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9801  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / WMD-WTF? on: February 13, 2011, 09:38:16 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1356645/A-weapon-mass-destruction-U-S--Shock-confession-Customs-officer.html

Coverup or no big deal?
9802  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: February 13, 2011, 08:41:21 PM
If he was NOC, then I could see the US walking away. Walking away when Davis has diplomatic immunity would be unthinkable, well before Obama was president it would be.....
9803  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Legal issues on: February 13, 2011, 12:25:41 PM

One would allow a roving wiretap on a terror suspect to monitor his conversations as he moves from phone to phone. That can be a useful tool, but the authorization is so broad that the government does not even have to specify the suspect’s name to get a warrant. The failure to provide a more narrow identification of the suspect is too lax and could lead to abuse.

**Anything can potentially lead to abuses. Ignorance of criminal investigations exemplified by this editorial is typical of attack on the PATRIOT act. Anyone know what a "John Doe" warrant is?
9804  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Tea Party, Glen Beck and related matters on: February 13, 2011, 10:28:34 AM
The silver lining in all this is seeing that a revolt against against the mullahs appears to be developing. Aside from that, I don't think things are going to go well.
9805  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Tea Party, Glen Beck and related matters on: February 13, 2011, 10:08:30 AM
I'm pretty much there with him.
9806  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 13, 2011, 10:07:46 AM
We shall see.
9807  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Presidential on: February 12, 2011, 08:46:34 PM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnwJDCK1rk8&feature=player_embedded#at=73

What real leadership looks like.
9808  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Hmmmmmm...... on: February 12, 2011, 04:37:16 PM
http://www.gallup.com/poll/125639/Gallup-Daily-Workforce.aspx

**Whom to believe?
9809  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: How do you say "reset button" in Arabic? on: February 12, 2011, 11:30:57 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/11/AR2011021103048.html?hpid=topnews

But a senior Republican member of Congress who has access to intelligence reports said U.S. spy agencies have seen recent indications that other Middle East leaders were dismayed by the United States' treatment of Mubarak.


"The other countries are mad as hell, and they're mad as hell at us," said the lawmaker, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the matter candidly.

http://www.dnaindia.com/world/report_saudi-arabia-fears-egypt-unrest-could-bolster-iran-s-role-in-region-analysts_1504576

Saudi Arabia is more concerned about losing allies to counter its regional adversary Iran than with the risk that upheavals sweeping Tunisia and Egypt might spread to the kingdom, diplomats and analysts say.

Flush with petrodollars, the world's top oil exporter can splash out to alleviate any social tensions due to unemployment — around 10 percent of the Saudi work force is jobless — and quell any unrest in the absolute monarchy, they say.

But some believe the Saudi rulers would be alarmed if the United States jettisons Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who, like successive Saudi monarchs, has been a longtime US ally since taking power three decades ago.

"The Saudis... are worried that the US has made a foreign policy mistake by appearing to give up support for Mubarak too easily," said Simon Henderson, a Washington-based Saudi watcher.
9810  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / How do you say "reset button" in Arabic? on: February 12, 2011, 11:26:37 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/11/AR2011021103048.html?hpid=topnews

But a senior Republican member of Congress who has access to intelligence reports said U.S. spy agencies have seen recent indications that other Middle East leaders were dismayed by the United States' treatment of Mubarak.


"The other countries are mad as hell, and they're mad as hell at us," said the lawmaker, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the matter candidly.
9811  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: February 12, 2011, 11:24:40 AM
Are you a "progressive" like Obama, JDN?
9812  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Intel Matters on: February 12, 2011, 11:23:50 AM
Doing a quick search on "Muslim Brotherhood" on this forum brings up posts on them at least as far back as 2003. It's not like there isn't a huge body of knowledge in english documenting the malevolent, and very non-secular nature of the MB.

Sad.
9813  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Clapper off on: February 12, 2011, 10:09:01 AM



Mark Steyn: 'The guy in charge of U.S. intelligence is an idiot'
9814  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Right-wing hatred on: February 11, 2011, 05:04:30 PM


Stop the hate!
9815  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Victory lap from A-jad on: February 11, 2011, 04:31:39 PM
http://apnews.myway.com/article/20110211/D9LAIKV80.html

Ahmadinejad: Egyptian protests herald new Mideast
 Email this Story

Feb 11, 7:24 AM (ET)

By ALI AKBAR DAREINI


 

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran's president said Friday that Egypt's popular uprising shows a new Islamic Middle East is emerging, one that Mahmoud Ahmadinejad claims will have no signs of Israel and U.S. "interference."

