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10651  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Criminal Justice system on: May 27, 2010, 02:35:30 PM
http://www.floridabar.org/DIVCOM/JN/JNNews01.nsf/8c9f13012b96736985256aa900624829/e8d46469fcaf33768525749c004963c0?OpenDocument

• Recent budget cuts — which averaged about 10 percent from the 2007-08 budget to the 2008-09 budget — combined with the intent of the state to withhold an additional 4 percent from the current budget, means many agencies won’t have enough money to meet all of their core functions. “We lost all fat six to 10 years ago,” said Mark Zadra, assistant commissioner for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, expressing a common sentiment around the meeting table. “Then they cut connective tissue. Now they’re lopping off arms and legs.” Judges and representatives from state attorneys and public defenders said they won’t have enough money to try all the cases on their dockets, raising a public safety issue.

• The budget problems are complex and interrelated. For example, just giving one entity more money might not necessarily help. Having more judges and court staff won’t help with rising criminal caseloads if there aren’t more assistant state attorneys and assistant public defenders to staff the courtrooms, participants said. Some effects are even more interrelated. Participants noted a push by counties to have criminal defendants sentenced to a year and a day for relatively minor offenses, instead of a year. The extra day means they are sent to state prison instead of the county jail, which relieves local jail overcrowding. But it is also helping fuel an explosion in the state prison population, which is expected to grow from 98,000 inmates to around 128,000 in the next seven years. As the state scrambles to build more prisons, it has less money for public defenders and state attorneys and for the courts. That in turn slows down the handling of criminal cases, which leads to a higher population in county jails as defendants await their day in court.

• Some budget cuts can cost more money than they save. Coxe noted that reducing the number of prosecutors and public defenders can lead to an expensive increase in county jail populations. Others said the courts may struggle to hear all traffic court cases, which could lose revenues for both the state and courts, and that prisons are losing money for education and rehabilitation programs, which could lead to high recidivism rates.
10652  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 27, 2010, 02:28:37 PM
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0409/21053.html

More on the topic.
10653  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 27, 2010, 02:14:52 PM
Why?
10654  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: on: May 27, 2010, 01:56:28 PM
TJ railing against hereditary bondage....

Wow.
10655  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 27, 2010, 01:51:49 PM
Meaningless, token B.S. The intention is to create a headline and only that, nothing more.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D9FV86NG4&show_article=1
10656  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 27, 2010, 01:00:47 PM
At least we have a president with extensive experience and a solid financial background to get us through these perilous times.











Do I really have to point out that was sarcasm?
10657  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Criminal Justice system on: May 27, 2010, 12:56:53 PM
Normal is overwhelmed, there is no "surge capacity" in the system and now things are starting to fall apart. Things that would have been investigated and prosecuted not long ago aren't now.
10658  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 27, 2010, 08:55:00 AM
http://www.foxbusiness.com/story/markets/economy/economic-war-poses-threat-recession/

A Dry Run for Economic Warfare

Still, the Pentagon is apparently concerned enough to hold its first ever war game focused on economic warfare, according to a person familiar with the event.

“There was good news and bad news. The good news was the game worked successfully. The bad news is China won,” the person told FOX Business.
10659  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Criminal Justice system on: May 26, 2010, 09:53:04 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2010-03-31-court-cuts_N.htm

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89140782
10660  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Criminal Justice system on: May 26, 2010, 09:47:16 PM
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/03/22/20090322courtbudget0322.html

Budget cuts pinch court functions
From file access to speed of trials, impacts are big
by Michael Kiefer - Mar. 22, 2009 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic

 .
Like most government agencies, state and county courts are facing massive budget cuts.

The impact will be great, affecting everything from how the public accesses information to the speed of civil trials.

