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10551  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 17, 2010, 12:31:53 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/17/obama-administration-to-china-sorry-about-that-racist-az-law/

It gets even better.

BTW, After 9/11, China banned all muslims from flying for a period of time. Remember the outrage and boycotts? Me either.
10552  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 17, 2010, 09:40:27 AM
Well, I do confess that for me that taken in their totality they are holy verses; I think our FF were divinely inspired.

I think if they had stood up and freed their slaves against their own economic best interest, you'd have a stronger arguement for divine inspiration.
10553  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 17, 2010, 09:37:05 AM
"gravitating toward the tools and tactics employed by the armed forces as there's no reason to reinvent that wheel."

Law enforcement has been structured under a paramilitary model since Sir Robert Peel founded the London Metropolitan Police, which was the model for police forces in the US. Law enforcement has always adopted the tools and tactics employed by the armed forces, subject to the needs of policing and the appicable laws and policies governing their use.

Read up on Graham v. Connor. You'll find that no matter how a LEO is dressed, or exactly how they are armed, the legal standards in using force are identical. There is no "SWAT" exemption in the law or caselaw.
10554  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 17, 2010, 07:33:51 AM
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2010/05/026310.php

US State Dept. apologizes to China for Arizona. Seriously.
10555  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: May 16, 2010, 12:12:25 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/16/rahm-we-screwed-up-the-messaging-on-israel/

Chickens come home to roost.
10556  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Communicating with the Muslim World on: May 16, 2010, 08:44:42 AM
I have a newfound respect for Allen Ginsburg.
10557  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 10:23:44 AM
And unless/until the general public changes it's collective mind on the topic, the WOD will continue. Even if every drug became legal, there would still be drug enforcement, just as there is still enforcement of laws related to alcohol, tobacco and pharmaceuticals.
10558  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 09:36:46 AM
I can assure you that most everyone in law enforcement spends a huge amount of time and energy worrying about the civil and criminal liabilities that come with the job. The vast majority of people that get into this job do it to do the right thing. We do what we do because we want to get the job done and go home at the end of the shift in the same condition we reported for duty in. I have been injured in the line of duty more than once and as I type this I have fresh, open wounds obtained in a struggle that wasn't going to end with us being friends at the end of the day.

I don't want to shoot someone's pet, but I don't want to be someone's pet's chew toy even more. When I first pinned on a badge at 22, I wanted action. Now, I just want to make sure that me and everyone I'm responsible for goes home safe, with as little drama and paperwork as possible.

No one in their right mind says "I want to go out and fcukup so profoundly that I get IA'ed, named in hostile press reports, sued and potentially investigated and prosecuted at the state and local levels.
10559  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 15, 2010, 09:05:39 AM
There is nothing cavalier in my response, just a statement of fact. Just as innocents and friendlies die of "friendly fire" in combat. As an example, no one bust their hump to become a military aviator just so years down the line, they can accidentally drop a bomb on troops they are trying to support in a firefight with the enemy. I remember seeing footage from Desert Storm where If I recall correctly, a Apache crew chewed up what they thought was a column of Iraqi armor, just to find out they were Bradley fighting vehicles filled with our troops.  I recall the pilot of the helo saying "Oh god" as the vehicles burned. Can you imagine living with that? Do you think cops want to kick in doors in the wrong house and give an elderly woman a heart attack? Do you think there are no consequences for these officers, both formal and informal?
10560  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 14, 2010, 11:02:09 PM
Okay, so you've dismissed the whole of Balko's work because of some confidential informant/anonymous informant verbiage issue. Think his work is sourced and so stands on it's own despite any semantic dispute. Yes he takes a strong Libertarian stand every bit as ardent as your Authoritarian stand. Perhaps the truth lies somewhere in the middle, but I find value in the data he presents.

**The law is all about the specific use of words with specific definitions. When alarmists such as Balko misinform the public with the idea that a single phone call from an unidentifed person can cause a search warrant to get issued, it's untrue and damaging to both law enforcement and the public. He is the Al Gore of this topic with an agenda that won't let the facts get in the way of emotional propaganda.**
10561  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: May 14, 2010, 10:25:58 PM
Well said, Doug.
10562  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 13, 2010, 11:02:59 PM
I wish I had the money to air spanish language ads in AZ pointing out all the wonderful sanctuary cities in CA and subsidize bus tickets to those places. See how Ah-nold likes that.
10563  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 10:58:37 PM
I'll never say never, but it's very doubtful that any search warrants are being issued/served anywhere for personal use quantities of marijuana. I'd also note that I doubt very many, if any originalist scholars would interpret the 9th to mean that weed smoking was an inherent right.

