen on 9/11.
10382  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 04:00:51 PM
I would argue that AQ understands that attacks on the global aviation infrastructure provide a huge return on investment. It's not just the lives lost on a successful attack, it's the economic and psychological impact that provides the big payoff.

I prefer to call them Jihadis, since they are waging jihad against the unbelievers as required in the koran. Islamo-fascist is accurate, if a bit redundant.
10383  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 09, 2010, 11:55:52 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/01/08/cbsnews_investigates/main6073415.shtml?tag=stack

Jan. 8, 2010
Suspect: 20 Others Trained to Blow Up Jets
CBS Exclusive: Terror Suspect Abdulmutallab Boasted 20 Other Muslim Men Being Prepared in Yemen to Mimic Christmas Bomb Plot

**So, if explosives being brought onto aircraft is such a useless tactic, why does AQ return to it over and over again?**
10384  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Foreign Policy on: January 09, 2010, 11:33:52 AM
Kill the enemy and disrupt their networks and you make it much harder for them to carry out large scale attacks against you.
10385  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: China on: January 09, 2010, 09:43:41 AM
Nice to see Barry show a little spine. Of course the PRC will not let this go unaddressed.
10386  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: China on: January 09, 2010, 09:41:18 AM
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6080DQ20100109?type=politicsNews

China again denounces U.S. arms sale to Taiwan
BEIJING
Fri Jan 8, 2010 11:32pm EST

Fri, Dec 4 2009
BEIJING (Reuters) - China on Saturday again denounced U.S. arms sales to Taiwan, saying they were an intrusion in Chinese internal affairs that risked undermining its relations with the United States.
10387  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The United Nations/ US Sovereignty on: January 09, 2010, 01:22:41 AM
I like Krauthammer.  I would point out that to my knowledge, he has no legal background while Andrew McCarthy is a former Assistant US Attorney. Usually I am making a counterarguement to someone asserting that the police use of some kind of technology is rapidly leading us down the path to a police state. One of the things that reassures me is that the American system requires that everything done by a law enforcement officer, no matter if he or she is a deputy from Mayberry or a FBI Special Agent, is subject to review by someone in a black robe with a gavel and by a jury of citizens in the case of a prosecution. Everything you do in an investigation is subject to discovery and subpeona. If you, as a law enforcement officer, violate someone's constitutional rights, you are subject to multiple levels of civil and criminal liability. Why should foreign law enforcement officers be exempted from this while here on US soil?
10388  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The United Nations/ US Sovereignty on: January 08, 2010, 06:40:42 PM
http://article.nationalreview.com/print/?q=OThhZmZhYjI1NDI0NGNlZDUwZjYzNTNkYzNmNmFmY2Q=

January 08, 2010, 0:30 p.m.

Interpol Immunity
Obama takes America down another notch with an unnecessary, reckless act.

By Andrew C. McCarthy


Finally, today, we get at least an attempt at an explanation of President Obama’s dead-of-night decision on December 16 to grant Interpol — the international police force — immunity from American law. (See here and here.) Unfortunately, in the habit to which we’ve grown accustomed, the Obama administration itself didn’t provide the explanation. It comes from Interpol’s secretary general, Ron Noble, via an informative report by Valerie Richardson at Human Events. (Ms. Richardson, who quotes from my posts in her story, was good enough to call me for comment; I regret that, because of the press of other business, I didn’t retrieve the message until after I learned early this morning that her story was posted.)

The biggest problem with President Obama’s immunity grant is that it came without any explanation. The administration can’t or won’t explain why a president — whose administration is notoriously indifferent to American sovereignty — suddenly decided Interpol needed to be freed from the U.S. Constitution and other American law. Certainly, Interpol was not clamoring publicly for immunity; neither Noble nor any other Interpol official was heard to suggest that American law was interfering with some aspect or other of its operations.
 
READ IT ALL
10389  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / This guy should have run for president on: January 08, 2010, 06:22:08 PM
http://www.swamppolitics.com/news/politics/blog/2010/01/mccain_vs_obamas_leftwing_crus.html

Where was this guy in 2008?
10390  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: January 08, 2010, 07:40:40 AM
The double agent homicide bomber appears to have gutted the CIA's Af-Pak operations. I smell the ISI, or at least a jihadist element within.

http://hotair.com/archives/2010/01/06/scarborough-scoop-how-the-talibans-double-agent-bomber-ambushed-the-cia/

Even more so, now.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2010-01-07/did-pakistani-spies-help-cia-bomber/full/

Did Pakistani Spies Help CIA Bomber?
by Gerald Posner

 Afghan spy officials tell The Daily Beast’s Gerald Posner that the chemical fingerprint of the bomb that killed seven CIA agents matches the kind produced by Pakistani intelligence.

Early evidence in the December 30 bombing that killed seven CIA agents suggests a link to Pakistan, two senior Afghan sources, including an official at their spy agency, told The Daily Beast. The pair said that U.S. has already taken a chemical fingerprint of the bomb used by a Jordanian double agent in the attack, and that it matches an explosive type used by their Pakistan equivalents, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI.