Earlier this year, the Arizona Legislature cut $11 million from the state court and probation budgets for the remainder of this fiscal year, which ends June 30. Cuts to the 2010 budget may be more severe.
10661  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Criminal Justice system on: May 26, 2010, 09:42:54 PM
I can say that I'm seeing cracks developing in the system due to budget cuts. It's not just the law enforcement agencies that are underfunded/understaffed, it's DA's offices and the courts. Police can make lots of arrests, but without the DA to prosecute and courts to hold the trials, then the wheels really start coming off.
10662  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 26, 2010, 09:09:59 PM
Could China have built a military capable of defeating ours for that amount of money? Think of this as economic warfare.
10663  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Middle East War on: May 26, 2010, 08:40:52 AM
That certainly is plausible, but do you think Petraeus would participate in that?

**He is a soldier. He can follow the lawful orders from the CIC, or he can put in his retirement papers and then speak publicly when clad in civvies.**
===============================
 
Does the following shed any light?

**Obarry is trying for a "Peace with honor" surrender of both wars and playing his very weak hand in an attempt for it to not look like that, fooling no one.**


10664  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 26, 2010, 08:32:02 AM
Meaningless, token B.S. The intention is to create a headline and only that, nothing more.
10665  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Middle East War on: May 25, 2010, 09:56:39 PM
A white house desperate for some appearance of strength and competence leaks programs that are probably emasculated with policy and procedure designed by Holder's DOJ, so their disclosure is no real loss.
10666  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: california on: May 25, 2010, 07:16:05 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/25/ca-cap-and-trade-will-cost-jobs-economic-growth/

Funny you should mention that....
10667  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: california on: May 25, 2010, 10:05:36 AM
http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USN2427330520100524

You know what would help California right now? More taxes!
10668  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security and American Freedom on: May 24, 2010, 02:10:45 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/24/the-case-of-the-missing-wallet/


Hmmmmmm.....
10669  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 24, 2010, 12:39:32 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/23/AR2010052304170.html?hpid=topnews

This doesn't bode well....
10670  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 24, 2010, 09:51:06 AM
I can tell you that due to the financial crisis, I can already see serious cracks forming in the criminal justice system.
10671  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: May 24, 2010, 09:30:37 AM
http://www.saf.org/LawReviews/Stearns1.htm

St. Louis University Public Law Review
Gun Control Symposium
vol 18, no. 1, 1999: 13.
Posted for Educational use only. The printed edition remains canonical. For citational use please visit the local law library or obtain a back issue.



THE HERITAGE OF OUR RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS

REPRESENTATIVE CLIFF STEARNS *

There is an old adage that says you need to look where you have been to learn where you are going. I believe that it is helpful, and sometimes necessary, to review the issues of the day through a political and historical perspective ¾ looking where we have been. Such a linear approach adds context to a discussion, providing an understanding as to why a sound policy in the past may or may not remain so today. This is especially applicable to the topic of this paper.

10672  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: May 24, 2010, 08:52:29 AM
Even better is to not be carried by six or tried by twelve.
10673  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Way Forward for the American Creed on: May 24, 2010, 07:33:12 AM
"The problem is that paleoconservatives are self-marginalizing, and self-destructive."

Exactly!!!
10674  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Right to self-defense in other legal systems on: May 24, 2010, 07:10:04 AM
http://www.davekopel.com/2a/LawRev/The-Human-Right-of-Self-Defense.pdf

Well grounded in many legal systems, not just ours.
10675  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: May 24, 2010, 06:38:02 AM
Agreed.
10676  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: May 24, 2010, 12:07:19 AM
http://www.guncite.com/journals/caprec.html

A nice paper on the English Common Law origins of self defense.
10677  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: May 23, 2010, 11:28:01 PM
The Magna Carta and English Common Law recognized an inherent right to self defense. This is quite different than the "I don't need no gubbamint" posture of some loonatarians.
10678  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: May 23, 2010, 08:55:45 PM
A constant theme emerging here is the need for Libertarians to abandon their Utopian fantasies if they wish to actually make any impact on the body politic. You might be armed, but the force of law has the upper hand in using force and that is the ultimate form of persuasion.
10679  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 23, 2010, 06:29:06 PM
But if you go carrying pictures of Congressman Paul
Your voting bloc will be really small....
10680  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 23, 2010, 09:16:18 AM

