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2851  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: December 17, 2013, 07:16:09 AM
Good post.  It goes to show us how very difficult it is to know what is true and what is not true.  OTOH I don't even know if the conclusions in this fact checker are true.
2852  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin, LGBT, "discrimination", & discrimination. on: December 17, 2013, 07:11:25 AM
To me the left has simply made a mockery out of marriage.

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/12/16/North-Dakota-Allows-Man-In-Same-Sex-Marriage-To-Also-Marry-Woman
2853  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: December 14, 2013, 08:33:22 PM
Agreed ditto
I suppose we will win by default.

The only reason not to come out with a plan sooner is the Clintons will coop and act as though it was their idea all along.

Classic Clinton.
2854  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / football on: December 14, 2013, 08:29:36 PM
*Freshman* wins the Heisman!  After perfect season:

http://video.search.yahoo.com/play;_ylt=A2KLqIBOEq1SUzwANZT7w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTByNDV2czA1BHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDBGdwb3MDOQ--?p=james+winston&vid=168f70ecbb560d15e7402afa4a9d818f&l=00%3A13&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DV.4755582274830826%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D-mBcnmNur8o&tit=Jameis+Winston+Throws+Football+Over+FSU+Pike+House+%28%40BritBrock%29&c=8&sigr=11abp5s11&sigt=11vjbbb54&pstcat=arts+culture+and+entertainment&age=0&&tt=b
2855  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / 2nd post on: December 14, 2013, 01:25:23 PM
I recall Donald Berwick bitching how an insurance company would not let his daughter have a test he said she needed.  Well apparently the insurance company thought she did not.  He was saying he did not know the criteria they used to deny the test.  We need to go in with our eyes open not closed.  As if to say when his beaucracy denies care at least there will be some sort of study to back it up. 

Well I can tell you the insurance companies also have studies to back up their denials.  They don't just deny care totally out of thin air.

So Berwick didn't like being denied but he has no problem being one who denies others when HE decides it ok.

I didn't learn if his daughter who ultimately got the test actually benefitted from it.  I can almost guarantee she didn't.  But he didn't mind.  He didn't pay for it.

Hypocrite.  Like most libs.
2856  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: December 14, 2013, 01:15:59 PM
Doug,

The plan is to get to single payer and then control our health care through a gigantic managed care program.  Rationing through restricting resources, use the cheapest drugs possible and a gigantic academic research complex employed to do studies that will support the restrictions.

The 80s show that managed care will control costs for a while till they start to go up again.  But it will not be fun or pleasant except for the stakeholders.  The providers and patients will be inconvenienced and hassled up the arse.  The way care is measured will show that there is not a huge difference in negative "outcomes" so the politburo will claim victory.  The truth is that it all depends on the outcomes being measured.  Don't think for a second this will be not be manipulated.

Individuals are no longer important - it is all population based measurements.  I did see one article questioning the validity of such measurements.

Like I have posted before results of studies can be statistically manipulated in various ways to make them sound like more important than they are.

The pharmaceutical companies do do the same thing.  Everyone plays the numbers games to their advantage.  The truth is much harder to discern.
2857  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: December 14, 2013, 01:00:23 PM
"BREAKINGTHE WAR MENTALITY"

It is really incredible how these geniuses @ Columbia discovered and understood that war is bad.  They like the Brockster are just too infatuated with themselves.  The "I am better than you" theme just drips from this incredibly boring drivel.

So this guy wrote this worthless piece.  Yet no one ever remembers him?  It sounds like to me he was not simply lurking introvertedly in the shadows.

And this was 1983.  What does this clown think the anti-war protesters kids of the 60's were all about.  Each generation of academic know it all's it seems is so freakin' narcisstic that they think they are wiser than anyone before.

Like the ancient Greek saying that wisdom is wasted on youth.

Like I said "young and dumb".    
2858  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The US Congress; Congressional races on: December 12, 2013, 12:08:17 PM
The Republicans are on target to win by default.  Not win with an agenda as far as I can see.
2859  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: December 12, 2013, 12:06:14 PM
Crafty,

Very interesting post on the "pharmacists".  However today most pharmacists are not in their own business like days past when they were their own professionals in their own practices.   They are part of huge chains.   Hospitals, physicians and nursing homes and others are all becoming corporatized and bigger and bigger corporate chains.

The bigger the better able to cope with all the red tape.

So what do these cuts mean to Walgreens CVS etc.?

I guess the Obama shots response would be they can make it up on volume.  Sure, I am happy to make 50% less because I know I can simply make it up by working 50% harder to see 50% more people per day.  I get paid less, work harder, patients get less time with me and we are all one happy bunch.

Those who did not have insurance make out like bandits now.  

No problem right Gen. Colin Powell - you fool.

2860  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / This is a wake up call on: December 12, 2013, 11:55:40 AM
I never heard this before.  How many other "journalists" are bribed to be spokespeople for interest groups?   I guess others are too with their ghost written books, speaking engagements etc. 

http://www.truthrevolt.org/news/unions-paid-msnbcs-schultz-177000-2012-75000-2013
2861  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / second post on: December 10, 2013, 06:54:44 PM


Two 2013 Nobel Winners Sound Alarm

Tuesday, December 10, 2013 5:05 PM
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From: "Outsider Club" <ww-eletter@angelnexus.com>To: "craig price" <super65.intell@yahoo.com>
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Two 2013 Nobel Winners Sound Alarm

By Adam English | Tuesday, December 10th, 2013


As you're reading this, some of the world's best and brightest are in Stockholm, Sweden to accept their Nobel prizes in recognition of their brilliance and ground-breaking work.

Two of them are bringing very deep concerns about a coming crash with them.

Robert J. Shiller, Eugene F. Fama, and Lars Peter Hansen will take the stage to receive their awards for analyzing asset prices in finance and the markets.

Both Shiller and Fama — two men with profoundly different views — have recently been peppered with questions about the economy and markets.

Neither like what they see, and what they discussed touches on the short-sighted manipulation of assets from real estate to stocks and bonds.

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 Speculative Bubble
Robert Shiller won his prize by compiling and analyzing long-term housing sale information in the U.S., probably for the first time ever. From the data, he drew some strong conclusions. Here is a short list:
•There is no continuous uptrend in home prices in the U.S.
•Home prices show a strong tendency to return to their 1890 level in real terms
•Changes in home prices bear no relation to changes in construction costs, interest rates, or population

Yet people consistently make the error of getting into real estate because prices rise in nominal figures that are not adjusted for inflation or other factors.

The U.S. Census has proof of this going back for over fifty years. Since 1940, it has asked homeowners to estimate the value of their homes. The estimates average out to a 2% appreciation per year in real terms. The actual increase is 0.7%.

Housing sales have been strong. Existing homes are scarce, houses stay on the market for less time and prices are way up in the hardest-hit markets. It looks healthy on the surface, but it is a mirage.

Cash-only transactions have dominated the market, peaking at 60% back in May of this year and drifting down to 30% in recent months. 15-20% is average and reasonable.

Families do not pay cash. Wealthy private and large institutional investors use cash to speculate on rising values while pocketing rental income.

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 On CNBC two weeks ago, in response to hedge funds and institutional investors claiming they are long-term investors, Shiller had this to say:

...[Housing investors] are not. I think what they've learned... there is short-run momentum in the housing market, and so they know how to play momentum, but as soon as it looks like it's weakening, they'll exit.... we can't trust momentum...

How can these guys not notice how fast home prices have been going up and the fact that historically momentum is a much better play in housing than it has been in the stock market? So I'm pretty sure this is on their minds. They are not going to say this, I guess. They're not going to say they're going to dump them.

I wholeheartedly agree. Wealthy private and institutional investors are funneling unprecedented asset price gains and unfettered access to easy credit with bargain bin interest rates into home purchases.

They'll keep hyping the market until a bitter end is in sight, capture short-term gains, and leave a new batch of families indebted for life.

"Bubbles Look Like This"

Shiller was back in the press earlier this month talking about stocks as well. Talking with German news service Der Spiegel, he stated that he believes sharp rises in equity and property prices could lead to a dangerous financial bubble and may end badly.

As he told the magazine, "...in many countries stock exchanges are at a high level and prices have risen sharply in some property markets."

"I am most worried about the boom in the U.S. stock market. Also because our economy is still weak and vulnerable," he said. "Bubbles look like this. And the world is still very vulnerable to a bubble."

Of course, the Fed doesn't see a bubble forming and is not weighing the concerns of Shiller and many other prestigious economists in their deliberations over quantitative easing.

If you're like the Fed and just look at price to earnings multiples, everything looks just fine.

However, earnings are looking good on the surface because profit margins are roughly 70% above their historic norms. If you take a look at the stock market over the past century, you'll see that profit margins inevitably return to the norm and negatively impact future earnings growth for years afterwards.

The median price to revenue ratio in the S&P 500 is now higher than it was in 2000. When profits return to normal, an abnormally large proportion of revenue will disappear and expose extremely high valuations.

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Robbing Peter to Pay Paul
In real estate and the stock market, we can trace this growing asset bubble back to the Fed, along with government debt and policies.

It even applies to the bond market. Government debt is ballooning due to unfunded spending and entitlement programs. Manipulation of interest rates and a steady flow of easy money is driving massive inflows into risky corporate and junk bonds.

Some of the worst — payment in kind bonds that allow borrowers to repay interest with more debt — have jumped from $6.5 billion in 2012 to $16.5 billion this year.

This has Eugene Fama, who normally voices skepticism about the existence of asset bubbles at all, concerned about a debt-fueled crash.

Saturday he told Reuters: "There may come a point where the financial markets say none of their debt is credible anymore and they can't finance themselves. If there is another recession, it is going to be worldwide."

As for the exuberance over the last job report he said, "I am not reassured at all. The jobs recovery has been awful. The only reason the unemployment rate is 7%, which is high by historical standards in the U.S., is that people gave up looking for jobs. I just don't think we have come out of [recession] very well."

The simple fact of the matter is you can't rob Peter to pay Paul. Adding easy credit and cash into bloated asset markets, along with corporate and government debt, is not worth creating confidence in the market and out-sized gains for a select few.

The only silver lining is that so much value was stripped from real estate and the stock market five years ago — mostly from the lower and middle classes — that we won't see the same 60% losses. However, the longer the situation persists, the worse it becomes.

Of course, many won't see a loss at all. They aren't working. The number of employable Americans rose 2.4 million over the last year while the official labor force shows a 25,000-person drop.

Yet the Fed, other central banks and governments continue to manipulate the free market and strip future growth and earnings. Entrenched financial institutions and politicians continue to enrich themselves to maintain their wealth and power at our expense.

Hopefully, the research Nick Hodge has been doing is true and a Fourth Turning is right around the corner.


Take Care,

Adam English

Adam English
 
2862  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: December 10, 2013, 06:44:01 PM
The cognitive dissonance of Wesbury:

Consumer spending grew over 3% the highest in some time.  What about consumer debt being the highest in some time?  Any connection:

http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

"We really do tip our hats to those who dive deeply into the details of job reports – even though they don’t really understand the data – to find that one nugget of negative information that will boost hits on their webpages and get them retweeted"

My hat tip to an economist who has been a ceaseless bull for 15 straight years.
2863  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Powell is for single payer on: December 10, 2013, 07:43:25 AM
Colin Powell Pitches Single-Payer Health Care in US

ABC News
By

Colin Powell Pitches Single Payer Health Care in US
General Colin Powell attends the

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell has waded into the health care debate with a broad endorsement of the kind of universal health plan found in Europe, Canada and South Korea.

"I am not an expert in health care, or Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act, or however you choose to describe it, but I do know this: I have benefited from that kind of universal health care in my 55 years of public life," Powell said, according to the Puget Sound Business Journal, last week at an annual "survivors celebration breakfast" in Seattle for those who, like Powell, have battled prostate cancer. "And I don't see why we can't do what Europe is doing, what Canada is doing, what Korea is doing, what all these other places are doing."

Europe, Canada and Korea all have a "single-payer" system, in which the government pays for the costs of health care.

