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201  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Rest in Peace R.I.P. RIP on: August 16, 2014, 07:45:10 AM
Another hero who fought for us has died of what sounds like war related problems.  From meds used for chronic pain?

He was only 28.   I was in my medical training at that age.  So he urinated on dead bodies.  Certainly distasteful but not a crime when your in a war zone fighting and enemy that would happily cut off your head.


****Marine who urinated on corpses in Afghanistan dies
.


Associated Press
By MARTHA WAGGONER 17 hours ago
   
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A decorated retired Marine whose career as a sniper was derailed by a video that showed him urinating on the corpses of Taliban fighters has died, his attorney said Friday.

Cpl. Robert Richards, 28, was found dead Wednesday by his wife at their Jacksonville home, Attorney Guy Womack said. Neither foul play nor suicide is suspected.

The death was most likely from Richards changing medications he took because of injuries he suffered in a roadside bomb during one of his three tours in Afghanistan, Womack said.

Richards was demoted from sergeant after a video showed four Camp Lejeune Marines — in full body armor — urinating on three Afghans in 2011. One Marine looks down at the bodies and jokes, "Have a good day, buddy."

The video was posted on YouTube in early 2012. It was condemned internationally and caused outrage in the Middle East.

It was "a temporary lapse of discipline, and it should in no way define the service and honor of the snipers," Womack said.

Richards' sniper unit killed 12 Taliban fighters, some of whom the Marines knew were part of a cell making roadside bombs and training others, Womack said. About a month earlier, the Taliban cell had planted a bomb that blew the legs off a Marine.

One of the Marines in the video testified that their operation was designed to pursue bomb-making experts believed responsible for killing a corporal whose leg was later found hanging from a tree. The Marines were reacting to those events when they urinated on the bodies, Womack said.

"He never said it was OK," Womack said. "Marines shouldn't do that. At the same time, it really wasn't the crime of the century. "

Richards almost died when a roadside bomb exploded near him during his second tour, Womack said. Shrapnel went through his throat and an emergency tracheotomy on the battlefield saved his life, the attorney said. He also almost lost a foot and suffered back injuries. He was awarded a Purple Heart.

Richards was supposed to get 18 months off from active duty, but he returned early when a platoon commander asked him to join a new sniper unit that had no combat veteran snipers.

"He called it a personal obligation and said he would feel guilty if any of them were to die from their inexperience," Womack said.

Richards will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

___

Follow Martha Waggoner at http://twitter.com/mjwaggonernc
202  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Video Clips of Interest on: August 16, 2014, 07:35:07 AM
"Trading paint is a part of the sport, and it's not even uncommon these days for racers to leave their cars to confront rivals after a crash, which Ward appeared to be doing when he was killed."

Yes but it is not common to  have a race champion actually hit and kill the guy walking on the track.
I say let a jury decide.   

****Stewart may face criminal charges

Legal experts agree driver not in clear after Ward's racetrack death
 
Associated Press
 
Published 9:30 pm, Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Tony Stewart could still face criminal charges for running down Kevin Ward Jr. with his sprint car, even if the three-time NASCAR champion didn't mean to kill Ward, hurt him or even scare him.

Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero, who announced on Tuesday that the investigation is continuing, has said that his initial findings have turned up nothing that would indicate criminal intent in the crash at the Canandaigua Motorsports Park.

But legal experts agree that does not mean Stewart is in the clear.

The NASCAR star could be charged with second-degree manslaughter under New York law if prosecutors believe he "recklessly caused the death of another person," with negligent homicide another possibility, according to criminal law professor Corey Rayburn Yung of the Kansas University School of Law.

"The question over whether someone was reckless is a factual one, and one a prosecutor might let a jury decide," said Yung, who also posts at the Concurring Opinion blog.

So Stewart would not expect to be charged for the car-on-car bump that sent Ward spinning into the wall. But if, for example, he were to tell police that he saw Ward on the track and tried to shower him with dirt or otherwise send him a message, a first-degree manslaughter charge could be a possibility, Yung said.

In a 1949 case that Yung uses in his class, midget car racer Joseph Sostilio was found guilty of manslaughter after he tried to squeeze a four foot-wide vehicle through a two-foot opening at 40 mph, crashing into another car and sending it into the one driven by Stephen D. Bishop. Bishop's car flipped three times and he was killed.

Sostilio's conviction was upheld on appeal by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Noting that a violent or aggressive act on a football field or in a boxing ring is not necessarily a crime, Justice Henry Tilton Lummus wrote: "In the present case physical contact was not an essential part of the racing of automobiles."

That was a half-century ago, and racing has changed. Trading paint is a part of the sport, and it's not even uncommon these days for racers to leave their cars to confront rivals after a crash, which Ward appeared to be doing when he was killed.
203  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Corruption on: August 16, 2014, 07:15:14 AM
Classic corruption.   Land deals with rail lines or highways to soar values.

Sounds like Reid's deal in Nevada.

But comeback will be think of the jobs created.  Think of turning an old lot into a thriving neighborhood.

And nothing done illegally (?)

And corruption does not concern Democrats.   Not at all.

She just keeps getting elected and getting richer.

What about other family members?  Her kids are raking in the dough and stuffing their pockets while she is in power too, no?
204  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Oh the "inhumanity" of it all. How "terrifying" on: August 15, 2014, 09:24:04 PM
Doug writes:

"I disagree.  This will not be the "second wave".   

Me:  We must be the most inhumane country in the world to force so many people to flock here from all over the world to be "terrorized".

Oh the inhumanity.   We must do something.  We must.  We must.  Now.  Don't wait.  People are suffering.   The children.  The families.  The humanitarian crises of it all.  We can't just sit by:
 
******5 Terrifying Facts About Undocumented Asian Americans

Posted:  08/15/2014 4:48 pm EDT    Updated:  5 hours ago   
Print Article   
 
Why are these facts so terrifying? Because they illustrate an extreme injustice against basic human rights of people living in the United States. It is an injustice when people must live under constant fear or threat of being deported and separated from their families. It is an injustice when people do not have the opportunity to pursue their dreams and be an asset to this country. It is an injustice when people do not have the freedom to leave a country, travel and see their loved ones. America prides itself as being the "Land of Opportunity." It's about time we ensure that opportunity is a real possibility for all people living in this country.

1) According to the Department of Homeland Security, 1.3 million undocumented immigrants are from Asia.

While generally perceived as a Latino issue, 12 percent of all undocumented immigrants in the U.S. are Asian Americans. While there is a fear of detainment and deportation if their status becomes known, the undocumented Asian American population is growing in its political presence and visibility in order to advocate for changes to enhance their standard of living. Organizations such as RAISE (Revolutionizing Asian American Immigrant Stories on the East Coast) strive to create safe spaces for undocumented youth to share their stories and fight for humane immigration policies.

2) Of the 11.2 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S., 2 million are minors or young adults under 30; of this number, 10 percent or 40,000 are Asian.

 Undocumented people cannot leave the country, cannot get a driver's license, cannot get minimum wage -- in addition to living with the threat of being deported at any time for their undocumented status. Thousands of children immigrated to the U.S. with their parents in search of a better future, only to grow up and discover that their undocumented status prohibits them from fulfilling their dreams and reaching their full potential. As an undocumented student, they are not eligible for federal grants and most scholarships, making college extremely unaffordable. Even as some students find a way to fund their college education, they cannot accept full time jobs after graduation. These legal limitations restrict young people from being an asset to our future economy. For example, the average DREAM Act student will make $1 million more over his or her lifetime by obtaining legal status, which results in tens of thousands of dollars for federal, state and local treasuries.

3) Undocumented status and deportation tears families apart. Almost 4.3 million close family members are waiting around the world to be reunited with a loved one in the United States.

According to Asian Americans Advancing Justice:


Asian Americans are the most likely to have family members caught up in visa backlogs. Approximately 60 percent of Asian Americans are foreign-born -- the highest percentage of any racial group. In 2012, 85 percent of visas issued for Asian countries were family based. Although Asian Americans comprise only 6 percent of the US pop, Asian immigrants received more than one third of the world wide family immigration visas.



Founder of RAISE Neriel David Ponce shares, "I've been away from the Philippines for 14 years now and missed weddings, births and passings of my relatives. Separation from my relatives has definitely been a challenge being undocumented."

4) Over 250,000 Asian American immigrants have been deported under the Obama Administration.

In total, there has been a record breaking 2 million deportations since Obama's presidency -- averaging about 1,000 people a day. Under current immigration laws, deported immigrants are not allowed to re-enter the country. Not only does this split up families and disrupt their economic stability, it becomes nearly impossible for families to visit each other if their children have undocumented status.

5) Undocumented people -- adults and children -- are more likely to be exploited in the workforce.

Due to their status, undocumented people get paid lower wages than other workers. They also face the threat of employers reporting them to Immigration and Customs Enforcement if they do not comply with the terms of exploitation. Undocumented people are subjected to extremely vulnerable and inhumane conditions; they can't even fight for basic human rights without the threat of being deported and separated from their families.

In addition to these facts and numbers, the award winning documentary, "Why We Rise," produced by the youth led organization RAISE tells the story of 3 brave New Yorkers living with undocumented status. With the courage to share their stories, they aim to humanize the immigration issue by demonstrating that the only difference between them and everyone else is a piece of paper.

In an effort to raise awareness and mobilize the community, there will be a theater performance by undocumented Asian youth in New York City this Wednesday, August 13th titled, "Letters from UndocuAsians." Exercising their voice and making their undocumented status known is already a huge feat in itself. "RAISE produced 'Letters from UndocuAsians' after seeing how powerful an impact our last show '#UndocuAsians' made," says organizer Neriel David Ponce. "We wanted a night where we can invite an audience we can be real to, where our stories can be told by us and our experiences shown by us. It's not just a performance but a night where we also want the audience to take action."

To learn more from these courageous and empowered youth, be sure to sign their petition and check out their event.

Follow Sahra Vang Nguyen on Twitter.
 
 Follow Sahra Vang Nguyen on Twitter: www.twitter.com/oneouncegold 
205  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / David Brock - sounds like he goes with the highest bidder on: August 14, 2014, 10:16:04 AM
David Brock

Very odd.  A conservative and then suddenly he is not.   He is a flaming liberal.   He reminds me of that other white haired turn coat named Crist from Florida:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Born
November 2, 1962 (age 51)
Washington, D.C., United States

Education
University of California, Berkeley

Occupation
journalist, author

David Brock (born November 2, 1962) is an American journalist and author, the founder of the media group Media Matters for America.[1] He was a journalist during the 1990s[2] who wrote the book The Real Anita Hill and the Troopergate story, which led to Paula Jones filing a lawsuit against Bill Clinton.

In the late 1990s, Brock's views shifted significantly towards the left, although he still considers himself a conservative Democrat. In 2004, he founded Media Matters for America, a non-profit organization that describes itself as a "progressive research and information center dedicated to comprehensively monitoring, analyzing and correcting conservative misinformation in the U.S. media."[3]




Contents
  [hide] 1 Background
2 Shift to the left
3 Books
4 References
5 External links


Background[edit]

Brock was born in Washington, D.C., and was adopted by Dorothea and Raymond Brock.[4] He has a younger sister, Regina. Brock was raised Catholic; his father held strong conservative beliefs.[4]

Brock grew up in Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, where he went to Our Lady of the Assumption School, and later attended Paramus Catholic High School in Paramus, New Jersey.[5] He then attended the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked as a reporter and editor for The Daily Californian, the campus newspaper, sometimes expressing conservative views. He was an intern at The Wall Street Journal. He graduated from Berkeley with a B.A. in history in 1985.

In 1986 he joined the staff of the weekly conservative news magazine Insight on the News, a sister publication of The Washington Times. After a stint as a research fellow at The Heritage Foundation, in March 1992 Brock authored a sharply critical story about Clarence Thomas's accuser, Anita Hill, in The American Spectator magazine. A little over a year later, in April 1993, Brock published a book titled The Real Anita Hill, which expanded upon previous assertions that had cast doubt on the veracity of Anita Hill's claims of sexual harassment.

