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101  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Just unbelievable how low this low life is on: May 30, 2014, 09:00:53 PM
Clinton writes that she takes responsibility for the deaths, but adds that there has been "a regrettable amount of misinformation, speculation and flat-out deceit" by some in politics and the media.

"I will not be a part of a political slugfest on the backs of dead Americans. It's just plain wrong, and it's unworthy of our great country," Clinton writes. "Those who insist on politicizing the tragedy will have to do so without me."

Can anyone think of anything more infuriating than this?   IS this the best America can do?  A shyster lying slob.  The corruption is mind boggling.
102  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: May 30, 2014, 06:18:15 AM
"Just to be perfectly clear, are we talking the nomination or the presidency here?"

I meant the Democratic nomination.

As for the Presidency, at this point there is no one on the right who appears to have what it will take to beat her. 

And the Republicans party as a whole is wandering in the wilderness.   I fear we will have another Dole, McCain, or Romneyesque like underwhelming candidate.

Compare the Republican party hodgepodge patchwork to the Democrat/Clinton machine.

She will win big the women vote.  Don't believe that then think Black vote and Obama.  No matter how bad Obama is the Blacks are married to him.  Same for the gals and Hillary.  Especially most younger women and definitely ***all*** single mothers.
103  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: May 29, 2014, 10:25:03 AM
"It won't be Hillary"

Doug,

I propose a bet.  I think it will be Hillary.

 
104  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: May 29, 2014, 10:23:10 AM
" Obama is campaigning for himself to be UN Secretary General"

Yup. Fits his megalomania.   Fits his one world government goal.   With him at top.   THIS is his true colors. 

"  which I think could put him directly at odds with US President Marco Rubio on world issues"

Not only that but it puts him at odds with US interests.   He is giving our country away.

Was anyone else really offended by seeing this guy, standing in front of a sea of troops along with a giant American flag wearing a replica WW2 bomber jacket to deflect from the VA scandal?

To think that this guy, the son of an American hating Communist, a pre hippy hippy who disliked America, spent his whole life hanging wth American hating radicals would have the nerve to stand there in a bomber jacket.   When Bush did it we knew he loved America.  When Reagan did it with the flag we knew he loved America.   When Bush senior would do that we knew he WAS a WW2 hero pilot.

When this guy does it we know he is a lying fraud.  WW2 vets would and should be rolling in their graves or in their nursing homes taking massive heartburn meds.

This fraud standing their like this while he does everything he can get away with giving the country away.  He mocks this country.
105  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Dr. Ben Carson on: May 29, 2014, 10:14:42 AM
Dr. Carson was on Levin's radio show recently and when asked about running he said he would rather not;  and said something like, 'who in their right mind would?'
Yet he wouldn't rule it out in order to serve.

My opinion is not now for the highest office but maybe in the future or how about a lower office first?
106  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: May 28, 2014, 09:00:20 PM
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=60467
107  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Duck Dynasty at GOP conference on: May 28, 2014, 07:14:39 PM
I hope at least he doesn't dress up in his clown suit and actually wears a suit and tie but I doubt it.  Look he may be a very smart business man and entertaining to those so inclined but give me a break.  Are people really going to take this seriously?   And Donald Trump again?  He must have paid an arm and a leg.   I don't have anything against Trump but at this point he is not a serious spokesperson for Americans.  OTOH hand the left had their promiscuous BCP champion.....

*******Duck Dynasty's Robertson To Address GOP Conference

Happy, happy, happy!

News
 |
 Larry O'Connor |

The Republican Leadership Conference has announced their speakers for this weekend's conference in New Orleans, LA and the list includes reality television star Phil Robertson and Donald Trump.

Phil Robertson, patriarch of the Robertson family and star of the series “Duck Dynasty,” will address the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference, Thursday May 29th at 6pm. Also speaking on Thursday evening are RNC Chairman Reince Priebus, Gov. Bobby Jindal, Sen. Ron Johnson and Ben Sasse.
 Other Speakers at the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference include Governor Rick Perry, Governor Phil Bryant, US Senators Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, & David Vitter; Donald Trump, Newt Gingrich, Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, Michele Bachmann and Allen West! The Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans has become one of the premier political events in the country.

Robertson was a target of gay rights activists in December 2013 after comments regarding homosexual behavior were published in an interview with GQ magazine. At the time, A & E, the network his show Duck Dynasty appears on, suspended him. After an intense and vocal response from the show's loyal fans, and an overwhelming petition drive here at Truth Revolt, he was reinstated.********* 
108  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: May 28, 2014, 06:31:48 PM
Thursday, May 19, 2011



   
USS Cesar Chavez? Why not the USS Saul Alinsky?





 Incredibly, the U.S. Navy has decided to name a cargo ship after the guy who came up with the Obama campaign slogan, "Yes, we can!" That man is the late labor agitator and community organizer Cesar Chavez. Chavez's union, the United Farm Workers, used the saying he coined as its official motto. (In Spanish, "¡Sí se puede!")

 The decision to name a Navy ship after this radical is remarkable not only because President Obama's teleprompter has the phrase "Yes, we can!" burnt into it from the phrase's overuse, but because the far-left leader was a disciple of communist sympathizer Saul Alinsky. Chavez, who died in 1993, worked for the Community Service Organization from 1952 to 1962. CSO was a pressure group created by Alinsky's Industrial Areas Foundation. Chavez has been lionized by the left because he hated capitalism and shared Alinsky's contempt for the American system. The man even sounded like Alinsky, insisting he loved America while working to undermine its institutions. Chavez said

Until the chance for political participation is there, we who are poor will continue to attack the soft part of the American system - its economic structure. We will build power through boycotts, strikes, new union - whatever techniques we can develop. These attacks on the status quo will come, not because we hate, but because we know America can construct a humane society for all its citizens - and that if it does not, there will be chaos.
"There will be chaos?" Prediction or threat? You decide.

 Chavez is also connected to ACORN founder Wade Rathke, a fact I reported in my new book, Subversion Inc.: How Obama's ACORN Red Shirts are Still Terrorizing and Ripping Off American Taxpayers.

 When Rathke was employed as an organizer at ACORN's parent organization, the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO), he was trained by a man named Bill Pastreich who had studied Alinsky’s in-your-face organizing techniques. Pastreich had also been employed by Chavez's United Farm Workers.

 Is it just a matter of time before the Obama administration commissions the USS Saul Alinsky? No doubt it will be a destroyer.

Follow me on Twitter and check out my new book Subversion Inc.: How Obama’s ACORN Red Shirts are Still Terrorizing and Ripping Off American Taxpayers.

109  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: May 28, 2014, 07:49:51 AM
I'll post more on the Pope later.  Let me read more about him and what he says.  But he insulted my country, my way of life, my belief system and as a result me.

I won't just sit and allow him to do this.

Morality works in many ways.  Not his or the highway.
110  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: May 28, 2014, 07:32:48 AM
Well this Pope has already lost me with his Communism remarks.   

If everyone was forced (that's right - forced) to have what they earn confiscated and doled out we would still be in the stone age.

I mean absolutely no disrespect to Catholics.  But this guy is a quack.

His sense of morality is in outer space.

There is something megalomanic about him.
111  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Murdered by the gay mafia; conspiracy theory on: May 26, 2014, 09:14:04 AM
By/Stephanie Condon/CBS News/May 12, 2014, 5:35 PM

Keith Crisco, Clay Aiken's congressional opponent, dies
 
Keith Crisco, the North Carolina congressional candidate running in a Democratic primary election against Clay Aiken, was found dead in his home Monday. Crisco, 71, died from injuries sustained from a fall, WRAL reports.

The textile entrepreneur was running against the former American Idol star for the Democratic nomination in North Carolina's 2nd district. Crisco and Aiken both garnered about 40 percent of the vote in last Tuesday's primary. Aiken won just a 369-vote lead, leaving open the possibility of a recount or a runoff election. The winner of the primary would face off against Rep. Renee Ellmers, R-N.C.

Aiken said in a statement that is "stunned and deeply saddened" by Crisco's death and will suspend all campaign activities "as we pray for his family and friends."

"Keith came from humble beginnings," Aiken said. "No matter how high he rose - to Harvard, to the White House and to the Governor's Cabinet - he never forgot where he came from. He was a gentleman, a good and honorable man and an extraordinary public servant. I was honored to know him."

Democratic strategist Brad Crone said that he spoke with Crisco earlier in the day and that the candidate planned to concede the race Tuesday.

"This is a shocking day," Crone said in a statement to CBS News. "At Keith's instructions, I called Gary Pearce, an advisor to Mr. Aiken, to convey that Keith was going to concede the election tomorrow morning and would be calling Mr. Aiken to congratulate him."

The North Carolina board of elections said in a statement, "The State Board of Elections is saddened to hear of the passing of Keith Crisco. A native of North Carolina, we are grateful for Mr. Crisco's service to our state and his community through the years. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Crisco family during this difficult time."

Ellmers released a statement Monday saying her thoughts and prayers are with Crisco's family and friends.

"I am deeply saddened by this sudden and painful tragedy and wish God's blessings for Keith's family through the coming days," she said. "His kindness and dedication to his principles were models we should all strive toward, and he will be dearly missed."
.
© 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
112  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: May 22, 2014, 10:17:20 AM
Doug writes,

" The area where far left and right should find agreement is to stop giving special favors to the powerful"

Agreed.  But I never hear this from the Right.   Nothing wrong with getting rich honestly.   But to enhance the advantages they already have just makes it worse.

You even begin to level the playing field with petty minimum wage regulations.  I don't understand why the NAACP is marching into McDonald's headquarters screaming for an increase in chump change.  Who in their right mind goes to work for McDs serving burgers as a career?  You either try to move up to better management positions or go to school or some other endeavor with a real future. 

The NAACP should be marching into the "f" White House demanding the ONE to stop allowing people to flood into our country driving down wages for those already here.

Of course wages are a few bucks an hour.  Every single fast food place around here has people with accents.  So yea, big companies love this.

But the NAACP?   
113  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 22, 2014, 10:09:31 AM
Doug,

Beautifully summarized dilemma Conservatives are in.   We are really boxed in.  The left knows it so it is putting the pressure on this issue.

I will be absolutely shocked if Obama doesn't simply pardon everyone in the end.  We see every day how he doesn't believe in America.

He is happy to give it away for his liberal agenda.

I agree with you Rubio's heart was in the right place.