The WOD will continue until you see a serious shift in numbers from what this polling says: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-20002941-503544.html
10564  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 13, 2010, 10:19:36 PM
I'm boycotting CA. and will deliberately spend money in AZ.
10565  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 10:16:32 PM
I don't dispute that point, I just disagree with citing quotes from the founders as if they are holy verses. I doubt they intended them to be taken as such.
10566  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 03:49:50 PM
So exactly what is your policy suggestion for search warrants?


I'll bet a keg of Guinness that next year and the year after that tactical teams are still shooting the occasional dog and even kicking in the wrong door every so often to serve search warrant.

I quoted Radly Balko from the article you posted and then showed how he deliberately placed confidential informant in with anonymous informant for propaganda purposes. Either that, of he knows less on the topic than anyone who read this thread and half-way paid attention. Either scenario does not lend credibility to his writing on the topic. Call that an ad hominem if you want.
10567  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 03:22:03 PM
No, I am placing ideas expressed by TJ in the proper context. He was a flesh and blood human with flaws and a lack of insight demonstrated by his ownership of slaves while advocating ideals of freedom. The constitution wasn't delivered on tablets from a burning bush, and no matter how much hemp might have been consumed by the founding fathers, I doubt very much they could envision issues related to search and seizure for the US in 2010.

This does not mean that I endorse that the constitution means what ever the agenda is for a left wing jurist's personal political viewpoints at any given moment. Rather than worshipping idols with feet of clay, understand that the big picture is the balance between the greater good and individual freedoms based on pragmatic realism, not ivory tower dreams of a golden past that never was.
10568  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 02:41:11 PM
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/jefferson/true/
10569  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 02:38:30 PM
It's not a liberal tactic to point out the flaws in individuals such as the slave owning founding fathers. So then if TJ wasn't screwing his slaves, then the slavery bit isn't that big of a deal?
10570  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 13, 2010, 01:21:12 PM
TJ's rant would carry a bit more weight if he hadn't written this in between trips to the slaves' quarters. Where does fcuking your slaves fall into the continuum of despotism?
10571  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 01:15:22 PM
"In many other cases, such raids transpire based on little more than a tip from an anonymous or confidential informant."

Ok, first of all, there is a big difference between an anonymous and a confidential informant. I'm sure Mr. Balko understands the difference, but he doesn't want the truth to get in the way of stirring the the uninformed into a hysterical froth.

I know that reading all the real case law and police procedure I post isn't nearly as satisfying as getting upset that the hemp that our first president grew is now geting sad-faced doggies shot, but if you want to make a reasoned arguement you're going to have to employ logic rather than waving bloody dog collars.

Ok good info on CIs: http://www.lawofficer.com/news-and-articles/articles/lom/0311/establishing_informant_reliability.html

Now on using anonymous informant for a search warrant: http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/Abstract.aspx?id=172539

Intended for police training, this report summarizes the facts and reasoning that led to an appellate court decision that a court was not justified in issuing a search warrant based solely on information provided by an anonymous informant to a law enforcement officer.

10572  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 12:08:53 PM
I think the concept of intercepting everyone's electronic correspondences is fundamentally un-American. I think the idea of police forces kicking in citizens doors more than 100 times a day in the name of the WOD is fundamentally un-American.

**These are your opinions, however you are in the minority.**

The Founders were quite clear in their feelings on these matters--see the Federalist Papers et al--and I so have little sympathy for arguments that go "that's the way it is and a judge signed the paper so deal with it."

**THe 4th amd. says No UNREASONABLE search and seizure, not No search and seizure. **

Something every bit as wrong as BHO's appropriation of the healthcare system has occurred, and if you are unable to see it no amount of keyboarding on my end is going to change that.

Do you have a source for your ad hominem attacks on Balko? His pieces appear well documented, his stats are sourced, the incidents he speaks to are easily found; is there some piece of information out there I'm missing that would taint him as a source? I've already mentioned the case of the local Mayor who had his two friendly, fleeing dogs shot by SWAT as part of an abject intelligence failure and raid; the viral nature of the video certainly ought to give you an idea what American citizens think of this use of force, and if these raids are indeed occurring at a rate of up to 150 per day isn't it appropriate for citizens to weigh the benefits and costs and then speak accordingly? Or is there nothing to see here and we should just move along and perhaps reinforce our doors?