The book became a best-seller. It was later attacked in a book review in The New Yorker by Jane Mayer, a reporter for The New Yorker, and Jill Abramson, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal. The two later expanded their article into the book Strange Justice, which cast Anita Hill in a much more sympathetic light. It, too, was a best-seller. Brock replied to their book with a book review of his own in The American Spectator.

In the January 1994, issue of The American Spectator, Brock, by then on staff at the magazine, published a story about Bill Clinton's time as governor of Arkansas that made accusations that bred Troopergate.[2] Among other things, the story contained the first printed reference to Paula Jones, referring to a woman named "Paula" who state troopers said offered to be Clinton's partner.[2] Jones called Brock's account of her encounter with Clinton "totally wrong," and she later sued Clinton for sexual harassment, a case that became entangled in the independent counsel's investigation of the Whitewater controversy and eventually led to the impeachment of the president. The story received an award later that year from the Western Journalism Center, and was partially responsible for a rise in the 25-year-old magazine's circulation, from around 70,000 to over 300,000 in a very short period.[citation needed]

Shift to the left[edit]

Three years later, Brock surprised conservatives by publishing a somewhat sympathetic biography of Hillary Clinton, titled The Seduction of Hillary Rodham. Having received a $1 million advance and a tight one-year deadline from Simon & Schuster's then-conservative-focused Free Press subsidiary, Brock was under tremendous pressure to produce another bestseller. However, the book contained no major scoops. In Blinded by the Right (2002), Brock said that he had reached a turning point: he had thoroughly examined charges against the Clintons, could not find any evidence of wrongdoing and did not want to make any more misleading claims. Brock further said that his former friends in right-wing politics shunned him because Seduction did not adequately attack the Clintons. He also argued that his "friends" had not really been friends at all because of the open secret that Brock was gay.[6]

In July 1997, Brock published a confessional piece in Esquire magazine titled "Confessions of a Right-Wing Hit Man," in which he recanted much of what he said in his two best-known American Spectator articles and criticized his own reporting methods.[7][8] Discouraged at the reaction his Hillary Clinton biography received, he said, "I . . . want out. David Brock the Road Warrior of the Right is dead." Four months later, The American Spectator declined to renew his employment contract, under which he was being paid over $300,000 per year.

Writing again for Esquire in April 1998, Brock apologized to Clinton for his contributions to Troopergate, calling it simply part of an anti-Clinton crusade.[2] He told a more detailed story of his time inside the right wing in his 2002 memoir, Blinded by the Right: The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative, in which he settled old scores and provided inside details about the Arkansas Project's efforts to bring down Clinton. Later, he also apologized to Anita Hill.

In 2001 Brock accused one of his former sources, Terry Wooten, of leaking FBI files for use in his book about Anita Hill. Brock defended his betrayal of a confidential source by saying, "I've concluded that what I was involved in wasn't journalism, it was a political operation, and I was part of it. . . . So I don't think the normal rules of journalism would apply to what I was doing."[9] Also in 2001, only months before Brock finished production of his book, "Blinded by the Right," he was committed to the psychiatric ward of Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington.[10]

Brock directly addressed the right-wing "machine" in his 2004 book, The Republican Noise Machine, in which he detailed an alleged interconnected, concerted effort to raise the profile of conservative opinions in the press through false accusations of liberal media bias, dishonest and highly partisan columnists, partisan news organizations and academic studies, and other methods. Also in 2004, he featured briefly in the BBC series The Power of Nightmares, where he stated that the Arkansas Project engaged in political terrorism.

About the same time he founded Media Matters for America, an Internet-based progressive media group "dedicated to comprehensively monitoring, analyzing, and correcting conservative misinformation in the U.S. media."

Brock announced in 2010 that he was forming a super-PAC, American Bridge, to help elect liberal Democrats, starting with the 2012 election cycle.[11] In describing Brock's intentions for the super-PAC, The New York Times referred to Brock as a "prominent Democratic political operative"[1] (mirrored by The Washington Post's characterization of him as a "former journalist-turned-political operative")[12] and New York Magazine referred to Brock's "hyperpartisanship."[13]

In 2010, Brock's assistant, Haydn Price-Morris, carried a concealed Glock handgun while attending events with Brock. He even illegally brought the gun to events in Washington, D.C. Price-Morris said he carried the firearm to protect Brock.[14] In the same year, Media Matters donors had "restricted" $612,500 to be applied to “gun and public safety issues." [15]

In a 2011 interview with Politico, Brock vowed to wage "guerrilla warfare and sabotage" against Fox News.[16]

In early 2014, Brock was named to the board of Priorities USA Action as the super-PAC also announced its support for a possible Hillary Clinton presidential run in 2016.[17]

Books[edit]
The Real Anita Hill: The Untold Story. Free Press, 1993. ISBN 978-0-02-904656-2
The Seduction of Hillary Rodham. 1996, Free Press. ISBN 978-0-684-83770-3
Blinded by the Right: The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative. 2002, Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 978-1-4000-4728-4
The Republican Noise Machine: Right-Wing Media and How It Corrupts Democracy. 2004, Crown. ISBN 978-1-4000-4875-5
Free Ride: John McCain and the Media with Paul Waldman. 2008, Anchor. ISBN 0-307-27940-5
The Fox Effect: How Roger Ailes Turned a Network into a Propaganda Machine with Ari Rabin-Havt. 2012, Anchor. ISBN 978-0-307-94768-0

References[edit]

1.^ Jump up to: a b Luo, Michael (23 November 2010). "Effort for Liberal Balance to G.O.P. Group Begins". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
2.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Reporter Apologizes For Clinton Sex Article". CNN. March 10, 1998. Archived from the original on 2008-06-14. Retrieved 2008-10-17.
3.Jump up ^ "Who We Are". Media Matters for America. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
4.^ Jump up to: a b Stated in Brock's Blinded by the Right
5.Jump up ^ Brock, David. "Blinded by the right: the conscience of an ex-conservative", p. 14. Random House, 2003. ISBN 1-4000-4728-5. Accessed January 30, 2011. "... when I arrived at my all-male high school, Paramus Catholic High School in Paramus, New Jersey, I was singled out and ridiculed for being different."
6.Jump up ^ Bruni, Frank (2002-03-24). "Sorry About That". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-03-11.
7.Jump up ^ Alicia C. Shepard , "Spectator's Sport", American Journalism Review, May 1995. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
8.Jump up ^ David Brock, "Confessions of a Right-Wing Hit Man", Esquire, July 1997.
9.Jump up ^ Kurtz, Howard (2001-09-01). "Jerry's Kidding, Edited Out". The Washington Post.
10.Jump up ^ http://www.drudgereportarchives.com/data/2002/05/22/20020522_143906_brockb.htm
11.Jump up ^ Ruggiero, Mark (14 January 2011). "Bridge to Somewhere: Democrats Launch Fundraising Super-PAC". Campaigns & Elections. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
12.Jump up ^ Farhi, Paul (3 December 2010). "Outfoxed by Fox News? No way.". The Washington Post. Retrieved 26 June 2011.
13.Jump up ^ Zengerie, Jason (22 May 2011). "If I Take Down Fox, Is All Forgiven?". New York Magazine. Retrieved 11 June 2011.
14.Jump up ^ http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/12/inside-media-matters-sources-memos-reveal-erratic-behavior-close-coordination-with-white-house-and-news-organizations/6/
15.Jump up ^ http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/15/thedc-top-ten-interesting-nuggets-from-media-matters-2010-tax-records/
16.Jump up ^ http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0311/51949.html
17.Jump up ^ Confessore, Nicholas, "Biggest Liberal 'Super PAC' to Fund Possible Clinton Bid", New York Times, January 23, 2014. Retrieved 2014-01-23.

External links[edit]
Media Matters for America
David Brock at the Internet Movie Database
Appearances on C-SPAN Booknotes interview with Brock on The Real Anita Hill, June 13, 1993.

Works by or about David Brock in libraries (WorldCat catalog)
Anti-Drudge, Brock Profile in Guernica Magazine
Right-Wing Journalism dialog with David Brock and Tucker Carlson, Slate (June 25, 1997)
David Brock, "His Cheatin’ Heart," The American Spectator (January 1994) (The "Troopergate" Story)




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

206  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Collection kept in family for 5 generations is very rare on: August 14, 2014, 09:45:51 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/video/antiques-roadshow-blockbuster-1-million-235359093.html
207  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: August 14, 2014, 08:18:35 AM
In public:   "Israel has the right to defend itself so says the Golfer in Chief.    In private:  " just don't expect to get any offensive arms from us".
White House in the dark over arms supplies to Israel: report

AFP
3 hours ago

An Israeli artillery fires a 155mm shell towards targets in the Gaza Strip from their position near Israel's border with the Palestinian enclave on August 2, 2014

An Israeli artillery fires a 155mm shell towards targets in the Gaza Strip from their position near Israel's border with the Palestinian enclave on August 2, 2014 (AFP Photo/David Buimovitch)

Washington (AFP) - Israel secured supplies of ammunition from the Pentagon last month without the approval of the White House or the State Department, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

Since officials there were caught off guard as they tried to restrain Israel's campaign in Gaza, the administration of President Barack Obama has tightened controls on arms shipments to Israel, the newspaper said, quoting US and Israeli officials.

But the case illustrated that the White House and the State Department have little influence over the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the paper said, quoting officials from both countries.

The Journal said that US officials, rather than play their traditional role as mediators, have now been reduced to bystanders as Israeli forces and Hamas battle it out.

On Wednesday, the paper said, Obama and Netanyahu had a particularly tense phone call.

Netanyahu has "pushed the administration aside" but wants America to give Israel security assurances in exchange for agreeing to a long-term deal with Hamas, the Journal said, quoting US officials.

Israel and militants in Gaza were holding their fire Thursday after a new truce got off to a shaky start, with night-time Palestinian rocket fire followed by Israeli air strikes.
208  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Stewart 's temper well known on: August 14, 2014, 08:04:28 AM
According to this confronting nemesis on the track even occasionally happens though I never saw it.  OTOH I am not a race fan.  Sport just never interested me.   Personally I don't think it would be hard to prove this was manslaughter based on what we the public know.  It is obvious Stewart tried to play chicken with the guy and run him off the track both while he was driving and later when he was standing on it.  I wouldn't think he wanted to kill him but he played it rough and close and he did kill the guy. 

https://trove.com/me/content/LGcu7?chid=42979&_p=trending&utm_source=wp&utm_medium=Widgets&utm_campaign=wpsrTrendingExternal-1-opt
209  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: August 13, 2014, 10:28:23 PM
soloDAD does work for Nat Geo?

I might have to cancel my subscription.  Or threaten to.   Just like the soloDAD libs do.

210  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: August 13, 2014, 08:16:34 AM
"Mrs. Clinton has thought hard about this, and here is what she told Mr. Goldberg: "The big mistake was thinking" that "the end of history has come upon us, after the fall of the Soviet Union. That was never true, history never stops and nationalisms were going to assert themselves, and then other variations on ideologies were going to claim their space." She cites jihadi Islamism and Vladimir Putin's vision of restored Russian greatness as prime examples"

Does anyone who has a brain and who is old enough to know better really believe she is some kind of great thinker?

She is spoon fed all this stuff by liberal professors and other foreign policy experts who are hanging on for windfall.

Yes while trouble is increasing around the world the left who gave Bamster a free ride now will switch gears as Rush pointed out recently and the focus will shift to Hillary.

The Narcissistic one (not Bill or Hillary) the other one, will get increasingly indignant and bitter now that he will slowly fade from the limelight of those who put him on the pedestal.

211  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: August 13, 2014, 08:04:47 AM
Thanks for posting.  I haven't read Steyn in a while but he is really good.

And his final question:   where are the Republicans?

In hiding.   To think after what Obama and his mafia army has done to this country the Republicans should be ready to roll into power.  Instead people from  both the moderate to far right and the entire left even hate them more.

Just because Obama's ratings are as low as possible (he would NEVER go lower than 40% due to the entitlement die hard progressive crowd)  doesn't mean most of these people will automatically vote Republican who are disliked even more.

