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3401  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / This whole establishment thing is so corrupt on: October 21, 2011, 02:53:36 PM
"Like why are we funding fcking car companies?"

Yes my head is exploding with the outrage of how are money is wasted.

Well this goes to the heart of the problem.  What *are* tax payers funding and why and who is benefitting.  The whole system is in question.   The business of pork and every spending scheme has got to be more transparent and we the darn voters need to know who is voting for what legislation and why.

Like the mocking of Cain's tax plan as being "too simple".  As though a two thousand page health care bill that I can guarantee Brock had no idea what was in it is better?  The more complicated the more we can be manipulated.   

Cain has served us more than any other candidate so far.

Perry is coming out with a simple tax plan I think.  Romney is too establishment to get it or care.

3402  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: The First Amendment & Free Speech on: October 21, 2011, 11:34:00 AM
"Rather than the attempts to cutail speech"

I don't buy that bribing our gov officials is free speech.  Yet it is the opinion of the Supreme Court because essentially that is what is happening.  They are ruling on a narrow line of thinking which is their job.  I am not saying they are wrong, but we still have a big problem.

I think what you are saying is that we can't stop bribery of government people so the best option is just limit their function overall?

3403  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / My legally and scholarly diatribe on: October 21, 2011, 09:52:35 AM
I took Doug's repsonse from the cognitive dissonance of Republicans to this thread:

"Campaign finance reform was lambasted by the..." ... [first amendment]   

Without a law degree I will do my best to interpret the situation.   Campaign finance reform was brought to the Supreme court in a case suggesting that it would obstruct the free speech right of the Constitution.  The majority opinion of the  Justices was that it would so it was struck down.

Am I correct to assume that the issue before the Court was this "Constitutional" in that it does not interfere with the people's right to free speech?  If that is the situation the issue before the Court is to address this and not really any other.

I was reading an article from someone with both a law and medical degrees.  He claims that doctors think in systems taking into account all the issues involved while lawyers think in a linear fashion addressing only the more narrow question.

That said the Court would not have considered the issue of ethics or morality involved of wealthy people having unfair access to politicians and influencing their legislative decisions with the ability to provide money and other less overt benefits to their political campaigns.  Worse is the issue of the revolving door of government appointed and hired and elected officials have going in and out of the private sector.  Worse than that is the families and friends of these people who use their family and business ties to influence these others.  (Think the Pelosi mafia like mob).

Now GM will rightly point out that less wealthy people can band together and form conglomerates that together can raise money to compete with the bigger wealthier interests.

One could argue that evens the playing field.  To some degree it does though obviously no one would say it can be leveled without the help of big donors in most cases/circumstances.

In the end I can agree up to this point about it being logically acceptable albeit far from perfect situation.

But where it crosses the line in my thinking is that the influence the wealthy are having on elected officials either directly or through intermediaries (lobbyists of ex gov officials) (elected officials most of whom are lawyers and promptly go into the DC legal community becoming instant partner because of their contacts with legislators) is that their influence is to get legislators to spend not their personal money but publically taxes (people's money if you will).

This is where the line has to be drawn.  And this is what I think people from both the left and right political spectrums can agree that this is totally corrupt and illegitimate and got to stop.  This is the "establishment" both sides are sick of> 

You know what Joe Scarborough this may be how DC works, and yes I know there have been those who have many times campaigned on changing this only to later find out they are running up against interests that are just to powerful they cannot do what they wanted.  But Joe, this is exactly why people are frustrated and disgusted and from both left and right looking for someone different - not another good ole boy like Romney who simpoly knows how the system works.  The system is broken. 

 
3404  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: October 18, 2011, 04:31:29 PM
"Not being able to count on America might actually simplify their  options"

Interesting thought.  What little I hear is Israel is arming for the inevitable with submarines, anti ballistics and Netanyahu has plainly said we will do it ourselves.

"jumping through the international hoops of acceptance."