Some Democrats who strongly advocated for, and failed to get, a single-payer system in the 2010 Affordable Care Act, still believe the current law doesn't go far enough to reform the US health system.

A retired four-star general and former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Powell told the audience about a woman named Anne, who as his firewood supplier, faced a healthcare scare of her own. Anne asked Powell to help pay for her healthcare bills, as her insurance didn't cover an MRI she needed as a prerequisite to being treated for a growth in her brain. In addition, Powell's wife Alma recently suffered from three aneurysms and an artery blockage. "After these two events, of Alma and Anne, I've been thinking, why is it like this?" said Powell.

"We are a wealthy enough country with the capacity to make sure that every one of our fellow citizens has access to quality health care," Powell. "(Let's show) the rest of the world what our democratic system is all about and how we take care of all of our citizens."

Powell, who has taken heat from Republicans for twice endorsing President Obama's election and reelection bids, said he hopes universal healthcare can one day become a reality in the U.S. "I think universal health care is one of the things we should really be focused on, and I hope that will happen," said Powell. "Whether it's Obamacare, or son of Obamacare, I don't care. As long as we get it done."
2864  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: December 08, 2013, 08:46:58 PM
I am posting this not because of Netanyahu but this that Mandela wrote in an autobiography:

"In my experience I have found Jews to be more broadminded than most whites on issues of race and politics, perhaps because they themselves have historically been victims of prejudice," Mandela wrote in his 1994 autobiography.

He is thus the first and only prominent Black to acknowledge any appreciation for Jewish support of Black civil rights.


*****Netanyahu missing Mandela memorial for cost reasons
     
Jerusalem (AFP) - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has decided not to attend a memorial service for Nelson Mandela this week because it is too expensive to travel to South Africa, Israeli media reported Sunday.

Netanyahu had notified the South African authorities that he would fly in but cancelled his plans at the last minute due to the costs involved -- around 7.0 million shekels ($2 million) for his transport and security alone, pubic radio and the Haaretz daily reported.

"The decision was made in light of the high transportation costs resulting from the short notice of the trip and the security required for the prime minister in Johannesburg," Haaretz reported.

The Israeli leader has been in the spotlight recently with revelations that taxpayers dished out almost $1 million last year to maintain his three residences.

The media highlighted a bill of 17,000 euros ($23,000) for water to fill a swimming pool at his villa in Caesarea in the country's north.

More than 50 heads of state and government have confirmed their intentions to travel to South Africa to pay their respects to the anti-apartheid hero who died last Thursday, South Africa's foreign ministry has said.

US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle will be among 80,000 people attending a vast memorial service Tuesday in the Soweto sports stadium that hosted the 2010 World Cup final.

The commemorations will culminate with Mandela's burial on December 15 in Qunu -- the rural village where he spent his early childhood.

Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas has announced that he will attend Tuesday's memorial service.

Israeli leaders have paid warm homage to the former South African president who died after a long illness at the aged of 95.

Netanyahu paid tribute to Mandela as "a man of vision and a freedom fighter who disavowed violence".

But some commentators have noted that Israel maintained close relations with the apartheid-era regime until the United States said the ties could threaten Washington's generous annual military aid to the Jewish state.

After his release from 27 years incarceration in 1990, Mandela, who first visited Israel and the Palestinian territories in 1999, was an ardent supporter of the Palestinian cause but also a firm believer that Israelis would ultimately take the path of peace.

"In my experience I have found Jews to be more broadminded than most whites on issues of race and politics, perhaps because they themselves have historically been victims of prejudice," Mandela wrote in his 1994 autobiography.

South African Jews played a prominent role in the struggle against apartheid, among them late communist leader Joe Slovo, who headed the ANC's military wing.*****
2865  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: December 08, 2013, 08:13:26 PM
“I am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from Nelson Mandela’s life," Obama said. "Like so many around the globe, I cannot imagine my own life without the example that Nelson Mandela set."  He added: "So long as I live, I will do whatever I can to learn from him."

Obama really has no class whatsoever.

Clinton is the same way with something like "Obama got the big things right.  He gets the easy things wrong".  or something like that.

I don't know who is more narcissistic or self serving.  It really is a tie.

One difference is Clinton just wants to be loved.  Obama (already loves himself) is an angry man on a vengeance vendetta.
2866  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: December 08, 2013, 10:01:01 AM
Just as I suspected.  The only mention of Reagan, of course, is not to give any credit but to point out he refused sanctions against South Africa for support of apartheid.

As for Krauthammer's article:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/charles-krauthammer-woe-to-us-allies/2013/12/05/cdf511ca-5de1-11e3-bc56-c6ca94801fac_story.html

Obama sees history through the lens of racial anger.  We are all influenced by our experiences.  But he is not objective.

2867  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: December 08, 2013, 09:54:13 AM
" wonder if the anti-Reagan protestors of the 1980s (or press) now understand that Reagan's determination and success in toppling the Soviet Union led directly to the fall of apartheid.  Conversely, I wonder if or when Mandela understood that his choice in aligning with the worst oppressors was counter-productive in his cause to end oppression."

About as much as Obama understands that undermining our friends and accommodating our enemies will reverse this achievement of Reagan.  Read Krauthammer's piece on the Ukraine being driven back to the Russian sphere of control.  Can anyone imagine what that must be like to the Ukrainian people who only a generation ago were left mass slaughter at the hands of the Soviets?

OTOH I the New Yorker is hardly a conservative rag.  Do they mention the name Reagan in the article?  I will look.
2868  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / G Will on Pollack's book on: December 08, 2013, 09:47:43 AM
Unthinkable, unthinkable, unthinkable, then too late and worse.  That is my opinion.
Others think otherwise:

******By George F. Will,   Published: December 6

In his disproportionate praise of the six-month agreement with Iran, Barack Obama said: “For the first time in nearly a decade, we have halted the progress of the Iranian nuclear program.” But if the program, now several decades old, had really been “halted” shortly after U.S. forces invaded neighboring Iraq, we would not be desperately pursuing agreements to stop it now, as about 10,000 centrifuges spin to enrich uranium.

If Denmark wanted to develop nuclear weapons, we would consider that nation daft but not dangerous. Iran’s nuclear program is alarming because Iran’s regime is opaque in its decision-making, frightening in its motives (measured by its rhetoric) and barbaric in its behavior. “Manes,” writes Kenneth M. Pollack of the Brookings Institution, “from whose name the word manichean derives, was a Persian who conceived of the world as being divided into good and evil.” But Pollack says suicidal tendencies are not among the irrationalities of the Iranian leadership, who are not “insane millenarians.”
best editorial cartoons of 2013 (so far): A collection of cartoons from around the country.

In “Unthinkable: Iran, the Bomb, and American Strategy,” Pollack argues that Iran’s nuclear program has been, so far, more beneficial to the United States than to Iran. Because of the anxieties and sanctions the program has triggered, Iran is more isolated, weak, impoverished and internally divided than at any time since it became a U.S. adversary in 1979. And one possible — Pollack thinks probable — result of Iran acquiring a nuclear arsenal would be Saudi Arabia doing so. Pollack considers this perhaps “the most compelling reason” for Iran to stop just short of weaponization.

Writing several months before the recent agreement was reached, Pollack said that, given Iran’s adamant refusal to give up all enrichment, it will retain at least a “breakout capability” — the ability to dash to weaponization in a matter of months, even weeks. Hence the need to plan serious, aggressive containment.

In September 2012, the Senate voted 90 to 1 for a nonbinding resolution “ruling out any policy that would rely on containment as an option in response to the Iranian nuclear threat.” The implication was that containment is a tepid and passive policy. But it was not such during the 45 years the United States contained the Soviet Union. And containment can involve much more than mere deterrence of Iran, against which the United States has already waged cyberwarfare.

Pollack believes that, were it not for Israel “repeatedly sounding the alarm,” Iran “probably would have crossed the nuclear threshold long ago.” But if a nuclear Iran is for Israel unthinkable because it is uncontainable, Israel’s only self-reliant recourse — a nuclear attack on Iran’s nuclear infrastructure — is unthinkable. And, Pollack thinks, unnecessary. The existence of Israel’s nuclear arsenal is a sufficient deterrent: The Iranian leadership is “aggressive, anti-American, anti-status quo, anti-Semitic, duplicitous, and murderous, but it is not irrational, and overall, it is not imprudent.”

There will be no constitutional impropriety if Congress recoils against the easing of sanctions and votes to impose even stiffer ones on Iran. The president has primary but not exclusive responsibility for foreign policy. It is time for a debate about the role of sanctions in a containment policy whose ultimate objective is regime change. For many decades prior to 1989, humanity was haunted by the possibility that facets of modernity — bureaucracy and propaganda technologies — could produce permanent tyrannies impervious to change. (See Hannah Arendt’s “The Origins of Totalitarianism.”) In “Nineteen Eighty-Four,” George Orwell wrote, “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — for ever.” Since 1989, however, tyrannies seem more brittle. And Pollack believes “the basic ingredients of regime change exist in Iran,” which “today is a land of labor protests and political demonstrations.”

Pollack may be too sanguine when he says that, since the brutal smashing of the Green Revolution of June 2009, “the Islamic Republic has been delegitimized and is starting to hollow out.” His fear is that even massive U.S. air strikes would only delay the danger that provoked them and thus might “prove to be nothing more than a prelude to invasion, as they were in Iraq and almost were in Kosovo.”

The logic of nuclear deterrence has not yet failed in the 64 years since the world acquired its second nuclear power. This logic does not guarantee certainty, but, says Pollack, “the small residual doubt cannot be allowed to be determinative.” His basic point is: “Our choices are awful, but choose we must.” Containment is the least awful response to Iran’s coming nuclear capability.

Read more from George F. Will’s archive or follow him on Facebook.******
2869  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Pathological Science on: December 06, 2013, 08:26:13 AM
I know Doug looked outside his Minneapolis window and cursed the big oils for all that snow.  grin

We had a lot of rabbits in the area this year.  The wild turkeys were not seen. 

I cursed the carbon producing scum all season.  It is their fault.

Thank God we are going to get a carbon tax.  I really don't mind paying higher prices to compensate oil companies who will be forced to pay this tax.

Nothing grander than financing the Democrat Party.  One third of my life or more already is devoted to their existence.
2870  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: December 06, 2013, 08:22:28 AM
Another one of my colleagues expressed his opinion that for doctors it is better to have a single payer.  Yes they will control us and squeeze us endlessly.  It is his opinion that is preferable to the myriad insurance companies each with their own multiple plans and rules.  Certainly they fight us every tooth and nail.  We spend fortunes just having to navigate the myriad systems.  Not that a single payer Federal system would be a piece of cake but just that we would know exactly what we are dealing with and would eventually learn the system.  I definitely don't agree with this.  I don't want government controlling our lives.  I just mention this to note some doctors do feel differently.  We will see more and more of this kind of stuff as the politburo members slowly propagandize us towards a single payer system.  The young and dumb will not even know what hit them.  We all know there are big problems in health care and we know much of the following to be true.  But again this sounds like the opening act to the next big propaganda push we on the right know is coming:

********Advocacy and policy news for internists
 
U.S. Health Care Falters When Compared With Other Countries, New Survey Finds

More Americans say they forego care because of access problems and a costly, confusing system
 
The U.S. health care system is a bewildering and expensive muddle that most people would like to see changed, even if they have insurance, according to a report in the November issue of Health Affairs.

It found that three of every four Americans surveyed said they would like to see a fundamental restructuring of health care in the country.

"There is a real call for moving away from the status quo," said study co-author Cathy Schoen, senior vice president for research, policy and evaluation at the Commonwealth Fund, which conducted the survey.

Problems with health care cropped up even among Americans covered by health insurance, the researchers found. As Schoen said, "We have a lot of people who, even when they have an insurance card, their insurance has holes in it."

The survey also included citizens of 10 other countries, and comparing the foreign responses to those of Americans revealed serious differences in the way health care works in the United States compared with elsewhere. For instance:

A third of all Americans, both insured and uninsured, reported going without medical care when sick because of the cost. About 58 percent of the uninsured skipped needed care. By comparison, fewer people reported a cost barrier to care in each of the other 10 countries surveyed. In eight of them, 14 percent or fewer people said they had to skip care because of money concerns.