The Iranian leader spoke as the country marked the 32nd anniversary of its 1979 Islamic Revolution that toppled the pro-U.S. shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and brought hardline clerics to power.

Ahmadinejad's remarks came hours after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is transferring authority to his deputy but refused to step down, angering hundreds of thousands of Egyptians who have been demanding he relinquish his three-decade grip on power.

Tens of thousands marched down Tehran's main boulevard in state-organized anniversary festivities, chanting in support of Egyptian anti-government protesters. Some Iranians set an effigy of Mubarak on fire while others shouted: "Hosni non-Mubarak, 'Mubarak' (congratulations) on the uprising of your people."

Iran's state TV broadcast simultaneous live footage of the gathering at Tehran's Azadi, or Freedom, Square and that of anti-government demonstrations in Cairo's downtown Tahrir Square where tens of thousands had gathered by noon Friday.

Iran, which is at odds with the international community over its controversial nuclear program, has sought to portray the popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt as evidence of a replay of its own Islamic Revolution.
9816  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: February 11, 2011, 04:23:35 PM
Yeah, the Obama-koolaid has turned bitter for many.
9817  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: February 11, 2011, 04:10:33 PM
In case you hadn't noticed, we're well beyond "little" redistribution.




"Collective salvation" is one of those marxist doctrines clad in christianity he learned from Rev. Wright.
9818  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 11, 2011, 03:57:19 PM
The key problem is what you and I might define as freedom is probably not what many muslims in Egypt define as freedom. Also, having a military junta running a country probably doesn't qualify under most any definition of freedom anyone would care to use.
9819  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: February 11, 2011, 01:01:25 PM
"But I'ld vote for the dog catcher before Palin."

By "dog catcher" you mean a marxist Chicago crook with no experience outside of governmental shakedowns, that spent 20 years attending an anti-white racist church, yes?
9820  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 11, 2011, 12:42:08 PM
"which is the natural yearning to live free of being under the heel of Mubarak's police thugs. "

What if the heel of Mubarak's police thugs was preventing a hot war with Israel and an Sharia state and the rebirth of the caliphate?
9821  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Ralph had it right on: February 11, 2011, 05:52:23 AM
Intelligence Failure   
By Ralph Peters
New York Post | Thursday, January 08, 2009

WOULD you ask your accountant to perform brain surgery on your child? That's the closest analogy I can find to the choice of Democratic Party hack Leon Panetta to head the CIA.

Earth to President-elect Obama: Intelligence is serious. And infernally complicated. When we politicize it - as we have for 16 years - we get 9/11. Or, yes, Iraq.

The extreme left, to which Panetta's nomination panders, howled that Bush and Cheney corrupted the intelligence system. Well, I worked in the intel world in the mid 1990s and saw how the Clinton team undermined the system's integrity.

Al Qaeda a serious threat? The Clinton White House didn't want to hear it. Clinton was the pioneer in corrupting intelligence. Bush was just a follow-on homesteader.

Now we've fallen so low that left-wing cadres can applaud the nomination of a CIA chief whose sole qualification is that he's a party loyalist, untainted by experience.

The director's job at the CIA isn't a party favor. This is potentially a matter of life and death for thousands of Americans. But the choice of Panetta tells us all that Barack Obama doesn't take intelligence seriously.

Mark my words: It'll bite him in the butt.

After the military, the intel community is the most complex arm of government. You can't do on-the-job training at the top. While a CIA boss needn't be a career intelligence professional, he or she does need a deep familiarity with the purposes, capabilities, limitations and intricacies of intelligence.

Oh, and you'd better understand the intelligence bureaucracy.

Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.), who was blindsided - and appalled - by the Obama mafia's choice, has the essential knowledge of how the system works. She, or a similar expert, should have gotten this nod. But the president-elect wanted a clean-slate yes-man, not a person of knowledge and integrity.

We're witnessing the initial costs of Obama's career-long lack of interest in foreign policy, the military and intelligence. He doesn't think the top job at the CIA's important and just wants political cover on that flank. (Guess we got Panetta because Caroline Kennedy has another engagement.)