No matter what they do they have an enemy hell bent on wanting them driven out of Israel either by exodus or extermination.
The international community (pardon this stupid phrase) won't budge it seems till its too late if at all.

"Judging from his photo on wikipedia"

I appeared thin to start with but his picture recently shows someone who was kept on bare subsistance.

Truthfully, I am not very religious at all.  Yet I guess there is still something in me about this.  I have tears just seeing all this.

Yes some Jews are pushy.  Take Soros.  Yet cannot the world leave us the hell alone to live in peace.

I keep hearing Jews worrying about the Blacks and the poor etc.  Has anyone heard one prominant Black or otherwise minority or poor person speak up for a Jew?

If anyone has let me know.

 


3405  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: October 18, 2011, 02:23:04 PM
GM, Netanyahu already knows this.

Eventually there will be war.  It is inevitable.  Israel is screwed and I feel the sentiment in the US is turning against the "Jews".

Here is his statement:

****October 11, 2011, 6:01 pm

Netanyahu Statement on Shalit Deal
By ROBERT MACKEY
We have concluded ardeous negotiations with #Hamas to release #Gilad #Shalit. He will be coming home in the next few days.
Tue Oct 11 18:54:24 via web
The PM of Israel
IsraeliPM

Below is the complete text of remarks made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel on Tuesday, at the start of an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss a prisoner exchange agreement with Hamas. The agreement would secure the release of a single captive Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, and more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners.

Today, I bring a proposal to the government for a deal that will bring Gilad Shalit home alive and well; bring him home to his parents, Aviva and Noam; his brother, Yoel; his sister, Hadas; his grandfather Zvi; and the entire people of Israel. Two and a half years ago, when the government was formed, I took upon myself, as my first priority, to bring Gilad home to his people, to his family — to bring him home safe and sound.

At the time, Gilad was already held in captivity for two and a half years, with no visits from the Red Cross, with no visits at all, and we did not know what state he was in. The first step I took, and we approved it here in the government, was to get a video recording of Gilad, and we all breathed a sigh of relief when we saw it. We saw that he was functioning, physically, mentally and cognitively. We saw that he was functioning well. We knew that he was healthy and that he was alive. I regarded that tape as an insurance policy, because it obliged the Hamas before the international community to safeguard him, to keep him alive and maintain his health. But that was obviously only the first step.

The most important mission that we had was more challenging — to actually bring Gilad home. To that end we held long and tough negotiations through the German mediator. These negotiations were based on a framework outlined by the previous government. They were long and exhausting and despite all our efforts, a deal was not reached.

I must point out that not a day went by without us trying various ways to bring Gilad home, any way possible, and that didn’t work either. In the last few weeks, the negotiations were renewed in Cairo, this time with the Egyptian government as mediator. My instructions to the team were to adhere to the principles and framework that are important for the security of the State of Israel, which I will detail in the meeting.

There is an in-built tension between the desire to bring back an abducted soldier, or citizen, and the need to maintain the security of the citizens of Israel. This is my dual responsibility as prime minister.

The deal I am bringing to the government expresses the right balance between all of these considerations. I do not wish to hide the truth from you — it is a very difficult decision. I feel for the families of victims of terror, I appreciate their suffering and distress, I am one of them. But leadership must be examined at moments such as this, being able to make difficult, but right, decisions.

I believe that we have reached the best deal we could have at this time, when storms are sweeping the Middle East. I do not know if in the near future we would have been able to reach a better deal or any deal at all. It is very possible that this window of opportunity that opened because of the circumstances would close indefinitely and we would never have been able to bring Gilad home at all.

Therefore, for all of these reasons, I instructed the team to put their initials on the deal last Thursday, and today it was finalized and signed by both sides. I thank my military secretary, Maj. Gen. Yohanan Locker; the chief of the Shin Bet, Yoram Cohen; my personal envoy to the negotiations, David Meidan; and his predecessor, Hagai Hadas. I thank the team that has accompanied them all these years.