About two of every five Americans had more than $1,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses for the previous year, whether or not they had insurance. "Even when we're insured, the United States is an outlier," Schoen said. "The insured went without care because of cost and were on the high end of spending out-of-pocket." Among the other countries, Australia and Switzerland had about 25 percent of their citizens reporting more than $1,000 in out-of-pocket medical spending, but the rest had far fewer people who spent that much.


About 25 percent of Americans said they waited six days or more to see a doctor the last time they needed care. That increased to 40 percent among the uninsured. However, three-quarters of Americans were able to see a specialist in less than four weeks. Access to physicians proved better in most other countries. Only in Canada (33 percent) and Norway (28 percent) did more people have to wait six days or more to see a doctor. Access to specialists was much worse in other countries, though in Switzerland, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands, a comparable number of people were able to see a specialist within a month.


More people in the United States rely on emergency room care, with 36 percent of the insured and 48 percent of the uninsured saying they visited an ER within the last two years. By comparison, about 41 percent of Canadians said they had been to the ER recently, but people in the other nine countries reported less reliance on emergency care. For example, 28 percent of people in New Zealand, Norway and Switzerland had been to an ER in the past two years.


Americans also reported more bureaucratic battling over their health benefits. "A third of people spent a lot of time on paperwork or had insurance disputes where their insurance didn't cover as much as they expected it to," Schoen said. That was more than any other country. The next highest, Switzerland, had 25 percent reporting health benefit problems. Sweden and the United Kingdom had just 4 percent reporting that they had to dispute bills or deal with unexpected costs.


"These are all symptoms of a care system under stress," Schoen said. "We spend more than any other country, but we are more likely to forego care."

A leading health economist, Stuart Altman, said that none of the findings were all that surprising.

"It's all the reasons why we need to cover more people, try to make the system a little simpler, and see if we can get our costs down," said Altman, a professor of national health policy at Brandeis University.

"What's interesting is, even among our wealthier citizens, there is a fair amount of apprehension about the confusing system we live in," Altman said. "That was a very telling piece of their analysis. It's a complicated health care system we have. There's no going around it."

Schoen said she hopes that when the Commonwealth Fund does the survey again in a couple of years, the changes wrought by the Affordable Care Act will improve the cost and access problems that Americans reported in the current survey.

"The hope is we will have brought in the insurance for people who don't have any, and the insurance will be more meaningful," she said. "We're expecting this to look better in the future. It's really a benchmark."

Altman was not as optimistic, however.

"Many of the issues are not going to go away," he said. "The Affordable Care Act is an attempt to reduce the number of people who are uninsured over time, and that's a good thing, but it does not in and of itself make our system less confusing."

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2871  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: December 06, 2013, 08:09:08 AM
Many Jews might argue that the Iran deal is preferable to strikes and outright war with Iran.  Such as Crafty's Stratford Post on the subject.  The twisted arguments are ridiculous as we can all see Iran is hell bent on achieving nuclear weaponry capability.

But as the saying goes we all have our opinions and mine is just one of many.

This picture to me portrays what I have noted multiple times.  The liberal Jews love the Democrat Party and also hate the Republicans more then Nazis.

http://news.yahoo.com/obama-defends-iran-deal-hanukkah-celebration-105731643.html
2872  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / WHo is going to protect us? We are all screwed. Most don't even know it. on: December 04, 2013, 08:02:05 AM
Especially the young and dumb.

This is why Sessions is right.  Anyone think Exxon was the corporation to fear.  What about the internet oligarchs?  Who the hell is going to protect us from abuse from them?

The government?  Why the government can't even protect their own websites?

Who is going to protect us from the abuse and evil that exists in all humanity?

I hear nothing from our representatives Pubs, Crats, or Partiers.  Nothing.  As a victim of information technology from organized crime and American Big entertainment business  I want answers. 

I am still hearing dead Freakin silence.  To may ex party Republicans - it ain't just the government we need to fear>
 

******Op-Ed Columnist

Mommy, the Drone’s Here!

By MAUREEN DOWD
 
Published: December 3, 2013 60 Comments

For Op-Ed, follow @nytopinion and to hear from the editorial page editor, Andrew Rosenthal, follow @andyrNYT.
. If you aren’t nervous enough reading about 3-D printers spitting out handguns or Google robots with Android phones, imagine the skies thick with crisscrossing tiny drones.

“I know this looks like science fiction. It’s not,” Jeff Bezos told Charlie Rose on “60 Minutes” Sunday, unveiling his octocopter drones.

The Amazon founder is optimistic that the fleet of miniature robot helicopters clutching plastic containers will be ready to follow GPS coordinates within a radius of 10 miles and zip around the country providing half-hour delivery of packages of up to 5 pounds — 86 percent of Amazon’s stock — just as soon as the F.A.A. approves.

“Wow!” Rose said, absorbing the wackiness of it all.

The futuristic Pony Express to deliver pony-print coats and other Amazon goodies will be “fun,” Bezos said, and won’t start until they have “all the systems you need to say, ‘Look, this thing can’t land on somebody’s head while they’re walking around their neighborhood.’ ”

So if they can’t land on my head, why do they make my head hurt? Maybe because they are redolent of President Obama’s unhealthy attachment to lethal drones, which are killing too many innocents in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and our spy agencies’ unhealthy attachment to indiscriminate surveillance.

Or maybe they recall that eerie “Twilight Zone” episode where a Brobdingnagian Agnes Moorehead fends off tiny spaceships with a big wooden stirrer — even though these flying machines would be dropping off the housewares.

Or maybe it’s because after “60 Minutes,” “Homeland” featured a story line about a drone both faulty and morally agnostic. The White House chief of staff, wanting to cover up a bolloxed-up covert operation on the Iraq-Iran border, suggested directing the drone to finish off its own agent, Brody.

“I will not order a strike on our own men,” the acting C.I.A. chief, played by Mandy Patinkin, replied sternly. “Hang it up.”

Or maybe I am leery that Bezos, who is also dabbling in space tourism, was looking for a Cyber Monday p.r. coup by playing to Americans’ ranker instincts, hooking our instant gratification society on ever more instant gratification. Do we really need that argyle sweater plopped in our hands in half an hour as opposed to the next day? What would Pope Francis say?

And won’t all the other alpha moguls want their own drone fleets? Howard Schultz will want to drop your half-caf, bone-dry, ristretto, venti, four-pump, sugar-free, cinnamon dolce, soy, skinny Starbucks latte on the front step at 7 a.m., and Tim Cook will want to deliver the latest Apple toys the soonest, and Disney’s Robert Iger will want his drones gussied up like Mary Poppins.

It will be interesting to watch The Washington Post cover new owner Bezos as he takes on the F.A.A. over drone regulations. The agency is drafting rules to let larger commercial drones and airlines share the sky, with an eye toward issuing licenses in 2015, but a handful of states are passing restrictions of their own.

Lobbying for private unmanned drones, Bezos will be aligned with the Motion Picture Association of America, which is working to get directors the right to use drones for aerial shots.

It’s a business taking flight. Experts say there may be as many as 30,000 unmanned private and government drones flying in this country by 2020, ratcheting drones into a $90 billion industry, generating 100,000 jobs. A degree in drone management can’t be far off.

Politico writes that the logistics of drone delivery will be dizzying: “It’s easy enough to drop a package on someone’s front steps, but what if the person lives in a fifth-floor apartment? Amazon wants to launch the service in large urban areas — could a drone collide with a skyscraper?”

Drones are less restricted abroad. Irish filmmaker Caroline Campbell used one to shoot film of Google and Facebook offices in Dublin, telling Wired, “We feel that it is no more intrusive than something like Google Street View.”

Journalists, police and paparazzi jumped on the drone trend. One photographer dispatched a drone over Tina Turner’s Lake Zurich estate to snap shots of her wedding last summer — before police ordered it grounded.

According to USA Today on Tuesday, all sorts of American businesses are eluding drone restrictions: real estate representatives are getting video of luxury properties; photographers are collecting footage of Hawaiian surfers; Western farmers are monitoring their land; Sonoma vintners are checking on how their grapes are faring. As Rem Rieder wryly noted in that paper, Bezos may eventually let his drones help with home delivery of The Washington Post, “but it’s bad news for kids on bikes.”

Law enforcement agencies are eager to get drones patrolling the beat. And The Wrap reported that in the upcoming Sony remake of “RoboCop,” Samuel L. Jackson’s character, a spokesman for a multinational conglomerate that has to manufacture a special RoboCop with a conscience for America (still traumatized by “The Terminator,” no doubt) scolds Americans for being “robophobic.”
2873  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: December 04, 2013, 07:40:34 AM
Answer to the following question is yes.  Half or more of the country will always hate it.  The group that will benefit will love it.  And eventually it will be patched up and we know for sure the Crats will go crazy on the airwaves brainwashing us as to how great it is.   So yes the Pubs need to be ready.  Will they?  History tells us no.

IMO Levin is correct about this too.  Waiting for AHA to collapse on itself is a major mistake.  The Crats won't let it.  It has to be appealed.

****Do Republicans need a Plan B on ObamaCare?

By Jon Terbush 7 hours ago The Week
 
John Boehner may need another playbook.
For years, Republicans have trotted out the same message: ObamaCare is a massive disaster, and the public knows it. And when Healthcare.gov crashed out of the starting gate, that message proved quite resonant.

Yet as ObamaCare begins to turn the corner, Democrats are going back on the offensive, touting the law's benefits and successes in hopes of boosting support for it — and the party — ahead of the 2014 elections. Republicans, meanwhile, have so far stood by the same critiques, betting that the law will still be seen as a failure come Election Day.

Which raises a thorny question for the GOP: What if ObamaCare works?

Undoubtedly, ObamaCare is now functioning better than it was in October. Though problems remain for the exchange site — the back end is still a mess, often sending bogus or incomplete information to insurers — enrollments are reportedly surging through both the federal and state-run marketplaces.

Good news in hand, the White House and congressional Democrats this week launched a campaign of daily pro-ObamaCare messaging to promote the law ahead of the Dec. 23 enrollment deadline for coverage that kicks in Jan. 1, 2014. Their goal is to present a "raw two-sided picture," according to Politico, with "Democrats delivering benefits on one side, and Republicans trying to deny them on the other."

"My main message today is: We're not going back," Obama declared in a reboot speech Tuesday.

If ObamaCare keeps improving, the GOP's "we told you ObamaCare was a mess" pitch could quickly wear thin. And if it does, Republicans will find themselves in need of a new argument or a legislative alternative.

So far, they don't really have either.

On the messaging front, Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) on Tuesday repeated boilerplate GOP criticisms that the law was "fundamentally flawed," and that it "continues to wreak havoc on American families, small businesses, and our economy." Other GOP leaders similarly contended that the law was still a problem-plagued failure.

That the message hasn't changed despite ObamaCare's turnaround proves that "Republican complaints of two months ago were purely opportunistic," wrote Jamelle Bouie over at the Daily Beast.

"For them, it just doesn't matter if Healthcare.gov is working, since ObamaCare is destined to fail, reality be damned!" he added. "At most, the broken website was useful fodder for attacks on the administration. Now that it's made progress, the GOP will revert to its usual declarations that the Affordable Care Act is a hopeless disaster."

The GOP has also yet to offer a credible legislative alternative to ObamaCare. Though there are several Republican bills that would reform the health care system, they're generally considered suspect, and none have consensus support within the GOP. Boehner on Tuesday tellingly dodged a question about whether he would even bring up such a bill up for a vote, saying only, "We'll see."

Polls have shown that while voters aren't too keen on the health care law, they're willing to give it a chance. Indeed, the first few months of ObamaCare's disastrous rollout could be a distant memory once coverage and benefits kick in next year.

Which points to another problem for Republicans: Their anti-ObamaCare crusade will be tough to sustain once people begin to see the law's benefits in action. Mother Jones' Kevin Drum sussed out that point, writing, "Once the benefits of a new program start flowing, it's very, very hard to turn them off."