I've never seen anything from Balko that wasn't hysterical misinformation. Oh my, the widdle puppies got shot! Sad eyes...... cry
10573  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Kagan on: May 13, 2010, 11:20:21 AM
When did Matthew Broderick gain so much weight? Just asking.....
10574  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 11:17:27 AM
It appears that a dealable amount wasn't found, however this does not mean that they were not there earlier. Dealer implies that the drugs are being sold. A search warrant was issued by a judge, who obviously found there was probable cause to believe there was evidence of a crime to be seized at the residence. Pardon the officers serving a search warrant for not wanting to be a pit bull's chew toy. Shooting an aggressive dog is quite reasonable and to be expected under those circumstances.

So, when G. Washington grew hemp, was it legal? Yes.

Has any court anywhere ruled that drug laws are unconstitutional? No.

Can you offer any evidence that the search warrant in Radly Balko's little propaganda piece was unlawful or unconstitutional? You may not like drug laws or tactical teams and search warrants, but the general public does, so I guess you'll just have to adjust to the concept.

10575  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 09:08:55 AM
http://www.fletc.gov/training/programs/legal-division/podcasts/4th-amendment-roadmap-podcasts/4th-amendment-transcripts/execution-of-a-search-warrant-i.html

http://www.fletc.gov/training/programs/legal-division/podcasts/4th-amendment-roadmap-podcasts/4th-amendment-transcripts/execution-of-a-search-warrant-ii-podcast-transcript.html
10576  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 09:02:22 AM
I don't mind the seizure of assets, but it should only happen after a conviction. It should never happen with charges not being filed.
10577  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 08:57:56 AM
http://www.fletc.gov/training/programs/legal-division/podcasts/4th-amendment-roadmap-podcasts/4th-amendment-transcripts/search-warrants-podcast-transcript.html

Search Warrants (podcast transcript)Miller:    Weíre back.  This is Tim Miller and Jennifer Solari.  Weíre making some progress donít you think, Jenna?

Solari:    I think so.

Miller:     Ah, weíve explained that a government intrusion into a place where one has a reasonable expectation of privacy triggers the 4th Amendment, and that once triggered, the search has to be reasonable and to be reasonable the courts are typically going to require probable cause supporting a warrant.  Now Jenna you did an excellent job explaining probable cause.

Solari:    Thanks.

Miller:    Now Iím going to ask whatís a search warrant?

Solari:    In a nut shell, itís judicial permission to search a particular place for specific evidence of a crime.

Miller:    Who can issue one?

Solari:    Federal judges or state court judges of record, as long as theyíre neutral and detached.  And, when I say neutral and detached, I mean theyíre just not partial to either side. 

Federal judges obviously can issue warrants and there are magistrate judges, district court judges, appellate court judges and of course we have justices of the Supreme Court.  I really donít envision too many agents knocking on the doors of the Supreme Court to get a warrant.  For the most part, theyíre going to be dealing with federal magistrate judges and as I stated state court judges of record can also issue warrants. 

Iím doubt a whole lot of federal agents use state court judges of record, but I would imagine that it probably comes into play when we have people, say working for Bureau of Land Management, where they may be a single agent by him or herself, way out in the wilderness, and they just donít have easy access to a federal court.  Whether a court is a  court of record, a state court of record, is determined by state law, but an essential feature of that is a permanent record - a record of proceedings be kept and be made in that state court.  Thatís what makes it a court of record.

Miller:      Sounds to me like most federal agents are going to be going before federal judges.  Do you agree?

Solari:    Thatís right and for the most part; itís going to be a magistrate court judge.

Miller:    Federal magistrate?

Solari:    Yes.

Miller:    Do the judges have any kind of jurisdictional limits?

Solari:    Yes; since federal search warrants can be issued by federal judges, or again from a judge in the state court of record.  Theyíre issued to search for and seize a person or property located within that judgeís district.  So, with a few limited exceptions, the person to be searched, or the place to be searched has to be found within that judgeís district.

Miller:    What district does Georgia fall into?

Solari:    First, federal districts donít cross state lines.  Each state consists of one or more districts.  Kansas is only a single district.  Georgia has three districts - the Southern, Middle and Northern Districts of Georgia.