I thank the [Israel Defense Forces], the security forces for doing everything they could regarding Gilad Shalit. I also wish to thank the German mediator, and the chancellor, Angela Merkel, who supported his mission all along. send a special thanks to the government of Egypt and the Egyptian intelligence services for providing much assistance in mediating and helping us reaching this agreement.
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October 11, 2011, 6:01 pm
Netanyahu Statement on Shalit Deal
By ROBERT MACKEY
We have concluded ardeous negotiations with #Hamas to release #Gilad #Shalit. He will be coming home in the next few days.
Tue Oct 11 18:54:24 via web
The PM of Israel
IsraeliPM

Below is the complete text of remarks made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel on Tuesday, at the start of an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss a prisoner exchange agreement with Hamas. The agreement would secure the release of a single captive Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, and more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners.

Today, I bring a proposal to the government for a deal that will bring Gilad Shalit home alive and well; bring him home to his parents, Aviva and Noam; his brother, Yoel; his sister, Hadas; his grandfather Zvi; and the entire people of Israel. Two and a half years ago, when the government was formed, I took upon myself, as my first priority, to bring Gilad home to his people, to his family — to bring him home safe and sound.

At the time, Gilad was already held in captivity for two and a half years, with no visits from the Red Cross, with no visits at all, and we did not know what state he was in. The first step I took, and we approved it here in the government, was to get a video recording of Gilad, and we all breathed a sigh of relief when we saw it. We saw that he was functioning, physically, mentally and cognitively. We saw that he was functioning well. We knew that he was healthy and that he was alive. I regarded that tape as an insurance policy, because it obliged the Hamas before the international community to safeguard him, to keep him alive and maintain his health. But that was obviously only the first step.

The most important mission that we had was more challenging — to actually bring Gilad home. To that end we held long and tough negotiations through the German mediator. These negotiations were based on a framework outlined by the previous government. They were long and exhausting and despite all our efforts, a deal was not reached.

I must point out that not a day went by without us trying various ways to bring Gilad home, any way possible, and that didn’t work either. In the last few weeks, the negotiations were renewed in Cairo, this time with the Egyptian government as mediator. My instructions to the team were to adhere to the principles and framework that are important for the security of the State of Israel, which I will detail in the meeting.

There is an in-built tension between the desire to bring back an abducted soldier, or citizen, and the need to maintain the security of the citizens of Israel. This is my dual responsibility as prime minister.

The deal I am bringing to the government expresses the right balance between all of these considerations. I do not wish to hide the truth from you — it is a very difficult decision. I feel for the families of victims of terror, I appreciate their suffering and distress, I am one of them. But leadership must be examined at moments such as this, being able to make difficult, but right, decisions.

I believe that we have reached the best deal we could have at this time, when storms are sweeping the Middle East. I do not know if in the near future we would have been able to reach a better deal or any deal at all. It is very possible that this window of opportunity that opened because of the circumstances would close indefinitely and we would never have been able to bring Gilad home at all.

Therefore, for all of these reasons, I instructed the team to put their initials on the deal last Thursday, and today it was finalized and signed by both sides. I thank my military secretary, Maj. Gen. Yohanan Locker; the chief of the Shin Bet, Yoram Cohen; my personal envoy to the negotiations, David Meidan; and his predecessor, Hagai Hadas. I thank the team that has accompanied them all these years.

I thank the [Israel Defense Forces], the security forces for doing everything they could regarding Gilad Shalit. I also wish to thank the German mediator, and the chancellor, Angela Merkel, who supported his mission all along. send a special thanks to the government of Egypt and the Egyptian intelligence services for providing much assistance in mediating and helping us reaching this agreement.