By the middle of 2014, ObamaCare is going to have a huge client base; it will be working pretty well; and it will be increasingly obvious that the disaster scenarios have been overblown…

Given all this, it's hard to see ObamaCare being a huge campaign winner. For that, you need people with grievances, and the GOP is unlikely to find them in large enough numbers. The currently covered will stay covered. Doctors and hospitals will be treating more patients. ObamaCare's taxes don't touch anyone with an income less than $200,000. Aside from the tea partiers who object on the usual abstract grounds that ObamaCare is a liberty-crushing Stalinesque takeover of the medical industry, it's going to be hard to gin up a huge amount of opposition. [Mother Jones]

Republicans have so far committed themselves to staunchly opposing ObamaCare no matter what, even producing a playbook for attacking the law from here to November 2014. But if ObamaCare continues to improve, the GOP might need to draw up a new play — or risk getting burned at the polls****
2874  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: December 03, 2013, 08:04:06 AM
GM,

It is only a depression to those people who are feeling and living the pain.  To guys like Wesbury it really is just a semantics game.

2875  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Wow on: December 03, 2013, 08:01:29 AM
This is to me an unspeakable and unforgiveable outrage.  With all the threats and regulations we as providers of health care face with the Health Insurance Portability and Privacy Act (HIPPA) we now see this:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101225308   angry

Does this not speak to the dishonesty of this administration as well as many other examples?
2876  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / marijauna gossip reposted from health thread on: December 03, 2013, 07:54:22 AM

The Motley Fool

 5 Jaw-Dropping Facts About Legal Marijuana

By Brian Orelli  | More Articles 
November 30, 2013 | Comments (25) 

The legal use of marijuana for both medical use and adult recreational use is on the rise. Here are five facts that might just surprise you about the drug.

 Source: Chuck Coker, Flickr.

1. Marijuana could be the best-selling legal drug. Ever.
According to ArcView Market Research, the national market for legalized marijuana could hit $10.2 billion in five years. Pfizer's (NYSE: PFE  ) Lipitor currently holds the record for prescription drugs at about $13 billion. If ArcView's prediction is correct, it's not hard to see how marijuana could surpass that record in the following year. It's growing from a base of just $1.44 billion this year.

And unlike Pfizer, which saw Lipitor sales crash once generic versions hit the market, there isn't likely to be a cliff that causes sales to drop precipitously, short of having the federal government decide to crack down on state laws. Of course, unlike Lipitor, you can't invest in one company to capture all the revenue.

2. 14 states could join Colorado and Washington legalizing marijuana for recreational use
In fact, that's one of the driving forces behind ArcView's growth prediction. The sentiment has shifted recently; a majority of Americans now favor legalization. If they vote the same way they answer poll questions, it's likely that we'll see many more states where marijuana use is legal in the coming five years.

The driving force for the states is the potential revenue from taxes. They want to get their cut, which they don't get on illegal sales now.

It'll be interesting to watch Colorado and Washington as they try to deal with how to tax what many consider to be a drug to help people -- which are typically not taxed -- compared with a recreational drug, which, like cigarettes and alcohol, are typically highly taxed.

3. The government sends out marijuana cigarettes each month
It's part of a study to see if marijuana could help patients with glaucoma. At its peak, there were 30 patients enrolled in the study, which stopped accepting new participants in 1992. Those still enrolled get sent their prescriptions from a special farm on the University of Mississippi campus that provides the drug for medical research.

4. Only 6% of studies on marijuana investigate its potential benefit.
According to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, the other 94% investigate its potential harm. The problem, as Gupta points out, is that it's very hard to run clinical trials on marijuana use since it's still illegal at the national level. While the University of Mississippi farm can provide the medication legally for studies, it's apparently not that all that easy to acquire medication from it.

Researchers also have to gain approval from the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse, which has a mission "to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction." That's not exactly a ringing endorsement for potential benefits of drugs.

5. The receptor that marijuana activates has been an (unsuccessful) drug target
Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, one of the active drugs in marijuana, is available as a prescription drug called Marinol, developed by Abbott's drug arm, now called AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV  ) , to stimulate appetite and control nausea and vomiting in patients taking chemotherapy. But the drug isn't widely used because it's absorbed by different people at different levels, making it hard to get the right dosage .

Sanofi (NYSE: SNY  ) tried to do the opposite and block the receptor, thus controlling appetite. While Sanofi's obesity drug, Acomplia, was fairly good at helping patients shed the pounds, it had psychiatric side effects including depression. The FDA never approved the drug, and Sanofi had to remove it from the market in Europe in 2008.

*************************************
My thoughts:  On #1   Best selling drug?  Who would grow it and sell it?

On #2  Kind of sad that the driving force for legalization is tax revenue.  Just another example how everything is money.  I guess one could make similar claims for gambling and prostitution where those are also legal.  Alcohol and maybe a sugar tax.  The latter suddenly could be labeled a vice.

On #3 I didn't know the government was sponsoring studies on use of marijuana for glaucoma.  It can lower intra-orbital pressures but my understanding is the affects were too erratic and there are so many better drugs that the use for this is dubious.  I met an eye doctor in Florida who got into trouble with the ATF for testing this.  He claimed they ruined his life and his wife eventually committed suicide over it.  I only know his side of the story.  This was about ten years ago.  He was in his seventies.

On # 4 Old drugs do make comebacks.  Gupta noted that most studies looked at the harms not the benefits.  Remember thalidomide?  The drug given to pregnant women in Europe that led to horrible birth defects?   Just the mere mention of it afterwards gave everyone the shivers.  Now it is a beneficial drug used for other diseases.
 
On # 5 The Sanofi drug did work to help people lose weight but then a suicide was reported and that was that in the US.  I don't know what the experience was in Europe since it was approved there and later taken off their market. 

I left the comments from some other readers here:

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Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 5:25 AM, VikingBear wrote:



Legalize everything.

Let the herd cull itself.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 8:46 PM, Kalamakuaikalani wrote:



Hard to take your article seriously when you title it "5 Jaw-Dropping Facts ....." & then subtitle number 1: 1. Marijuana could be the best-selling legal drug. Ever. ................... It's not a FACT if marijuana COULD BE. It either is or it isn't & THEN, that would be a FACT.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 8:53 PM, glenns45 wrote:



Controlled Substance Act of 1971 signed by a President who was forced to resign or be prosecuted. The DEA was created to make sure the right people were selling the Drugs and supporting the NWO. The Feds are the ones who bring in the drugs this is on public record do some research.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:23 PM, towolf2 wrote:



When it smacks somebody upside the chops, then you know what is a fact and what isn't. That's 35 years as a pro grower speaking. Say hey to The Duke for me!!




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:26 PM, towolf2 wrote:



Which part am I reading? The educated humorous enriching part, or is this the NASCAR Channel. Caught out again.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:53 PM, oldmutt1949 wrote:



5 other jaw breaking facts about marijuana.

1. It has 424 compounds that turns into over 2000 when lit.

2. Those 2000 compounds release numerous poisons including hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide.

3. French Academy of Science using the atomic microscope has shown long term use of marijuana can alter a person DNA ( Science Daily )

4. Total number of people killed in the drug war in Mexico, central and Latin America exceeds the number of U.S. casualties in VIet Nam.

5. A lot of hippies from my generation who smoked this polluted crap are no longer here.

And last but not least their isn't a single study that has confirmed that all the substances in marijuana are safe evident by he emergency rooms a In Denver and other cities kept busy treating kids poisoned by this stuff because their parents are so dumb down they can't provide their children a safe environment.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:59 PM, fixer wrote:



Hemp used to be such a valuable crop that in George Washington's time ,farms we're required to plant a percentage of their fields with hemp.The oil from the seeds was a good lamp oil and the fiber made strong cloth and rope.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:21 PM, southernhippy wrote:



Old mutt is lying his butt off, Just look at old willie Nelson to see the truth, Pot smoking does not affect your age. Off course old mutt is talking about smoking and not one work about eating.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:24 PM, junior wrote:



something else you forgot oldmutt1949, there was talk about leagalizing it in my state. Even if it does become legalized, we were told by the plant manager that if our random pee test revealed any THC we would still loose our job.

This is why I agree with Vikingbear. Let the herd cull itself. The job market may open up so that someday I can find a job where I can afford a pack of store bought cigarrettes




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:32 PM, southernhippy wrote:



BTW mutt lets add some other facts to that mix..

Pot smokers tend to be closer to normal weight...

Higher good cholesterol.

Also lets add the fact that smoking pot don't increase you chances of lung or any other cancer. Not to mention and numerous medical uses of MJ among those would be nausea, seizure control, pain management. So when do we decide when the good outweighs the bad? Almost every war on Pot argument has been debunked, when do you see anything other than hate?

BTW us hippies are alive and well living a great and healthy life style, after all it was us hippies who came up with the who vegetarian thing long before anyone else, peace out...




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:57 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



"evident by he emergency rooms a In Denver and other cities kept busy treating kids poisoned by this stuff" Yeah oldmutt, them hospital rooms are just packed with them pot smoking whippersnappers. Too funny! If you have any time between your naps and your shuffleboarding league, you can take a few minutes to look up that marijuana by itself equals the same amount of emergency room visits as OTC sleep medicine. I will give you the benefit of the doubt, that you may have been mistaken for synthetic marijuana which is extremely dangerous.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:57 PM, OldSkewel wrote:



Oldmutt1949 is NOT lying southernhippy. ANYONE with at least 1/2 a brain knows it is NOT natural OR healthy to take smoke of ANY kind into a healthy set of lungs.

What I find truly ironic is the very same people that use to jump all over big time tobacco companies and the dangers of smoking absolutely sound like hypocrites now touting the oh so many benefits of cannabis which EVERYONE knows the most popular form of use is the SMOKING thereof.

While we're on the subject of cannabis, somebody please remind me, isn't hashish addictive? What, basically; is hashish comprised of...?

As far as the economic impact is concerned, it WOULD make sense to legalize it but that's the ONLY reason and EVEN THEN, the economic benefits would be relatively short term compared to the devastating social and moral impact (especially considering America's children) that would no doubt occur as you just as well can take America's public education school system and pitch it out the window, not that it works that well now but can you imagine what would happen if "chronic" was legalized...?






Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:08 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



Just one more observation while I'm still laughing....I'm not perfect with punctuation or grammar, but someone that doesn't smoke marijuana telling me: "jaw breaking" instead of "jaw dropping"...."their" instead "there"....."he" instead of "the"....."a In" instead of just plain out "in" minus the "a" and capital "I".....Geez, I need to smoke a bowl to even make sense of your comment at all.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:09 PM, southernhippy wrote:



Odds of MJ addiction is the same as gambling, Pot has no chemical addiction. You also have the same chance of becoming a workaholic or any other habit that could be considered a bad or good life choice. Pot has been around for more than 10k years and has not stopped any progression of mankind. BTW CBD's that are found in pot are also anti-cancerous, also naturally lowers blood sugars and even can protect the brain in the event of a heart attack or stroke. BTW we are also talking about Eating the plant, y'all do know it's non-toxic and impossible to overdose on right? Y'all are just looking that that lovely drug free propaganda against a persons right to live as they chose too. BTW one other note, Pot does have 5 natural nero keyways in the brain that can open up nero pathways(hence why there is enhanced sight, smells, and creativity.) Pot is indeed a natural product the human mind knows very well. MJ has been demonized for decades for no real reason other than sobriety, nothing else.

I do agree on one Idea though, kids under 21 should not get access and should be treated like booze and advertising should be the same as tobacco when it comes to kids.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:21 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



Old Skewel: Is it natural or healthy to drive a car? But you do it anyways don't you? Your trip to the store tomorrow will produce more pollutants into EVERYBODYS air, than one pot smoker can produce in a year. btw....I don't know if you've been asleep the past 50 years, but kids in school(if they choose to)get pot just as easy now, as they would if it was legal and fell under same laws as tobacco. As far as hash...it is basically the same as marijuana, just made from different parts. And the same studies you got your information that it was addictive, are the same ones that say marijuana is also.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:36 PM, HMull81 wrote:



Let’s get a few things right:

First - the problem with legalizing any previously illegal substance isn’t a morally grounded issue; being that most of these substances are vices are not socially accepted when overly indulged anyway.