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-07/15/content_11710420.htm

It appears that China has more than 2 Trillion dollars in it's foreign currency holdings. Is there even half a trillion of gold in existance on the planet at current prices? Explain to me how this works out in practical terms.
10681  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 23, 2010, 08:39:59 AM
So if China demands it's 3.88 Trillion in gold NOW, what do we do?
10682  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: May 22, 2010, 04:41:34 PM
http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/05/20/not-just-their-big-fat-greek-funeral/

Own it, Obama voters.
10683  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism: on: May 22, 2010, 03:45:53 PM
You are free to have any opinion you want, so long as it's leftist.

By the way, don't all the arguments that are used to justify anti-smoking laws work just as well to justify banning gay male sexual behavior?
10684  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 22, 2010, 03:41:25 PM
To answer the worries of converting back to gold standard:
It seems to me if you linked the dollar to an ounce of gold it would be 1 dollar to 0.000909091ounce of gold. (1ounce/1100 dollars =0.000909091 oz to $)  I guess the question would be how much gold and how many dollars are there?  Maybe the solution would be to start another currency, 1 buck = 1 oz gold, then let it compete with the us dollar.  The dollar would be phased out via market forces while the new currency takes over.  With our electronic currency technology fractions of a "buck" would be easier to deal with and make the transactions  more feasible. 


We have a ballpark figure of 288 billion dollars worth of gold and the amount of money owed to China and others is about 3.88 TRILLION. Do we just toss China the keys to Ft. Knox and the west coast? Do we tell everyone who bought a t-bill "whoops"? What of every American who holds dollars, most of which only exist in cyberspace?
10685  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 22, 2010, 09:40:05 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6qEQ-KnitQ&feature=player_embedded

10686  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, & the US Dollar on: May 22, 2010, 08:53:04 AM
The US Treasury Department reported Monday that China's holdings of US Treasury securities rose 2 percent to $895.2 billion in March , the first increase since last September.

Total foreign holdings of Treasury securities rose 3.5 percent to $3.88 trillion.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/06/AR2009110604799.html?hpid=topnews

Aren't we sitting on a gold mine?
The price isn't right, but it doesn't matter -- all that glitters won't be sold
 

By Martha C. White
The Big Money
Sunday, November 8, 2009

Buried in the Treasury's International Reserve Position report is an intriguing bit of math. The document details the total amount, by weight, of the Treasury's gold reserves, plus a dollar value for said metal. But some fast division reveals something interesting: The Treasury marks the value of its gold at $42 an ounce, the price settled on in 1973, two years after the United States scrapped the Bretton Woods System, which had held gold at $35 an ounce for decades.

Wait -- what? Spot gold is heading toward $1,100 per ounce, and the Treasury is embracing a Cold War relic of a price? If the Treasury's bling were valued at the spot price, we'd be sitting on a literal gold mine of nearly $288 billion.
10687  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 05:08:36 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/21/gaffetastic-rand-paul-cancels-sunday-meet-the-press-appearance/

FAIL.
10688  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Humor/WTF on: May 21, 2010, 11:20:34 AM
I'm glad you were able to work ham in there.
10689  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 10:58:04 AM
Doug,

I hope the Pauls are better at medicine than they are at politics. Much like the French love for Jerry Lewis, I cannot begin to understand how the Pauls attract such a cultish following.
10690  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 21, 2010, 08:59:22 AM
Let me be sure I understand the Libertarian stance on these issues:

1. The civil war was about states right's and Lincoln was a horrible dictator and it wasn't about slavery at all, and slavery would have gone away on it's own.