 

114  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / War on saturated fat, just a money making scam? on: May 22, 2014, 09:59:49 AM
I frankly am not sure what to make of this except that I am thinking of going out and buying a plate of (without the bread) corn beef, roast beef, and pastrami, and yes tongue!

In general I suggest to patients just to keep the calories down as much as possible.  Diets, low fat, low carb, low this low that.  Just low calories with some obvious healthy foods with fiber and nutrients like fruits and vegetables.

I included some of the comments posted in response to the article.   

******Heart Association’s Junk Science Diet

By Barbara H. Roberts, MD 4 hours ago The Daily Beast
 
Heart Association’s Junk Science Diet
   
The dogma that saturated fat causes heart disease is crumbling.

A recent Cambridge University analysis of 76 studies involving more than 650,000 people concluded, “The current evidence does not clearly support guidelines that [recommend]… low consumption of total saturated fats.”

Yet the American Heart Association (AHA), in its most recent dietary guidelines, held fast to the idea that we must all eat low fat diets for optimal heart health. It’s a stance that—at the very best—is controversial, and at worst is dead wrong. As a practicing cardiologist for more than three decades, I agree with the latter—it’s dead wrong.

Why does the AHA cling to recommendations that fly in the face of scientific evidence?

What I discovered was both eye opening and disturbing. The AHA not only ignored all the other risk factors for heart disease, but it appointed someone with ties to Big Food and bizarre scientific beliefs to lead the guideline-writing panel—just the type of thing that undermines the public’s confidence in the medical community.

The AHA guidelines warrant that saturated fat make up no more than 5 to 6 percent of daily calories for adults because this will lower “bad” (LDL) cholesterol. And, for those people who need blood pressure control, the guidelines also suggest lowering sodium (salt) intake to no more than a teaspoon (2,300 mg) daily.

Despite many other known risk factors for heart disease, salt and fat were, astonishingly, the only two considered by the AHA panel writing the guidelines. There are many other recognized risk factors the AHA ignored, including blood sugar level, low “good” (HDL) cholesterol, insulin levels, and body weight—all of these are influenced by diet.

In fact, most people who have heart attacks don’t have elevations in bad cholesterol. They are much more likely to have metabolic syndrome—a condition that puts you at high risk for diabetes and heart disease. Metabolic syndrome is defined when you have three of the following: high triglycerides (blood fats), high blood sugar, high blood pressure, low “good” cholesterol (HDL-C), and a large abdomen measurement (abdominal obesity).

Interestingly enough, blood triglycerides do not go up with eating fat—they go up if you eat a diet high in processed grains, starches, and sugar. Unfortunately for the proponents of high carbohydrate diets, high blood triglycerides are a major risk factor for heart disease. In addition, low fat/high carb diets lower protective “good” cholesterol and raise insulin. These diets are implicated in the development of diabetes, which is a potent risk factor for developing heart disease.

The writers of the 2013 statin guidelines based their recommendations on studies that looked at the reduction in the risk of events like heart attacks in people treated with statins, compared to people on placebo. The AHA dietary guidelines do not cite any diet studies that looked at whether following a specific diet lowered the risk of developing cardiac events—yet they are giving dietary advice. Why?

There might be two plausible reasons. One is the AHA’s moneymaking “Heart Check Program.” The second is the conflict of interest (and curious beliefs) of Robert Eckel—the co-chair of the panel that wrote the guidelines.

The AHA introduced the Heart Check Program in 1995 and it has been quite the moneymaker, as the AHA sells the Heart Check stamp-of-approval to food manufacturers. Food companies shell out between $1,000 and $7,500 to be certified by the Heart Check Program—and then there are yearly renewal fees. The program currently endorses 889 foods as “heart-healthy.”

And the Heart Check Program is not the only way the AHA benefits from Big Food companies. In their annual report for 2012-2013, the AHA lists among its lifetime donors of $1 million or more Conagra, Quaker Oats, and Campbell Soups, among others.

Forty-five percent of these “heart healthy” foods—over 400 of them—are meat; 92 are processed meats—which have been shown to have either neutral or negative effects on heart health.

Even more problematic are the foods containing added sugar. The AHA recommends that women consume less than 6 teaspoons (100 calories) of sugar a day and less than 9 teaspoons (150 calories) for men. Yet there are items that get the nod of approval from the Heart Check program despite being near or at the sugar limit, like Bruce’s Yams Candied Sweet Potatoes and Healthy Choice Salisbury Steak. Indeed, until 2010, the Heart Check imprimatur was stamped on a drink called Chocolate Moose Attack, which contained more sugar per ounce than regular Pepsi.

And until this year, Heart Check approved many foods with trans-fats, which raise bad cholesterol and lower good cholesterol, among other deleterious effects on health, like increasing inflammation and the laying down of calcium in arteries.

Like the dietary guidelines, the AHA Heart Check Program appears to address only the effect of foods on cholesterol level and blood pressure. Meanwhile, since the 1970s, our yearly sugar consumption has skyrocketed along with the incidence of diabetes and obesity.

This brings us to Dr. Robert H. Eckel, the co-chair of the Working Group. He is a consultant for Foodminds, which specializes “in food, beverage, nutrition, health and wellness.”  Foodminds works with more than 30 leading food, beverage, and nutrition to offer a “one stop shop of…consulting…to guide food and beverage companies in navigating the complexities around the upcoming FDA Nutrition Facts label overhaul.”  In other words, Foodminds is a lobbying firm for “Big Food.”

And then there is this:

Dr. Eckel describes himself as “a scientist and professing six-day creationist and a member of the technical advisory board of the Institute for Creation Research…” Many scientists are religious. This is not to question Dr. Eckel’s religious beliefs, but to question his ability to think scientifically. He believes there is scientific proof that the world was created in six days and that evolution does not exist. This should at least raise eyebrows when the co-chair of an influential panel charged with giving scientifically sound dietary advice has a financial conflict of interest and proselytizes for beliefs that are anti-scientific.

Practice guidelines affect both public policy and medical practice. We should expect professional medical organizations —like the American Heart Association—to examine all the evidence relating to diet and heart disease risk.

The American people should be able to trust that only impartial scientists write guidelines. We should be confident that those experts are not working to advance corporate interests and that they do not espouse beliefs that are well outside the scientific mainstream. An avowed creationist who consults for a food lobby hardly seems an appropriate choice to fulfill these criteria.

READ MORE The Truth About Salt

For the last several decades, the AHA has promoted a low fat high carbohydrate diet as a cornerstone of heart health. It has taken a very public position that saturated fats are a major driver of heart disease risk and the mounting tide of evidence that this is dead wrong must put them it in a very uncomfortable position. And yet a fundamental requirement of science—as opposed to propaganda—is that when evidence that contradicts a hypothesis is replicated over and over again, that hypothesis must be abandoned.

The idea that eating high amounts of saturated fat causes hardening of the arteries—the so-called “diet-heart hypothesis”— deserves to be jettisoned along with other discredited belief systems. Creationism comes to mind. Will the AHA step up to the plate?

The American Heart Association had not returned an inquiry for comment at the time of publishing. 


 ...



.
10 Comments  .


Ernesto 1 hour ago


two years ago, I realized that the AHA did NOT need my donation. It seemed to me that most of their donations may come from the food and pharmaceutical industry so, they really don't need either my participation on the heart day walk. Their statistics show that during the past 30 years their guidelines and recommendations are linked to a double fold increase of heart disease in the U.S. And the sad part is that doctors, specifically cardiologists, and health insurances either promote or follow these inept guidelines. Recently, I almost purchase a food brand deli turkey which it showed a heart check on the label. I decided to read the ingredients to find out that the processed meat contained too much sodium and phosphates. Both ingredients are bad for the heart. AFP RELAXNEWS Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 10:39 AM
 Phosphates, which are also found in Parmesan, colas and baking soda, may stimulate the production of the hormone FGF23, which puts a strain on the heart and can lead to high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, researchers said.....

 Definitely, the AHA doesn't need my two cents... I don't need their two cents either.

 


oh well 55 minutes ago


Dr. is correct as she is wrong in her approach. Levels of cholesterol and other lipids are a result for most people higher than normal weight values and excessive intake of fats and sugars. High blood pressures can be influenced by amount of salt intake, however salt in itself is not the only culprit: kidney disease, stress and release of catecholamines contribute to arterial injury as does smoking: the latter being a virtual do not enter area for heart
 patients and their families. Exercise to help control weight, increase HDL and help in lowering levels of glucose and stress hormones all contribute to a healthier person who feels better and sees the world in a better light which influences attitude and heart health and brain health as well..

 In essence balance is a key for most people but be careful of those heavy meals and overdoing it whether at the gym or the table.....

 Have a nice day.


Sandra 2 hours ago

I did a research paper for school a couple of years ago that validates what this article is saying about saturated fats. Not sure why the author finds it necessary to back up her view by bringing Dr. Eckel's belief in creationism as some kind of evidence to back up the idea? There is enough material available on diet and heart disease to prove the point. I don't believe in the 6 day creationism story either, but don't see how it can discount someone as a scientist.


MrHersch11 49 minutes ago

I was rolling right along, agreeing with each of Dr Roberts' points, and then she throws in the creationism thing. That's a whole separate issue, and her use of that issue tends to make you forget all the valid points she made throughout the rest of the article. She'd have been better off making her points about AHA and diet, and then shutting up.

Sam 51 minutes ago

Being stupid is relevant.


Seldom Wrong 20 minutes ago

Sugar and grain based foods do far more damage than meat and dairy. After 60 years of pushing an unhealthy diet, the American Heart Association has succeeded in making us all fat and sick. When are they going to own up to their guilt and change their recommendations? If they keep pushing the same lies, they don't deserve anyone's support.

Candy 1 hour ago

So is this article attacking the diet that the AHA backs up or is it attacking creationism and Dr. Eckel?
 
Lothar F 39 minutes ago

The AHA, and the AMA as well, have sold us, the public, down the river to big business interests. People need to use common sense and stick to a traditional diet that does not contain any processed or refined foods.
 
Sam 44 minutes ago

How does a nutball end up in any scientific position?

 My clinic recommends one third fat for most diets.

JohnW 1 hour ago

I'm so glad this is finally coming out. Dr. Atkins said this for years. People's health would greatly benefit it they would cut out the cookies and pop.


Lynne 2 hours ago

If true, this is all fairly damning. Shame on the AHA for allowing it.