This morning I Invited Noam Shalit to my residence, and I spoke on the phone with the mother, Aviva, and the grandfather, Zvi. I told them that I am keeping my promise and I’m bringing their son and grandson home. I told them, “I’m bringing your boy back.” I am happy that I succeeded in fulfilling the Jewish decree of redeeming captives, and if all goes as planned, Gilad will be back in Israel in the next few days with his family and his people.

The nation of Israel is a unique people. We are all mutually responsible for each other, as our sages said: “He who saves one soul, it is as though he saved an entire world.” Tonight, I bring the government a proposal to save Gilad Shalit, to finally bring him home to Israel after five years.
3406  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / We have a "silent" war on the border on: October 18, 2011, 01:52:41 PM
Cain joked something about setting up an electified fence with a sign saying you will be killed if you touch this.

The response from the left and Scarborough was of course to mock him and use this as fodder to demonstrate that he is not Presidential material.

Yet we have a silent war going on with Mexico drug dealers and Brock is totally ineffective and actually presided over giving the murderers guns.  Yet the MSM is silent!

Instead of travelling around playing class warfare and campaigning and supporting the bums marching for more government payouts the real bum in the WH should have his butt on the border addressing this.

I don't expect the left to get it but the "establishment" Republicans?   This has all the appearances they are just protecting their power and financial interests. 

We keep hearing the "est." right saying the party is not what it used to be.  Well thank God.  I am getting more frustrated and angrier every day.
3407  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: October 18, 2011, 12:45:23 PM
Sure one downside is it encourages more hostage taking.

Israel has done this many times before though I don't know if recently till now.

Netanyahu and other decision makers may be looking at a bigger picture.

3408  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / JOE SCARBOROUGH: bought and paid for political establishment on: October 18, 2011, 09:46:21 AM
Scarborough who was once part of the Gingrich Republican revolution is a self serving establishment guy making lots of money now trying to seem moderate and conciliatory.  Is this guy that stupid, bought and paid for, or does he just not get it?

Republicans like him have sold us all out.  I was shocked and disgusted by his total mocking diatribe this AM on the MSNBC Democrat machine propaganda network.  Instead of appauding Cain he mocks him.  With Republicans like him we don't need enemies.  What is his salary anyway?  Is he doing that broad who sits next to him or what?  They certainly appear to have something going between them.  But I digress:

****POLITICOOpinionThe reality show facing GOP votersMain Content
Opinion Column
The reality show facing GOP voters

 Here's the hook -- no one in this actors’ studio is qualified to be president, the author says. | AP Photo Close
By JOE SCARBOROUGH | 10/17/11 4:11 PM EDT
All the world is a stage and in this year’s GOP presidential race, it is a reality show soundstage cluttered with clownish characters auditioning for the role of commander in chief.

A bemused audience of political spectators and cable chatterers has been entertained this year by a fallen speaker, a pizza mogul, a wild-eyed ideologue, a billionaire developer and a hockey mom from Alaska.

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Two of those actors have starred in actual reality shows, but — here’s the hook — no one in this actors’ studio is qualified to be president.

This train wreck of a reality show started the season with a sputtering governor’s resignation. That was followed by a blizzard of book deals, reality shows and FOX News contracts that kept the chattering classes transfixed. Never mind the fact that few mainstream political commentators ever bothered to mention to their audience that Sarah Palin was ill-equipped to handle this show’s lead role.

Palin’s presidential screen test was rudely interrupted by “Apprentice” star Donald Trump, who commanded center stage long enough to sneak a peek at President Obama’s birth certificate, all the while renegotiating a blockbuster deal with NBC.

Being the front-runner for the GOP nomination carried certain benefits, and for The Donald that advantage came in the form of leverage over NBC Entertainment.

As Trump left the political stage, the void was quickly filled by the tea party’s best supporting actress, Michele Bachmann — whose rapid rise and fall was a political rags-to-riches and back to rags story that few Hollywood producers would find believable. That is, unless they heard that unlikely pitch after working on Rick Perry’s presidential campaign.