Can Cruz or anyone step up.  All we need is a likable, smart person with a great mouthpiece.  That does not include Romney, Jeb or Rand (IMO).
212  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: August 12, 2014, 07:21:02 PM
Doug,

Perhaps this is also an example of what Rush was speaking about today that the MSM is starting to drop blanket support of their chosen one now that they can start supporting the next chosen one -> Hillary.

Forget about the world burning.  What about what he did to us here at home.

Again I don't see him as tone deaf.  He has accomplished much of what he wanted.  Redistribute wealth, mess up our health care, close to granting amnesty to 20 million illegals (Marc Levin points out that the official number has been 11 million now for 15 years when we all can easily see them all around us. And what about their kids - people it is far more than 11 mill), destroyed the coal industry, kept down the oil and gas as best he could, rewarded all those who bribed him, punished all the rest of us, did what he could to hurt Jews in Israel, promote Muslims even the Jihadists, increase racial divide not decrease it.   His heart goes out to the black shot in Missouri.  What about the business owners whose stores were trashed.   I suppose his son could have looked like the kid who died but not those who looted the stores.  Not a "f" peep about that. 

This is what he was and is about from day one.  Didn't we all see this coming?  No surprise.  He did what he planned to do all along.   He doesn't care about America.  Never did.  So time to play golf.

213  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Video Clips of Interest on: August 12, 2014, 09:13:40 AM
I don't find the original video with the choke hold.  What are posted is a later video showing the police just kind of standing around the dead body.

The choke hold is gone I think.

No?
214  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Homicide - I see what you mean on: August 11, 2014, 09:14:24 PM
Thanks GM

But I disagree with you.  I think there was intent on the older driver to force the younger one off the track directly leading to an accident.  I agree with you the young guy was foolish to get in front of the car.  Yet that guy was a champion driver.  He could have easily avoided him.  He played chicken with the guy.   I hope he is charged with some sort of crime.

But now onto the previous video concerning the choke hold incident.

AS for the Eric Garner video showing the choke hold I notice it can no longer be found on the internet which to me smacks of a cover-up.  I would really like to review it.  It sure looked to me that the officer had his arm around Garner's neck not just his chin holding his bed back.

Suddenly the defenders are out in force claiming it was "not a choke hold".   I could be wrong but it sure was when I saw it.   Suddenly law enforcement has taken the video down off the internet. 

I feel like the public is being censored and I don't like it one bit.
215  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the Republicans on: August 11, 2014, 08:28:17 PM
I listen to Marc Levin and all I can think is why the heck do we not have Republicans who can articulate what he does day after day?

Why are the politicians on "our side" so darn lame?

They should be able to tear Obama and his party apart.

All they do is run in fear.

It has to also be a old boy's club.   

Rand Paul ain't goin to save anyone.  I'll take Cruz any day.

To think some are talking up Romney again?

Oh my "f" God.   I want to explode.    angry
216  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: August 11, 2014, 08:22:51 PM
"According to this provision, taxpayers will make up the difference for health insurance companies whose plans lose money under ObamaCare. Last November, as it became clearer what this section of the law actually meant, I introduced legislation repealing it and protecting taxpayers from being forced to cover insurers' ObamaCare losses."

Again the top health care companies stocks and their top officials are making millions and are at all time highs and the rest of us get bulldozed.  Their employees can't even afford their own health care.

My rates going up another 50% despite sky high deductibles.   The whole thing will crash.

 
217  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Video Clips of Interest on: August 11, 2014, 07:34:40 AM
Hi GM.

"Homicide does not necessarily mean it's a criminal act"

Please explain.

Would "manslaughter" be more accurate?   Already the lawyers are coming out and explaining "intent" is hard to prove.

Looking at the video it appears that Stewart at the very least did nothing to avoid the younger driver.   It does seem clear he forced him off the track to start with. 

He also seems to swerve into the guy while he is running him over although it is possible he was trying to shake him off the car?

OTOH the younger driver did indeed turn it into a game of chicken risking his life by walking to the middle of the track.

But a racing champion should have been able to avoid hitting him.

I think at least manslaughter fits.   
218  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / homicide? on: August 10, 2014, 02:18:16 PM
1)  It does appear driver A forced driver B off to the side of the track causing him to crash into the wall.

2)  It does appear driver A did not attempt to avoid driver B who was standing on the track and even worse veers into him.

http://deadspin.com/reports-tony-stewart-ran-over-opposing-driver-during-1618893708
219  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Here it comes on: August 10, 2014, 01:20:33 PM
I guess I am wrong.  I thought he would wait till after the election.  He probably figures why bother.  

And the Republican response will be to just  suck up and pander to illegals.   12 million.  At least.   I find it hard to believe there are really 370,000 deportations a year.  "Funding" for only 400 K .  Oh I like that argument.  

"Bold" by one description.  "Defining moment in a second term marred by gridlock" is another description.
 Not in this article is outrageously ridiculous analogy to the "Emancipation Proclamation". 

 If these people were future Republicans could anyone imagine the difference.   Your not going to win these uneducated poor people over with ideals.  They want benefits.  Dems are happy to oblige. With the middle classes money.

Worse this will ultimately lead to Texas going blue.  The end of the Republican party and conservative America with regards at least to the electoral college.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/obama-preparing-one-boldest-moves-173000149.html

220  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / schools are liberal indoctrination camps on: August 09, 2014, 11:06:40 PM
We must teach our children to be the NICEST on the planet.  We are all so nice and thoughtful and understanding.   That is the most important thing.  We all love one another NOW, right NOW....

I never realized how many people are promoting this crap.  It must be the internet juggernaut.   Where did all this liberal crap come from?   That and millions coming here who don't believe in America anymore.

*******Readin’, Writin’, and Social Justice Agitatin’

By Michelle Malkin  •  August 8, 2014 07:57 AM

Readin’, Writin’, and Social Justice Agitatin’
by Michelle Malkin

It’s back-to-school season across the country. But in an increasing number of districts, “back to school” doesn’t mean back to learning. Under the reign of social justice indoctrinators, academics are secondary to political agitation. Activism trumps achievement.

In Massachusetts, the John J. Duggan Middle School will open on August 25 with a new name and mission. It is now a “social justice magnet school.” As a hiring advertisement for teachers explained earlier this year, the emphasis will be on “helping students develop the necessary skills to analyze and synthesize information and to generate empathy by looking at multiple sides of important issues facing the world, be that hunger, water quality, racial barriers, child labor or imbalance of power.”

Concise writing, as you can see, is not on the social justice pedagogues’ agenda.

Oh, and forget about memorizing times tables or mastering the scientific method. The new principal says the school’s primary job is teaching “fairness.” Duggan Middle School’s junior lobbying factory is “serious about creating 21st century global citizens, and it begins with understanding who we are as members of each of those communities.”

The ultimate goal of these social justice prep schools: creating left-wing political advocates.

At the Crescent Heights Social Justice Magnet School in Los Angeles, children will work on “action projects” tied to the “United Nations Millennium Development Goals.” Students will spend the academic year transforming into “agents of change.” Yes, they will learn language arts. But basic reading and writing are only a focus of the magnet school, the founders explain, because “we want our students to recognize injustice in their world or the world at large and be able to fully express their outrage, their plan of attack, their progress in this endeavor.”

In Chicago, Ground Zero for social justice brainwashing, the Social Justice High School (SOJO), follows a similar mission. Activist teachers openly foster identity politics and systematically undermine individualism. Their specialties: “struggle and sacrifice.” SOJO’s mission statement sounds like a pot-addled Oberlin College freshman’s — er, freshperson’s — Sociology 101 term paper:

“Through collective community power, we commit to a conscious effort to overcome the intended historical obstacles that have been designed to disempower and divide our communities.”

At the Paulo Freire Social Justice Charter School, also in Massachusetts, students won’t learn math. They’ll be taught “social justice math.” (Freire was a Brazilian leftist who wrote a social justice teacher’s Bible called “Pedagogy of the Oppressed.”)

His acolytes explain the push for radicalization of math: “Math is an instrument for detailing social justice issues and developing critical consciousness.” In the hands of progressive teachers, math “becomes an analytic tool to bring awareness to important world issues.”

In other words: One plus one equals “That’s unfair!”

New York City schools have been infested for years with city-funded math teachers who “train students in seeing social problems from a radical anticapitalist perspective,” as City Journal’s Sol Stern reported. As I’ve noted previously, the “Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers” guide rejects traditional white male patriarchal methods of teaching computation and statistics in favor of politically correct number-crunching.

Out: Algebraic equations, geometric proofs and advanced calculus.

In: “Racial profiling, unemployment rate calculation, the war in Iraq, environmental racism, globalization, wealth distribution and poverty, wheelchair ramps, urban density, HIV/AIDS, deconstructing Barbie, junk food advertising to children, and lotteries.”

State education codes mandate value neutrality in the classroom. But in schools of “social justice,” every academic subject is a means to a “progressive” (anti-American, pro-collectivist, redistributive) ideological end. The radical transformation of K-12 classrooms into leftist agitation labs is embedded in the mission of countless teachers colleges and universities, which require social justice training or offer special certification in its indoctrination techniques.

These teaching institutions are pumping out generations of educators who cast themselves as leaders against “social struggle” — instead of facilitators of intellectual inquiry. Passing the most rigorous student standards in the world won’t amount to squat as long as the overseers of public education exploit government schools as community organizing vehicles for captive tots, tweens and teens.
221  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Gaming the system on: August 09, 2014, 08:41:48 PM

I've heard this is the most expensive hospital in the country.  One of the guys who bought the hospital at basement rates, who used to be with Blackstone got his Wall Street buddies to finance fixing the place up and embarked on an out of network strategy and then resold it for something like a 40 million profit.  The health care mogul as he was called in a news article now has a mansion in the Hamptons.   So this poor guy gets stuck with a 9K bill.

I have a patient who told me he went to this hospital which is much farther from here than several others to have a procedure done via a limousine.   In this way the patient got in his mind "first class treatment".  The bill is usually multiples of what it would otherwise cost.  I explained this abuse to the patient.   His response:   "but it didn't cost me anything".  I asked him doesn't this dishonest game playing while using you as the pawn bother you?  His response, was again "it didn't cost me a thing".

So there you have it.   I replied, but it costs everyone else a bundle to finance this.  What do you think happens to everyone's insurance rates with this going on?   No response from him.  No concern.   

*********Hospital ER Charges $9,000 to Bandage Cut Finger

Money Talks News
By Krystal Steinmetz 8 hours ago
 
A New Jersey teacher was stunned when he received a $9,000 bill after his cut finger was bandaged in a hospital emergency room. Baer Hanusz-Rajkowski cut his finger with the claw end of a hammer. After waiting a few days to see if it would heal on its own, Hanusz-Rajkowski decided to go to the emergency room at Bayonne Medical Center in New Jersey, according to NBC New York. It was determined (without X-rays) that his finger didn’t need stitches. So Hanusz-Rajkowski left with a bandaged middle finger. NBC New York said he was surprised to get this in the mail:

Hanusz-Rajkowski got hit with an $8,200 bill for the emergency room visit. On top of that, Bayonne Medical Center charged $180 for a tetanus shot, $242 for sterile supplies, and $8 for some antibacterial ointment in addition to hundreds of dollars for the services of the nurse practitioner.

That $9,000 bill left Hanusz-Rajkowski speechless. From NBC:

“I got a Band-Aid and a tetanus shot. How could it be $9,000? This is crazy,” Hanusz-Rajkowski said. “If I severed a limb, I’d carry it to the next emergency room in the next city before I go back to this place.”

Why was the bill so high? The answer isn’t clear. It’s more of a he said, she said. Carepoint Health bought Bayonne Medical Center about six years ago, making it a for-profit business, NBC said. Dr. Mark Spektor, president and CEO of the medical center, said the big bill is the fault of Hanusz-Rajkowski’s insurance company, United Healthcare, which no longer has an in-network pricing contract with the hospital. Spektor said United doesn’t offer fair reimbursement rates. According to NBC, Mary McElrath-Jones, spokeswoman for United Healthcare, disagrees with Spektor. “United Healthcare is deeply concerned about hospitals establishing an out-of-network strategy to hike the rate they charge for emergency room services, often surprising patients,” she said. Regardless of whether there’s an in-network price deal, New Jersey law demands that insurers cover the costs of ER visits, NBC said. United Healthcare ended up paying $6,640 on the bill. After the story hit the news, the hospital wrote off Hanusz-Rajkowski’s portion of the bill. Some people are calling for a price cap on ER procedures, NBC reported. Spektor said that would put the hospital, which was once on the brink of bankruptcy and is now profitable again, at risk.