115  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The next step towards single payer government run health care on: May 22, 2014, 09:33:03 AM
Most employers could shift healthcare coverage to exchanges by 2020, report says
Switch from employer to individual plans could save businesses $3.25 trillion

Publish date: MAY 15, 2014
Print


By: Rachael Zimlich
 
A new report is gaining attention for its prediction that U.S. companies could save trillions of dollars over the next decade by using the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) healthcare exchanges, and eliminating employee health plans.

The report, prepared for the financial services industry by S&P Capital IQ Global Markets Intelligence, predicts that companies could shift 90% of their workers from employer-based healthcare to individual coverage on insurance marketplaces by 2020. If all U.S. companies with 50 or more employees transferred coverage for their employees to the marketplace, they could save $3.25 trillion by 2025, the report predicts. If only Standard & Poor’s (S&P) 500 companies did so, they would save between $690 billion and $800 billion over the same period.

The premise of the ACA is to shift the responsibility for healthcare insurance to employees. This will put corporate America in a position to redefine its role in healthcare, the report states.

S&P 500 companies employ about 138 million people, or 20% of the American workforce. So when S&P companies adopt a practice, it often indicates the start of a new, large-scale trend among employers.

The report predicts that when the switch from employer to individual insurance begins, it won’t take long to complete, with 10% of S&P companies expected to begin transferring coverage to workers by 2016, 30% by 2017, 70% by 2019 and 90% by 2020. Low- and middle-income employees, entry-level workers or new college graduates, and part-time employees will be pushed into individual coverage first and will receive federal subsidies to help afford their new plans. Higher-income workers will follow later, likely with stipends to help cover the cost of their coverage, the report predicts. Those stipends will eventually become part of employee pay, completing the transition to a complete corporate abandonment of providing healthcare coverage.

But with all that money saved, someone is going to have to pay more, whether it is employees or the government. According to the report, employees moved to the exchange would pay nearly $2,800 more for their health benefits in 2016 compared with what they paid under an employer-provided insurance plan, or an increase of about 50%. But many low-wage, and even some middle-wage, employees will be eligible for a government subsidy to offset the cost of their their premiums which will also increase the financial burden of subsidizing healthcare for the federal government, the report predicts.

On the other hand, the more individuals that purchase healthcare coverage through the exchanges, the more affordable and competitive the market will become, the report explains. Purchasing individual coverage also will reduce the stress caused by changing jobs, because coverage won’t change with the employment. Overall, the shift could give employees more control over their healthcare coverage and more stability, but could also result in higher premiums for anyone not eligible for federal subsidies or offered stipends from their employers.

The report predicts that employee costs for healthcare will more than double by 2025, although they will be paying the same percentage—about 26%—of their premiums over that period. Employers’ share of premiums will drop from roughly 70% to 33%, while the government’s share is predicted to jump from less than 4% to about 41%.

 
116  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / "Obama Republicans" on: May 21, 2014, 10:03:54 PM
I can't post under "future of Republican party"  ; it is locked.

So I post here.  Good lead article on Breitbart today:

Rise of the 'Obama Republicans'



 
 

 394

 2

 804

 8


 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Email ArticlePrint articleSend a Tip
by Craig Shirley  21 May 2014, 10:48 AM PDT 710  post a comment 

The 1980 campaign brought about the dissolution of the old New Deal Coalition and the rise of the Reagan Democrat, a phrase coined by Newsweek political writer Peter Goldman after that historic election.
Yet all campaigns cannot be viewed as isolated incidents but rather as a river flowing from one through the next. Conservative Democrats broke with Adlai Stevenson in 1952 to support Eisenhower and many broke with Hubert Humphrey in 1968 to support Republican Richard Nixon or George Wallace, another Democrat.

By 1972, many conservative Democrats supported Nixon over George McGovern so at least in presidential campaigns, culturally conservative Democrats were already moving away from their historic home. Only the election of Jimmy Carter in 1976, a southern populist reformer--and Watergate--and Betty Ford’s liberalism--forestalled the inevitable.

The Gipper’s massive victory in 1980 was fueled by more that 30 percent of Democrats nationwide, who took a powder on Carter after he moved to the left. Reagan received the same amount in the 1984 election in part because he’d done nothing to disappoint them and the liberal establishment nominated Walter Mondale, a good man who was trapped in a New Deal past.

Reagan ran again as the anti-establishment candidate of the future and swamped the lifetime Democrat, ironically with the help of Democrats. Yet the Establishment Republicans simply could not abide by the realigning elections of 1980, 1984, and 1994.

By the final years of the last century, some inside the GOP wanted the Reagan Revolution to be over, thus the phrase “compassionate conservative.” George W. Bush ran and lost the popular vote in 2000 without once ever calling for a spending cut or the elimination of one single wasteful federal program. After that, the GOP would continue to embrace the persona of Reagan--they had little choice--but no longer would they embrace the American conservative philosophy of the Gipper.

Hence, the stirrings of the Obama Republicans.

What has altered the storyline in the past several years is not the emergence of the Tea Party but rather the permanent entrenchment of Big Government Republicans, aka Obama Republicans. President Obama has had that much effect on the national debate, which has had a direct effect on the national Republicans.

The last gasp of principled conservatism may have come in 2010 with the rise of the Tea Party, but this also gave rise to the countervailing force of the Obama Republicans, resulting in the nomination of Mitt Romney in 2012.

In spite of losing five of the previous six presidential contests, it is the Obama Republicans who now rule the party apparatus of the GOP. Obama Republicans have also spread out among the state bureaucracies, the academies, Wall Street, Detroit, and nearly all of corporate America.

They have bought into Obama’s Oligarchy of big business and big government doing business together, at the expense of the little guy.

Obama supported TARP. Bush supported TARP. The ruling classes supported TARP. Wall Street supported TARP. Therefore, $750 billion--initially--was taken from the rest of the country to “rescue” the corrupt elites of Wall Street.

And never one prosecution or investigation. The greatest wealth transfer in American history and the elites of both parties were in on the score. The Republicans pulled of the heist and the Democrats drove the getaway car.

Other examples abound.

The new Obama Republicans are members of the bureaucratic classes, are pro-government, pro-gay marriage, pro-abortion, pro-NSA, and pro-amnesty. They are sophisticated, urban, and have utterly nothing in common with the Tea Party Reaganites. Indeed, they are culturally closer to Obama’s and Romney’s view of the world than Reagan’s.

Power is everything. Power vindicates all. The shady forces of the national GOP party committees supported a pro-abortion, pro-Obamacare stalker in Oregon’s senate primary because she is a) a woman and b)…? The national GOP plays the very same identity politics that Obama and the Democrats have played for years by embracing one victim group after another. (Shirley & Banister assisted Jason Conger in Oregon’s GOP primary because he was the ethical conservative candidate.)

The Obama Republicans are fueled in part by old Bush speechwriters and neocons and High Tories who sometimes make a pass at talking about conservatism but that is mainly to keep the yokels at the grass roots guessing. Mostly though, they spend their time bashing the Tea Party Reaganites.

There is a dialectic to American presidential politics which occurs every generation or two. From Jefferson’s “New American Revolution” to Jackson’s “Democratic Populism” to Lincoln and the rise of the Republican reformers to Teddy Roosevelt and then to FDR’s “New Deal” and two generations later to Reagan’s “New Federalism,” and now to Obama, 28 years after Reagan--right on schedule--we may be witnessing a paradigm shift again in American politics.

It should be no surprise that the Republicans on Capitol Hill offer nothing of opposition to Obama. They can best be labeled the “Rollover Caucus.” Oh, they will run commercials and mouth platitudes to fool conservative voters to get their money and their votes for this fall, but everybody knows they’ve signed on to Obamacare because their corporate masters in the insurance companies and pharmaceutical industries told them to do so. They have always supported immigration reform because, again, their corporate masters told them to do so.

The Administrative state is here to stay, as long as the status quo holds. The only question now is how long the Tea Party Reaganites stay with a party which is fundamentally opposed to them and despises them.

117  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / 2 nd post today on: May 21, 2014, 08:07:46 AM
I haven't the time this AM to review this site.  Looks like it might give us more info on illegal immigration.  A colleague told me he heard illegals commit crimes way out of proportion to their numbers but when I did a very quick search this AM I find one review titled something to the effect that their crimes are blown way out of proportion and another that says their crimes are quite scary.  So finding the truth among the agendas is not easy.  And of course no one is really counting anyway.  The Feds under this WH can not be counted on to tell us the truth about what they at least really think is going on.

This might be helpful. 

http://www.illegalimmigrationstatistics.org/
118  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 21, 2014, 07:57:21 AM
I like Doug's dream act.

But most immigrants illegal or not vote Democrat.  They want the benefits.  Except for many Florida Cubans and some Eastern European who were enslaved under Communism.

The rest see they can game a system for benefits and don't see the forest for the quick cash.  All is asked in return is their vote.

They duly comply.

In conclusion, Doug's well thought out and correct dream act is more of a "dream" for Doug, me, and those of us who really believed in America as exceptional.
119  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: May 20, 2014, 08:43:43 PM
They know Obama will grant amnesty.  Either next year after this Nov election or before he leaves office.   
120  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / We can thank LBJ for Vietnam and the beginning of the demise of USA on: May 19, 2014, 07:52:55 AM

How LBJ ruined America:

**********Great Society's decline: The high cost of Lyndon Johnson's grand project

 By George Will 

 JewishWorldReview.com |    Standing on his presidential limousine, Lyndon Johnson, campaigning in Providence, R.I., in September 1964, bellowed through a bullhorn: “We’re in favor of a lot of things and we’re against mighty few.” This was a synopsis of what he had said four months earlier.

Fifty years ago this Thursday, at the University of Michigan, Johnson had proposed legislating into existence a Great Society. It would end poverty and racial injustice, “but that is just the beginning.” It would “rebuild the entire urban United States” while fending off “boredom and restlessness,” slaking “the hunger for community” and enhancing “the meaning of our lives” — all by assembling “the best thought and the broadest knowledge.”

In 1964, 76 percent of Americans trusted government to do the right thing “just about always or most of the time”; today, 19 percent do. The former number is one reason Johnson did so much; the latter is one consequence of his doing so.

Barry Goldwater, Johnson’s 1964 opponent who assumed that Americans would vote to have a third president in 14 months, suffered a landslide defeat. After voters rebuked FDR in 1938 for attempting to “pack” the Supreme Court, Republicans and Southern Democrats prevented any liberal legislating majority in Congress until 1965. That year, however, when 68 senators and 295 representatives were Democrats, Johnson was unfettered.