Miller:    Suppose an agent wanted to search a house here in Brunswick, Georgia; where would the agent go for a search warrant?

Solari:    Well, since Brunswick is in the Southern District of Georgia, the agent would go to a federal magistrate within the Southern District.

Miller:    Makes sense.

Solari:    Mmmhmm

Miller:    What if the person or thing to be searched moved outside of the district before the search?

Solari:    Well as long as the place to be searched is within the judgeís district when the warrantís issued, the warrant can still be executed outside the district if that item or place happens to move.

Miller:    Are there any exceptions to these jurisdiction requirements?

Solari:    A couple.  Nation wide warrants are authorized in certain cases.  Say for instance terrorist activities occur within a certain district; the judge in that district can issue a warrant thatís good in any other district, as long as some of those terrorist activities took place in that judgeís district.  Also, in cases of stored electronic communications, nation wide search warrants are possible by a judge with jurisdiction over the offense thatís involved.

Miller:    Now we talked about this before when we were talking about probable cause; but, how does an agent get a search warrant?

Solari:    With a search warrant application; and, again that application consists of three primary pieces of information.  The agent has to set forth where he or she wants to search.  We have to particularly describe the place to be searched to a reasonable certainty. 

The agent has to set forth what he wants to search for.  Again, with particularity so we know what the agentís authorized to search for and seize. 

And, of course, probable cause.  This is the meat of the application describing the facts that support probable cause.  It shows that the things to be searched for are located in the place to be searched.

Miller:    Now letís, letís talk a little bit about each of these three parts.  How does the agent describe the place to be searched?

Solari:    Well, first letís talk about where the requirement comes from.  The 4th Amendment actually states that no warrant shall issue without a particular description describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized. So agents have to describe the place with reasonable certainty.  Iíd like to explain that.  Letís say, someoneís not involved in your operation at all.  Youíre running a case and youíve obtained a warrant from the court, but for some reason you and your team canít execute it that day.  You need someone else to come in and do it for you.  That person should be able to pick up your warrant and based on your description of that place, they should be able to get to that place and identify it to a reasonable certainty - so they know theyíre at the right place when they execute that warrant.

Miller:    So somebodyís given directions to a party before, he ought to accomplish this task.  Donít you think?

Solari:    I think so.

Miller:    What can agents search for?

Solari:    Well you can find that list in Federal Rules of Criminal Procedures 41C.  Thereís a laundry list of things like evidence of a crime, and that seems like it includes just about anything, but let me give you a for instance. 

Bloody clothes would be evidence of a crime if you suspect someone of an assault, rape, or murder.  We can also search for contraband and by that, I mean stuff thatís illegal to possess, like drugs, explosives, or child pornography; just unlawful to possess in of themselves.  We can search for fruits of a crime, so the fruits of a larceny maybe a stolen t.v. set or something else that was stole from a premises.  We can search for instruments of crime, things that were used in the offense, like the gun used in the bank robbery, or we can search for a person to be arrested or a person who is being illegally held. 

Miller:    I guess that agents also have to be pretty careful about how they describe those things, donít they?

Solari:    Yes.  Again, the 4th Amendment requires that the things to be seized be described with particularity, which makes sense.  The particularity requirement makes sure that a search is confined in its scope to the particular described evidence that relates to the crime for which the agent demonstrated probable cause.  So if the agentís looking for contraband, then he has to tell the magistrate what kind of contraband  You canít just say contraband or items illegally possessed.  You have to be specific and say for instance marijuana.  If the agent is looking for a stolen TV set, or the gun that was used in the robbery, he has to describe those items and if possible give the make, model or even a serial number if one is available.

Miller:    Now the third piece of this puzzle is that probable cause affidavit.  Now we discussed this a little bit earlier when we talked about probable cause.  Ah, can you reiterate a little bit?

Solari:    Sure.  The affidavit establishes, or should establish a nexus between those items youíre looking for - the evidence youíre seeking - and the place that you want to search. The standard proof again is probable cause - facts that would lead a person of reasonable caution to believe that that search is going to reveal specific evidence of the crime that you suspect. So, factors to consider in determining whether you satisfied that nexus requirement would be direct observations. 

Suppose an informant with a reliable track record tells you that he saw narcotics in the suspectís home.  So there we have a nexus between possession of illegal narcotics and the suspectís home.  The nature of the crime and the items sought. 