“Insurance companies in the state of New Jersey particularly have had record profits last year. Billions of dollars in profits while hospitals are struggling and closing. That is the real story,” Spektor said.

What do you think of Hanusz-Rajkowski’s hospital bill? Do you think you’ve been massively overcharged at a hospital? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

This article was originally published on MoneyTalksNews.com as 'Hospital ER Charges $9,000 to Bandage Cut Finger'.

 

 
 
 
222  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / The "out of network" game on: August 09, 2014, 10:13:15 AM
I've heard this is the most expensive hospital in the country.  One of the guys who bought the hospital at basement rates, who used to be with Blackstone got his Wall Street buddies to finance fixing the place up and embarked on an out of network strategy and then resold it for something like a 40 million profit.  The health care mogul as he was called in a news article now has a mansion in the Hamptons.   So this poor guy gets stuck with a 9K bill.

I have a patient who told me he went to this hospital which is much farther from here than several others to have a procedure done via a limousine.   In this way the patient got in his mind "first class treatment".  The bill is usually multiples of what it would otherwise cost.  I explained this abuse to the patient.   His response:   "but it didn't cost me anything".  I asked him doesn't this dishonest game playing while using you as the pawn bother you?  His response, was again "it didn't cost me a thing".

So there you have it.   I replied, but it costs everyone else a bundle to finance this.  What do you think happens to everyone's insurance rates with this going on?   No response from him.  No concern.   

*********Hospital ER Charges $9,000 to Bandage Cut Finger

Money Talks News
By Krystal Steinmetz 8 hours ago
 
A New Jersey teacher was stunned when he received a $9,000 bill after his cut finger was bandaged in a hospital emergency room. Baer Hanusz-Rajkowski cut his finger with the claw end of a hammer. After waiting a few days to see if it would heal on its own, Hanusz-Rajkowski decided to go to the emergency room at Bayonne Medical Center in New Jersey, according to NBC New York. It was determined (without X-rays) that his finger didn’t need stitches. So Hanusz-Rajkowski left with a bandaged middle finger. NBC New York said he was surprised to get this in the mail:

Hanusz-Rajkowski got hit with an $8,200 bill for the emergency room visit. On top of that, Bayonne Medical Center charged $180 for a tetanus shot, $242 for sterile supplies, and $8 for some antibacterial ointment in addition to hundreds of dollars for the services of the nurse practitioner.

That $9,000 bill left Hanusz-Rajkowski speechless. From NBC:

“I got a Band-Aid and a tetanus shot. How could it be $9,000? This is crazy,” Hanusz-Rajkowski said. “If I severed a limb, I’d carry it to the next emergency room in the next city before I go back to this place.”

Why was the bill so high? The answer isn’t clear. It’s more of a he said, she said. Carepoint Health bought Bayonne Medical Center about six years ago, making it a for-profit business, NBC said. Dr. Mark Spektor, president and CEO of the medical center, said the big bill is the fault of Hanusz-Rajkowski’s insurance company, United Healthcare, which no longer has an in-network pricing contract with the hospital. Spektor said United doesn’t offer fair reimbursement rates. According to NBC, Mary McElrath-Jones, spokeswoman for United Healthcare, disagrees with Spektor. “United Healthcare is deeply concerned about hospitals establishing an out-of-network strategy to hike the rate they charge for emergency room services, often surprising patients,” she said. Regardless of whether there’s an in-network price deal, New Jersey law demands that insurers cover the costs of ER visits, NBC said. United Healthcare ended up paying $6,640 on the bill. After the story hit the news, the hospital wrote off Hanusz-Rajkowski’s portion of the bill. Some people are calling for a price cap on ER procedures, NBC reported. Spektor said that would put the hospital, which was once on the brink of bankruptcy and is now profitable again, at risk.

“Insurance companies in the state of New Jersey particularly have had record profits last year. Billions of dollars in profits while hospitals are struggling and closing. That is the real story,” Spektor said.

What do you think of Hanusz-Rajkowski’s hospital bill? Do you think you’ve been massively overcharged at a hospital? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

This article was originally published on MoneyTalksNews.com as 'Hospital ER Charges $9,000 to Bandage Cut Finger'.
223  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Sen.Ted Cruz on: August 07, 2014, 11:48:44 AM
Not sure what to make of this article about Cruz.   Especially from the Post.  The "established" insider right is clearly going after Cruz.   I don't get the impression anyone one of them is necessarily trying to form any alliance with him.

224  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Check out the comments in response to the article on: August 07, 2014, 11:46:13 AM
Why I post this here can be understood after reading the blatant anti-Semitism in the comments posted after the article's announcement:

http://news.yahoo.com/israeli-billionaire-finds-3-bln-barrels-oil-reserves-110122178.html
225  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Education on: August 07, 2014, 09:59:09 AM
I now live in Central NJ -> ugghhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!  Should have stayed in Florida.  What a crooked Dem controlled - union controlled tax and distribute hole this is.  Anyway - does this not sound right of the Pepsi Generation Flowerchild almost commune nirvana of the 60's or what?

http://www.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/local/2014/08/06/high-school-diversity-initiative-expected-reach/13692487/
226  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: August 03, 2014, 08:57:51 PM
He will grant amnesty.   My guess after the 2014 election.   And no one can stop him.  Period.
227  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / News from Marc Levin's website on: August 03, 2014, 01:08:47 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2704715/Multiple-injuries-reported-shots-fired-Pennsylvania-hospital.html
228  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I am not holding my breath but... on: August 03, 2014, 12:26:29 PM
The liberal Jews may not be thrilled with the Democratic leaderships view on Israel but I still doubt they will vote for Republicans.   They just can't do it.   Just the same Israel's interests are only a small part of the reason they need to ditch the Democrat party.   First and foremost, how about supporting a country that puts America first?  I also don't know why they feel the need to cozy up to radical blacks.   The radical blacks certainly do NOT return the favor as one can see:

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/214135-gop-sees-signs-of-jewish-voters-drifting-away-from-democrats

That all said is we need people to be Americans first whether Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Black, White, Asian etc.

The Democratic party hijacked by socialists is not putting America first.

OTOH not all Republicans are doing this either.
229  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Neolithic people caused world sea levels to rise on: August 03, 2014, 08:02:24 AM
Somewhere around 8000BC.   This may have been the basis of the great flood myths that appear in ancient myths and eventually the Bible:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-11/uoe-fk111507.php
230  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Zakaria on the proxy war in Gaza on: August 02, 2014, 09:57:25 PM
Zakaria - > Gaza is now a proxy war. 

[No mention of his Harvard pal the anti-Semite Bamster being on the wrong side - AGAIN.  For that matter so is his network CNN]

"This time, Gaza fighting is 'proxy war' for entire Mideast
 
By Josh Levs, CNN

updated 1:48 PM EDT, Fri August 1, 2014
 
 The Gaza conflict is a proxy war for the Middle East, analysts say
Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia are seen as supporting Israel's crackdown on Hamas
Turkey and Qatar support Hamas
Hamas is an extension of the Muslim Brotherhood, which threatens some governments
 
  (CNN) -- The conflict raging in Gaza is different this time.

While Hamas' rocket attacks and Israel's military actions may look familiar, they're taking place against a whole new backdrop.

"This is unprecedented in the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict," says CNN's Ali Younes, an analyst who has covered the region for decades. "Most Arab states are actively supporting Israel against the Palestinians -- and not even shy about it or doing it discreetly."

It's a "joint Arab-Israeli war consisting of Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia against other Arabs -- the Palestinians as represented by Hamas."

As the New York Times put it, "Arab leaders, viewing Hamas as worse than Israel, stay silent."

Most Arab states are actively supporting Israel.
CNN's Ali Younes, Mideast analyst

One of the outcomes of the fighting will likely be "the end of the old Arab alliance system that has, even nominally, supported the Palestinians and their goal of establishing a Palestinian state," Younes says.

"The Israel-Hamas conflict has laid bare the new divides of the Middle East," says Danielle Pletka, vice president of foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. "It's no longer the Muslims against the Jews. Now it's the extremists -- the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, Hezbollah, and their backers Iran, Qatar and Turkey -- against Israel and the more moderate Muslims including Jordan, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia."

"It's a proxy war for control or dominance in the Middle East," says CNN's Fareed Zakaria.

To understand why and what all this means, we need to begin with understanding of Hamas.

Zakaria: Gaza is 'proxy war' for Mideast
Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood
 
Hamas, which has controlled the Palestinian government in Gaza for years, is an extension of the Muslim Brotherhood. To many Americans, the brotherhood is familiar for its central role in the power struggle for Egypt. But it's much larger than that.

"The Muslim Brotherhood is international, with affiliated groups in more than 70 countries, including Saudi Arabia and the UAE," says Eric Trager of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

The Arab Spring showed the region that uprisings can lead to the Brotherhood gaining power. So it's a threat to the governments it opposes.

"Israel's ongoing battle against Hamas is part of a wider regional war on the Muslim Brotherhood," says the Soufan Group, which tracks global security. "Most Arab states share Israel's determination to finish the movement off once and for all, but they are unlikely to be successful."

"From the perspective of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, the UAE and some other Arab states, what the Israeli Prime Minister is doing is fighting this war against Hamas on their behalf so they can finish the last stronghold of the Muslim Brotherhood," Younes says.

"Arab governments and official Arab media have all but adopted the Israeli view of who is a terrorist and who is not. Egyptian and Saudi-owned media are liberal in labeling the Muslim Brotherhood as 'terrorists' and describing Hamas as a 'terrorist organization.' It's a complete turnabout from the past, when Arab states fought Israel and the U.S. in the international organizations on the definition of terrorism, and who is a terrorist or a 'freedom fighter.'"

Egypt's new President vowed during his campaign that he would finish off the Muslim Brotherhood. Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the former military chief, deposed Egypt's first freely elected leader, President Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood, last year following mass protests against Morsy's rule.

El-Sisi was elected officially in June.

"In Egypt you have a regime that came to power by toppling a Muslim Brotherhood government," says Trager. "It's therefore in an existential conflict with the Brotherhood. So it doesn't want to see Hamas, the Palestinian Muslim Brotherhood, emerge stronger in a neighboring territory."

Egypt also has another reason to stand against Hamas: rising violence and instability in Sinai, the northern part of Egypt that borders Israel and Gaza. Hamas' network of tunnels includes some in and out of Egypt used to smuggle goods include weapons for attackson Israeli civilians.

It's part of a regional war on the Muslim Brotherhood.
The Soufan Group, which tracks global security

The new Egyptian government has been "cracking down aggressively since it removed the brotherhood from power," Trager says.

El-Sisi closed the border crossings between Egypt and Gaza, which has helped block Hamas militants from escaping or smuggling in more weapons during Israel's onslaught. But it also has contributed to the humanitarian crisis of people trapped in Gaza.

Egypt proposed a cease-fire, and Israel quickly accepted it -- indicating that it contained the terms Israel was looking for, analysts say. Hamas rejected it. While Egypt has worked furiously to try to broker a truce in the past, Cairo this time shows little rush to change its proposal to one much more favorable to Hamas, analysts say.

Saudi Arabia, UAE, Jordan

The monarchies of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Jordan have called on Hamas to accept the cease-fire proposal as is.

"We condemn the Israeli aggression and we support the Egyptian cease-fire proposal," Jordan's King Abdullah said last week.

Countries such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE are "challenged by Islamists who come to power via the ballot box rather than through royal succession," says Trager.

The Saudis and Egyptians are more scared of Islamic fundamentalism than they are of Israel.
CNN's Fareed Zakaria

"So these countries have been directly supportive of the coup in Egypt because it removed elected Islamists and therefore discredited that model."