Forget a "team of rivals." Obama's creating a campaign staff for 2012.

Of course, he's reeling from the shrill rage of the Moveon.org crowd over his nomination of grown-ups to be his national-security adviser, director of national intelligence, administrator of veterans' affairs and, yes, secretary of state. (By the way, how could Hillary be dumb enough to accept a job where success is impossible?)

Panetta's appointment is a sop to the hard left, a signal that intelligence will be emasculated for the next four - or eight - years.

Think morale's been bad at the CIA? Just wait.

Conservatives played into this scenario by insisting that any CIA analysis that didn't match the Bush administration's positions perfectly amounted to an attack on the White House. Well, sorry. The intelligence community's job isn't to make anybody feel good - its core mission is to provide nonpartisan analysis to our leaders.

To be a qualified D-CIA, a man or woman needs a sophisticated grasp of three things: The intel system, foreign-policy challenges and the Pentagon (which owns most of our intelligence personnel and hardware). Panetta has no background - none - in any of these areas. He was never interested.

If you handed Leon Panetta a blank map of Asia, I'd bet my life he couldn't plot Baghdad, Kabul or Beijing within 500 miles of their actual locations. (Maybe he can see China from his California think tank?)

This shameless hack appointment is the first action by the incoming administration that seriously worries me. Get intelligence wrong and you get dead Americans.
http://www.mediaite.com/online/report-cia-chief-based-congressional-mubarak-testimony-on-media-broadcasts/

Report: CIA Chief Leon Panetta Based Congressional Testimony On Mubarak Departure On ‘Media Broadcasts’

by Colby Hall | 10:30 pm, February 10th, 2011


CIA Director Leon Panetta testified to Congress today of a “strong likelihood” that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak would step down by the end of the day. The report of his impending resignation was only eclipsed by the news that Mubarak would NOT be stepping down as Panetta had indicated to congress. The worse part isn’t that Panetta was basing his statement on on media reports (and not intelligence.) No, National Intelligence Director James Clapper outdid Panetta with his erroneous claim that the Muslim Brotherhood is a “secular” organization.

Certainly the current upheaval unfolding in Egypt is a fluid situation, best described as a leaderless revolt that has put the State Department, the Pentagon and the CIA all on their heels. As it turns out, the true diplomatic stars so far in this story has been the media, who’s on the field reports have not only created compelling visuals for cable news outlets around the world, but also, strangely, informed the CIA director in his statements to Congress.

According to a report by Mark Landler and Mark Mazzetti for the NY Times (emphasis mine):

    Mr. Obama watched Mr. Mubarak’s speech on board Air Force One, returning from a trip to Michigan, the press secretary, Robert Gibbs, said. As soon as he arrived at the White House, Mr. Obama huddled with his national security aides. The administration appeared as taken aback by Mr. Mubarak’s speech as the crowds in Tahrir Square. The director of the Central Intelligence Agency, Leon E. Panetta, testified before the House of Representatives on Thursday morning that there was a “strong likelihood” that Mr. Mubarak would step down by the end of the day.

    American officials said Mr. Panetta was basing his statement not on secret intelligence but on media broadcasts, which began circulating before he sat down before the House Intelligence Committee. But a senior administration official said Mr. Obama had also expected that Egypt was on the cusp of dramatic change. Speaking at Northern Michigan University in Marquette, he said, “We are witnessing history unfold,” adding, “America will do everything we can to support an orderly and genuine transition to democracy.”
9822  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Ya think? on: February 11, 2011, 05:39:50 AM
http://althouse.blogspot.com/2011/02/what-is-absolutely-clear-is-that-we-are.html

February 10, 2011
"What is absolutely clear is that we are witnessing history unfold. It's a moment of transformation that's taking place because the people of Egypt are calling for change."

Maybe the world doesn't actually work according to the transformative moments visualizations of President Obama.
9823  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / I've got a better name on: February 10, 2011, 04:31:25 PM
Skynet

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12400647

Robots could soon have an equivalent of the internet and Wikipedia.

European scientists have embarked on a project to let robots share and store what they discover about the world.

Called RoboEarth it will be a place that robots can upload data to when they master a task, and ask for help in carrying out new ones.