Second – look up some history and consider why hemp production was ground to a halt in the first place, I’ll give you a hint……

It wasn’t because pothead hippies were overrunning the world with their outrageous free love and open minded way of living, that didn’t come until the 60s.

It is all economic and taxation that has put at spin on what any generation finds acceptable.

It doesn’t matter if you are for or against the legalization of pot, it matters where it would lead to based off of the revenue gained cause face it, the government has stopped doing for the people a long time ago, and if you are current with what is popular; the Kim and Kanye saga get more press than real issues such as legalizing pot, gun law, government debt, and not to forget my favorite government shut down.

I know that if I quit working when I was a soldier in the U.S. Army there were consequences which usually ended with me in a bad kind of way.




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 12:05 AM, allykat7825 wrote:



This will be the first step in finishing off the Regan inspired War against drugs which has cost so many billions over the years. It put the lotteries to shame when the taxes are added up and make many more people happy. Add cocaine to the list and the cartels are a thing of the past, which should please oldmutt. Oldmutt is probably not as old as I am and despite rumors to the contrary, and what many others might think, I still have my wits about me. .




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 1:03 AM, Sniper2013 wrote:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf07aK_5004




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 2:05 AM, uniquelyNzaneSam wrote:



Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Someday Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Perhaps after college graduations? How might one economically invest private citizen properties, hide them secure from theft, or accelerate prosperity to make defrauding obsolete?




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 2:50 AM, gareball wrote:



"Only 6% of studies on marijuana investigate its potential benefit.

According to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, the other 94% investigate its potential harm. The problem, as Gupta points out, is that it's very hard to run clinical trials on marijuana use since it's still illegal at the national level. While the University of Mississippi farm can provide the medication legally for studies, it's apparently not that all that easy to acquire medication from it".

If the FDA were to subject ANY drug from Big Pharma to the same skewed testing there wouldn't be a new drug on the market for decades. I'm betting that the drugs 'oldmutt' or 'Old Skewel' take to stay alive would never have passed such rigorous testing, and probably contain more virulent side effects than marijuana ever could.

Step into the 21st century, guys, and realize that it's time to put the idiotic and woefully expensive "war on drugs" to rest. It hasn't, and never will, work.

By the way 'old' fellas.....I'm 64 myself and have been a regular pot user for more than 45 of those years. I'm the picture of good health, thanks to a vegetarian diet, and will probably outlive both of you pot demonizers by a decade, at least. Oh, and 'Old Skewel', hashish IS NOT addictive, it's basically the resin from the marijuana flower and is nothing more than a more potent delivery device for THC. The sum total of what you anti-pot "experts" DON'T know is astounding. Then again, when you rely on anti-pot propaganda for your "facts" you're deliberately being fed a pack of lies designed to keep Big Pharma, the Liquor Lobby, and the 'for profit' prison system in customers for years to come. Try thinking for yourself, for once, and do the research so you'll be armed with REAL facts!


 

 
 
 
2877  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / end of privacy in football on: December 02, 2013, 08:07:41 AM
I guess it could be either electronic surveillance or possibly simply bribing insiders.   Maybe both.
Probably not new.  Just more obvious now.

*****Texans Allege ‘Fishy’ Adjustments By The Patriots

WILL GRUBB, Sports Radio 610

December 1, 2013 5:06 PM

Houston (CBS Houston) - The Texans defense struggled against Tom Brady and the Patriots. But then again, who doesn’t?

After the Texans 34-31 loss, defensive end Antonio Smith made it clear he thought Brady had a little extra help in carving up their defense to the tune of 365 passing yards.

“Either teams are spying on us or scouting us,” Smith said.

The nine-year veteran says the Texans added a new defensive wrinkle this week but the Patriots ’miraculously’  knew it was coming.

“It was just miraculous that they changed up some things that they did on offense that keyed on what we put in this week,” Smith said. “There’s no way. We have not did it ever (sic) before and they ain’t never changed it ever before so it was just kind of fishy.”

In 2007 the Patriots were involved in a scandal commonly know as ‘Spy Gate’ where Bill Belichick was fined $500,000 and the team had to forfeit a first-round draft pick for secretly taping coaches and walkthroughs.

“(Brady) knew what we were doing.” linebacker Joe Mays said.

“It is a specific thing that was important to what we were going to do today that they did all year.” Smith added.

The Patriots deciding to spy on a 2-9 team a week after their biggest win of the season seems like a stretch. But if the allegations are proven true, it would certainly be a major scandal for a Patriots team gearing up for a playoff run.

Get in contact with Will Grubb on Twitter – @WillGrubbRadio – or on Facebook – Will Grubb.*****
2878  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / marijuana gossip on: December 02, 2013, 07:55:17 AM
The Motley Fool

 5 Jaw-Dropping Facts About Legal Marijuana

By Brian Orelli  | More Articles 
November 30, 2013 | Comments (25) 

The legal use of marijuana for both medical use and adult recreational use is on the rise. Here are five facts that might just surprise you about the drug.

 Source: Chuck Coker, Flickr.

1. Marijuana could be the best-selling legal drug. Ever.
According to ArcView Market Research, the national market for legalized marijuana could hit $10.2 billion in five years. Pfizer's (NYSE: PFE  ) Lipitor currently holds the record for prescription drugs at about $13 billion. If ArcView's prediction is correct, it's not hard to see how marijuana could surpass that record in the following year. It's growing from a base of just $1.44 billion this year.

And unlike Pfizer, which saw Lipitor sales crash once generic versions hit the market, there isn't likely to be a cliff that causes sales to drop precipitously, short of having the federal government decide to crack down on state laws. Of course, unlike Lipitor, you can't invest in one company to capture all the revenue.

2. 14 states could join Colorado and Washington legalizing marijuana for recreational use
In fact, that's one of the driving forces behind ArcView's growth prediction. The sentiment has shifted recently; a majority of Americans now favor legalization. If they vote the same way they answer poll questions, it's likely that we'll see many more states where marijuana use is legal in the coming five years.

The driving force for the states is the potential revenue from taxes. They want to get their cut, which they don't get on illegal sales now.

It'll be interesting to watch Colorado and Washington as they try to deal with how to tax what many consider to be a drug to help people -- which are typically not taxed -- compared with a recreational drug, which, like cigarettes and alcohol, are typically highly taxed.

3. The government sends out marijuana cigarettes each month
It's part of a study to see if marijuana could help patients with glaucoma. At its peak, there were 30 patients enrolled in the study, which stopped accepting new participants in 1992. Those still enrolled get sent their prescriptions from a special farm on the University of Mississippi campus that provides the drug for medical research.

4. Only 6% of studies on marijuana investigate its potential benefit.
According to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, the other 94% investigate its potential harm. The problem, as Gupta points out, is that it's very hard to run clinical trials on marijuana use since it's still illegal at the national level. While the University of Mississippi farm can provide the medication legally for studies, it's apparently not that all that easy to acquire medication from it.

Researchers also have to gain approval from the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse, which has a mission "to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction." That's not exactly a ringing endorsement for potential benefits of drugs.

5. The receptor that marijuana activates has been an (unsuccessful) drug target
Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, one of the active drugs in marijuana, is available as a prescription drug called Marinol, developed by Abbott's drug arm, now called AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV  ) , to stimulate appetite and control nausea and vomiting in patients taking chemotherapy. But the drug isn't widely used because it's absorbed by different people at different levels, making it hard to get the right dosage .

Sanofi (NYSE: SNY  ) tried to do the opposite and block the receptor, thus controlling appetite. While Sanofi's obesity drug, Acomplia, was fairly good at helping patients shed the pounds, it had psychiatric side effects including depression. The FDA never approved the drug, and Sanofi had to remove it from the market in Europe in 2008.

*************************************
My thoughts:  On #1   Best selling drug?  Who would grow it and sell it?

On #2  Kind of sad that the driving force for legalization is tax revenue.  Just another example how everything is money.  I guess one could make similar claims for gambling and prostitution where those are also legal.  Alcohol and maybe a sugar tax.  The latter suddenly could be labeled a vice.

On #3 I didn't know the government was sponsoring studies on use of marijuana for glaucoma.  It can lower intra-orbital pressures but my understanding is the affects were too erratic and there are so many better drugs that the use for this is dubious.  I met an eye doctor in Florida who got into trouble with the ATF for testing this.  He claimed they ruined his life and his wife eventually committed suicide over it.  I only know his side of the story.  This was about ten years ago.  He was in his seventies.

On # 4 Old drugs do make comebacks.  Gupta noted that most studies looked at the harms not the benefits.  Remember thalidomide?  The drug given to pregnant women in Europe that led to horrible birth defects?   Just the mere mention of it afterwards gave everyone the shivers.  Now it is a beneficial drug used for other diseases.
 
On # 5 The Sanofi drug did work to help people lose weight but then a suicide was reported and that was that in the US.  I don't know what the experience was in Europe since it was approved there and later taken off their market. 

I left the comments from some other readers here:

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Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 5:25 AM, VikingBear wrote:



Legalize everything.

Let the herd cull itself.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 8:46 PM, Kalamakuaikalani wrote:



Hard to take your article seriously when you title it "5 Jaw-Dropping Facts ....." & then subtitle number 1: 1. Marijuana could be the best-selling legal drug. Ever. ................... It's not a FACT if marijuana COULD BE. It either is or it isn't & THEN, that would be a FACT.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 8:53 PM, glenns45 wrote:



Controlled Substance Act of 1971 signed by a President who was forced to resign or be prosecuted. The DEA was created to make sure the right people were selling the Drugs and supporting the NWO. The Feds are the ones who bring in the drugs this is on public record do some research.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:23 PM, towolf2 wrote:



When it smacks somebody upside the chops, then you know what is a fact and what isn't. That's 35 years as a pro grower speaking. Say hey to The Duke for me!!




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:26 PM, towolf2 wrote:



Which part am I reading? The educated humorous enriching part, or is this the NASCAR Channel. Caught out again.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:53 PM, oldmutt1949 wrote:



5 other jaw breaking facts about marijuana.

1. It has 424 compounds that turns into over 2000 when lit.

2. Those 2000 compounds release numerous poisons including hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide.

3. French Academy of Science using the atomic microscope has shown long term use of marijuana can alter a person DNA ( Science Daily )

4. Total number of people killed in the drug war in Mexico, central and Latin America exceeds the number of U.S. casualties in VIet Nam.

5. A lot of hippies from my generation who smoked this polluted crap are no longer here.

And last but not least their isn't a single study that has confirmed that all the substances in marijuana are safe evident by he emergency rooms a In Denver and other cities kept busy treating kids poisoned by this stuff because their parents are so dumb down they can't provide their children a safe environment.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 9:59 PM, fixer wrote:



Hemp used to be such a valuable crop that in George Washington's time ,farms we're required to plant a percentage of their fields with hemp.The oil from the seeds was a good lamp oil and the fiber made strong cloth and rope.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:21 PM, southernhippy wrote:



Old mutt is lying his butt off, Just look at old willie Nelson to see the truth, Pot smoking does not affect your age. Off course old mutt is talking about smoking and not one work about eating.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:24 PM, junior wrote:



something else you forgot oldmutt1949, there was talk about leagalizing it in my state. Even if it does become legalized, we were told by the plant manager that if our random pee test revealed any THC we would still loose our job.

This is why I agree with Vikingbear. Let the herd cull itself. The job market may open up so that someday I can find a job where I can afford a pack of store bought cigarrettes




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:32 PM, southernhippy wrote:



BTW mutt lets add some other facts to that mix..

Pot smokers tend to be closer to normal weight...

Higher good cholesterol.

Also lets add the fact that smoking pot don't increase you chances of lung or any other cancer. Not to mention and numerous medical uses of MJ among those would be nausea, seizure control, pain management. So when do we decide when the good outweighs the bad? Almost every war on Pot argument has been debunked, when do you see anything other than hate?