Saudi Arabia is "leading the charge," partly through backing the coup and financing state media reports that attacked the brotherhood, says Younes.

"Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the UAE all see the destruction of Hamas as of benefit to their internal security as well as to regional stability."

"The Saudis and the Egyptians are now more scared of Islamic fundamentalism than they are of Israel," says Zakaria.

"The Saudi monarchy is more worried about the prospects of Hamas winning, which would embolden Islamists in other parts of the Middle East, and therefore potentially an Islamist opposition in Saudi Arabia."

But Hamas is not alone.

Turkey and Qatar remain supportive of Hamas.

Qatar supported Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood government, and built "an Egypt-centric Al Jazeera network that became known for its strongly pro-Muslim Brotherhood line," says Trager.

Qatar also funds many Muslim Brotherhood figures in exile, including Hamas political leader Khaled Mashaal, who is believed to have orchestrated numerous Hamas terrorist attacks.

"I think this is a case of a country with a lot of money to burn making a certain calculation in 2011 that made a lot of sense at the time: that the Brotherhood was the next big thing that was going to dominate many of the countries of the region," says Trager. "Realistically, it made sense to bet on it."

Turkey has "more of an ideological sympathy with the Brotherhood," he says.

Erdogan has tried to use the cause of the Brotherhood to bolster his own Islamist credentials.
Eric Trager, Washington Institute

Last week, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke with CNN, accusing Israel of "genocide."

"Erdogan has tried to use the cause of the Brotherhood to bolster his own Islamist credentials at home," says Trager. Last year, Erdogan cracked down on mass demonstrations in his country.

Iran has long supported Hamas, supplying it with weapons. And Meshaal used to be based in Syria.

But that changed. In 2012, Meshaal left Syria as the country's civil war deepened -- a decision believed to have caused a breakdown in his relationship with Iran as well, says Firas Abi Ali, head of Middle East and North Africa Country Risk and Forecasting at the global information company IHS. Tehran is aligned with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

Now, Syria -- Israel's neighbor to the north -- is locked in a brutal, multiparty civil war, with Islamist extremists hoisting severed heads onto poles. The war, believed to have killed more than 115,000 people, is just one of the many developments emphasizing how many "fault lines" there are in the region, Richard Haass, president of Council on Foreign Relations, told "CNN Tonight."

"There's fault lines within the Palestinians between Hamas and the other part of the Palestinian Authority. You have Sunnis vs. Shia. You have Iran vs. Saudi Arabia and the Arabs. You have secularists vs. people who embrace religion in the political space."

The Palestinian Authority

Paying a price for all this is another key player: Fatah, the Palestinian faction that controls the West Bank. Fatah and Hamas have long fought each other, but earlier this year made another effort at a unity government.

Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas, who is in charge of the government in the West Bank, "seems politically exhausted by all the twists and turns he has made in search of a durable solution," the Soufan Gruop says. "And the one chance of reasserting his authority through a unity government that would have forced Hamas into a subordinate and less militant role has now disappeared. He must now watch helplessly as protests in the West Bank undo whatever progress he had made towards a two-state solution."

Gaza conflict by the numbers
 
CNN's Jethro Mullen, Brian Todd
231  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Zbigniew on: August 02, 2014, 09:51:09 PM
Nothing  like giving a failed NSA from a failed Presidency a chance to give his worthless anti-Semitic (as he always has been) opinion.   So his daughters remark "morning Jew" was not just a slip of the tongue.  Here he goes off again:     
 
Brzezinski: Netanyahu 'making a very serious mistake'

Discussion in 'Middle East & Africa' started by Hazzy997, Yesterday at 4:29 AM.
Yesterday at 4:29 AM  #1 

 Joined:Apr 13, 2013Messages:11,425Ratings: +10 / 9,529 / -4  Palestinian Territory, OccupiedUnited States

Brzezinski: Netanyahu 'making a very serious mistake'

 Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

 Fareed speaks with former U.S. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski about Israel's military operation in Gaza.

 Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu on CNN told Wolf Blitzer that the invasion of Gaza was a strategy to demilitarize Gaza, explaining the use of force. But it has been quite a robust use of force…Do you think that it is going to succeed, the Israeli strategy?

 No, I think he is making a very serious mistake. When Hamas in effect accepted the notion of participation in the Palestinian leadership, it in effect acknowledged the determination of that leadership to seek a peaceful solution with Israel. That was a real option. They should have persisted in that.

Instead Netanyahu launched the campaign of defamation against Hamas, seized on the killing of three innocent Israeli kids to immediately charge Hamas with having done it without any evidence, and has used that to stir up public opinion in Israel in order to justify this attack on Gaza, which is so lethal.

 I think he is isolating Israel. He's endangering its longer-range future. And I think we ought to make it very clear that this is a course of action which we thoroughly disapprove and which we do not support and which may compel us and the rest of the international community to take some steps of legitimizing Palestinian aspirations perhaps in the U.N.

232  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: August 01, 2014, 08:26:26 PM
Bigdog,
Thank you.

The author of both those articles does not paint a positive outlook to say the least.

Just tends to bolster the belief that Boehner is in way over his head as speaker.
233  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Finally on: July 31, 2014, 07:20:01 PM
A guy willing to stand up to white collar corruption.  This guy is now my hero:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/31/nyregion/us-attorney-warns-cuomo-on-ethics-case-.html?_r=0
234  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Have babies to kill Jews on: July 31, 2014, 09:53:55 AM
It's right here.  Palestinians having babies up there with the highest rates in the world.   Many even point out it is to sacrifice them against Israel.   Where is the world condemnation of this?:

Palastinina birth rate explodes


April 21, 2002|By Tom Hundley Foreign Correspondent


SHUFAT REFUGEE CAMP, Israel — Married at 15, she gave birth to her first child less than a year later. Six months ago, she gave birth to her eighth. Fatima Shaher, 31, a Palestinian woman with dark eyes and an easy smile, loves children. She said she expects to have more.

In recent weeks, Israel has been unnerved by a ferocious wave of suicide bombs that has turned the simple act of boarding a city bus or eating in a crowded restaurant into an existential calculation. But some Israelis say that ticking beneath the surface of the violent confrontation between Arab and Jew, is a silent bomb, a demographic bomb.

Shaher and other Palestinian women are producing babies at one of the highest rates in the world. While Israelis are alarmed by the trend, Palestinians have mixed views. Some see it as their ultimate weapon; Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat once referred to Palestinian mothers as his "biological bomb." Others see the explosive birth rate as a catastrophe that will keep the Palestinians mired in poverty and despair.

Among Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, the annual birth rate is 40 for every 1,000 of population; among Palestinians living in Israel, it drops slightly to 36 per 1,000. The birth rate among Jews across the region is 18.3 per thousand -- high by European standards but less than half that of the Palestinians.

At the moment, the population is evenly balanced between Arabs and Jews. But as the competition heats up for scarce living space and water resources, the Palestinians are on the brink of a population explosion that will swamp the Jewish populace in less than a generation.

The dry, narrow strip of land between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea is already crowded with 9.7 million people. Arnon Sofer, a demographer at Israel's Haifa University, predicted last year that by 2020 the number of people living on the land will swell to 15.2 million, 58 percent of them non-Jews.

Similarly, a U.N. study predicts that by 2050 the population in the West Bank and Gaza will almost quadruple to almost 12 million.

Pointing to these numbers, Israeli leftists argue that the creation of a separate Palestinian state is the only way to guarantee the "Jewishness" of the Jewish state. On the Israeli right, the numbers have generated discussion of cruder measures. Among them, large transfers of Palestinians to neighboring Arab states, sufficiently crippling the instruments of Palestinian self-rule so that it poses no threat to Jewish domination, or imposing a "Chinese rule" that strictly limits the number of children Palestinian couples may have.

Many Palestinian politicians, on the other hand, are heartened by the statistics, thinking that if they just hang tough, time is on their side. As the present crisis worsens in the occupied territories, the Palestinian population, especially its men, cling to this straw.

"When we used to have land, we had many children to help with the work. Now we are having many children to help us recover our land," said Muhammad Nofal, 45, an unemployed driver who has seven children. He and his family live in the Shufat refugee camp, on the outskirts of Jerusalem.

"I have six sons, three for the struggle and three for me," he said, echoing the words of Arafat, who famously
235  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Runs in the family. on: July 31, 2014, 09:43:57 AM
Incompetence and anti-Semitism.  And...

Of course.  A rapid defense on Huffington Post.  Could anyone imagine the outcry if a Conservative slipped and said what was on her mind about a guest.   Taking this into context one must remember that her father is a definite Jew hater from the Carter years.  Perhaps she will apologize and of course bygones will be bygones.  As long as she is a liberal we know her heart is in the right place  wink:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/30/mika-morning-jew-joe_n_5633478.html
236  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: July 31, 2014, 08:35:37 AM
Why would anybody trust the US again?  We abandoned Iraqis who helped us just like we abandoned the Kurds and just like we abandoned S. Vietnamese who helped us.


Shimon Peres on CNN saying he trusts Obama and Kerry?  Oh common!   Give me a break. 

237  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / surgeon posts before and after pictures of patient on: July 31, 2014, 08:32:25 AM
I agree this is outrageous that this guy uses pictures of a patient to promote himself.  How dare him!
That said who the heck would have had any clue who this woman was?  Now we all know who she is. 

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/doctor-sued-over-cocaine-nose-photos-687321
238  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: July 31, 2014, 07:55:49 AM
This makes the legal argument for the case.

I am not sure about the practical or political wisdom of this. 

To me it seems more a ploy to try to appease Conservatives (aka Boehner using this to show case that he IS standing up to the self Chosen one).   Would this not take more than a year or longer.  By then we will have several million more illegals in the US (actually now that I think of it immigration is not even in the law suit - oh my God - what a mea culpa!).

Levin doesn't think it will work.  Not that he is always right and many would argue not politically strategically helpful but he understands these things a ton more than me.

239  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: July 30, 2014, 11:27:34 PM
"Gamechanger Salon is comprised of “experienced change makers from different ‘worlds’ of the movement to share stories, honest reflections, interesting articles, and provocative ideas on how we build a stronger, more coordinated, more game-changing movement for the 21st Century” according to the policy manual"

Who the hell are these people and who asked them to change our "world" and what the hell are they to decide what is best for the rest of us.

Again the disease *narcissistic liberalism*.  They are so impressed with their own intelligence.  They know better then most in the world and they are going to fix it.   The ignorant "masses" just don't know better.  We need their help.  We just don't know it.

And what does this exactly mean:

*experienced change makers"

you mean progandists, deceivers, manipulators, divide and conquer, fascists, bribers, extortionists, con artists, snake oil salesmen?

240  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: July 30, 2014, 11:16:08 PM
Stockman is right.  And what does 40% of the voting public want to do about the wealth gap?

Tax the "rich" which also includes much of the middle class, to pay for all their debts. Continue the war on savings as Crafty apply puts it, "welcome" 5 million more poor illegals on top of the 12 million already here, and then all their relatives turning the rest of the country into Kalifornia (NJ too), punish the energy sector as Doug pointed out is the most thriving sector of all, embolden our enemies, piss off our friends, divide the nation even more and blame the other side, call them "haters" as the first Black and stooge in office does, all the while it is their policies worsening this mess.

But yes gotta support that brockster and the rest of the "for the po crowd".
The democrats in lock step eternally pushing *forward*  destroying America.

241  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I am one American Jew this guy does not speak for on: July 30, 2014, 07:41:41 PM
Proving that he suffers from the mental disorder called *narcissistic liberalism* please read on.  Lets rally around this guy and self flagellate ourselves till we are all murdered and still blame ourselves for it.   

Every time I feel proud of being a Jew I hear or read about this crap and think of only disgust, embarrassment, and shame.
Do other conservative Jews feel this way? 

****a daily independent global news hour

with Amy Goodman & Juan González

Henry Siegman, Leading Voice of U.S. Jewry, on Gaza: "A Slaughter of Innocents"

Henry Siegman, president of the U.S./Middle East Project. He is the former executive director of the American Jewish Congress from 1978 to 1994 and former executive vice president of the Synagogue Council of America.