Perry, who seemed to call for the hanging of Ben Bernanke along with the secession of Texas, saw his lead in the GOP field dissolve faster than a tax break for “Jersey Shore” in Chris Christie’s home state.

And speaking of that low-rent reality show, the Republican party’s answer to Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino found himself booted to the side of the stage after dumping an untold fortune on bling in a blue box. Tiffany’s favorite former speaker was also caught on camera roughing up enemies by comparing them to Joseph Stalin and Adolph Hitler. Like Sorrentiino, Newt Gingrich has proved himself to be every bit as rhetorically reckless as when the “Jersey Shore” star threatened to kick Snookie’s boyfriend in the head.

All of this leads us to Herman Cain, a man so woefully ill-prepared for the presidency that his lone economic adviser brags about being ignorant of economic theory with as much gusto as candidate Cain mocks those who would suggest he knows little about world politics.

“When they ask me, ‘Who is President of UBEKI-beki-beki-becki-stan, stan, I am going to say ‘Do you know?’”

The fact that Citizen Cain takes great pride in his ignorance of global affairs is understandably unnerving to American voters in this unstable age. But on the small stage on which Mr. Cain now finds himself, the Godfather’s Pizza CEO fits with these vapid times as much as James Dean did with his in the 1950s classic, “Rebel Without a Cause.” Sadly, Cain and his fellow cast members are little more than rebels without a clue. That reality is a dismal curtain call for the Republican party and the country it hopes to run.

Compared with the GOP’s field of reality stars, George W. Bush looks like Brando, Paul Ryan is as attractive as Robert Redford, and Chris Christie is Brad Pitt. So much for an audition process that leaves the audience, once again, aching for more.

A guest columnist for POLITICO, Joe Scarborough hosts “Morning Joe” on MSNBC and represented Florida’s 1st Congressional District in the House of Representatives from 1995 to 2001.****
3409  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The better poltical choice on: October 18, 2011, 09:36:42 AM
Though certainly not a good one.

"is the only way the nation of Israel can begin to contemplate such a terrible choice."

In the end this has to be a political decision.  Unfortunately Israel has no good option.  IF they refuse the deal they don't get their "child" back and internationally they look like they are hoarding Palestinian prisoners.  If they do it they may buy a tiny smidgeon of political capital from the "international community" which is basically bought and paid for by Arab oil money to always be against the Jews.  And worse the Palestinians themselves will never appreciate the lopsided deal and as a peace or goodwill gesture and instead know this is what always results when they take a hostage.  Which is of course  why they continue to take hostages.

So either way Israel is always the poltical loser.  This is just the least bad of the choices.  And they do get their "child".

Just my armchair take.

3410  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: October 17, 2011, 04:31:03 PM
" by honest definition"

Like the honest stuff coming out of Europe.  Such as we have plenty of resources, lots of options, restructuring is taking place, move the bad debt into some isolated corner of the balance sheet as though it no longer exists,  the US is behind the European Union,  and on and on.

The attempts at maintaining confidence at the expense of honesty - well...

Think of the can in the road that has been trounced dozens of times and is so flat it looks like a pancake.

3411  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Decline, Fall, (and Resurrection?) of America on: October 17, 2011, 04:25:58 PM
…We live in a time where international law remains underdeveloped, international governance is non-existent or weak, and international society is fundamentally anarchic. As a result the role of force in international relations has been magnified. But the age of weapons of mass destruction and newer technologies make it essential that we consider new ways of regulating the use of force in international relations.

blah blah blah

One world government with Brock as head.  Then we will have all the international laws anyone could want - and more.  Personally I don't want to give up our sovereignty to some international judicial system.
3412  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: October 17, 2011, 11:58:20 AM
Well I guess everyone saw the Rasmussen poll with Cain 43 to Brock 41!

Cain said he thinks he could garner a third of the Black vote.  That would be giant.