He remains, regarding government’s role, much the most consequential 20th-century president. Indeed, the American Enterprise Institute’s Nicholas Eberstadt, in his measured new booklet “The Great Society at Fifty: The Triumph and the Tragedy,” says LBJ, more than FDR, “profoundly recast the common understanding of the ends of governance.”

When Johnson became president in 1963, Social Security was America’s only nationwide social program. His programs and those they subsequently legitimated put the nation on the path to the present, in which changed social norms — dependency on government has been destigmatized — have changed America’s national character.

Between 1959 and 1966 — before the War on Poverty was implemented — the percentage of Americans living in poverty plunged by about one-third, from 22.4 to 14.7, slightly lower than in 2012. But, Eberstadt cautions, the poverty rate is “incorrigibly misleading” because government transfer payments have made income levels and consumption levels significantly different. Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, disability payments, heating assistance and other entitlements have, Eberstadt says, made income “a poor predictor of spending power for lower-income groups.” Stark material deprivation is now rare:

“By 2011 . . . average per capita housing space for people in poverty was higher than the U.S. average for 1980. . . . [Many] appliances were more common in officially impoverished homes in 2011 than in the typical American home of 1980. . . . DVD players, personal computers, and home Internet access are now typical in them — amenities not even the richest U.S. households could avail themselves of at the start of the War on Poverty.”

But the institutionalization of anti-poverty policy has been, Eberstadt says carefully, “attended” by the dramatic spread of a “tangle of pathologies.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan coined that phrase in his 1965 report calling attention to family disintegration among African Americans. The tangle, which now ensnares all races and ethnicities, includes welfare dependency and “flight from work.”

Twenty-nine percent of Americans — about 47 percent of blacks and 48 percent of Hispanics — live in households receiving means-tested benefits. And “the proportion of men 20 and older who are employed has dramatically and almost steadily dropped since the start of the War on Poverty, falling from 80.6 percent in January 1964 to 67.6 percent 50 years later.” Because work — independence, self-reliance — is essential to the culture of freedom, ominous developments have coincided with Great Society policies:

For every adult man ages 20 to 64 who is between jobs and looking for work, more than three are neither working nor seeking work, a trend that began with the Great Society. And what Eberstadt calls “the earthquake that shook family structure in the era of expansive anti-poverty policies” has seen out-of-wedlock births increase from 7.7 percent in 1965 to more than 40 percent in 2012, including 72 percent of black babies.

LBJ’s starkly bifurcated legacy includes the triumphant Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 — and the tragic aftermath of much of his other works. Eberstadt asks: Is it “simply a coincidence” that male flight from work and family breakdown have coincided with Great Society policies, and that dependence on government is more widespread and perhaps more habitual than ever? Goldwater’s insistent 1964 question is increasingly pertinent: “What’s happening to this country of ours?”

 

 

 
121  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / We have LB Jerk to thank on: May 18, 2014, 09:27:12 PM
How LBJ ruined America:

**********Great Society's decline: The high cost of Lyndon Johnson's grand project

 By George Will 

 JewishWorldReview.com |    Standing on his presidential limousine, Lyndon Johnson, campaigning in Providence, R.I., in September 1964, bellowed through a bullhorn: “We’re in favor of a lot of things and we’re against mighty few.” This was a synopsis of what he had said four months earlier.

Fifty years ago this Thursday, at the University of Michigan, Johnson had proposed legislating into existence a Great Society. It would end poverty and racial injustice, “but that is just the beginning.” It would “rebuild the entire urban United States” while fending off “boredom and restlessness,” slaking “the hunger for community” and enhancing “the meaning of our lives” — all by assembling “the best thought and the broadest knowledge.”

In 1964, 76 percent of Americans trusted government to do the right thing “just about always or most of the time”; today, 19 percent do. The former number is one reason Johnson did so much; the latter is one consequence of his doing so.

Barry Goldwater, Johnson’s 1964 opponent who assumed that Americans would vote to have a third president in 14 months, suffered a landslide defeat. After voters rebuked FDR in 1938 for attempting to “pack” the Supreme Court, Republicans and Southern Democrats prevented any liberal legislating majority in Congress until 1965. That year, however, when 68 senators and 295 representatives were Democrats, Johnson was unfettered.

He remains, regarding government’s role, much the most consequential 20th-century president. Indeed, the American Enterprise Institute’s Nicholas Eberstadt, in his measured new booklet “The Great Society at Fifty: The Triumph and the Tragedy,” says LBJ, more than FDR, “profoundly recast the common understanding of the ends of governance.”

When Johnson became president in 1963, Social Security was America’s only nationwide social program. His programs and those they subsequently legitimated put the nation on the path to the present, in which changed social norms — dependency on government has been destigmatized — have changed America’s national character.

Between 1959 and 1966 — before the War on Poverty was implemented — the percentage of Americans living in poverty plunged by about one-third, from 22.4 to 14.7, slightly lower than in 2012. But, Eberstadt cautions, the poverty rate is “incorrigibly misleading” because government transfer payments have made income levels and consumption levels significantly different. Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, disability payments, heating assistance and other entitlements have, Eberstadt says, made income “a poor predictor of spending power for lower-income groups.” Stark material deprivation is now rare:

“By 2011 . . . average per capita housing space for people in poverty was higher than the U.S. average for 1980. . . . [Many] appliances were more common in officially impoverished homes in 2011 than in the typical American home of 1980. . . . DVD players, personal computers, and home Internet access are now typical in them — amenities not even the richest U.S. households could avail themselves of at the start of the War on Poverty.”

But the institutionalization of anti-poverty policy has been, Eberstadt says carefully, “attended” by the dramatic spread of a “tangle of pathologies.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan coined that phrase in his 1965 report calling attention to family disintegration among African Americans. The tangle, which now ensnares all races and ethnicities, includes welfare dependency and “flight from work.”

Twenty-nine percent of Americans — about 47 percent of blacks and 48 percent of Hispanics — live in households receiving means-tested benefits. And “the proportion of men 20 and older who are employed has dramatically and almost steadily dropped since the start of the War on Poverty, falling from 80.6 percent in January 1964 to 67.6 percent 50 years later.” Because work — independence, self-reliance — is essential to the culture of freedom, ominous developments have coincided with Great Society policies:

For every adult man ages 20 to 64 who is between jobs and looking for work, more than three are neither working nor seeking work, a trend that began with the Great Society. And what Eberstadt calls “the earthquake that shook family structure in the era of expansive anti-poverty policies” has seen out-of-wedlock births increase from 7.7 percent in 1965 to more than 40 percent in 2012, including 72 percent of black babies.

LBJ’s starkly bifurcated legacy includes the triumphant Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 — and the tragic aftermath of much of his other works. Eberstadt asks: Is it “simply a coincidence” that male flight from work and family breakdown have coincided with Great Society policies, and that dependence on government is more widespread and perhaps more habitual than ever? Goldwater’s insistent 1964 question is increasingly pertinent: “What’s happening to this country of ours?”
122  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud, SEIU/ACORN et al, etc. on: May 17, 2014, 08:50:33 PM
They have no problem when their fellow Democrats win ridiculous awards.   Every other week I see Hillary winning some award which is really a thinly veiled bribe to the next potential President.   angry

I heard no disclaimer from Shapman about George Herbert Bush winning an award recently at the Kennedy Center for you know what - his bravery at raising taxes against his campaign promise.   For THAT the "F" left has an award for him.  Not any other service he provied the country his entire life.  Just for raising taxes. 
And worse, he goes and "graciously" accepts the phony award.   The Bushes are great Americans.   Their politics suck.

 angry
123  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Economist on Marx de jour's economics on: May 17, 2014, 08:43:52 PM
Piketty fever

Bigger than Marx

A wonky book on inequality becomes a blockbuster
 May 3rd 2014  | From the print edition


Timekeeper  

Making equations cool again

IT IS the closest thing to a pop-culture sensation heavyweight economics will ever provide. “Capital in the Twenty-First Century”, a vast work on the past and future of inequality by Thomas Piketty, a French economist, has become the best-selling title at Amazon.com. In America the online retailer has run out of the 700-page hardcover, which it sells for $25.

“Capital” has many virtues. It is a clear and thorough analysis of one of the foremost economic concerns of the day. It provides readers with a simple explanation for rising inequality. Wealth generally grows faster than the economy, Mr Piketty argues. What is more, there are few economic forces that counteract its natural tendency to become concentrated, as greater wealth brings greater opportunity to save and invest. In the absence of exceptionally rapid growth or a nasty period of geopolitical instability like that between 1914 and 1945, inequality therefore grows.



The book has attracted much criticism, however. The most common complaints fall into four broad categories. The first concerns Mr Piketty’s tone, beginning with the title. A deliberate allusion to Karl Marx’s magnum opus, it suggests both immodesty and an innate antipathy to markets. Some critics object to Mr Piketty’s use of words like “appropriation” to describe the rising share of income going to the rich. Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Daniel Shuchman, a fund manager, fumed at the book’s “medieval hostility to the notion that financial capital earns a return”.


This is not just a matter of presentation. There is no disguising that Mr Piketty is keener on redistribution than many of his critics. Clive Crook, a columnist at Bloomberg (and former deputy editor of The Economist), asks whether the levels of future inequality the book predicts are really as “terrifying” as Mr Piketty claims.

Others find fault with the book’s economics. The statement “r > g” (meaning that the rate of return on capital is generally higher than the rate of economic growth) is central to the book’s argument that wealth tends to accumulate over time. But some complain that r is too mushily defined, especially by comparison with the calculus-strewn pages of much economics research. Writing in Foreign Affairs, Tyler Cowen of George Mason University reckons Mr Piketty sees capital as a “growing, homogeneous blob”, and so fails to take account of the variation, across time and investments, in the returns to wealth.

Happily, “Capital” is not written in economist-ese. There is relatively little mathematics; Mr Piketty uses 19th-century literature to illustrate many of his points. He freely acknowledges that riskier ventures are more lucrative than safer bets like government bonds. But he is less interested in individual investment choices than in the overall growth in value of an economy’s wealth, including everything from industrial machinery to summer homes and art collections. His data suggest that, with the exceptions mentioned, wealth of this sort does tend to grow faster than the economy as a whole. Since 1700, he reckons, wealth globally has enjoyed a typical pre-tax return of between 4% and 5% a year—considerably faster than average economic growth.