BTW us hippies are alive and well living a great and healthy life style, after all it was us hippies who came up with the who vegetarian thing long before anyone else, peace out...




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:57 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



"evident by he emergency rooms a In Denver and other cities kept busy treating kids poisoned by this stuff" Yeah oldmutt, them hospital rooms are just packed with them pot smoking whippersnappers. Too funny! If you have any time between your naps and your shuffleboarding league, you can take a few minutes to look up that marijuana by itself equals the same amount of emergency room visits as OTC sleep medicine. I will give you the benefit of the doubt, that you may have been mistaken for synthetic marijuana which is extremely dangerous.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 10:57 PM, OldSkewel wrote:



Oldmutt1949 is NOT lying southernhippy. ANYONE with at least 1/2 a brain knows it is NOT natural OR healthy to take smoke of ANY kind into a healthy set of lungs.

What I find truly ironic is the very same people that use to jump all over big time tobacco companies and the dangers of smoking absolutely sound like hypocrites now touting the oh so many benefits of cannabis which EVERYONE knows the most popular form of use is the SMOKING thereof.

While we're on the subject of cannabis, somebody please remind me, isn't hashish addictive? What, basically; is hashish comprised of...?

As far as the economic impact is concerned, it WOULD make sense to legalize it but that's the ONLY reason and EVEN THEN, the economic benefits would be relatively short term compared to the devastating social and moral impact (especially considering America's children) that would no doubt occur as you just as well can take America's public education school system and pitch it out the window, not that it works that well now but can you imagine what would happen if "chronic" was legalized...?






Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:08 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



Just one more observation while I'm still laughing....I'm not perfect with punctuation or grammar, but someone that doesn't smoke marijuana telling me: "jaw breaking" instead of "jaw dropping"...."their" instead "there"....."he" instead of "the"....."a In" instead of just plain out "in" minus the "a" and capital "I".....Geez, I need to smoke a bowl to even make sense of your comment at all.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:09 PM, southernhippy wrote:



Odds of MJ addiction is the same as gambling, Pot has no chemical addiction. You also have the same chance of becoming a workaholic or any other habit that could be considered a bad or good life choice. Pot has been around for more than 10k years and has not stopped any progression of mankind. BTW CBD's that are found in pot are also anti-cancerous, also naturally lowers blood sugars and even can protect the brain in the event of a heart attack or stroke. BTW we are also talking about Eating the plant, y'all do know it's non-toxic and impossible to overdose on right? Y'all are just looking that that lovely drug free propaganda against a persons right to live as they chose too. BTW one other note, Pot does have 5 natural nero keyways in the brain that can open up nero pathways(hence why there is enhanced sight, smells, and creativity.) Pot is indeed a natural product the human mind knows very well. MJ has been demonized for decades for no real reason other than sobriety, nothing else.

I do agree on one Idea though, kids under 21 should not get access and should be treated like booze and advertising should be the same as tobacco when it comes to kids.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:21 PM, imnxtc2001 wrote:



Old Skewel: Is it natural or healthy to drive a car? But you do it anyways don't you? Your trip to the store tomorrow will produce more pollutants into EVERYBODYS air, than one pot smoker can produce in a year. btw....I don't know if you've been asleep the past 50 years, but kids in school(if they choose to)get pot just as easy now, as they would if it was legal and fell under same laws as tobacco. As far as hash...it is basically the same as marijuana, just made from different parts. And the same studies you got your information that it was addictive, are the same ones that say marijuana is also.




Report this Comment On December 01, 2013, at 11:36 PM, HMull81 wrote:



Let’s get a few things right:

First - the problem with legalizing any previously illegal substance isn’t a morally grounded issue; being that most of these substances are vices are not socially accepted when overly indulged anyway.

Second – look up some history and consider why hemp production was ground to a halt in the first place, I’ll give you a hint……

It wasn’t because pothead hippies were overrunning the world with their outrageous free love and open minded way of living, that didn’t come until the 60s.

It is all economic and taxation that has put at spin on what any generation finds acceptable.

It doesn’t matter if you are for or against the legalization of pot, it matters where it would lead to based off of the revenue gained cause face it, the government has stopped doing for the people a long time ago, and if you are current with what is popular; the Kim and Kanye saga get more press than real issues such as legalizing pot, gun law, government debt, and not to forget my favorite government shut down.

I know that if I quit working when I was a soldier in the U.S. Army there were consequences which usually ended with me in a bad kind of way.




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 12:05 AM, allykat7825 wrote:



This will be the first step in finishing off the Regan inspired War against drugs which has cost so many billions over the years. It put the lotteries to shame when the taxes are added up and make many more people happy. Add cocaine to the list and the cartels are a thing of the past, which should please oldmutt. Oldmutt is probably not as old as I am and despite rumors to the contrary, and what many others might think, I still have my wits about me. .




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 1:03 AM, Sniper2013 wrote:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf07aK_5004




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 2:05 AM, uniquelyNzaneSam wrote:



Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Someday Where oldMutt1949 is investment advice?: anti-pesticidal controls against garden herbivores? Bet on that eliminates most carcinogens' category of compounds. Good alarm oldMutt about marijuana combustion: extreme diarrhea treatment on terminal illness cases will not intrest as much financial and mental risk as combustibles, crack and meth. Expect ascending physical medicine values from home-brewed tea-therapy thereby more versatile prescriptions flavorful hashish gel-capsuled and milligram-tweeked synthetically. Noncombusted eliminates psychological addiction injuring only nervous system like brain damages from psychotropic over-use.

>Behavioral health dermal patches prescribing "thc" will dominate nicotine futures into oblivion. Chemical, money lust, even commercialed availability are not the gateway drugs guaranteeing stupefied economics. Anti-faith religious propaganda misinterpretation-poisoning scorches your love into an emptying black-holes to drain away everyone&thing appreciable. Artificial counterfeits especially joy inducements cannot possibly satisfy longest-term spiritual-nature provisions. Will algebraic naturals ever displace monetary abstracts? Perhaps after college graduations? How might one economically invest private citizen properties, hide them secure from theft, or accelerate prosperity to make defrauding obsolete?




Report this Comment On December 02, 2013, at 2:50 AM, gareball wrote:



"Only 6% of studies on marijuana investigate its potential benefit.

According to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, the other 94% investigate its potential harm. The problem, as Gupta points out, is that it's very hard to run clinical trials on marijuana use since it's still illegal at the national level. While the University of Mississippi farm can provide the medication legally for studies, it's apparently not that all that easy to acquire medication from it".

If the FDA were to subject ANY drug from Big Pharma to the same skewed testing there wouldn't be a new drug on the market for decades. I'm betting that the drugs 'oldmutt' or 'Old Skewel' take to stay alive would never have passed such rigorous testing, and probably contain more virulent side effects than marijuana ever could.

Step into the 21st century, guys, and realize that it's time to put the idiotic and woefully expensive "war on drugs" to rest. It hasn't, and never will, work.

By the way 'old' fellas.....I'm 64 myself and have been a regular pot user for more than 45 of those years. I'm the picture of good health, thanks to a vegetarian diet, and will probably outlive both of you pot demonizers by a decade, at least. Oh, and 'Old Skewel', hashish IS NOT addictive, it's basically the resin from the marijuana flower and is nothing more than a more potent delivery device for THC. The sum total of what you anti-pot "experts" DON'T know is astounding. Then again, when you rely on anti-pot propaganda for your "facts" you're deliberately being fed a pack of lies designed to keep Big Pharma, the Liquor Lobby, and the 'for profit' prison system in customers for years to come. Try thinking for yourself, for once, and do the research so you'll be armed with REAL facts!

2879  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Time to prevent elderly from living too long? on: December 01, 2013, 09:36:57 PM
 shocked

My experience in medical care has brought me to the conclusion that care near the end of life does not have to be akin to an all out war fought to keep a patient alive till their last dying breath.   Alternative options such as palliative care or hospice care are ethical, valid, and most importantly humane options for many.   The key word is these must remain as OPTIONS that can be chosen, sampled, refused or changed  with the knowledge that the decision is never binding.   I still am convinced that medical science has as much capacity to reduce costs as well as increase them.  Just think how much death and disease will be prevented when we are better at curing a disease like Hepatitis C.  How about dementia or obesity?   People will live longer and mostly though not always better. 

***************Human Exceptionalism

Life and dignity with Wesley J. Smith.

Time to Prevent Elderly From Living Too Long?

By Wesley J. Smith

December 1, 2013 5:03 PM

Bioethicist Founding Father Daniel Callahan has long supported death panel health care rationing based on age. He has now weighed in against spending a lot on research to delay the aging process.

The transhumanists aren’t going to like this! From, “On Dying After Your Time:”

Even if anti-aging research could give us radically longer lives someday, though, should we even be seeking them? Regardless of what science makes possible, or what individual people want, aging is a public issue with social consequences, and these must be thought through.
Regardless of what science makes possible, or what individual people want, aging is a public issue with social consequences, and these must be thought through. Consider how dire the cost projections for Medicare already are. In 2010 more than 40 million Americans were over 65. In 2030 there will be slightly more than 72 million, and in 2050 more than 83 million. The Congressional Budget Office has projected a rise of Medicare expenditures to 5.8 percent of gross domestic product in 2038 from 3.5 percent today, a burden often declared unsustainable.

Contrary to the transhumanist eschatology, Callahan doesn’t believe that extending the length of lives will also mean extending their vitality. I tend to agree. But he doesn’t exactly practice what he preaches:

Modern medicine is very good at keeping elderly people with chronic diseases expensively alive. At 83, I’m a good example. I’m on oxygen at night for emphysema, and three years ago I needed a seven-hour emergency heart operation to save my life. Just 10 percent of the population — mainly the elderly — consumes about 80 percent of health care expenditures, primarily on expensive chronic illnesses and end-of-life costs. Historically, the longer lives that medical advances have given us have run exactly parallel to the increase in chronic illness and the explosion in costs. Can we possibly afford to live even longer — much less radically longer?

Callahan could have refused that expensive treatment. I don’t say he should have, but no one forced him to spend all that (presumably) public money on care.

He does ask a valid question, I think, about the wisdom of pouring resources into radical life-extending research (at least public money). However he also seems to assert that the elderly be somehow prevented from living longer (my emphasis):

We may properly hope that scientific advances help ensure, with ever greater reliability, that young people manage to become old people. We are not, however, obliged to help the old become indefinitely older. Indeed, our duty may be just the reverse: to let death have its day.

What does that mean? Some kind of Logan’s Run scenario?

Callahan isn’t that type. But he should have specified what he meant. As I read him, he seems to be proclaiming some kind of a moral duty of the elderly to die.

Or it could mean refusing efficacious medical care to the elderly that the younger would be able to obtain. In less genteel hands than Callahan’s, it could mean something even more insidious.

My, don’t those clouds on the horizon look dark?**********
2880  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / One poll that surveys US opinion of a government controlled health system on: December 01, 2013, 08:09:22 PM


http://www.newsmax.com/newswidget/poll-gallup-healthcare-insurance/2013/11/25/id/538519
2881  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Warning. The following is obscene. on: December 01, 2013, 07:57:42 PM
I am not sure this is suitable for people with brains:

http://www.alternet.org/visions/noam-chomsky-america-hates-its-poor rolleyes
2882  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The war on the rule of law on: December 01, 2013, 06:11:27 PM
Mr. McCarthy certainly connects all the dots.

Obama is clearly on record as stating "single payer" total government controlled national health system is in his mind the best.

So are probably most if not all of the academic politburo members who are behind the present AHA.  Berwick for example is well known for admiring the British system.

I am not totally convinced the flawed AHA was part of scheme to insure its own failure thus creating the vacuum for the government statists to move in a fill the void as though they were rescuing us with a mandatory single national health system.

It certainly could be.  I just don't know if they are that clever.

I am not sure it would matter if this was preplanned or just bumbling.   

We know they will never stop till they get to their goal of total control over our lives.

One question I have.  I wonder how many Americans would be just fine if we do have a government only health system. 

Socialism, communism, fascism, are not dirty words anymore. 
 