Researchers behind it hope it will allow robots to come into service more quickly, armed with a growing library of knowledge about their human masters.
9824  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: February 10, 2011, 04:18:26 PM
I like the executive experience and Mandarin especially. We could do worse.
9825  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Best of hands on: February 10, 2011, 02:21:49 PM
http://hotair.com/archives/2011/02/10/u-s-director-of-national-intelligence-the-muslim-brotherhood-is-largely-secular/

U.S. Director of National Intelligence: The Muslim Brotherhood is … “largely secular”; Update: Video added
9826  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 01:56:48 PM
Golly, I sure feel better!
9827  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Newt Gingrich on: February 10, 2011, 10:53:52 AM
Mittens Romney and Newt, I find them smart and capable and utterly untrustworthy.
9828  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 10:47:08 AM


Love this pic on drudge.
9829  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 10:41:47 AM
I think the House of Saud will not go easily or quietly.
9830  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 10:38:34 AM
If we lose Saudi, Banks will be the least of our concerns.
9831  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 10:21:49 AM
We'll soon find out. Got money in oil futures?
9832  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: February 10, 2011, 10:20:40 AM
Nice. Scott Stewart does outstanding work.
9833  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Egypt's Mubarak to step down on: February 10, 2011, 10:14:29 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41506482/ns/world_news-mideastn_africa/

Egypt's Mubarak to step down

CAIRO — Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak is to step down after 17 days of pro-democracy protests, two sources told NBC News on Thursday.

Following an all-day meeting of the country's supreme military council, the army said all the protesters' demands would be met and a further statement was expected to be made later Thursday, clarifying the situation.
9834  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 10:02:43 AM


"We drove up the world price of oil from $20 to $100 with our failure to produce or use our own energy?  http://www.wtrg.com/oil_graphs/oilprice1947.gif "

Yeah. Al Saud could cut production and raise the cost per bbl. We'll fund Egypt one way or the other.
9835  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Egypt on: February 10, 2011, 09:01:53 AM
Know how the Saudis could afford to bankroll Egypt?
9836  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Saudis told Obama to back Mubarak on: February 10, 2011, 09:01:06 AM
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/

Exclusive: Saudis told Obama to back Mubarak
Hugh Tomlinson Riyadh
February 10 2011 12:01AM

Saudi Arabia has threatened to prop up President Mubarak if the White House tries to force a swift change of regime in Egypt. In a testy personal telephone call on January 29, King Abdullah told President Obama not to humiliate Mr Mubarak and warned that he would step in to bankroll Egypt if the US withdrew its aid programme, worth $1.5 billion annually. America’s closest ally in the Gulf made clear that the Egyptian President must be allowed to stay on to oversee the transition towards peaceful democracy and then leave with dignity. “Mubarak and King Abdullah are not just allies, they are close friends, and the King is not about to see his friend cast aside and humiliated,” a senior source in the Saudi capital told The Times. Two sources confirmed details of the King’s call, made four days after the people
9837  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Homegrown on: February 10, 2011, 07:18:20 AM
http://thehill.com/homenews/house/143127-napolitano-warns-lawmakers-of-threat-from-homegrown-radicalization-domestic-terrorism

Napolitano warns of threat from homegrown radicalization, terrorism
By Jordy Yager - 02/09/11 07:00 PM ET

Homeland security and counter-terrorism officials warned lawmakers Wednesday that the nation is increasingly threatened by foreign terrorists who seek to recruit U.S. citizens.

The largest threat to the U.S. is no longer Osama Bin Laden, according to the director of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCIC), Michael Leiter, but is now Anwar Al-Awlaki, the head of the Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula group based out of Yemen.

The increased threat that Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula poses revolves heavily around its ability to attract and reach U.S.-natives who want to be trained in terrorism techniques, and who could fall beneath the radar of intelligence circles more easily.
9838  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Bias on: February 10, 2011, 06:48:00 AM
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/259354/more-political-bias-academia-veronique-de-rugy

More on the Political Bias in Academia
February 9, 2011 10:37 A.M.
By Veronique de Rugy 

As I have reported in these pages before, George Mason University’s Dan Klein has done a lot of work on the political bias against conservatives or free-marketeers in academia. Yesterday, over at Freakonomics, Stephen Dudner added to the conversation by commenting on a piece by John Tierney in the New York Times about the bias that “some of the world’s pre-eminent experts on bias discovered an unexpected form of it at their annual meeting.”