Doubting Thomas

Other critics claim that Mr Piketty ignores bedrock principles of economics. Those dictate that the return on capital should fall as it accumulates. The 100th industrial robot does not provide nearly the same boost to production as the first. Kevin Hassett, of the American Enterprise Institute, a free-market think-tank, reckons the return should fall fast enough as wealth builds that the share of income that goes to the owners of capital should not rise (as Mr Piketty suggests it does).

This disagreement is partly a problem of definitions. Capital in Mr Piketty’s book includes forms of wealth, such as land, that would not figure in economists’ models of production; his rate of return is the pace at which such wealth grows rather than the benefit to firms of investing it. Mr Piketty’s data appear to justify this approach: in the past, at least, the rich have been able to shift resources into higher-yielding forms of wealth when over-investment slashes the return. Mr Piketty also argues that the return on capital can be propped up by technology, which could lead to new ways of substituting machines for people.

A third category of criticism focuses on whether Mr Piketty overstates the extent to which the future is likely to resemble the past. Mr Cowen wonders whether r, however defined, is likely to continue to be higher than the rate of economic growth. Writing in the National Review, Jim Pethokoukis predicts that the same excessive pessimism about economies’ capacity for growth that sank Marx’s prophecies would also undermine Mr Piketty’s.

In a similar vein, some critics question the parallel between today’s wealth (which is mostly the product of soaring labour incomes) and that of the “idle rich” of the 19th century, living off inheritance. The long-run relationship between r and g has little to do with the fortunes accumulated by Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos.

Mr Piketty acknowledges the point, but does not let it distract him from his broader emphasis on the long-run returns to wealth. That is not an absurd decision. Some fortunes, like Warren Buffett’s, seem a confirmation of the contention that r is greater than g. Mr Piketty rightly points out that self-made riches may become tomorrow’s family fortune, given the propensity of wealth to perpetuate itself.

The book’s final section, on how policy should respond to rising inequality, has provoked the most disagreement. Mr Piketty’s proposal for a global tax on wealth is widely written off as politically impossible (which he concedes). Critics like Mr Cowen and Greg Mankiw, an economist at Harvard University, argue that his recommendations are motivated by ideology more than economics.

“Capital” does give unduly short shrift to conservative concerns. Mr Piketty glosses over the question of whether attempts to redistribute wealth will weaken growth. He also assumes, rather blithely, that growing inequality leads to instability. Yet that is not always the case: many democracies have managed such challenges without upheaval. Given the mass of data Mr Piketty has assembled, he might profitably have analysed in what circumstances inequality generates conflict. Then again, the success of his book, and the ever-expanding commentary it has provoked, will doubtless inspire others to do so soon.

From the print edition: Finance and economics
124  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Benghazi and related matters on: May 16, 2014, 07:09:39 PM
I wondered about that too.  Wasn't he sodomized according to reports?  I suppose she would conclude it was necrophilia.
125  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Benghazi and related matters on: May 15, 2014, 10:02:38 AM
Of course I never expect any real objectivity from Eleanor Clift.  I only bother to post this crazy piece to highlight how the left simply refuses to recognize and criticize a cover-up just before an election.   Just outrageous.  It really is like mafia.  Simply bribe voters with taxpayer money and we have half the population agreeing to ignore this:

*******Eleanor Clift

05.15.14

My Benghazi Scandal

I may be under fire from conservatives for saying Ambassador Stevens wasn’t murdered in Benghazi, but I’m not backing down. Here’s why I said what I did.

After getting hammered by the right for remarks I made on the McLaughlin Group last weekend, I’d like to put what I said into the context that my critics omit. My information came from a former ambassador who lamented that complex and chaotic events in Benghazi are being way oversimplified. He pointed out that Ambassador Chris Stevens died of smoke inhalation in the safe room of a CIA outpost, that he wasn’t murdered in the sense that word is normally used. I thought this was an appropriate observation and still do, despite the hysteria my saying so has ignited on the right.

There is shared blame for the fact that Stevens wasn’t properly guarded and defended, but the chaos of that night and the days following stemmed from herculean efforts to keep the CIA’s involvement secret. Stevens was a very brave and assertive ambassador. He knew the language and the people, and he took risks he shouldn’t have. The former ambassador whose views I relied on believes that Stevens was in Benghazi to confront the CIA about prisoners they were holding and interrogating at the outpost. He speculates the attack on the facility was to free the prisoners.

If these are the kinds of questions that the select committee examines, maybe it will be a worthwhile exercise.

In the meantime, for perspective, I urge everyone to read Jane Mayer’s article “Ronald Reagan’s Benghazi,” which recounts a series of terrorist attacks in Beirut beginning with the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in April 1983, when 17 Americans, including seven CIA officers, were among the 63 killed. In October 1983, a truck filled with explosives rammed a Marine compound, killing 241 unarmed Marines in their sleep. Next was the torture and murder of the CIA station chief in Beirut, followed by yet another bombing of a U.S. outpost in September 1984, two months before the presidential election.

No administration is immune to tragic events in troublesome spots in the world, and not every tragedy is a scandal.

A House investigation of the Marine barracks bombing found “very serious errors in judgment” and recommended additional security measures around the world. When the September ’84 bombing occurred nearly a year later and the security was not yet in place, Democrats did not see it as an opportunity to score political points. Instead they accepted President Reagan’s explanation that repairs take time: “Anyone who’s ever had their kitchen done over knows that it never gets done as soon as you wish it would.”

Today no one in either party would accept such a benign explanation for a lapse in security, nor should they. But no administration is immune to tragic events in troublesome spots in the world, and not every tragedy is a scandal. Poking around for partisan gain in what lawmakers now know were clandestine activities for answers to questions that for the most part have already been answered is the scandal
126  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / My first thought when I saw this picture on: May 15, 2014, 09:50:35 AM
I wonder if this is what the explosion of the "crater" at the battle of Petersburg, Virginia in 1864 looked like:

http://news.yahoo.com/massive-tunnel-bomb-hits-syrian-army-video-095628015.html
127  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: May 15, 2014, 09:45:18 AM
GM, what do you think?

Can we banish or send her on a long vacation to:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elba

Huh?

We need to rid the world of her where she can do no further harm.
128  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: May 15, 2014, 09:35:14 AM
One of my fellow neurologist friend whose politics would fit well on this board said she was lucky to come out of it without (obvious) brain damage.   It is not my area, but my understanding from him is that some of these people do suffer strokes and permanent brain damage.

Of course she had immediate and top of the line care.  Suppose it was someone who was home alone.
129  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Remarkable life of a former slave: Robert Smalls on: May 13, 2014, 09:56:40 PM
Escaped slavery with others by hijacking a gun boat and dressing up as whites and sailed out of Charleston harbor.
Served for the Union as a civilian advisor and met Abraham Lincoln in 1862 helping to convince the President and Sec of War Stanton to allow Blacks to fight for the Union.
Later became a Republican Congressman and served several terms.

Wrote legislation that led to the first *mandatory* public schools in the country.

Wrote legislation that would have essentially provided for racial integration of the military but it was never "considered" roghly 80 years before the military was integrated.

Gotta love the next quote from him.  How times have changed:  


Smalls identified with the Republican Party, saying it was

"The party of Lincoln which unshackled the necks of four million human beings." In his campaign speeches he said, "Every colored man who has a vote to cast, would cast that vote for the regular Republican Party and thus bury the Democratic Party so deep that there will not be seen even a bubble coming from the spot where the burial took place." Later in life he recalled, "I can never loose [sic] sight of the fact that had it not been for the Republican Party, I would have never been an office-holder of any kind—from 1862—to present."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Smalls
130  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Benghazi and related matters on: May 11, 2014, 12:01:10 PM
Apparently the CIC feels it is none of the public's business where he was.

Could anyone imagine the MSM accepting that as an answer if it were Nixon?
131  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The "crises" on: May 11, 2014, 11:59:02 AM
Fits Hillary's narrative doesn't it?   Butchery in Africa.  Who knew?  How convenient:

http://news.yahoo.com/katie-couric-kidnapping-nigeria-bringbackourgirls-184944658.html
132  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: May 10, 2014, 12:37:46 PM
good point
133  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iraq on: May 10, 2014, 12:36:42 PM
"BARAQ THREW IT AWAY"

He would see it in his political interests that the mission is not a long term success.  Fits the Democrat/Socialist Party narrative.

No coincidence.
134  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: May 10, 2014, 10:30:16 AM
My post from last year.  I pointed out I agreed with Ezekial Emanuel that there IS NO shortage of doctors or at least primary care:

*****Follow up to previous post.  Went to meeting of the New Jersey american college of physicians few weeks ago and listened to Ezekiel's talk.

Basically he starts with a bunch of charts and graphs describing what we all know - health care costs are going up and are unsustainable.

His prescription is basically for provider groups to form and control costs by monitoring what they do "outcomes" and basically what managed care has been doing for decades now.   I guess the difference is really now the politburo types are requiring we do it on industrial scale with industrial level quality control with reems of data, measurements, more data of the data more measurements and every penny counted.  He gave one example from a gourp of several hundred physcians Caremont though I don't remember where they are located and I haven't looked into it - yet.

Supposedly they cut costs while increasing the bottom line.  Thus this is a model for all.

He also explains the cost rising is down form over 2% to around 0.8%.  Of course he is suggesting he and the rest of the politburo are responsible for cost savings - not that the economy is so bad for most people they can't aford their co pays their deductables their premiums and neither can as many employers.

I only had a chance for one question so I asked him about Clay Christiansens theory that Nurse Practitioners will supplant primary care doctors and it is inevitable and no stopping it.  He said PCP's are not replaceabale by nurses and that he doesn't think that would happen - though we are clearly seeing that trend.

He doesn't believe that there is a doctor shortage.  Indeed I agree with him on that.  There probably is a shortage of a few specialties and doctors in some low income urban areas or in the boondocks but certainly not in the north east and probably the West coast.

Indded if any group feels threateneed by the low wages of illegals /legal immigrants no where is this felt more than in health care.

All we see here are doctors born everywhrere else.  The schools of course also like to play the shortage gimmack so they can get more money to churn more graduates out and the nursing programs the same.