2883  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / one of many economist articles on China on: November 30, 2013, 03:51:15 AM
Crossing a line in the sky

What China’s new air-defence zone over disputed islands says about its foreign policy
 Nov 30th 2013  | From the print edition

ACUTELY conscious that the emergence of new powers on the world stage has more often than not led to war, China’s leaders make much of their plans for a “peaceful rise”. But they often have an odd way of showing it. Take China’s declaration on November 23rd of an Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) above a stretch of the East China Sea that includes the Senkaku or Diaoyu islands, which it disputes with Japan. This was bound to create alarm in China’s own neighbourhood and tension in its relations with the incumbent superpower. So it calls into question the priority China really places on maintaining peace; or, perhaps, its skill in managing its rise without sparking conflict.

The declaration seemed contrary to at least three stated foreign-policy aims. First, China claims to aspire to a “new type of great-power relationship” with America. But the invocation of an ADIZ—elsewhere in the world a relic of the cold war—was almost bound to prompt some old-fashioned muscle-flexing in response. America quickly reaffirmed that, although it takes no position on who owns the islands, they are covered by its mutual-defence treaty with Japan. Nor did it take America long to test the threat contained in the ADIZ declaration of unspecified measures against aircraft entering the zone without following its procedures. On November 26th two American B-52 bombers based in Guam crossed the new zone without informing China. An American aircraft-carrier group was already in the area, ready for a joint exercise with Japan, simulating a defence of the country from attack.



All this came just ahead of a planned visit to China, Japan and South Korea in early December by America’s vice-president, Joe Biden, intended to reassure both China and America’s allies about America’s strategic “pivot” to Asia. Mr Biden is said to have a good rapport with Xi Jinping, China’s leader. Just as well.

Second, the ADIZ has done great damage to China’s fairly successful recent efforts to reassure its neighbours of the benevolence of its intentions. China and South Korea, for example, have been getting on well lately—helped in part by shared resentment of what they see as Japan’s refusal to confront the evils of its wartime past, and its intractability over territorial disputes. Yet the ADIZ, which also encroaches on areas claimed by South Korea, prompted the government in Seoul to express regret too. And it created a bone of contention with Taiwan, with which relations have steadily improved in recent years.





Both Mr Xi and Li Keqiang, the prime minister, made well-received tours in South-East Asia in October, drawing attention to their reliable presence at a time when Barack Obama had cancelled a trip. China’s importance as an economic partner overshadowed the disputes it has with four regional countries over the South China Sea. But the ADIZ to the north suggests it is only a matter of time before China feels able to enforce one there as well. That China’s new aircraft-carrier and other warships were this week headed for exercises in the South China Sea was a reminder that China claims almost the entire sea and is ready to bully rivals—notably, of late, the Philippines—that stand up to it.

Third, and most broadly, the assertiveness over the specks in the East China Sea makes a mockery of the 35-year-old policy adopted by Deng Xiaoping of “strategic patience” or “hiding one’s brilliance”—which implied concentrating on developing the economy before throwing China’s weight around. Yet more than ever, China needs a stable global environment. A Communist Party central-committee meeting earlier in November promised a series of ambitious but high-risk economic reforms.

So it is possible that the announcement of the ADIZ was a blunder, an ill-considered overreaction to Japan’s threat to shoot down unmanned aircraft entering its airspace. Chinese foreign policy has sometimes seemed unco-ordinated and oddly insensitive to the consequences of assertive nationalism. But in this case all the relevant arms of party and government were surely on board. And at the party meeting, Mr Xi seemed to have consolidated his own power over decision-making with the announcement of a new national-security council to take charge of the management of internal and external threats. Even so, China may have miscalculated in some ways: in including South Korean-claimed airspace, for example, or in including aircraft not just approaching China, but merely crossing its ADIZ; or perhaps in thinking that such a zone was enforceable at all.

Yet the ADIZ dovetails with China’s long-term strategy for the islands. Since Japan’s government “nationalised” three of them (buying them from a private owner) in September 2012, China has stepped up incursions in the sea and air around them. Having contested Japanese sovereignty over the islands for decades, it has set out to undermine Japan’s claim to exercise administrative control. The ADIZ is a natural extension of this.

On the way up

The aim is to cow Japan, knowing that its government is under pressure from business to improve ties with the country’s biggest market, and believing that, as China rises inexorably, Japan is in long-term decline. China also hopes, some Chinese scholars suggest, to raise the diplomatic and military cost to America of its alliance with Japan, partly by provoking Japan into belligerence of its own. Then America might exert pressure on its ally to meet China’s demand, which is deceptively reasonable: for Japan to concede that the status of the islands is disputed.

An even more fundamental explanation of China’s apparently reckless behaviour is that nothing in its commitment to a peaceful rise is meant to trump the safeguarding of its national sovereignty. Mr Xi emerged from the party’s meeting appearing all-powerful. But no Chinese leader can afford to look weak on an issue, such as the disputed islands, that China has framed as one of its own sovereignty. He will find it hard to back down.
2884  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: November 27, 2013, 07:40:38 AM
Mark Levin actually discussed this same topic on his radio show yesterday 11/26/13.  He agrees with me completely.  It can be downloaded from his website.

There are many computer programmers here who cannot find jobs and whose wages have been stagnant.  So we need endless immigrants to compete endlessly keeping wages low while cost of living keeps going up. 

That said, the real point is FINALLY we have a prominent Republican speaking to the unfair power of the extreme wealthy.  We are all for people to become wealthy.  I am.  I wish I was one.  But when they then start getting benefits the rest of us don't that they use to tell the rest of us what to do and setting policy for their own ends, then we have a problem.  That is what the phrase "1% ers" is about.  Finally s few Repubs speaking about this.  I believe if more did then we would win by a landslide.
2885  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / "tweaking" - our lives on: November 27, 2013, 07:36:55 AM
More from the technocrat elites.  So we know that reducing the speed limit would save lives just by lowering the speed limit to a total crawl?  So now we make a city of several million slow down even more because statistically we might save some lives.  Why not get rid of all the cars?   Then the 98 % would be 100%?  Why do they decide when where how much?   Again the liberals making everyone suffer for some haze stats.  No one should ever die (except when they approve - death panels).  Every single thing must be studied and data has not become basis of all our laws, how we must live our lives.  It will NEVER end.  First the world has to give into delayed red lights.  Then we have the disability thing that inconveniences 98 % for the few.  Now millions must slow down for a relative tiny theoretical gain.   No end.   There really is no compromise. 

****Council Working to Reduce Speed Limit on City Streets

By Jill Colvin 11/26 4:03pm

The New York City Council hopes to pass legislation that would reduce the speed limit on most residential and side streets to 20 miles per hour, Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced today.

“We are actively working on that bill and our goal is to pass it before the end of the year,” Ms. Quinn said during an unrelated press conference this afternoon before the month’s final council meeting. “We’re actively working on it right now.”

The bill, introduced by Councilman David Greenfield, is aimed at reducing serous pedestrian injuries and traffic fatalities. Last year, 148 pedestrians were killed in traffic accidents and crashes.

“We are working to fine-tune this life-saving legislation that will slow down automobiles on narrow residential streets. I am hopeful that we can get consensus on this important legislation, which will literally save lives once it is enacted here in New York City,” he said in response to the speaker’s comments.

But there are complications. The city’s Department of Transportation has argued the proposal would conflict with state law, which only allows limits that low if other traffic-calming devices are used. Last Friday, Councilman Jimmy Vacca, chair of the council’s transportation committee, told WNYC the bill was being “tweaked a little bit” and that members were “aiming for 25 miles per hour on narrow, one-way streets.”

Currently, the speed limit on most city streets is 30 miles per hour, unless otherwise posted. The new regulations would be a boon to advocates–including those who installed their own 20-mile limit signs in Park Slope this week–but have drawn grumbles from some drivers who feel the city’s notoriously gridlocked streets are slow enough.

According to the group Transportation Alternatives, pedestrians have an 80 percent chance of surviving being hit by a car traveling 30 miles per hour and a 98 percent chance of survival if the car is traveling 20 miles per hour.

The measure is just the latest of several recent efforts aimed at making streets safer for pedestrians. Later today, the council is expected to pass another bill, introduced by Councilwoman Debi Rose, aimed at slowing speeds near public and private schools. The rules would require the city to install speed humps near at least 50 schools.

“Speeding is the number one cause of deadly crashes in New York City and we must do everything we can to prevent fatalities,” Mr. Quinn said in a statement touting Mr. Rose’s bill.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Michael Bloomberg did not immediately comment on whether the mayor supports the bill.


Follow Jill Colvin on Twitter or via RSS. jcolvin@observer.com****
2886  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I cannot believe it on: November 25, 2013, 11:22:06 PM
For possibly the first time ever - I agree and appreciate Chuck Schumer's comments:

"The disproportionality of this agreement makes it more likely that Democrats and Republicans will join together and pass additional sanctions when we return in December," said Sen. Charles Schumer (D., N.Y.).

I hope it isn't the last time he stands up.  We will see.  Will Hillary jump in and pretend to be Israel' savior?

Iran leaders have concluded what we on this board concluded over a year ago, if not over two years ago. 

Obama has already decided to let Iran go nuclear with a "containment" strategy.   He played Netanyahu for a sucker.  He had to "contain" Israel first.
If we could see it certainly the mullahs were laughing all the way to uranium mine.


2887  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Yes!Yes!Yes!Yes!Yes! on: November 25, 2013, 11:05:03 PM
This is what I want to hear from Republicans.  This is what most of America wants.   We don't need the bums in DC or the bums in academia who are the technocrat communists telling us who to let into OUR country.  And the masses don't want to hear Freaking CEOS of big corporations running their political mouths off about how we need more immigrants to fill their coffers with low waged positions.   We, the people decide who comes here God Damn it!  Millions of Americans are unemployed and we have these big companies sending jobs overseas and demanding more immigrants come here to compete and drive down wages even more.  How about we get rid of 50% disability and unemployment and these  same big shots hire and train some of them.

We cannot keep bringing them on in.  We are displacing our own.

Now finally a Republican speaks up for Americans and tells the Google Microsoft Facebook GE oligarchs to shut up.  He is not their tool.  He was elected by us, not them, to serve us, not them.   That is the ticket for '16 folks.  The very first time I hear a Repub say what I have been saying for months if not years.  

If we don't want a country that is 50% on the dole - we cannot have a country controlled by 5%.  The 5% cannot get special privileges.  Those on the dole cannot get special benefits.  They ALL, top and bottom must play by the same rules.

We lower taxes but they don't get all the breaks most cannot get.  Fair and square from bottom to the very top.
The Republicans must shed the party of the rich image. They are the party for all Americans.

grin grin

Go Jeff, the MAN:

*****Sen. Sessions slams Obama, CEOs on immigration

3:51 PM 11/25/2013

Neil Munro
White House Correspondent

Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions wants wealthy CEOs to butt out of immigration policy.

“America is not an oligarchy… A Republic must answer to the people,” Sessions said today, in a direct response to President Barack Obama’s latest effort to get wealthy California CEOs to increase their support for his unpopular push for increased immigration.

“Congressional leaders must forcefully reject the notion, evidently accepted by the president, that a small cadre of CEOs can tailor the nation’s entire immigration policy to suit their narrow interests,” Sessions declared in a populist statement that contradicts the media’s image of Republican coziness with CEOs.

Sessions’ statement was released shortly before Obama used a San Francisco speech to ask friendly high-tech CEOs in California to revive his failing effort to pass an immigration-boosting bill.

The bill has been blocked by top GOP leaders in the House, who are trying to balance donors’ demands for more workers with voters’ demands for more jobs.

Obama has been working with top CEOs since summer to push the Senate’s immigration expansion that would welcome 30 million immigrants, plus millions of temporary guest workers, over the next decade.

That influx would import roughly one immigrant or guest-worker for every American aged 11 to 21, or one immigrant for every American teenager in 2012. Current law allows 1 million immigrants and 700,000 guest workers to enter the country each year.

The push is being supported by numerous billionaires, including New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg, Fox News’ Rupert Murdoch and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg.