The bomb’s provenance was an immediate concern after the attack, which took place in a remote base in eastern Afghanistan called Camp Chapman, because of its compact power. Most suicide attacks involve a bulky vest or belt. “It is not possible that the Jordanian double agent received that type of explosive without the help of ISI,” a senior government aide to President Hamid Karzai told me. “The problem is that CIA trusted a Jordanian but not the Afghan operatives we offer to them. If the U.S. forces recruit, they must recruit Afghans who do not have family members in Pakistan.”

“The CIA has a policy usually not to trust anyone,” says Mahmoud Karzai, the president’s brother. “But when they do they trust someone, it is often the enemy, as obvious from the case of the CIA deaths.”
The CIA declined comment on the accusation of a possible ISI role. The U.S. embassy in Pakistan had no comment. Multiple attempts over two days to obtain a comment from Pakistani officials were unsuccessful.
10391  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Michael Yon in Afghanistan on: January 08, 2010, 07:35:08 AM

----
I turned in a trespasser on a property recently.  The sheriff deputy  had him frisked and handcuffed very quickly on very little information, ultimately releasing him without pressing charges.  I suppose the handcuffs help secure the situation and also served to intimidate a bit as the officers sorted out the facts.

Under Habeas Corpus I think they have 3 days to charge or release you. I assume this was more like minutes, though apparently uncalled for.  Yon was 'arrested' only in the sense of losing his liberties for that period, but not charged with anything or denied entry.

**What the deputy did was a "Terry Stop", which is an investigative detention, based on a reasonable suspicion that a crime has, or is being committed. It is a seizure of a person or persons for a reasonable amount of time until either you estabish probable cause for an arrest or cut the person(s) loose.**

The fedspeak guy probably had it partly right - Yon's travel location history just looked fishy to them and that's all they knew.
10392  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Michael Yon in Afghanistan on: January 07, 2010, 07:41:28 PM
He knows his fedspeak.
10393  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 07, 2010, 07:17:51 PM

NCTC director Michael Leiter remained on ski slopes after Christmas Day airline bombing attempt
BY James Gordon Meek
DAILY NEWS WASHINGTON BUREAU

Thursday, January 7th 2010, 4:00 AM
 
Somodevilla/GettyMichael Leiter, head of the NCTC, set up after 9/11 to battle terror attacks, could be in hot water after remaining on ski slopes following Christmas Day jetliner bombing try. - The top official in charge of analyzing terror threats did not cut short his ski vacation after the underwear bomber nearly blew up an airliner on Christmas Day, the Daily News has learned.

Michael Leiter, director of the National Counterterrorism Center since 2007, decided not to return to his agency's "bat cave" nerve center in McLean, Va., until several days after Christmas, two U.S. officials said.



Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2010/01/07/2010-01-07_antiterror_chief_took_ski_pass_remained_on_slopes_after_christmas_bomb_attempt.html#ixzz0bym35EPI
10394  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 07, 2010, 07:02:19 PM
And so I have to wonder if the nice palestinian was just 5150 as they say in SoCal, or a probe.
10395  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues on: January 07, 2010, 11:17:57 AM
 grin
10396  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: January 06, 2010, 11:24:53 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/print?id=9493323

Obama Orders Air Marshal Surge by Feb. 1: 'Race Against Time'

**All is well, all is well. Nothing to worry about, no actionable intel, just putting every federal gun and badge toter we have on every flight possible for no real reason.**
10397  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: January 06, 2010, 10:55:56 PM
The double agent homicide bomber appears to have gutted the CIA's Af-Pak operations. I smell the ISI, or at least a jihadist element within.

http://hotair.com/archives/2010/01/06/scarborough-scoop-how-the-talibans-double-agent-bomber-ambushed-the-cia/

Even more so, now.
10398  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues on: January 06, 2010, 10:53:26 PM
There is established caselaw for hiring persons unfit for law enforcement as well as retaining them in the job. Chicago will end up writing some big checks because of this.
10399  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues on: January 06, 2010, 01:39:07 PM
http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local-beat/chicago-police-scrap-entrance-exam-80790827.html

They should scrap the background requirements as well. After all, we did the last presidential election.
10400  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / More government oppression! on: January 06, 2010, 01:07:27 PM
**I take back everything I've said to those that see every attempt at law enforcement as evidence of the US rapidly devolving into a police state. The evidence for your arguements has become too compelling.**

NH artist protests halt to Bigfoot project
From Associated Press
January 06, 2010 12:42 AM EST

JAFFREY, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire artist and videographer who dressed as Bigfoot in a state park says his rights were trampled by big government.

Jonathan Doyle, of Keene, has complained in a letter to the state parks department that a Mount Monadnock park ranger halted his performance art project in the fall because he didn't have a permit.

Doyle is arguing through the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union Foundation that his free-speech rights were violated when he was expelled from the state park in Jaffrey. He says he and others with him, some also in costume, were on a lesser-used trail and weren't bothering other park visitors.

Doyle says the state hasn't responded to his letter. The Division of Parks and Recreation says it has been forwarded to the state attorney general's office.

___

Information from: The Keene Sentinel, http://www.keenesentinel.com


**First they came for those in the bigfoot suits, I said nothing as I did not wear a bigfoot suit.....**
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