Getting back to Emanuel his personality is the same as his brother Rahm.    He ran out after one question after mine.  I guess he had his next speaking engagement.l****

The doctors exist and are being churned out left and right.  Except is some rural areas as always.  If there are going to be longer waits it would be a  result of some doctors refusing to accept patients our of principle or more they refuse to accept the lower pay coverage.   As always follow the money.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/05/10/obamacare-surge-primary-care-overload/8894227/
135  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / FEC chair was ? Republican on: May 10, 2014, 10:18:05 AM
A Republican trying to silence Drudge and Hannity?  Wow.  Is this an example of the Washington "Establishment" steamrolling conservatives OR just Democrat politics?:

http://www.fec.gov/members/goodman/goodman_bio.shtml
136  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / most defense projects go over budget on: May 10, 2014, 09:40:27 AM
With the recent announcement of the new multibillion dollar Presidential helicopter program the question remains will it even remain within the budget.  Answer is almost certainly no.   

http://gizmodo.com/5637188/is-this-the-reason-why-most-military-projects-go-over-budget/all
137  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I wish I could be as optimistic as you. on: May 10, 2014, 09:31:45 AM
Doug writes,

"President Obama's magnificent political success can be attributed to one main cause:  weak opponents."

No doubt Republican candidates are all with flaws. 

But we are up against a very antagonistic media.

We are up against a very antagonistic educational class.

We are up against racial and gender and class politics.

We are up against buying of votes that cold hard taxpayer cash can buy.

Worse, "establishment Republicans" certainly are part of the problem.

Doug I hope your are right and I am wrong.   I think it is too late. 


138  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: May 10, 2014, 09:25:02 AM
The side by side comparison of the pictures is really creepy.   They are nearly identical in appearance.

Did his mother know this guy before he was born?  I am not clear.
139  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iraq on: May 10, 2014, 09:16:32 AM
Saddam,

" I like to call a spade a spade" when speaking of Zionists and Americans.  Just not himself or his sons.

Bush thought Iraqis would be dancing in the streets when we rid them of this monster.  Some Iraqis felt that way.  But not enough.   How many Iraqis died since then 100K?

Our country did a glorious deed.  Our troops are heroes to the World.  And look at the thanks we get.  Look at the Democrat Party twisting this for political gain.

Disgusting and sad.
140  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Foreign Policy on: May 08, 2014, 11:09:58 AM
" G.W.'s screw-up was thinking that we had any business (let alone any chance of success) in trying to institute a democratic, human-rights-based government in Iraq.  This is a society which has been governed by Islam, which is inherently anti-individual, and until and unless this changes, instituting a democracy there, or in any other Middle Eastern society is a fool's errand."

I agree with this.  I was wrong too because I was for getting rid of that monster Saddam.  But so was the hILL  wink  Ten years of "girl power" driven down our throats day in and day out.  Perhaps we can form an alliance with White, Black, Asian, Latino men  cheesy 
141  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: May 08, 2014, 11:05:26 AM
Agree with two previous posts.  I am very pessimistic that it is already too late.  The left is winning big.
We have immense corruption in government, wall street and the rest.  We hear about "1% ers" when it suits the left's political purposes.  The answer is always to tax the rich and buy votes with the cash.  Obamster reduced funding for the FBI for white collar crime.  And yet the illegals get more legal help than the rest of us:


******Administration to pledge equal education for illegal immigrants
 .

By Benjamin Goad - 05/07/14 02:27 PM EDT

The Obama administration announced Wednesday it would issue new guidance requiring U.S. schools to provide equal education to all children, regardless of their immigration status.

Attorney General Eric Holder and Education Secretary Arne Duncan are expected to detail the proposal Thursday morning during a conference call with reporters.

The Justice and Education departments sought through 2011 guidance to ensure equal treatment for children living in the U.S. illegally in accordance with the Supreme Court’s 1982 Plyler vs. Doe ruling, which prohibited a school district from charging illegal immigrants extra tuition fees.

“The Obama administration continues to receive reports that school districts are adopting policies and practices that have the effect of discouraging, and in some cases preventing, undocumented children and children from immigrant families from enrolling in public schools,” the Justice Department said in announcing the follow-up guidance. “The new guidance is intended to help address these issues.“

The updated guidance is intended to help schools understand their responsibilities under Plyler vs. Doe and other federal civil rights laws..

Read more: http://thehill.com/regulation/205484-administration-to-pledge-equal-education-for-illegal-immigrants#ixzz318lrFiIR
Follow us: @thehill on Twitter | TheHill on Facebook
142  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / One of the biggest threats to our nation; under the Godless on: May 08, 2014, 10:46:36 AM
The cover up of Benghazi and the complicity of the entire Democrat establishment either by ideology, bribery, and extortion is one of the threats to our country @ this time.

I don't recall any other time in history wherein we had top members of a Presidential administration cover up a terrorist attack on Americans and just before an election and there appears to be No accountability.  

For those of us who are old enough to remember Watergate the comparison is stark.  I was 15 or 16 at the time and I remember vividly how the MSM in newspapers and TV news networks were ALL OVER this story driving it home till Nixon resigned before he was impeached.  Most people in the beginning didn't even pay attention or care.  Most people still favored Nixon.  In retrospect I am not even sure that when he resigned he might not still have had more favorable voters than not.

The MSM were tripping and stepping over each other to get him (the Republican) with hysteria and demonical fervor.  

Fast forward to the present.   Any objective person can say the Benghazi cover up is far worse then was Watergate.   Bernstein says, but Nixon's crimes were not just about Watergate but an entire "shadow" government.   Don't we see an entire shadow government and press now??

The entire integrity of the Presidential Office is at stake in my opinion.   If there is no accounting of this and it is allowed that it is OK for such deceit to be inflicted on our people without holding those responsible then we are finished.  Clinton started this kind of thinking.  He may be popular but he did great damage to the integrity of the Office or the Presidency as well as our country.  

Republicans must not let this stand.  Not just for political reasons but for the future integrity of that office and our country.  

If the MSM continues to threaten Fox, talk radio, Republicans away from this.   "They risk it backfiring", "nothing there", "already old story", " we already investigated this as did the (Democratic controlled) Senate and all the rest.

Almost all the Dow companies have ties to Clinton Foundation.  So what about the 1% ers?  Republicans have to reach out to the ALL voters and point this out.  
Today the Democratic Party is the Socialist Party.  Propaganda and all.  Big problem for our future.  
143  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: May 08, 2014, 10:28:41 AM
The hILL is already out along with Obamster on the talk circuit turning this into the her image of girl power.  Of course this is horrific.  Along with all the other horror stories that come out of Africa as long as I can remember.   Black on Black crime.  Remember Bush I going into Somalia for humanitarian reasons?

But she seizes on this to change the topic from Lewinsky and it fits her gender twist.  IF 200 Black boys were murdered she would have been silent.

Typical Clinton change the story, twist to her political game and benefit and the journalist MSM do everything to give HER free press.  Why is it her opinion even matters now on this?

Ten more years of the Clintons.... cry angry rolleyes
144  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / substances harder than diamonds discovered on: May 06, 2014, 09:38:44 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16610-diamond-no-longer-natures-hardest-material.html#.U2mb-xXD_b0
145  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / "E" cigarettes on: May 04, 2014, 09:34:53 AM
My 2 cents again.  I think E cigarettes are a great idea.  A patient told me he uses one without the nicotine and flavored which helps with the "habit" part of smoking: 


*******U.S. e-cigarette experiment inspires new medical device

Reuters
By By Toni Clarke 2 hours ago
 
Electronic cigarette vaporizers Cera and Luna by Thermo-Essence Technologies are pictured in San Carlos

(L-R) Electronic cigarette vaporizers Cera and Luna by Thermo-Essence Technologies are pictured in San …
By Toni Clarke

(Reuters) - When Noah Minskoff's mother died of lung cancer in 2007, e-cigarettes were just entering the U.S. market. Minskoff, who had just started medical school in Utah, wondered whether the devices might have saved his mother's life by helping her quit smoking. Later, he sent some samples to his boyhood friend Nathan Terry, a mechanical engineer, and asked for his opinion.

Terry, who was working in Germany for the French industrial firm Areva, took apart the products to see how they were made. What he found disturbed him: at the heart of the devices were heater wires of unknown quality wrapped around bundles of glass fibers and surrounded by steel wool, silicon, plastic, tape and adhesives.

Wires between the heater, circuit board and batteries were connected with lead solder and also housed in tape and plastic. Everything was close to the heat source, meaning consumers were at risk of inhaling fiber and metal particles as well as toxic fumes from hot plastic and lead.

"There were red flags everywhere," Terry said.

Still, he liked the concept and decided to design a version of his own, avoiding the use of fiberglass, plastic and solder and sourcing his materials entirely in the United States. In 2009 he reunited with Minskoff in California and formed a company, Thermo-Essence Technologies, to sell the product.

At $300 a piece, the e-cigarette serves a niche market, albeit one with a loyal following among medical marijuana patients and smokers looking for a high-end e-cigarette. As many as 30,000 have been sold.

But what began as a quest to develop a better e-smoke has broadened into an ambitious effort to design a new medical device: an inhaler that delivers measured doses of nicotine to help people quit smoking. The technology could also eventually be used as an abuse-resistant delivery device for other drugs, including opioid painkillers.

If successful, the inhaler could become the first new smoking-cessation product to emerge from the e-cigarette field and would compete with products such as GlaxoSmithKline Plc's nicotine gum and Pfizer Inc's antismoking drug, Chantix.

A STARTUP WITH BIOTECH FUNDING

To develop the inhaler, Terry formed a second company, Minusa LLC, which is based in Newtown, Connecticut. Minskoff left Thermo-Essence for family reasons and is not involved in Minusa. Terry himself is leaving Thermo-Essence, which is currently being sold, to concentrate on Minusa.

The new company obtained initial funding from Michael Breede, a commercial real-estate-turned-biotech investor whose father suffered from drug and alcohol addiction and who is eager to see an abuse-resistant painkiller device.

"This is in my wheelhouse," he said. "I think we can put a serious dent in this problem."

When Terry developed his e-cigarette he assumed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would begin regulating the industry, as it has recently done, proposing a ban on sales to people under the age of 18 and requiring companies to register. Later it could impose product standard and quality controls.

Terry wanted to create a product that would pass any FDA inspection. He used a pure metal wire wrapped around a rod made from magnesia-stabilized zirconia, a highly durable ceramic material. Instead of meshes, tape and plastic he used novel porous ceramics and surgical-grade alloys, and instead of soldering parts together he connected them mechanically, fitting components together like Legos to complete the circuits.

He built on that design to create his drug-delivery device, known as Envi, a single-user, tamper-resistant, metered-dose inhaler.

Envi is about the size of a short cigar and comes with a spare in a case the size of a deck of playing cards.

The nicotine or other drug will come in a sealed cartridge that the patient will insert into the inhaler. To activate the device, the user will have to enter a code. The inhaler will be programed to deliver a certain amount of drug and then turn off.