We talked before about the sale of counterfeit currency.  Itís only natural to think that if a person has something of high value, they are probably going to secure it in their home.  Sometimes agents have to rely on inferences rather than a direct observation.  Umm and we have to be mindful also so that the information canít be stale, and this probably comes into play most often with drug offenses. 

If your informant came to you and said he saw narcotic in the suspects home, the very next question you probably need to ask is ďwhen?.Ē  If this was six months ago, narcotics  might not be there any longer.  The information is stale.  The age of the information is going to be a critical factor in determining probable cause, depending on the item that youíre looking for.

Miller:    Okay, thanks.  I tell ya, letís take a break and when we come back, weíll talk about how these warrants must be executed.  You know like who can execute them, the method of entry, locations that can be searched, durations of search, and the need to inventory whatís taken.

Solari:    All right.
10578  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Legal Issues created by the War with Islamic Fascism on: May 13, 2010, 08:46:44 AM
You still have to establish a nexus between the fund raising and the terrorist act. The Animal Liberation Front may bomb a research lab, but this doesn't mean you can then arrest everyone who doesn't like testing on animals. You could however pursue both the bombers and those that provided the funds for the bombing, if the funds were given knowing they would allow for a terrorist act to be committed.
10579  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 13, 2010, 08:40:13 AM
http://www.shouselaw.com/search-warrants.html

Although the above is Cali. specific, most all of applies to other states as well.
10580  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 12, 2010, 11:06:21 PM
Drug dealers present potentially serious threats. Using a tactical team is entirely reasonable to serve a search warrant. As usual, Radly Balko fills his writing with misinformation, if not outright lies.
10581  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: May 12, 2010, 08:40:15 PM
May 12, 2010
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2010/05/12/depression_2010_105530.html

Depression 2010?
By Robert Samuelson

WASHINGTON -- It is now conventional wisdom that the world has avoided a second Great Depression. Governments and the economists who advise them learned the lessons of the 1930s. When the gravity of the financial crisis became apparent in late 2008, the response was swift and aggressive. Central banks like the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank dropped interest rates and lent liberally to threatened financial institutions and rattled investors. The United States and many countries approved "stimulus" programs of tax cuts and additional spending. Panic was halted. A downward spiral of falling private spending and rising unemployment was reversed. The resulting economic slump was awful. But it was not another Great Depression. The worst has passed.

Or has it? Greece's plight challenges this optimistic interpretation. It implies that celebration is premature and that the economic crisis has moved into a new phase: one dominated by the huge debt burdens of governments in advanced societies. Comparisons with the Great Depression remain relevant -- and unsettling. Now, as then, we may be prisoners of deep and poorly understood changes to the world economic system.
10582  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: WSJ: Shazad and the pre-911 paradigm on: May 12, 2010, 08:33:21 PM
Question presented:  What of Glenn Beck's hypothetical last night in the context of the Kagan nomination and her statement in support of treating someone accused of raising money for AQ as an enemy combatant:  What if another Timothy McVeigh strikes?  Can the State use what Mukasey describes below to go after those of us who actively support the 912 movement/the Tea Party?



Unless you knowingly raise money for the Timothy McVeigh or a terrorist group that espouses your ideals, there isn't anything illegal in lawful political speech.
10583  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 10, 2010, 12:19:21 AM
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columns/Manhattan-Moment/Arizona-law-is-hated-because-it-could-be-effective-92851479.html

Read it all.
10584  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: May 06, 2010, 10:41:51 AM
Armed citizens can't do much regarding IEDs, can they?
10585  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: May 06, 2010, 08:57:49 AM
You can deprive a person of their rights, but only through due process.

This differs from engaging an enemy on a battlefield. When the Marines waded onto Iwo Jima, they were not serving a search warrant on the Japanese bases on the island and placing the Japanese troops under arrest.

Placing a person on a watchlist is a law enforcement tool for internal use. Placing a person on a watchlist does not remove their core constitutional rights. Until you establish probable cause for an arrest, and it's upheld by judicial review, you cannot deprive them of freedoms.
10586  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: May 06, 2010, 08:48:24 AM
So, my question is to the libertarians is, should law enforcement have intelligence units and U/C officers?