Tierney’s note about the bias:

    It was identified by Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist at the University of Virginia who studies the intuitive foundations of morality and ideology. He polled his audience at the San Antonio Convention Center, starting by asking how many considered themselves politically liberal. A sea of hands appeared, and Dr. Haidt estimated that liberals made up 80 percent of the 1,000 psychologists in the ballroom. When he asked for centrists and libertarians, he spotted fewer than three dozen hands. And then, when he asked for conservatives, he counted a grand total of three.

    “This is a statistically impossible lack of diversity,” Dr. Haidt concluded, noting polls showing that 40 percent of Americans are conservative and 20 percent are liberal.

This part is really interesting:

    “Anywhere in the world that social psychologists see women or minorities underrepresented by a factor of two or three, our minds jump to discrimination as the explanation,” said Dr. Haidt, who called himself a longtime liberal turned centrist. “But when we find out that conservatives are underrepresented among us by a factor of more than 100, suddenly everyone finds it quite easy to generate alternate explanations.”

Dubner makes a good point which is that under representation isn’t hard to understand in a self-selecting group. In fact, it is the point of the selection.

    The lack of diversity isn’t actually “statistically impossible” in a self-selecting group. But that of course is the point. How can it be that an academic field is so politically homogeneous? What kind of biases does such homogeneity produce? What sort of ideas get crowded out? And how homogeneous are other disciplines?

    I have to say that I was surprised at the overt political (leftward) bias exhibited by several prominent economists at the recent American Economics Association meetings, although my sample set was quite small.

Tierney concludes:

    In the old version, the society announced that special funds to pay for travel to the annual meeting were available to students belonging to “underrepresented groups (i.e., ethnic or racial minorities, first-generation college students, individuals with a physical disability, and/or lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered students).”

    As Dr. Haidt noted in his speech, the “i.e.” implied that this was the exclusive, sacred list of “underrepresented groups.” The society took his suggestion to substitute “e.g.” — a change that leaves it open to other groups, too. Maybe, someday, even to conservatives.

Finally, a recent piece in the Chronicle of Higher Education reports on a new analysis that shows the left-leaning bias in Harvard University Press:

    Harvard University Press’s output during the last decade has leaned heavily to the left, according to an analysis published this week in Econ Journal Watch. The press’s slant embodies and reinforces ideological disparities in academe, the paper argues, because faculty members are rewarded for publishing with prestigious presses like Harvard.

The analysis is here.

It would be interesting to understand why such bias exists (especially in economics where my bias tells me that it doesn’t make sense!). Also, does evidence of bias make it go away?

Thanks to Jason Fitchner for the pointer.
9839  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / 'Green' lightbulbs poison workers on: February 09, 2011, 09:54:52 PM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article6211261.ece

'Green' lightbulbs poison workers
Hundreds of factory staff are being made ill by mercury used in bulbs destined for the West
Michael Sheridan, Foshan

WHEN British consumers are compelled to buy energy-efficient lightbulbs from 2012, they will save up to 5m tons of carbon dioxide a year from being pumped into the atmosphere. In China, however, a heavy environmental price is being paid for the production of “green” lightbulbs in cost-cutting factories.

Large numbers of Chinese workers have been poisoned by mercury, which forms part of the compact fluorescent lightbulbs. A surge in foreign demand, set off by a European Union directive making these bulbs compulsory within three years, has also led to the reopening of mercury mines that have ruined the environment.

Doctors, regulators, lawyers and courts in China - which supplies two thirds of the compact fluorescent bulbs sold in Britain - are increasingly alert to the potential impacts on public health of an industry that promotes itself as a friend of the earth but depends on highly toxic mercury.

Making the bulbs requires workers to handle mercury in either solid or liquid form because a small amount of the metal is put into each bulb to start the chemical reaction that creates light.
Related Links

    * Two dead after ‘chemical incident’ at hotel

Mercury is recognised as a health hazard by authorities worldwide because its accumulation in the body can damage the nervous system, lungs and kidneys, posing a particular threat to babies in the womb and young children.

The risks are illustrated by guidance from the British government, which says that if a compact fluorescent lightbulb is broken in the home, the room should be cleared for 15 minutes because of the danger of inhaling mercury vapour.