When the device is returned to the case, which is required after each dose to activate it for the next dose, data on the patient's usage will be downloaded and available to be viewed electronically by the prescribing physician.

"It will only let you take your prescription," Terry said. "It will log your usage and transmit it in real time, and make it easier for the doctor to monitor and interact with the patient."

BUILDING A BETTER INHALER

Terry, 37, who grew up on an organic farm in Ohio to "hippy commune" parents and studied mechanical engineering at the University of Idaho, faces multiple challenges.

Inhalers are typically more expensive to develop than pills, and ensuring patients get the right dose is more complicated.

"I can see a lot of barriers, but the idea is certainly interesting," said Dr. Ben Forbes, a Reader in Pharmaceutics, broadly the equivalent of a U.S. professor, at King's College London who specializes in inhaled medications.

There needs to be a good reason to target a drug to the lungs, Forbes said. Drugs that are inhaled may work faster than pills, so a device that offered quick pain relief in an abuse-resistant form would be "brilliant" if it could be produced economically, he added.

"Changes in inhaler technology have been very incremental over the years, so maybe something like this would have a place."

In the meantime, big tobacco companies are developing alternative nicotine products they hope one day will carry a "modified risk" of harm. Some are dispensed through an inhaler.

Unlike Terry's smoking-cessation device, which he plans to file with the FDA's drug division, these products would be marketed as less risky alternatives to smoking and be processed through the FDA's tobacco division.

However smokers end up using the new products will be the subject of intense research by the FDA.

Terry believes he is creating a product that will survive any market configuration. Minusa has a long way to go, and human trials may be two years off. Eventually he hopes to partner with a big drug company.

"I think we can change how drugs are delivered."

(Reporting by Toni Clarke in Washington; Editing by Michele Gershberg and Prudence Crowther)

146  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / frack boom on: May 04, 2014, 08:47:05 AM
My 2 cents first:

I recall in the late 1990s how one expert said we were at peak oil and the world supply will forever begin to decline.
Fast forward -  yes the biggest obstacle now are the environmentalists and the liberals.  I do agree we can't allow the frackers to simply scorch the Earth and leave vast wastelands for our descendants but we needn't go the other extreme either.  Need to rid the World of Obama first.   Probably even the Clintons would sign on to the Keystone pipeline.  Even they were not that destructive of the USA as the present guy.  (They are as destructive in other ways - ethics, honesty, etc.)

 
************Jeff McMahon Contributor

Follow   

I cover green technology, energy and the environment from Chicago. full bio →


Tech 5/04/2014 @ 8:58AM 682 views

Fracking Insiders See No End To Boom
 
Despite official predictions that the U.S. energy boom will pop like a bubble in the next 20 years, people engaged in drilling for oil and gas—from the financiers to the frackers—see no end to boom times or low gas prices, industry insiders said in Chicago Friday.

Late last year the International Energy Agency predicted the U.S. would surpass Russia and Saudi Arabia to become the world’s largest energy producer by 2015 but would run out of gas, so to speak, in the 2020s. The U.S. Energy Information Administration made a similar assessment  last year, predicting production would decline after 2020 and then increased demand would drive up gas prices.

But such glum assessments underestimate not only the amount of domestic shale oil and gas, but also the ingenuity of those  tapping it, the insiders suggested Friday at the Energy Forward conference hosted by the Chicago Booth Energy Group.

“It’s amazing how much is out there, and we have very high confidence on most of these plays that they’re going to be very long lived,” said Robert Beck, who explores for Anadarko Petroleum Corp.

Most shale oil wells today start strong but taper off quickly compared to conventional wells, and some cease production in 7.5 to 8 years. But drilling technologies are evolving quickly to change that, said James King, a vice president for well competition with Baker Hughes, an oilfield services company.

“There are a lot of bright minds working today to make the wells have higher rates of production, slower decline curves, better terminal production and at less cost,” King said. “In the long term I think there will be technological solutions to fast decline curves and short-life wells.”

The U.S. will set records for oil production this year, King said. ”I would expect it’s sustainable. The technology didn’t just happen, it wasn’t just switched on, it evolved over time, and we’ll have better technologies than we did before.”

New technologies are likely to be employed re-fracking wells that seem depleted to current technologies.

“There’s nothing to keep you from fracking the same well a second time or a third time. As we go back to fracking these existing wells, what we might find is that we’ll have more patience and spend a little more money on the science up front to determine where to stimulate an existing well, and so we’ll be able to bring wells back on at least as strong as they were originally.”

The U.S. has an estimated 5 to 6 trillion barrels of oil locked up in shale, said Vance L. Scott of the management consulting firm A.T. Kearney—resources up to 15 times the size of the largest oil field in Saudi Arabia, he said. “To date we’ve used as a species, depending on the source, 700 billion to a trillion in oil.”

In its 2013 Outlook, the Energy Information Administration predicted gas prices would increase by 2040 to $7.65 per million BTU. The industry insiders at Friday’s conference, while not venturing so precise a prediction so far ahead, expect prices to stabilize at a lower level for the foreseeable future.

“Eventually we think the markets are going to balance between $4 and $5—$5.50 kind of the upper bound,” Scott said.

The financial advisory firm Lazard also expects gas prices to stabilize between $4.50 and $5. The firm hired “very contrarian thinkers” to try to burst the bubble of optimism within the industry, said George Bilicic, Lazard’s global head of power, energy and infrastructure.

“We hired a consultant about 18 months ago to do a very elaborate study for us on natural gas. We said, it cannot be that everyone is right about natural gas…. We said prove why everyone is wrong. And they came back—these very contrarian thinkers—they came back and said everyone is right.”

Asked how confident he was in Lazard’s $4.5o price estimate, Bilicic said “I’m not confident at all.” There’s an argument between bulls who see prices rising with economic growth and LNG exports and bears who expect the demand for gas to be undercut by energy efficiency, renewable energy, and environmental concerns. But Lazard’s calculations place the price in that range.

“We’re not so sure where gas prices will be over the long term. We do a highly proprietary and, of course because its Lazard, highly sophisticated levelized cost of energy analysis where we use long-term gas prices at about $4.50 or $5 across the U.S.”

 “When we look at the reserves and we look at people’s ability to drill it’s hard to see how you’re going to see anything other than” that price, Bilicic said.

Environmental concerns remain the most overt threat to the boom.

“If you look at the carbon effects of natural gas and carbon is the issue, the difference between an all natural gas system and the system we have now, it’s not that much better from a carbon perspective, even displacing a lot of the coal,” Bilicic said. ”So we’re a little worried, but we think that’s the right outlook on things right now.”

Constraints could also come from unforeseen directions. Two years ago, there was a shortage of guar gum from India, a component of fracking fluids, and this winter’s polar vortex slowed transports of fracking sand from Wisconsin.

“Who would have thought little bitty things like guar and sand could slow the unconventional growth curve,” said Beck from Anadarko. “That’s another way the industry is different nowadays.”

Follow Jeff McMahon on Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, or email him here.

147  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: May 04, 2014, 08:37:03 AM
"If the left didn't have double standards, they'd have no standards at all."

Good point.  No standards at all except what suits them.  Either personally or with their progressive agenda.
148  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Drudgereport giving me heartburn on: May 04, 2014, 07:21:39 AM
My second 'negative' pessimistic post of the day.  I wake up feel refreshed and then I go to Drudge just to get aggravated.  
The media had no problem with releasing the contents of an illegally recorded *private* conversation between Sterling and his essentially prostitute friend ("I should have paid her") because it fit their liberal narrative, but now suddenly how dare this guy release to the public Kerry's comments which are FAR more important to the world because it is not in *their* narrative:

****Josh Rogin 
Washington Bureau
  
05.02.14

Damn Right I Taped Kerry’s ‘Apartheid’ Talk

And if I had to do it all over again, I’d do it in the exact same way.

Ten years ago, when I was a rookie reporter for the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun, I looked up to Joseph Nye as a sacred figure, the preeminent American expert on Japan. So it hurt a little when Nye wrote to Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday to accuse me of “sneaking in” to a meeting of the Trilateral Commission last week in Washington, where John Kerry made explosive remarks warning that Israeli could become “an apartheid state.”




But I don’t blame Joseph Nye for accusing me of unethical journalism practices. He is not a journalist and he does not know the “rules” of journalism, both written and not so. I do. I’m a reporter. I know the rules and I follow them meticulously. In ten years of reporting for five different top news organizations, I’ve never broken an agreement with an official or a source and I never will. My living is dependent on that reputation and I worked hard to earn it.

If a reporter agrees that a conversation or event is off-the-record, then of course he cannot print what was said during that interchange. But the unwritten rule—the one that directly applies here—is that if a reporter enters an off-the-record event uninvited and has not agreed to the off-the-record terms, he is free to report what happens inside that event. It’s the responsibility of the event organizers to keep reporters from entering events without invitations. As long as the reporter does not misrepresent himself and does not attempt to conceal a recording device, the event is fair game. That’s the rule.

Did I enter the Trilateral Commission event with Kerry, tape it, and then reveal to the world what our Secretary of State is saying to influential world leaders behind closed doors?

Damn right I did.

Other outlets, including Politico, rushed to publish posts alleging I “sneaked” into the meeting and “secretly” recorded Kerry, based on the Nye letter. They reported “great frustration at the State Dept.” over the story. Politico also dredged up a story from 2009 when Jeffrey Goldberg accused me of being a bad Jew and worse for reporting on his interview of the Israeli ambassador at a local synagogue on Yom Kippur.

(I did issue a minor correction to that story. But on the charge of being a bad Jew? Like Hebrew National, I answer to a higher authority.)

The Daily Caller pointed out that even as Politico called me a “repeat offender,” its reporter acknowledged that although attendees agreed to keep the meeting off the record, “Rogin, who was not invited to the event, was not bound by this agreement.”

The Huffington Post pointed out that Nye didn’t actually present any real evidence that I was inside the meeting at all, saying only that I was recognized by a “friend” who was a member of the commission. The unnamed “friend” would not put his name in front of the accusation. Nye declined multiple times to explain why. But it really doesn’t matter.




“If Rogin attended and did not explicitly agree to any off-the-record ground rules, and did not misrepresent himself in the process, the comments are fair game to report.”

“If Rogin attended and did not explicitly agree to any off-the-record ground rules, and did not misrepresent himself in the process, the comments are fair game to report from a journalistic standpoint,” the Huffington Post explained.