Read: “Israel Provoked This War.” By Henry Siegman (Politico)

Given his background, what American Jewish leader Henry Siegman has to say about Israel’s founding in 1948 through the current assault on Gaza may surprise you. From 1978 to 1994, Siegman served as executive director of the American Jewish Congress, long described as one of the nation’s "big three" Jewish organizations along with the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League. Born in Germany three years before the Nazis came to power in 1933, Siegman’s family eventually moved to the United States. His father was a leader of the European Zionist movement that pushed for the creation of a Jewish state. In New York, Siegman studied the religion and was ordained as an Orthodox rabbi by Yeshiva Torah Vodaas, later becoming head of the Synagogue Council of America. After his time at the American Jewish Congress, Siegman became a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He now serves as president of the U.S./Middle East Project. In the first of our two-part interview, Siegman discusses the assault on Gaza, the myths surrounding Israel’s founding in 1948, and his own background as a German-Jewish refugee who fled Nazi occupation to later become a leading American Jewish voice and now vocal critic of Israel’s policies in the Occupied Territories.

"When one thinks that this is what is necessary for Israel to survive, that the Zionist dream is based on the repeated slaughter of innocents on a scale that we’re watching these days on television, that is really a profound, profound crisis — and should be a profound crisis in the thinking of all of us who were committed to the establishment of the state and to its success," Siegman says. Responding to Israel’s U.S.-backed claim that its assault on Gaza is necessary because no country would tolerate the rocket fire from militants in Gaza, Siegman says: "What undermines this principle is that no country and no people would live the way that Gazans have been made to live. … The question of the morality of Israel’s action depends, in the first instance, on the question, couldn’t Israel be doing something [to prevent] this disaster that is playing out now, in terms of the destruction of human life? Couldn’t they have done something that did not require that cost? And the answer is, sure, they could have ended the occupation."



Transcript


This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: As we continue our coverage of the Israeli offensive in Gaza, we spend the rest of the hour with Henry Siegman, the former executive director of the American Jewish Congress, long described as one of the nation’s "big three" Jewish organizations along with the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League. Henry Siegman was born in 1930 in Frankfurt, Germany. Three years later, the Nazis came to power. After fleeing Nazi troops in Belgium, his family eventually moved to the United States. His father was a leader of the European Zionist movement, pushing for the creation of a Jewish state. In New York, Henry Siegman studied and was ordained as an Orthodox rabbi by Yeshiva Torah Vodaas. He later became head of the Synagogue Council of America. After his time at the American Jewish Congress, Siegman became a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He now serves as president of the U.S./Middle East Project.

AMY GOODMAN: Over the years, Henry Siegman has become a vocal critic of Israel’s policies in the Occupied Territories and has urged Isral to engage with Hamas. He has called the Palestinian struggle for a state, quote, "the mirror image of the Zionist movement" that led to the founding of Israel in 1948. He recently wrote a piece for Politico headlined "Israel Provoked This War." Nermeen Shaikh and I sat down with him on Tuesday. I started by asking Henry Siegman if he could characterize the situation in Gaza at the moment.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Yes, it’s disastrous. It’s disastrous, both in political terms, which is to say the situation cannot conceivably, certainly in the short run, lead to any positive results, to an improvement in the lives of either Israelis or Palestinians, and of course it’s disastrous in humanitarian terms, the kind of slaughter that’s taking place there. When one thinks that this is what is necessary for Israel to survive, that the Zionist dream is based on the slaughter of—repeated slaughter of innocents on a scale that we’re watching these days on television, that is really a profound, profound crisis—and should be a profound crisis—in the thinking of all of us who were committed to the establishment of the state and to its success. It leads one virtually to a whole rethinking of this historical phenomenon.


NERMEEN SHAIKH: What do you believe—Mr. Siegman, what do you believe the objectives of Israel are in this present assault on Gaza?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, they have several objectives, although I’m not sure that each of them is specifically responsible for the carnage we’re seeing now. It has what seems on the surface a justifiable objective of ending these attacks, the rockets that come from Gaza and are aimed—it’s hard to say they’re aimed at civilians, because they never seem to land anywhere that causes serious damage, but they could and would have, if not for luck. So, on the face of it, Israel has a right to do what it’s doing now, and, of course, it’s been affirmed by even president of the United States, repeatedly, that no country would agree to live with that kind of a threat repeatedly hanging over it.


But what he doesn’t add, and what perverts this principle, undermines the principle, is that no country and no people would live the way Gazans have been made to live. And consequently, this moral equation which puts Israel on top as the victim that has to act to prevent its situation from continuing that way, and the Palestinians in Gaza, or Hamas, the organization responsible for Gaza, who are the attackers, our media rarely ever points out that these are people who have a right to live a decent, normal life, too. And they, too, must think, "What can we do to put an end to this?"


And this is why in the Politico article that you mentioned, I pointed out the question of the morality of Israel’s action depends, in the first instance, on the question: Couldn’t Israel be doing something in preventing this disaster that is playing out now, in terms of the destruction of human lives? Couldn’t they have done something that didn’t require that cost? And the answer is: Sure, that they could have ended the occupation, with results—whatever the risks are, they certainly aren’t greater than the price being paid now for Israel’s effort to continue and sustain permanently their relationship to the Palestinians.


AMY GOODMAN: When you say that Israel could end the violence by ending the occupation, Israel says it does not occupy Gaza, that it left years ago. I wanted to play a clip for you from MSNBC. It was last week, and the host, Joy Reid, was interviewing the Israeli spokesperson, Mark Regev.




MARK REGEV: Listen, if you’ll allow me to, I want to take issue with one important word you said. You said Israel is the occupying authority. You’re forgetting Israel pulled out of the Gaza Strip. We took down all the settlements, and the settlers who didn’t want to leave, we forced them to leave. We pulled back to the 1967 international frontier. There is no Israeli occupation of the Gaza Strip. We haven’t been there for some eight years.



AMY GOODMAN: Henry Siegman, can you respond?


HENRY SIEGMAN: OK, yeah. That is of course utter nonsense, and for several reasons. First of all, Gaza is controlled completely, like the West Bank, because it is totally surrounded by Israel. Israel could not be imposing the kind of chokehold it has on Gaza if it were not surrounding, if its military were not surrounding Gaza, and not just on the territory, but also on the air, on the sea. No one there can make a move without coming into contact with the Israeli IDF, you know, outside this imprisoned area where Gazans live. So, there’s no one I have encountered, who is involved with international law, who’s ever suggested to me that in international law Gaza is not considered occupied. So that’s sheer nonsense.


But there’s another point triggered by your question to me, and this is the propaganda machine, and these official spokespeople will always tell you, "Take a look at what kind of people these are. Here we turned over Gaza to them. And you’d think they would invest their energies in building up the area, making it a model government and model economy. Instead, they’re working on rockets." The implication here is that they, in effect, offered Palestinians a mini state, and they didn’t take advantage of it, so the issue isn’t really Palestinian statehood. That is the purpose of this kind of critique.


And I have always asked myself, and this has a great deal to do with my own changing views about the policies of governments, not about the Jewish state qua Jewish state, but of the policies pursued by Israeli governments and supported—you know, they say Israel is a model democracy in the Middle East, so you must assume—the public has to assume some responsibility for what the government does, because they put governments in place. So, the question I ask myself: What if the situation were reversed? You know, there is a Talmudic saying in Pirkei Avot, The Ethics of the Fathers: "Al tadin et chavercha ad shetagiah lemekomo," "Don’t judge your neighbor until you can imagine yourself in his place." So, my first question when I deal with any issue related to the Israeli-Palestinian issue: What if we were in their place?


What if the situation were reversed, and the Jewish population were locked into, were told, "Here, you have less than 2 percent of Palestine, so now behave. No more resistance. And let us deal with the rest"? Is there any Jew who would have said this is a reasonable proposition, that we cease our resistance, we cease our effort to establish a Jewish state, at least on one-half of Palestine, which is authorized by the U.N.? Nobody would agree to that. They would say this is absurd. So the expectations that Palestinians—and I’m speaking now about the resistance as a concept; I’m not talking about rockets, whether they were justified or not. They’re not. I think that sending rockets that are going to kill civilians is a crime. But for Palestinians to try, in any way they can, to end this state of affair—and to expect of them to end their struggle and just focus on less than 2 percent to build a country is absurd. That is part of—that’s propaganda, but it’s not a discussion of either politics or morality.


NERMEEN SHAIKH: One of the things that’s repeated most often is, the problem with the Palestinian unity government is, of course, that Hamas is now part of it, and Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by Israel and also by the United States. I’d just like to read you a short quote from an article that you wrote in 2009 in the London Review of Books. You said, "Hamas is no more a 'terror organisation' ... than the Zionist movement was during its struggle for a Jewish homeland. In the late 1930s and 1940s, parties within the Zionist movement resorted to terrorist activities for strategic reasons." Could you elaborate on that and what you see as the parallels between the two?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, I’m glad I said that. In fact, I repeated it in a letter to The New York Times the other day, a week or two ago. The fact is that Israel had, pre-state—in its pre-state stage, several terrorist groups that did exactly what Hamas does today. I don’t mean they sent rockets, but they killed innocent people. And they did that in an even more targeted way than these rockets do. Benny Morris published a book that is considered the Bible on that particular period, the war of—


AMY GOODMAN: The Israeli historian.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Sorry?


AMY GOODMAN: The Israeli historian, Benny Morris.


HENRY SIEGMAN: The Israeli historian, right, then in the book Righteous Victims, in which he said—I recall, when I read it, I was shocked—in which he—particularly in his most recently updated book, which was based on some new information that the Israel’s Defense—the IDF finally had to open up and publish, that Israeli generals received direct instructions from Ben-Gurion during the War of Independence to kill civilians, or line them up against the wall and shoot them, in order to help to encourage the exodus, that in fact resulted, of 700,000 Palestinians, who were driven out of their—left their homes, and their towns and villages were destroyed. This was terror, even within not just the terrorist groups, the pre-state terrorists, but this is within the military, the Israeli military, that fought the War of Independence. And in this recent book, that has received so much public attention by Ari—you know, My Promised Land.


AMY GOODMAN: Shavit.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Ari Shavit. He describes several such incidents, too. And incidentally, one of the people who—according to Benny Morris, one of the people who received these orders—and they were oral orders, but he, in his book, describes why he believes that these orders were given, were given to none other than Rabin, who was not a general then, but he—and that he executed these orders.


AMY GOODMAN: Meaning?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Meaning?


AMY GOODMAN: What did it mean that he executed these orders, Rabin?


HENRY SIEGMAN: That he executed civilians. And the rationale given for this when Shavit, some years ago, had an interview with Benny Morris and said to him, "My God, you are saying that there was deliberate ethnic cleansing here?" And Morris said, "Yes, there was." And he says, "And you justify it?" And he said, "Yes, because otherwise there would not have been a state." And Shavit did not follow up. And that was one of my turning points myself, when I saw that. He would not follow up and say, "Well, if that is a justification, the struggle for statehood, why can’t Palestinians do that? What’s wrong with Hamas? Why are they demonized if they do what we did?"


AMY GOODMAN: I want to go to the Israeli prime minister earlier this month, Benjamin Netanyahu, vowing to punish those responsible for the killing of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, the Palestinian teen who was burned alive following the murders of three Israeli teens. But in doing so, Netanyahu drew a distinction between Israel and its neighbors in how it deals with, quote, "murderers."




PRIME MINISTER BENJAMIN NETANYAHU: I know that in our society, the society of Israel, there is no place for such murderers. And that’s the difference between us and our neighbors. They consider murderers to be heroes. They name public squares after them. We don’t. We condemn them, and we put them on trial, and we’ll put them in prison.



AMY GOODMAN: That was Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu talking about the difference. Henry Siegman, can you respond?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, the only difference I can think of is that in Israel they made the heads of the two major pre-state terrorist groups prime ministers. So this distinction he’s drawing is simply false; it’s not true. The heads of the two terrorist groups, which incidentally, again, going back to Benny Morris, in his book, Righteous Victims, he writes, in this pre-state account, that the targeting of civilians was started by the Jewish terrorist groups, and the Arab—and the Arab groups followed.