Documents issued by the Chinese health ministry, instructions to doctors and occu-pational health propaganda all describe mercury poisoning in lighting factories as a growing public health concern.

“Pregnant women and mothers who are breastfeeding must not be allowed to work in a unit where mercury is present,” states one official rulebook.

In southern China, compact fluorescent lightbulbs destined for western consumers are being made in factories that range from high-tech multina-tional operations to sweat-shops, with widely varying standards of health and safety.

Tests on hundreds of employees have found dangerously high levels of mercury in their bodies and many have required hospital treatment, according to interviews with workers, doctors and local health officials in the cities of Foshan and Guangzhou.

Dozens of workers who were interviewed on condition of anonymity described living with the fear of mercury poisoning. They gave detailed accounts of medical tests that found numerous workers had dangerous levels of the toxin in their urine.

“In tests, the mercury content in my blood and urine exceeded the standard but I was not sent to hospital because the managers said I was strong and the mercury would be decontaminated by my immune system,” said one young female employee, who provided her identity card.

“Two of my friends were sent to hospital for one month,” she added, giving their names also.


“If they asked me to work inside the mercury workshop I wouldn’t do it, no matter how much they paid,” said another young male worker.
9840  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: February 09, 2011, 09:43:08 PM
Don't give the left any ideas, P.C.
9841  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: February 09, 2011, 09:41:46 PM
The best tool for that is to not allow NIMBY-ism. LA needs power? LA needs to build it's own power plants. Not pass strict clean air laws, then buy power from a power plant in New Mexico, so Navajo kids in the middle of nowhere get to breath air pollution that rightly belongs in SoCal.
9842  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: February 09, 2011, 09:31:06 PM
Every CFL bulb box should have a picture of a Chinese infant with birth defects caused by mercury poisoning on it, just to keep things honest.

9843  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam the religion on: February 09, 2011, 09:28:07 PM
http://bigpeace.com/dreaboi/2011/02/09/jim-woolsey-the-importance-of-shariah-in-the-egyptian-revolution/

9844  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: February 09, 2011, 09:18:11 PM
I didn't know what was wrong with my dishwasher until I read this article. I'm going to find a greymarket source for phosphate soap. Stockpile it like non-toxicwastesite bulbs.

The problem in this and in other feel-good environmental legislation, there is no coherent cost/benefit analysis done. So, what impacts the environment more, phosphates or the cost of additional water/soap/electricity to clean dishes?
9845  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: February 09, 2011, 09:08:40 PM
Grace Segrist, of Mumma’s Appliances in central Pennsylvania, explains that for the last five years, dishwasher technology has been walking a tightrope between efficiency and performance and the switch to phosphate-free detergents finally pushed many consumers over the edge. “The old dishwashers used 16 to 18 gallons of water during a wash cycle,” Segrist explains, “and used hotter water, too.” Five years ago Energy Star units arrived on the scene that use only 6 to 8 gallons of lower-temperature water. Between those changes and the new detergents, Segrist estimates that about half her customers now call in to complain about the quality of the wash. Adding to the problem is that unlike when Coca-Cola made a big to-do of switching formulas in 1985, the new dish detergents were slipped onto shelves under cover of night. “People didn’t have a huge knowledge base on how phosphate-free would affect their dishwashers,” she says, “so people didn’t know what the problem was.”

So why take out the phosphates in the first place? The environment, of course. When phosphorus gets into fresh water, it acts as a fertilizer for algae. When the bumper crop of algae later dies, its decomposition takes up oxygen in the water. And reduced levels of dissolved oxygen are harmful to fish.


**But the whole article is worth reading.
9846  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Science vs. God on: February 09, 2011, 08:10:21 PM
The Lakota word for god is (from memory) "Wakan wiskasa", meaning "The great sacred mystery".
9847  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: February 09, 2011, 07:57:32 PM
Glad to have you here, Ya!
9848  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Egypt, Sharia and the MB on: February 09, 2011, 05:51:42 PM
http://bigpeace.com/dreaboi/2011/02/09/jim-woolsey-the-importance-of-shariah-in-the-egyptian-revolution/

9849  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Science vs. God on: February 09, 2011, 04:25:57 PM
Don't get me wrong, I like it. I wish it were something out of Einstein's bio.
9850  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Science vs. God on: February 09, 2011, 04:13:13 PM
Trust, but verify.  grin

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