Reporters can never reveal how they get their stories. Our processes, even our tricks, are sacred. They are the only advantage we have against the powerful people and organizations trying to keep information out of the public eye. They have hundreds of public affairs personnel, millions of dollars, and the ability to enforce tight control of media access to the leaders we trust with our national security and diplomacy. We have only our sources, our savvy, and our willingness to do what’s necessary to find out the things our government is trying to hide, within the bounds of the rules.

Nevertheless, in the interest of transparency, I will make this one time exception to my rule of never talking about my reporting process. Here is exactly what happened.

Friday morning I got a tip from a source that Kerry would be speaking at the Trilateral Commission meeting at the Mandarin Oriental hotel, a luxurious place just far enough away from downtown DC to avoid random foot traffic but still only 10 minutes from my office by taxi. The State Department had disclosed Kerry’s appearance there and marked it “closed press” in their daily scheduling note, but had not disclosed the location. I hopped in a cab.

I got there early so I parked myself in an empty room near the lobby and finished up another story I was working on. At about 2:30, the time of Kerry’s scheduled remarks, I walked over to the meeting room, walked straight to the front entrance of the room, nodded politely to the staffer at the door (she nodded back) and entered along with dozens of other people who were filing in.

Nobody ever asked me who I was. I didn’t have a name tag but many of the invited attendees weren’t wearing theirs so nobody thought anything of it. As the approximately 200 attendees got settled in for the Kerry speech, I found a seat in the corner, opened up my laptop, placed my recorder on my lap in plain sight, turned it on, and waited for the fun to begin.

A fellow journalist—I won’t say who, but you can read a list of the ones that attended the event here—spotted me in the hallway before the event. We made chit chat and talked about The Trilateral Commission in general terms. He mentioned that he was a member of the Commission. He didn’t ask me if I was a member or was invited and I didn’t volunteer any information either way. I have no idea if he is the “friend” who ratted me out to Joseph Nye.

Kerry stuck mostly to his script, but veered off at times, as he often does. I was focused on his remarks about Ukraine, when he seemed to reveal new information about intelligence collection on Russia and promised new sanctions. (I finished up a story from the room, and attributed Kerry’s remarks to “an attendee,” because there I was. Once I got home and had a chance to listen to the tapes, I sourced Kerry’s remarks to a recording obtained by The Daily Beast.) Kerry’s remarks on Israel were typical for him, until he dropped the now infamous A-bomb.

I left in the middle of the Q&A because I had another appointment. We will probably never know what else Kerry told the Trilateral Commission behind closed doors. I was proud to be able to bring my readers a story about what our top diplomat says about an important issue when he didn’t think the cameras were rolling. I expected some pushback and anger from the State Department. I was surprised that so many people bought the spin that I somehow I had done something unethical.

If I had to do it all over again, I would do it in the exact same way. Event organizers and public officials should be forewarned. The public disclosure of this episode may make it harder for me to enter rooms the powerful people don’t want me in, maybe not, we’ll see. If it does, no worries, I’ve got plenty of other ways to get important and true information about our government to my readers. I don’t have to break the rules to break news.

I will admit to one ethical indiscretion in the reporting of these stories. While I was waiting for Kerry to get to the meeting, I partook of the lunch buffet and made myself a plate of pork loin, chicken, and a very nice rice pilaf. Professor Nye, my apologies. Please send me a bill.****
149  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The Clintons on: May 04, 2014, 07:09:23 AM
Sorry Doug.  As much as I wish you are right I beg to differ......

"And Geffen, who gave Obama his first big Hollywood fund-raiser in 2008 and broke with the Clintons because he felt they lied “with such ease, it’s troubling,” now says he will “absolutely” support Hillary in 2016, calling her “an extraordinary, smart, accomplished woman.”

This country is so screwed.  Barring an unforeseen event or events the Republican party which by the way also does NOT represent me, but is closer to my values, has NO chance of defeating this *machine*.  The machine is far greater than the Clintons themselves.  It truly is remarkable how all Crats consistently fall into line when needed.  Just remarkable.
Any semblance of honesty or ethics is right out the window.  Lock step Jack footed boots; in lock step, and marching forward:

****Maureen Dowd

42 and 45 Overpower 44
MAY 3, 2014

Maureen Dowd  
WASHINGTON — THE First Family is all over the news, discussing the management of the economy, income inequality, raising the minimum wage, the vicissitudes of press coverage and the benefits of healthy eating.

Everywhere you look, the Clintons rule.

Bill popped up on the front page of The Times giving a speech at his alma mater, Georgetown University, in which he defended his economic policies and chastised the press for its tendency to create a “storyline” that doesn’t match reality. (Sort of like the storyline the Clintons created about Monica Lewinsky being a delusional stalker.)

Hillary’s Apache dance with the press is detailed in the new issue of Politico Magazine, a piece that got a lot more buzz than the news the White House was excited about on Friday: a sharp drop in the unemployment rate.

Chelsea is serenely smiling from the cover of Fast Company for a story on how “the product of two of the most powerful brands in the world” is “carving out her own identity — by joining the family business,” as vice chair in charge of shaping up the tangled finances of the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation. Her impending baby is being treated with enormous fanfare and exhaustive political analysis, like America’s answer to Britain’s bonny Prince George.

Obamaworld was even paranoid that Hillaryland would hijack the B-list festivities associated with the annual White House Correspondents Dinner this weekend.

The former and future Democratic regime is clearly itching to get back in the saddle and relieve a president who is stalled on every front, and who never really got any joy from working the joystick of power or appreciated the value of the carrot-stick approach that helped Lincoln and L.B.J. bend history.

Both President Obama and Hillary have recently referred to leadership as a relay race. And if a fatigued and fed-up Obama looks ready to pass the baton early, the ravenous and relentless Clintons look ready to grab it — and maybe give him a few whacks over the head with it.

Obama’s reign has become increasingly bloodless, and while the Clintons are not new blood, they do convey more vitality than the formerly electrifying politician in the White House.

Things have now reached the point where it feels as though 42 and 45 have already taken over the reins of Washington power from 44, who is fading Snapchat-fast.

The Clintons now have Obama, as one top Democrat said, “totally at their mercy” because they “take the oxygen out of the room.”

Hillary’s stock is so high — almost as high as her speaking fees — that in The Daily Beast, Tina Brown urged the front-runner to skip the campaign and simply go straight to becoming “post-President.”

Just to make the Clintons feel completely at home as they ramp up to the restoration, there is even a congressional investigation spurred by the vast right-wing conspiracy.

House Speaker John Boehner announced Friday that he would call a vote to set up a select committee to look into the Benghazi debacle, and whether Congress was misled by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and others in the Obama administration.

As Slate’s Dave Weigel tweeted, “The nice thing about having a Benghazi select committee is you can roll it over into the Hillary presidency.”

Many of those who aroused the Clintons’ opprobrium and well-known taste for vengeance by supporting the rookie Barack Obama in 2008 thought they were headed to a fresh era in politics, moving past the gnarly braiding of the personal and political that led to chaos in the Clinton era.

But the Clinton machine, once described by David Geffen as “very unpleasant and unattractive and effective,” has a Rasputin resilience. And now those who broke away are in the awkward position of having to make nice with the woman they helped vanquish.

Samantha Power recently said that she regretted calling Hillary a “monster” and offered her new view: “She just brings such rigor and conviction to everything she touches.”

Claire McCaskill, who endorsed Obama in 2008 and said she didn’t want her daughter near Bill Clinton and confided to a friend that she was nervous to be alone in an elevator with Hillary, announced in June that she is “Ready for Hillary.”

Caroline Kennedy, whose endorsement in 2008 comparing Obama to her father was pivotal, told NBC’s Chuck Todd: “I would like to see her run if that’s what she wants to do. I think she would be great.”

The will take a 42 and 45 anytime over a 41, 43 and 45.
There's just enough time for Barry to resign, make Joe president and show Bill and Hill he door.
 
Geffen might note the Clinton's still lie at ease, but next to Obama, they sound like saints. Come to think of it, Richard Nixon was a saint...
 
 And Geffen, who gave Obama his first big Hollywood fund-raiser in 2008 and broke with the Clintons because he felt they lied “with such ease, it’s troubling,” now says he will “absolutely” support Hillary in 2016, calling her “an extraordinary, smart, accomplished woman.”

Elizabeth Warren, who criticized Hillary in a 2003 book for an unprincipled stand on a bankruptcy bill, siding with the big banks she needed to bankroll her political career, lets Hillary off the hook in her new book.

Leon Panetta, who served as chief of staff for Bill Clinton and secretary of defense for Obama, told The Times that Obama had not yet defined America’s 21st-century role in the world.

“Hopefully, he’ll do it,” Panetta said, “and certainly, she would.”

The president who dreamed of being “transformative” seems bummed, and that’s bumming out Americans.

But when you talk about batting singles, you’re just asking to be overshadowed by the next big draft pick. If you’re playing small ball and you’re articulating your diminished expectations, it’s only natural that someone is going to fill the void.

Some Obama aides get irritated when Hillary distances herself from Obama and when her advisers paint her as tougher than Obama, someone who wouldn’t be afraid to drop the hammer and sickle on Vladimir Putin.

And some in Obamaworld think she could have skipped her $200,000-plus speeches to Goldman Sachs and helped the stumbling president make his push on health care, given that the push was focused on moms and kids, an area of interest for the woman who would be the first woman president.
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But they were hoisted on their own petard. It was the lone-cat President Obama who ignored the usual practice in politics — dancin’ with those who brung ya and dismantling your bitter rival’s machine — and encouraged the view of Hillary as the presumptive nominee over his unfailingly loyal vice president, Joe Biden. Three of his key political advisers — Jim Messina, Jeremy Bird and Mitch Stewart — have gone to super PACs supporting Hillary.

David Plouffe, the president’s former top political adviser, said Hillary could call him for advice and told Bloomberg’s Al Hunt that “there’s very little oxygen” for another Democrat to challenge her.

As Obama has learned, to his dismay, there’s now very little oxygen for him, too.
 
A version of this op-ed appears in print on May 4, 2014, on page SR1 of the New York edition with the headline: 42 and 45 Overpower 44. Order Reprints|Today's Paper|Subscribe  
150  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: May 02, 2014, 09:43:25 PM
Fair enough as long as you keep posting him when the market tanks as it inevitably always does.  OF course he or I know not when.  But he will still be talking his same schpeel.  (nicer Yiddish version of  bull shit).
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