2. Racially segregated businesses are ok, federal legislation forbidding such is again a violation of personal liberties/property rights.


Is this correct?
10691  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 20, 2010, 07:38:21 PM
Just keeping up the Paul family tradition of making the general public think Libertarians are fringe loons.
10692  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Happy Draw Mohammed Day! on: May 20, 2010, 06:42:06 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZw7ps886aI&feature=player_embedded
10693  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 20, 2010, 06:14:09 AM
I tend to agree with the second article, however we can't have political correctness/identity politics undercut "one people out of many". Seemingly, when wearing/displaying the American flag on "Cinco de Imaginary" is seen as offensive, then we are heading to a place where this country falls apart.
10694  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: China on: May 19, 2010, 08:26:17 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/19/world/main6498069.shtml

If this demonstrates a shift from isolated loners attacking children to groups of "have nots" against the "haves", then this could be a "Archduke Ferdinand" moment that really will shake the world.
10695  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud (ACORN et al), corruption etc. on: May 19, 2010, 07:22:43 PM
Good to see progress here.
10696  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 19, 2010, 05:34:12 PM
http://www.cis.org/articles/2004/back604.html

State and Local Authority to
Enforce Immigration Law
A Unified Approach for Stopping Terrorists

June 2004

By Mr. Kris W. Kobach

Download the .pdf version


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Enforcing our nation�s immigration laws is one of the most daunting challenges faced by the federal government. With an estimated 8-10 million illegal aliens already present in the United States and fewer than 2,000 interior enforcement agents at its disposal, the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE) has a Herculean task on its hands � one that it simply cannot accomplish alone.

The assistance of state and local law enforcement agencies can mean the difference between success and failure in enforcing immigration laws. The more than 650,000 police officers nationwide represent a massive force multiplier.

This Backgrounder briefly summarizes the legal authority upon which state and local police may act in rendering such assistance and describes the scenarios in which this assistance is most crucial. It does not cover the provisions of Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (that is, Section 133 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRAIRA) of 1996 titled "Acceptance of State Services to Carry Out Immigration Enforcement"), since the scope of such delegated authority is evident on the face of the Act. Rather, this Backgrounder describes the inherent arrest authority that has been possessed and exercised by state and local police since the earliest days of federal immigration law.

It has long been widely recognized that state and local police possess the inherent authority to arrest aliens who have violated criminal provisions of the INA. Once the arrest is made, the police officer must contact federal immigration authorities and transfer the alien into their custody within a reasonable period of time. Bear in mind that the power to arrest � and take temporary custody of � an immigration law violator is a subset of the broader power to "enforce." This is an important distinction between inherent arrest authority and 287(g) authority to enforce � which includes arresting, investigating, preparing a case, and all of the other powers exercised by BICE agents.

Where some confusion has existed in recent years is on the question of whether the same authority extends to arresting aliens who have violated civil provisions of the INA that render an alien deportable. This confusion was, to some extent, fostered by an erroneous 1996 opinion of the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) of the Department of Justice, the relevant part of which has since been withdrawn by OLC. However, the law on this question is quite clear: arresting aliens who have violated either criminal provisions of the INA or civil provisions that render an alien deportable "is within the inherent authority of the states."1  And such inherent arrest authority has never been preempted by Congress.

This conclusion has been confirmed by every court to squarely address the issue. Indeed, it is difficult to make a persuasive case to the contrary. That said, I will proceed to offer my personal opinion as to why this conclusion is correct. I offer this legal analysis purely in my private capacity as a law professor and not on behalf of the Bush Administration.


State Arrest Authority
The preliminary question is whether the states have inherent power (subject to federal preemption) to make arrests for violation of federal law. That is, may state police, exercising state law authority only, make arrests for violations of federal law, or do they have power to make such arrests only insofar as they are exercising delegated federal executive power? The answer to this question is plainly the former.