Since 2007, progressive and business groups have spent more than $1.5 billion on advocacy and lobbying to pass an immigration bill, despite massive unemployment, stalled salaries and negative polls. Other business groups have been pressured by the federal government and progressives to provide rhetorical support for the push.

Obama’s alliance with the wealthy CEOs is mutually beneficial. The CEOs would gain because high immigration will lower many Americans’ salaries and boost shareholders’ value. Progressives would gain a lock on political power once immigration boosts the number of government-dependent voters.

Sessions, however, is working alongside various U.S. groups to raise Americans’ wages by lowering immigration.

Polls shows Sessions’ populist low-immigration, high-wage pitch is popular, but his allies have far less less money or media coverage than Obama and his allies.

On Nov. 21, Sessions held a press conference in D.C. with Americans4Work, where he slammed CEOs who demand more immigrants.

“These business people do not get to set the [immigration] policy for the United States of America. They do not represent the United States of America, they represent their special interests… [and] I represent 4 million Alabamians and 300 million Americans,” Sessions said.

Sessions was backed up by Jan Ting, a law professor at Temple University, who told the conference that the current high-immigration, low-wage economy is “Blade Runner with food stamps.”

“Blade Runner” is a 1982 science-fiction movie in which most Americans are jobless and trapped in a violent, poverty-stricken nation.

After two decade of low-skill and high-skill immigration, California’s middle class is shrinking, and the gap between the wealthy and the poor is expanding.

The Americans4Work group has no “anger or animosity towards any immigrant,” said Thomas Broadwater, the group’s president. “Instead, we are fiercely and passionately pro-American.” The group gets no donations from business.

But Sessions acknowledged that many senators echo industry’s talking points when they’re asked by Americans about the issue.

“So many of my colleagues in the Senate, when they’re out campaigning, when they’re asked about immigration, without much thought, they say things like ‘I believe in immigrants, we’re a nation of immigrants, we’ve got to end this lawlessness, and I‘m for fixing the fence and the border, but really, we need more immigrants,’” Sessions said.

“They have not thought through the implications of the economic condition of America at this time,” Sessions told the press conference.

“The fundamental question we need to talk about is what would be the right [level] of immigrants.. [and] who it is we should give priority to,” he said.

“We’re a nation with an economy, not an economy with a nation… [and] we have a responsibility, a moral duty, to our citizens, to make their lives better, and we’re not doing a very good job,” Sessions said.


Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2013/11/25/sen-sessions-slams-obama-ceos-on-immigration/#ixzz2livunNrF*****
2888  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / bronx 1848 on: November 23, 2013, 10:18:13 PM
thought to be oldest photo of house in NYC.  1848.
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/11/16/behold_the_oldest_photo_ever_taken_of_new_york_city.php
2889  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin, LGBT, "discrimination", & discrimination. on: November 23, 2013, 09:25:43 PM
Maybe the leaders of Iran and Israel and Saudi Arabia can form a band.  How about a middle east rap gang?   They can curse each other out with rap lyrics.  Someone I know can write them and maybe win a Noble Peace Prize.
2890  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: November 23, 2013, 09:19:17 PM
CD,

I can't get to article.

Can you post the article itself?
2891  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: November 22, 2013, 11:00:25 AM
In response, to Doug and Crafty on Cruz and Rubio and Cristie...

I actually like Jindal though we noted how poor his performance of the State of the Union rebuttal a couple of years ago was .

But he might get better.   If Cruz is as smart as reported he could improve.   As for Paul he lacks something.  He is just to clinical for me.  He seems like a one trick guy.  The debt the debt the debt.  True as to its paramount importance but He can't seem to appeal beyond that.   Yes he went to a Black College and was given a little credit for trying.  His presentation to them was less than what even I could have done.

Rubio is very good.  But he has to figure out how to deal with ruthless Democrats.  Like obnoxious Schumer who stated he was "fond" of Rubio in a subtle condescending put down.  (like he was speaking of his grandson).

2892  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / from the history thread with '16 comparison on: November 22, 2013, 10:51:51 AM
BTW,

Dick's radio show is excellent.   I am not sure if it is national.  He pissed me off with his dead wrong prediction for the '12 election.  Yet he is extraordinarily insightful and does have very interesting talking points which I do not see or hear anywhere else.   I think we should continue to listen to him.

Interesting history lesson on how Truman got elected.  The democrats today are going to try the EXACT same strategy.   Balkanize the country pull on female heart strings, play up the rights issue for Latinos Gays and all the rest.  Then pass as many bills in the Senate.  Maybe as Harkin calls change the rules to all legislation in the Senate, then sit back and call Congress the "do nothing Congress" as the economy flounders.   All the while The grafter Clinton crew will be all over the media map drumming into our heads like the mediocre pop songs today over and over again how she is for getting things done and working with the other side.   Bill will be out there reminding us how the economy was better (thanks to a boom in tech - all which crashed just months after he left) and how he crossed the aisle to fix Medicaid (he was kicking and screaming and did so only when the polls instructed him to).

Perhaps the Truman '48 election is the going to be redacted in '16.   I am also going to post this on the 2016 thread where I think the analogy is quite strong.
2893  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: American History on: November 22, 2013, 10:49:51 AM
BTW,

Dick's radio show is excellent.   I am not sure if it is national.  He pissed me off with his dead wrong prediction for the '12 election.  Yet he is extraordinarily insightful and does have very interesting talking points which I do not see or hear anywhere else.   I think we should continue to listen to him.

Interesting history lesson on how Truman got elected.  The democrats today are going to try the EXACT same strategy.   Balkanize the country pull on female heart strings, play up the rights issue for Latinos Gays and all the rest.  Then pass as many bills in the Senate.  Maybe as Harkin calls change the rules to all legislation in the Senate, then sit back and call Congress the "do nothing Congress" as the economy flounders.   All the while The grafter Clinton crew will be all over the media map drumming into our heads like the mediocre pop songs today over and over again how she is for getting things done and working with the other side.   Bill will be out there reminding us how the economy was better (thanks to a boom in tech - all which crashed just months after he left) and how he crossed the aisle to fix Medicaid (he was kicking and screaming and did so only when the polls instructed him to).

Perhaps the Truman '48 election is the going to be redacted in '16.   I am also going to post this on the 2016 thread where I think the analogy is quite strong.
2894  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / third post on: November 22, 2013, 01:20:43 AM
Two amazing photos.  One the first known action battle photo ; 1870  I presume during the Franco Prussian war.  To the right is one soldier apparently at the moment he is shot.

Another photo from 1847 showing American troops in Mexico.

http://militaryhistorynow.com/2012/06/12/how-early-photographers-captured-historys-first-images-of-war/

Now we see war and death in our living rooms all the time.
2895  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / second post on this thread on: November 22, 2013, 01:12:18 AM
Some interesting photos circa Mexican-American War 1847.  The bottom one is reportedly the burial site of Henry Clay's son killed in the war 1847 age 36.  He served a term in Congress from Kentucky:

http://www.cartermuseum.org/interact/notes-from-underground/photo-of-the-week-mexican-american-war
2896  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / The original Alaskan gold rush on: November 21, 2013, 10:36:47 PM
http://klondike-history.discovery.com/?__utma=17607724.1495179485.1385094074.1385094074.1385094074.1&__utmb=17607724.11.9.1385094240646&__utmc=17607724&__utmx=-&__utmz=17607724.1385094074.1.1.utmcsr=yahoo|utmccn=(organic)|utmcmd=organic|utmctr=discover%20channel&__utmv=-&__utmk=49219558#chapter2
2897  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / A different view of dirty Harry's move on: November 21, 2013, 07:49:35 PM
Just as I figured.  The charts on CNN are part of the Democratic propaganda machine trying to convince that the Republicans are unprecedented in their obstructionism.
I was looking for a Conservative take and this so far fits the bill.  MSM cannot be trusted.  Reid's move is all about the Dems prospects for '14 having gone down in the last few weeks:

*****Are Republicans really blocking Obama’s judicial nominees at ‘unprecedented’ levels?

By Eric Pfeiffer 1 hour ago
    
President Obama addresses the nuclear option during a news conference on Thursday (AP)

When  President Obama gave his blessing to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s decision to invoke the so-called “nuclear option,”  he said the effort by Republicans to block his nominees was “unprecedented.”

"Today's pattern of obstruction, it just isn't normal," Obama said. "I support the step a majority of senators today took to change the way that Washington is doing business."

However, that’s only partially true.

Looking at all of Obama’s nominees across his administration, he has suffered unprecedented levels of obstruction, according to the Wall Street Journal. But when it comes to judicial nominees – the process that sparked Senate Democrats to approve the nuclear option on Thursday – he’s really just suffering from a historically negative trend going back more than two decades.

According to congressional data, former President George W. Bush actually had a lower percentage of circuit court nominees approved during his time in office than Obama.

And when it comes to the amount of time it takes for circuit court nominees to get approved, Bush and Obama are actually in surprisingly close company, with Bush fairing slightly worse. (See chart)

Obstruction of judicial nominees first became a regular practice during President Clinton’s time in office, and the amount of time it takes for a nominee to be approved skyrocketed during George W. Bush’s presidency.

According to a May report from the Congressional Research Service, President Obama had 71.4% of his circuit court nominees approved during his first term, which is slightly better than George W. Bush’s 67.3% level of success during his first term.

President Obama also didn't fare the worst when it comes to district court nominees. During his first term, 82.7% of Obama’s district court nominees were approved, George H.W. Bush had 76.9% of his nominees approved.

Interestingly, H.W. Bush is the only president during this period who had fewer court vacancies at the end of his first term than he did at the beginning. However, Obama is the only president who suffered an increased vacancy during his first term without more court positions being created.

But in recent years, it’s the amount of time it takes to get a nominee approved where the most radical change has taken place.

For example, during Reagan’s first term, it only took 45.5 days for one of his nominees to get approved. That number escalated only marginally over the next 20 years. But by the time George W. Bush was in office, the number skyrocketed to 277 days. Obama has fared slightly better than Bush, with his nominees taking 225.5 days to get approved. But historically speaking, it’s still a severe departure from most presidencies.

Obama’s district court nominees have also suffered from extended confirmation delays. Again, Reagan’s nominees breezed through, with just a 28-day waiting period during his first term, compared with 215 days for Obama.

So, at the end of the day, Obama’s experience may not be quite as unique as he wants the public to believe. But if the nuclear option does reverse the historical trend of obstruction, it’s a move that future presidents, both Republican and Democrat, will likely be thankful for.*****
2898  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Militarization of local police department. on: November 21, 2013, 07:14:33 PM
I guess this thread is as good as any.  I couldn't find a law enforcement thread and it doesn't quite fit under military issues:

http://www.belgrade-news.com/opinion/columnists/john_w_whitehead/article_f21c8780-515d-11e3-9f97-001a4bcf887a.html#user-comment-area
2899  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The US Congress; Congressional races on: November 21, 2013, 06:14:45 PM
CNN today had there guests on.  Tobin and the WH correspondent.  The latter, I cannot think of his name was claiming Reid did this because too many Obama judicial nominees were being blocked and of course they proceed to show charts that it is far more than in previous Presidents.

It seems more than coincidence that Reid does this NOW just as the Dems political fortunes have dropped since the Obamacare debacle.

Got to ram through as many liberals into the Fed Court system as possible in case they lose.  It always seems like the Dems are the ones to elevate the dirty nature of the fighting.

How many filibusters have there been all together not just judicial nominees?
2900  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: November 20, 2013, 09:29:54 PM
I have a dream.

The mainstream Republicans - the half asses - actually get behind someone like, well, Cruz.  And instead of tearing him down they start pile driving timbers as groundwork under him behind the scenes.

Work with him; groom him; he could be our chosen spokesperson. 

But alas I turn on the tube and I see Rove.  I hear Jeb Bush.  I hear the ridiculous nonsense about Christie (who could be more selfish then Clinton).  (At least Clinton was more or less a dedicated Democrat - what has Christie done for Republicans?).  These guys are not the answer.   What great ideas has Bush ever come up with?   Christie is not a big idea guy.
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