AMY GOODMAN: You’re talking about Irgun and the Stern Gang.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Yes, yes. And as you know, both the head of the Irgun and both the head of the Stern Gang—I’m talking about Begin and Shamir—became prime ministers of the state of Israel. And contrary to Netanyahu, public highways and streets are named after them.

AMY GOODMAN: Henry Siegman, former head of the American Jewish Congress. We’ll continue our conversation with him in a minute.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report, as we continue our conversation with Henry Siegman, president of the U.S./Middle East Project, former head of the American Jewish Congress. I interviewed him Tuesday with Nermeen Shaikh.


NERMEEN SHAIKH: I’d like to turn, Henry Siegman, to Khaled Meshaal, the leader of Hamas, who was speaking to Charlie Rose of PBS. He said Hamas was willing to coexist with Jews but said it would not live, quote, "with a state of occupiers."




KHALED MESHAAL: [translated] I am ready to coexist with the Jews, with the Christians, and with the Arabs and non-Arabs, and with those who agree with my ideas and also disagree with them; however, I do not coexist with the occupiers, with the settlers and those who put a siege on us.


CHARLIE ROSE: It’s one thing to say you want to coexist with the Jews. It’s another thing you want to coexist with the state of Israel. Do you want to coexist with the state of Israel? Do you want to represent—do you want to recognize Israel as a Jewish state?


KHALED MESHAAL: [translated] No. I said I do not want to live with a state of occupiers.



NERMEEN SHAIKH: That was Khaled Meshaal, the leader of Hamas, speaking to Charlie Rose. Henry Siegman, could you respond to that, and specifically the claim made by Israelis repeatedly that they can’t negotiate with a political organization that refuses the state of Israel’s right to exist in its present form?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Yes. It so happens that in both international custom and international law, political parties, like Hamas, are not required or even ever asked to recognize states, whether they recognize a state or not. The question is whether the government of which they are a part and that makes policy and executes policy, whether that government is prepared to recognize other states. And this is true in the case of Israel, as well, the government of Israel, any government. I, incidentally, discussed this with Meshaal, not once, but several times, face to face, and asked him whether he would be part of a government that recognizes the state of Israel, and he says—and he said, "Yes, provided"—they had a proviso—he said, "provided that the Palestinian public approves that policy." And he repeated to me the fact that—he said, "You’re absolutely right." He says, "People ask us will we recognize the state of Israel, and will we affirm that it’s legitimately a Jewish state." He said, "No, we won’t do that. But we have never said that we will not serve in a government that has public support for that position, that we will not serve in such a government."


But a more important point to be made here—and this is why these distinctions are so dishonest—the state of Israel does not recognize a Palestinian state, which is to say there are parties in Netanyahu’s government—very important parties, not marginal parties—including his own, the Likud, that to this day has an official platform that does not recognize the right of Palestinians to have a state anywhere in Palestine. And, of course, you have Naftali Bennett’s party, the HaBayit HaYehudi, which says this openly, that there will never be a state, a Palestinian state, anywhere in Palestine. Why hasn’t our government or anyone said, "Like Hamas, if you have parties like that in your government, you are not a peace partner, and you are a terrorist group, if in fact you use violence to implement your policy, as Hamas does"? So the hypocrisy in the discussion that is taking place publicly is just mind-boggling.


AMY GOODMAN: Henry Siegman, you’re the head, the former head, of one of the leading Jewish organizations, the American Jewish Congress.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Two of them, also of the Synagogue Council of America.


AMY GOODMAN: So, these are major establishment Jewish organizations. You said you went to see Khaled Meshaal, the head of Hamas, not once, but several times to meet with him. The U.S. government calls Hamas a terrorist organization. They will not communicate with them. They communicate with them through other parties, through other countries, to talk to them. Talk about your decision to meet with Khaled Meshaal, where you met with him, and the significance of your conversations.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, first of all, it should be noted that the U.S. has no such policy of not meeting with terrorist organizations. It has a policy of not meeting with Hamas. That’s quite different. We’re very happy to meet with the Taliban and to negotiate with them. And they cut off hands and heads of people, and they kill girls who go to school. And that didn’t prevent the United States from having negotiations with the Taliban, so that’s nonsense that we don’t talk to terrorist organizations. We talk to enemies if we want to cease the slaughter, and we’re happy to do so and to try to reach an agreement that puts an end to it. And why Hamas should be the exception, again, I find dishonest. And the only reason that we do that is in response to the pressures from AIPAC and, of course, Israel’s position. The largest caucus, parliamentary caucus, in Israel’s Knesset is called the caucus of Eretz Yisrael HaShlema, which the Likud leads.


AMY GOODMAN: Explain that in English, "the land of Israel."


HENRY SIEGMAN: An "eretz," in English—in English, it means the whole land of Israel. This is a parliamentary caucus, the largest caucus in the Knesset, which is totally dedicated to not permit any government to establish a Palestinian state anywhere in the land of Israel, headed by Likud, senior Likud members of Knesset, and headed—a party that is headed by the prime minister of Israel. And what boggles the imagination is that no one talks about this, no one points this out, and no one says, "How can you take these positions via Hamas if this is exactly what is going on within your own government that you are heading?"


NERMEEN SHAIKH: Henry Siegman, as you are far more familiar than most, the argument made by Israel and supporters of Israel is that what might be construed as a disproportionate response by Israel to Hamas has to do with the historical experience of the persecution of the Jews and, of course, the Holocaust. So how do you respond to those kinds of claims?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, I don’t accept that at all, because the lesson from the persecutions would seem to me—and certainly if you follow Jewish tradition, the lesson of those persecutions, we have always said, until the state of Israel came into being, is that you do not treat people in that kind of an inhumane and cruel way. And the hope always was that Israel would be a model democracy, but not just a democracy, but a state that would practice Jewish values, in terms of its humanitarian approach to these issues, its pursuit of justice and so on.


I have always felt that, for me, the Holocaust experience, which was important to me, since I lived two years under Nazi occupation, most of it running from place to place and in hiding—I always thought that the important lesson of the Holocaust is not that there is evil, that there are evil people in this world who could do the most unimaginable, unimaginably cruel things. That was not the great lesson of the Holocaust. The great lesson of the Holocaust is that decent, cultured people, people we would otherwise consider good people, can allow such evil to prevail, that the German public—these were not monsters, but it was OK with them that the Nazi machine did what it did. Now I draw no comparisons between the Nazi machine and Israeli policy. And what I resent most deeply is when people say, "How dare you invoke the Nazi experience?" The point isn’t, you know, what exactly they did, but the point is the evidence that they gave that decent people can watch evil and do nothing about it. That is the most important lesson of the Holocaust, not the Hitlers and not the SS, but the public that allowed this to happen. And my deep disappointment is that the Israeli public, precisely because Israel is a democracy and cannot say, "We’re not responsible what our leaders do," that the public puts these people back into office again and again.


AMY GOODMAN: You mentioned your experience as a Holocaust survivor. Could you just go into it a little more deeply? You were born in 1930 in Germany. And talk about the rise of the Nazis and how your family escaped.


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, I don’t consider myself a Holocaust survivor, in the sense that I was not in a concentration camp. But I lived under Nazi occupation. I was born in 1930, but the Nazis came to power in—I think in 1933. And shortly thereafter, we lived in Germany at the time. My parents lived in Germany, in Frankfurt. And they left. My father decided to give up a very successful business and to move to Belgium then, and on the assumption that Belgium was safe, that we would be escaping the Nazis. But in 1940, the Germans invaded Belgium, and they invaded France. That was in early 1940, I believe. And so, it’s a long story, but for the next—from that point on until February 1942, when we arrived, finally arrived in the United States.


And how my father pulled that off is a miracle; to this day, I don’t fully understand, because there were six children that he had to bring with him, and my mother, of course. We ran from place to place. First we were at Dunkirk, where the classic evacuation, memorable evacuation took place, and the French and the British soldiers withdrew to across the channel. We happened to find ourselves there at the time. And then we were sent back by the—when the Nazi troops finally caught up with us in Dunkirk, they sent us back to Antwerp. And then my father had connections with the police chief, because of his business interests in Antwerp before the Nazis came. He was tipped off the morning that we were supposed to be—the Gestapo was supposed to come to our house to take all of us away. And so we just picked up, and we managed to get to Paris. And from Paris, we crossed—we were smuggled across the border into occupied Vichy France, and we were there for about a year, again without proper papers and in hiding. Then we tried to cross into Spain. And we did, but when we arrived at the Spanish border, they finally closed the border and sent us back into France.


So, then we managed to get a boat to take us from Marseille to North Africa, where we were interned briefly in a camp in North Africa. And then the—what I believe was the last ship, a Portuguese, a neutral ship, taking refugees to the United States stopped in North Africa. We boarded that ship. And we were on the high seas for two months, because the Nazi subs were already busy sinking the ships that they encountered. So we had to go all the way around to avoid various Nazi submarine-infested areas.


So after two months on the high seas, we arrived in New York, where we were sent to Ellis Island, which was full of Bundists, who had been German Bundists, who were arrested and were being sent back to Germany. But as we walked into Ellis Island into that hallway, something I will never forget, "We’re in America at last!" And those Bundists were greeting each other in the hallway, "Heil Hitler!" So the "Heil Hitlers" that we were trying to escape in Europe was the first thing we encountered as we landed on Ellis Island.


AMY GOODMAN: And how did you end up becoming head of one of the country’s—or, as you said, country’s two major Jewish organizations? And what was your position on Zionism after World War II?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, my father was one of the leaders of European Zionism. He was the head of the Mizrachi in the religious Zionist movement, not just in Belgium, but in Western Europe. And the leaders, the heads, the founders of the Mizrachi—mayor of Berlin himself, Gold, many others—were guests in our house in Antwerp. And they used to take me on their knees and teach me Hebrew songs from Israel. So, I had—I was raised on mother’s milk, and I was an ardent—as a kid even, an ardent Zionist. I recall on the ship coming over, we were coming to America, and I was writing poetry and songs—I was 10 years old, 11 years old—about the blue sky of Palestine. In those days we referred to it as Palestina, Palestine.


And so, into adulthood, not until well after the ’67 War, when I came across—and I got to know Rabin and others, and I came across a discussion in which I was told by Israelis, by the Israeli people who I was talking to, government, senior government people, that they had an initiative from Sadat about peace and withdrawal and so on. And Rabin said, "But clearly, the Israeli public is not prepared for that now." And that hit me like a hammer. I always had this notion drilled into me that if only the Arabs were to reach out and be willing to live in peace with Israel, that would be the time of the Messiah. And the Messiah came, and the Israeli leadership said, "No, public opinion is not ready for that." And I wrote a piece then in Moment magazine—if you recall, it was published by Leonard Fein—and he made it a cover story, and the title was, "For the Sake of Zion, I Will Not Remain Silent." And that triggered my re-examination of things I had been told and what was going on on the ground.


NERMEEN SHAIKH: Prior to that, your sense had always been that if the Arabs reached out, there would be two states: Palestine and Israel.


HENRY SIEGMAN: I had no doubt about that. I mean, that was, you know, just a given, that we are sharing. The resolution said, you know, two states. The resolution, which Israel—the partition resolution, which Israel invoked in its Declaration of Independence, planted, rooted its legitimacy in that—it cited the Palestinian—the partition plan. But when someone these days says, "But there’s a partition plan that said that the rest of it, that was not assigned to Israel, is the legitimate patrimony of the Palestinian people," the answer given is, "Ah, yeah, but they voted they would not accept it, and the partition plan was never officially adopted." Well, why are you quoting it then in your Declaration of Independence, if you consider it to be null and void and not—anyway.


AMY GOODMAN: And the response of—or the slogan, the idea that was put forward so much in the founding of the state of Israel: Palestine is a land without people for a people without land?