The source of this authority flows from the states� status as sovereign entities. They are sovereign governments possessing all residual powers not abridged or superceded by the U.S. Constitution. The source of the state governments� power is entirely independent of the U.S. Constitution. See Sturges v. Crowninshield, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 122, 193 (1819). Moreover, the enumerated powers doctrine that constrains the powers of the federal government does not so constrain the powers of the states. Rather, the states possess what are known as "police powers," which need not be specifically enumerated. Police powers are "an exercise of the sovereign right of the government to protect the lives, health, morals, comfort, and general welfare of the people�" Manigault v. Springs, 199 U.S. 473, 480 (1905). Essentially, states may take any action (consistent with their own constitutions and laws) unless there exists a prohibition in the U.S. Constitution or such action has been preempted by federal law.2

It is well established that the authority of state police to make arrests for violation of federal law is not limited to those situations in which they are exercising delegated federal power. Rather, such arrest authority inheres in the States� status as sovereign entities. It stems from the basic power of one sovereign to assist another sovereign. This is the same inherent authority that is exercised whenever a state law enforcement officer witnesses a federal crime being committed and makes an arrest. That officer is not acting pursuant to delegated federal power. Rather, he is exercising the inherent power of his state to assist another sovereign.


Abundant Case Law. There is abundant case law on this point. Even though Congress has never authorized state police officers to make arrest for federal offenses without an arrest warrant, such arrests occur routinely; and the Supreme Court has recognized that state law controls the validity of such an arrest. As the Court concluded in United States v. Di Re, "No act of Congress lays down a general federal rule for arrest without warrant for federal offenses. None purports to supersede state law. And none applies to this arrest which, while for a federal offense, was made by a state officer accompanied by federal officers who had no power of arrest. Therefore the New York statute provides the standard by which this arrest must stand or fall." 332 U.S. 581, 591 (1948). The Court�s conclusion presupposes that state officers possess the inherent authority to make warrantless arrests for federal offenses. The same assumption guided the Court in Miller v. United States. 357 U.S. 301, 305 (1958). As the Seventh Circuit has explained, "[state] officers have implicit authority to make federal arrests." U.S. v. Janik, 723 F.2d 537, 548 (7th Cir. 1983). Accordingly, they may initiate an arrest on the basis of probable cause to think that an individual has committed a federal crime. Id.

The Ninth and Tenth Circuits have expressed this understanding in the immigration context specifically. In Gonzales v. City of Peoria, the Ninth Circuit opined in an immigration case that the "general rule is that local police are not precluded from enforcing federal statutes," 722 F.2d 468, 474 (9th Cir. 1983). The Tenth Circuit has reviewed this question on several occasions, concluding squarely that a "state trooper has general investigatory authority to inquire into possible immigration violations," United States v. Salinas-Calderon, 728 F.2d 1298, 1301 n.3 (10th Cir. 1984). As the Tenth Circuit has described it, there is a "preexisting general authority of state or local police officers to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws," United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez, 176 F.3d 1294, 1295 (10th Cir. 1999). And again in 2001, the Tenth Circuit reiterated that "state and local police officers [have] implicit authority within their respective jurisdictions �to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws.�" United States v. Santana-Garcia, 264 F.3d 1188, 1194 (citing United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez, 176 F.3d 1294, 1295). None of these Tenth Circuit holdings drew any distinction between criminal violations of the INA and civil provisions that render an alien deportable. Rather, the inherent arrest authority extends generally to both categories of federal immigration law violations.
10697  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 03:08:40 PM
Often in the booking process, the info entered is supplied by the subject being booked. When I was a state C.O. many years ago, we had several juveniles who were illegals from Guatamala housed in our facility for several days until it was figured out that they were adults. Whoops! Luckily, they didn't assault/sexually assault any other inmates in that time period before they were move to an adult facility.
10698  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:36:28 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2010/05/18/az-utility-board-member-responds-to-la-boycott-over-sb1070/