What is the libertarian model for counterterrorism?
10587  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 04, 2010, 04:49:26 PM
There are still administrative costs related to storage, audits. I know banks already have to hire staff just to meet current financial reporting statutes. In the big picture, the feds or other LE can already pick apart your financial transactions without much effort anyway.

www.fincen.gov
10588  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: May 04, 2010, 04:34:56 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/04/wh-reveals-exact-number-of-us-nuclear-warheads/comment-page-1/#comments

Hey, I've got a good idea! Let's elect someone to the presidency that wouldn't survive vetting for even a low level security clearance. What's the worst that could happen?
10589  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 04, 2010, 03:59:33 PM
The PA. ad is silly.

The 2nd is a real issue, especially with the costs involved in archiving the data, which we all get to foot the bill for.
10590  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: May 04, 2010, 05:56:17 AM
The headline to the story should read "Obama gives classified information to enemies".
10591  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: May 04, 2010, 12:36:07 AM
http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/times-square-bomb-pakistan-migr-connecticut-arrested-times/story?id=10546387

Pakistan …migrť in Connecticut Arrested as Times Square Bomber
FBI Says Faisal Shahzad Bought Vehicle That Carried Bomb on April 24, After Trip to Pakistan
 
3 comments By RICHARD ESPOSITO, BRIAN ROSS and PIERRE THOMAS
May 4, 2010
FBI has arrested a 30-year old Bridgeport, Connecticut man in connection with the failed attempt to set off a car bomb in New York's Times Square, federal authorities told ABCNews.com late Monday night.

**Angry Buddhist? Fundamentalist Christian? Tea Party member?**
10592  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 03:53:18 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/times-square-car-bomber-police-release-video-suspect/story?id=10534834

Persons of interest.
10593  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 03:45:23 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/7674080/Two-men-hunted-over-Times-Square-car-bomb.html

Two men hunted over Times Square car bomb
Police investigating a failed attempt to detonate a car bomb in Times Square are hunting two men filmed acting suspiciously at the scene.
 
By Tom Leonard in New York
Published: 7:04PM BST 03 May 2010

Link to this video They released security camera footage shot just after the car was abandoned with its engine running and hazard lights flashing.

It showed a white man in his 40s stopping in the street near the car, looking around and taking off his dark shirt, revealing a red one underneath.

 Stuffing the shirt into a bag, the man glanced back towards the now smoking car and he walked off in the opposite direction.

Raymond Kelly, the chief of New York's police, said the man was acting in a "furtive" manner.

Investigators were also expected to release another videotape, shot by a tourist, which was expected to show a man running north on Broadway away from the area.
10594  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 03:38:35 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/03/AR2010050300847_pf.html

Officials increasingly see international link in Times Square bomb attempt

By Spencer S. Hsu, Anne E. Kornblut And Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 3, 2010; 3:52 PM



The failed car bombing in Times Square increasingly appears to have been coordinated by more than one person in a plot with international links, Obama administration officials said Tuesday.

The disclosure, while tentative, came as the White House intensified its focus on the Saturday incident in New York City, in which explosives inside a Nissan Pathfinder were set ablaze but failed to detonate at the tourist-crowded corner of Broadway and 45th Street.
10595  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 11:18:30 AM
Either/or.

http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/msnbc/Sections/NEWS/NYPD-London.pdf

Note the last page.
10596  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 03, 2010, 10:25:44 AM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/03/torches-smashed-windows-must-have-been-a-tea-party/

Climate of violence, right?
10597  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 10:20:35 AM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/nyc-times-square-car-bomber-surveillance-video-10536898

Thoughts?
10598  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 03, 2010, 09:56:45 AM
PC,

Just made those calls.
10599  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 03, 2010, 09:18:45 AM
From the AP:

Investigators were also looking to speak with a man in his 40s videotaped shedding his shirt near the sport utility vehicle where the bomb was found.

The surveillance video, made public late Sunday, shows an unidentified white man apparently in his 40s slipping down Shubert Alley and taking off his shirt, revealing another underneath. In the same clip, he's seen looking back in the direction of the smoking vehicle and furtively putting the first shirt in a bag.

The NYPD and FBI also were examining "hundreds of hours" of security videotape from around Times Square.

Police said the crude gasoline-and-propane bomb could have produced "a significant fireball" and sprayed shrapnel and metal parts with enough force to kill pedestrians and knock out windows. The SUV was parked on one of America's busiest streets, lined with Broadway theaters and restaurants and full of people out on a Saturday night.

___
10600  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Energy Politics & Science on: May 03, 2010, 09:05:44 AM
http://www.financialpost.com/most-popular/story.html?id=2971866

Not the worst, by far.
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