HENRY SIEGMAN: Well, that was the common understanding and referred to repeatedly in Ari Shavit’s book and others, that the Zionist movement, at its very birth, was founded on an untruth, on a myth, that Palestine was a country without a people. And as he says, obviously—and he recognizes in his book that it was a lie. And therefore, from the very beginning, Zionism didn’t confront this profound moral dilemma that lay at its very heart. How do you deal with that reality? And as a consequence of that, one of the ways in which they dealt with it was to see to the expulsion of 700,000 people from their cities, from their towns and villages, and the destruction of all of them, which, to his credit, Ari Shavit writes about very painfully and honestly.

AMY GOODMAN: Henry Siegman, president of the U.S./Middle East Project. He’s the former executive director of the American Jewish Congress as well as the Synagogue Council of America. He recently wrote a piece for Politico headlined "Israel Provoked This War." We’ll link to it at democracynow.org. Tune in tomorrow for part two of our conversation with Henry Siegman, where he talks about U.S. support for Israel and U.S. media coverage.

By the way, Democracy Now! has a job opening. We have an opening for an on-air graphic designer and CG operator. Visit democracynow.org for more information.
242  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: July 30, 2014, 06:51:05 PM
Happy days are here again oh happy days are here again oh happy days are here again oh yeaaaaaaaahahhhh!!!!!!!!!

 wink

You wanna buy land in south central Florida?   grin
243  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / To Bigdog on: July 30, 2014, 06:49:01 PM
Do you have any thoughts as to the merits legally, politically, strategically, or practically on the GOP lawsuit against Obama?

Thanks in advance.
244  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: July 28, 2014, 06:47:03 PM
"Must also point out though that he lost the House, will lose the Senate"

I dunno about the last part.  Just today Dick Morris on his radio show said the Republicans are not a lock on winning the Senate.  They need six.  Four states the Senate seats appear they will shift from Dem to Rep, but two more are tossups and two are looking like they are going to stay Democrat including Landrieu AGIAN!

"losing the media, lost public support"

Doug, I don't see him losing media at all.  As for public support I don't see that either.  Push comes to shove people will vote their wallets and he is buying off plenty of "folks".  You know the little boring people he is so fond of referring to.  tongue
245  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Post from the State and Municipal thread on: July 28, 2014, 06:56:37 AM
"He is saying to a lot of immigrants and other groups, you can differ with conservatives on one issue (or two or three) and still vote conservative to move the country (state) in a better direction.  Certainly Reagan did that in his day with a wide range of voters"

Yes Reagan granted amnesty to millions.  That backfired and the vast majority vote for the other party.  Indeed I doubt anyone thinks Reagan could possibly win California now.   

Obama is not a weak President.  He is a very strong President.  He is done everything he said he would.  Socialized medicine.  Towards the eventual universal single payer.  A powerful EPA with expanding regulations.  Putting coal out of business.  Almost the carbon tax.   Higher taxes.  Blame the rich while taking all their money in taxes and payoffs.

He is changing the electorate as fast as he can.   Turning us into a one party country like Reagan's state is now.

He is downsizing the military, retreating from foreign involvement.  Withdrawn support from Israel as much he can while most Jews will support him anyway.

Need I go on.

The only weak ones are the Republicans.  They can't even get their message straight.  Most of their leaders are fumbling around. 

Obama has indeed in affect checked out.  Why?  He is not disengaged.  His work is done.  He has put America on his and his liberal backers trajectory.   Now just sit back and tell the Republicans 'f' 'y', play golf, hobnob with the beautiful and interesting people, travel all over seeing the sites, eat all the world's best food and enjoy.

He 'f' us over pretty good if you asked me.

 
246  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics at the State & Municipal level on: July 28, 2014, 06:55:50 AM
My friend Doug writes,

"He is saying to a lot of immigrants and other groups, you can differ with conservatives on one issue (or two or three) and still vote conservative to move the country (state) in a better direction.  Certainly Reagan did that in his day with a wide range of voters"

Yes Reagan granted amnesty to millions.  That backfired and the vast majority vote for the other party.  Indeed I doubt anyone thinks Reagan could possibly win California now.  

Obama is not a weak President.  He is a very strong President.  He is done everything he said he would.  Socialized medicine.  Towards the eventual universal single payer.  A powerful EPA with expanding regulations.  Putting coal out of business.  Almost the carbon tax.   Higher taxes.  Blame the rich while taking all their money in taxes and payoffs.

He is changing the electorate as fast as he can.   Turning us into a one party country like Reagan's state is now.

He is downsizing the military, retreating from foreign involvement.  Withdrawn support from Israel as much he can while most Jews will support him anyway.

Need I go on.

The only weak ones are the Republicans.  They can't even get their message straight.  Most of their leaders are fumbling around.  

Obama has indeed in affect checked out.  Why?  He is not disengaged.  His work is done.  He has put America on his and his liberal backers trajectory.   Now just sit back and tell the Republicans 'f' 'y', play golf, hobnob with the beautiful and interesting people, travel all over seeing the sites, eat all the world's best food and enjoy.

He 'f' us over pretty good if you asked me.

  
247  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: California on: July 27, 2014, 04:14:28 PM
" I cannot say that a pro-amnesty position is not necessary to have a chance of winning."

We lose either way  cry
248  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Crafty, have you heard of this guy? on: July 27, 2014, 08:02:20 AM
Barry Goldwater 2.0: This candidate wants to redefine conservatism 

 By George Will 
 JewishWorldReview.com |    MENLO PARK, Calif.

Fifty Julys ago, up the road near San Francisco, in the unfortunately named Cow Palace, the Republican National Convention gave its presidential nomination to Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who knew he would lose: Americans were not going to have a third president in 14 months. Besides, his don't-fence-me-in libertarian conservatism was ahead of its time. His agenda, however, was to change his party's national brand.

Today, in this state where one in eight Americans lives, and where Democratic presidential candidates can reap 55 electoral votes without spending a dime or a day campaigning, the Republicans' gubernatorial candidate has an agenda and spirit similar to Goldwater's. Neel Kashkari is not, as some careless commentary suggests, an anti-Goldwater, diluting the state party's conservatism. He is Goldwater 2.0, defining conservatism a half-century on.

He relishes "turning upside down" the parties' stereotypes. The Democratic candidate, 76-year-old Gov. Jerry Brown, is "the old white guy." Kashkari, the 40-year-old son of Indian immigrants, was born in 1973, the year before Brown was first elected governor. Brown is a child of the establishment — his father, Pat, California's 32nd governor, was defeated in 1966 by Ronald Reagan. Jerry Brown, California's 34th and 39th governor, is a government lifer, having been secretary of state, attorney general and Oakland's mayor when not unsuccessfully seeking a U.S. Senate seat and the presidency (three times).

Kashkari prospered in the private sector, a place as foreign to Brown as Mongolia. Born in Ohio, Kashkari studied mechanical engineering at the University of Illinois, came to California to work in the aerospace industry, then earned an MBA from Wharton, joined Goldman Sachs and landed a Washington job with a Goldman Sachs alumnus, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. As a treasury official during one of the most dangerous periods in America's economic history, from July 2006 to May 2009, Kashkari says: "I saw the best in our political system."



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He remembers that, with a liquidity-deprived financial system pushing the nation to the precipice of a depression, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell simply said, "Of course we'll find a way to get this done." The politically perilous but nation-saving business of bailing out the banking system was done in days. "What other democracy in the world," Kashkari asks, "can move that fast to deal with a crisis?"

Just as McConnell's opponent in this year's Kentucky Republican primary execrated McConnell's finest hour, Kashkari's primary opponent vociferously deplored Kashkari's role as administrator of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). This opponent, a factually challenged fire-breather (of illegal immigration, he said, "We are in a war"), also said Kashkari supports sharia law. That would be peculiar for a Hindu who calls himself "a libertarian socially" (he is pro-choice and pro-same-sex marriage) and lives in Southern California's culturally relaxed Laguna Beach.





     

     




Today, California is a one-party state: Democrats have 2-to-1 majorities in both legislative chambers and account for 40 of 55 members of Congress. Republicans hold no statewide office and have only 28 percent of voters registered by party. All of this has something to do with these facts: California has the nation's highest income tax, sales tax and poverty rate (adjusted for the cost of living) and the second-highest gasoline tax. Only four states have higher unemployment rates. Kashkari says California's "U-6 unemployment rate" — which includes unemployed people seeking full-time jobs, part-time workers who want full-time jobs and people too discouraged to seek jobs — is above 16 percent.

Running against Brown requires discerning silver linings on black clouds. Kashkari says of polls showing Brown leading 52 percent to 32 percent: Well, 100 percent of Californians know who Brown is, so 48 percent are looking for an alternative.

Kashkari promises to derail Brown's obsession — the (at least) $68 billion San Francisco-to-Los Angeles bullet train. Brown has been silent about the recent court decision striking down the tenure system that entrenches incompetent public school teachers. The public likes the decision; teachers unions loathe it. Brown, Kashkari says dryly, has "multiple owners."

"If I get Jerry on a debate stage," Kashkari says, "anything can happen." That is true, as is this: Goldwater lost 44 states but won the future. His conservative cadre captured the GOP, which won five of the next six and seven of the next 10 presidential elections. If California becomes a purple state and Democrats can no longer assume its 20 percent of 270 electoral votes, Republicans nationwide will be indebted to the immigrants' son who plucked up Goldwater's banner of conservatism with a Western libertarian flavor.

• George Will Archives
249  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / prediction on: July 26, 2014, 05:44:36 PM
Nominees for the Democratic ticket will be:

Hillary for Prez
Elizabeth Warren for V Prez

Can only one imagine the liberal and their MSM hoopla over this?

They will trumpet this as the seminal turning point in human civilization.
250  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / 2nd post today on this thread on: July 24, 2014, 09:38:40 AM
Howard said,

"If you’re anti-Israel, then you’re anti-America. It’s the only democracy over there"

I say, when one thinks of the Israel haters and liberals in general this statement fits quite well.

Excerpt from todays news release:


Howard Stern Gives Impassioned Defense of Israel


"If you’re anti-Israel, then you’re anti-America. It’s the only democracy over there, it’s the only friend we have who’s willing to fight and stand up for what’s right."

7.24.2014 |
 
When a caller attempted to blame Israel for the war with Hamas last week, SiriusXM radio host Howard Stern told him to “F*** off!” and then launched into an impassioned defense of Israel, saying “If you’re anti-Israel, then you’re anti-America” and arguing that Israel is “the only friend we have who’s willing to fight and stand up for what’s right.”   

The tense exchange began when the caller predicted that Stern would turn his back on Israel when Comedy Central host John Oliver was in the studio.

Stern: I’m not gonna change my tune. Israel’s at no fault.

Caller: Israel’s is at fault, actually.

Stern: F*** off!

The caller then claimed that “Zionists run Israel,” at which point Stern cut him off:

Stern:  Oh, f*** off... I don’t want to listen to any anti-Semitism today. Jews get enough s**t all over the world. They get s**t on all the time. Jews are the indigenous people of that area. I’m sick of the bulls**t. And the Arabs don’t even want those Palestinians, otherwise they’d let them matriculate into their country.

Stern eventually ended the call, saying, “you sicken me,” but added that being anti-Israel worked against the interests of America:


Stern: If you’re anti-Israel, then you’re anti-America. It’s the only democracy over there, it’s the only friend we have who’s willing to fight and stand up for what’s right.

After admitting that he lost his cool and let the caller “get under my skin,” he said he’s tired of reading “this bulls**t,” citing Pink Floyd’s anti-Israel Roger Waters, who he said “ought to shut his mouth too.” Stern then said that the problem was people were forgetting the history of Israel:

Stern: People forget history. Jews were being executed and killed, and they went over to Israel, this little sh*thole, which was a desert—it had nothing going on. 

Stern compared the drastic difference of the median income of Israelis, $30 thousand, and Palestinians, $2 thousand, as an example of the success of Israel despite living in the same region. He then pointed to the Palestinians' real problem: "They elected terrorists to run their country."

Stern: But the Palestinians are mad at the Israelis, instead of being mad at the f***ing terrorists running their so-called country—who are raping the country, taking all the aide the United States actually gives to them. That they’re not angry with; they’re angry with Israel. [...] They elected terrorists to run their country. That’s the difference. Who do you support? Get off your f***ing high horse
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