I'd rather he just flip the switch off, but still, this is good.
10699  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:27:12 PM
**The Hong Kong Police must be racist or something.....**   rolleyes

Hong Kong's highest court in a1999 decision allowed 8,000 mainland-born Chinese whose parents had permanent resident status to move to Hong Kong. This "right of abode" was overturned by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress in Beijing at the request of the Hong Kong government, threatening the judicial independence of Hong Kong's highest court. In January 2002, Hong Kong's highest court affirmed the Chinese government's reversal of its earlier ruling, and the Hong Kong government moved to deport the children of some Hong Kong residents.

Chinese-born children with at least one parent who is a permanent Hong Kong resident are permitted to live in the territory, but only if they were born after the parent received legal resident status.

The court gave the 7,300 "unlawful migrants" from the mainland who were in Hong Kong at the time of the ruling until March 31, 2002 to leave. Only 3,000 left; some 4,300 "abode seekers" defied the order to leave and became unauthorized residents. The abode-seekers made a last-ditch legal effort to stay, but their effort to obtain legal aid, the government ruled, does not entitle them to stay while they appeal.

Hong Kong police began searching for the mainlanders who were to leave Hong Kong in a manner that critics called "wufa wutian" (without law, without heaven)". On April 7, 2002, the first migrant was forcibly sent back to the mainland, and police continued to intercept and return the remaining 4,300 in April and May. Some of the migrants camped out at a park in central Hong Kong, hoping that their large numbers and the presence of reporters and photographers would keep the police away. Hong Kong's security secretary, Regina Ip, said "Our position is very clear. [The mainlanders] shouldn't be sneaking around in Hong Kong and wasting time but should return quickly to rebuild their lives."

In one story widely reported in Hong Kong, a Chinese father was allowed to bring only one of his twin daughters to Hong Kong in 1979. The then 12-year old girls played "paper, scissors, stone" to determine who would go to Hong Kong. The daughter in China was granted a tourist visa in 1999, and has lived illegally in Hong Kong since. The now 19-year old twin was told to report to immigration authorities for deportation in April, but at the last minute, she was allowed to stay because of her exceptional circumstances.

Most Hong Kong residents are not sympathetic to the migrants being removed. Many believe that the latest arrivals have fewer skills and impose more of a burden on society than previous migrants. The Hong Kong government has warned that, if it is not tough on mainland migrnats, densely settled Hong Kong will receive several million more migrants. The director of Hong Kong's external investment bureau blamed Chinese migrants for Hong Kong's seven percent unemployment rate.

Hong Kong allows 150 mainland Chinese a day, or 54,750 a year, to immigrate, and allows mainland Chinese to visit Hong Kong relatives for two three-month periods a year. Many of them are poor: 18 percent of new mainland migrants in Hong Kong are on welfare- the 60,127 account for one percent of Hong Kong residents, and 15 percent of Hong Kong welfare recipients. Of the 173,212 immigrants aged 15 and older who settled over the past seven years, 70 percent did not advance beyond Form Three secondary school education. Some 43 percent of new immigrants earned less than $HK6,000 a month, compared to 19 percent of all Hong Kong residents.
10700  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 18, 2010, 02:18:27 PM
Dating back to 2003, Hernandez has been arrested for mostly misdemeanor offenses 16 times by police officers in Denver, Longmont, Aurora, Westminster, Lakewood and Broomfield and sheriff's deputies in Boulder, Gilpin and Arapahoe counties, according to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records. His charges have included forgery, assault, theft, fraud and driving under restraint.
Sopranuk said Friday that Hernandez was born in California and is a U.S. citizen.

**He claimed to be a US citizen. He, in fact was an illegal alien from Guatamala. I can tell you from first hand experience that lots of illegals have numerous aliases in the system and bogusly claim to be citizens and ICE doesn't have the manpower to vett every arrestee. This is why local/state law enforcement needs to do it as well.**
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