He also threw back at the liberal verbal mugger Gregory that one Black he admires is Clarence Thomas.

This is what Republicans have been waiting for.  Someone Black or White who can bring Blacks back to the party of Lincoln.

This would ba seismic shift if things work out.

Ironically Brock may yet turn out to be the best blessing yet to emerge for the party - just not the Democrat party! grin
3413  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the Republicans on: October 16, 2011, 08:15:30 PM
"Those Accountants and Attorneys have lobbists that fight every attempt to simplify the US tax code."

Lobbyists are another problem.  They spend big money.  And pols need big money for campaigns.  They need big money to pay for the media complex.  The need lobbyist slots to stack with their relatives and business partners so it seems.

Campaign finance reform was lambasted by the right.  Certainly McCain's point had some ethical validity.


3414  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Economist on electro-magnetic weapons on: October 16, 2011, 08:06:54 PM
From the Economist - war without blood shed?

 *****Electromagnetic weapons
Frying tonight
Warfare is changing as weapons that destroy electronics, not people, are deployed on the field of battle
Oct 15th 2011 | from the print edition
 

 
BULLETS and bombs are so 20th-century. The wars of the 21st will be dominated by ray guns. That, at least, is the vision of a band of military technologists who are building weapons that work by zapping the enemy’s electronics, rather than blowing him to bits. The result could be conflict that is less bloody, yet more effective, than what is now seen as conventional battle.

Electromagnetic weapons, to give these ray guns their proper name, are inspired by the cold-war idea of using the radio-frequency energy released by an atom bomb exploded high in the atmosphere to burn out an enemy’s electrical grid, telephone network and possibly even the wiring of his motor vehicles, by inducing a sudden surge of electricity in the cables that run these things.

In this section
»Frying tonight
 
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Chilling out in the winter sun
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That idea, fortunately, was never tried in earnest (though some tests were carried out). But, by thinking smaller, military planners have developed weapons that use a similar principle, without the need for a nuclear explosion. Instead, they create their electromagnetic pulses with magnetrons, the microwave generators at the hearts of radar sets (and also of microwave ovens). The result is kit that can take down enemy missiles and aircraft, stop tanks in their tracks and bring speedboats to a halt. It can also scare away soldiers without actually killing them.

Many electromagnetic weapons do, indeed, look like radars, at least to non-expert eyes. America’s air force is developing a range of them based on a type of radar called an active electronically scanned array (AESA). When acting as a normal radar, an AESA broadcasts its microwaves over a wide area. At the touch of a button, however, all of its energy can be focused onto a single point. If that point coincides with an incoming missile or aircraft, the target’s electronics will be zapped.

Small AESAs—those light enough to fit on a plane such as a joint strike fighter (F-35)—are probably restricted to zapping air-to-air and surface-to-air missiles (the air force is understandably reticent about supplying details of their capabilities). Ground- or ship-based kit can draw more power. This will be able to attack both ballistic missiles and aircraft, whose electronics tend to be better shielded.

In the case of the F-35, then, this sort of electromagnetic artillery is mainly defensive. But another plane, the Boeing Growler, uses electromagnetics as offensive weapons. The Growler, which first saw action in Iraq in 2010 and has been extensively (though discreetly) deployed during the NATO air war against Colonel Qaddafi’s forces in Libya, is a souped-up version of the Super Hornet. It is fitted with five pods: two under each wing and one under the fuselage. Some pods contain AESAs or similar electromagnetic weapons. Others have eavesdropping equipment inside them. In combination, the pods can be used either to spy on enemy communications or to destroy them; to suppress anti-aircraft fire; to disable the electronics of ground vehicles; and to make life so hazardous for enemy aircraft that they dare not fly (and probably to shoot them down electronically, too, though no one will confirm this). The Growler is able to keep its weapons charged up and humming by lowering special turbines into the airstream that rushes past the plane when it is flying. America has ordered 114 of the planes, and has taken delivery of 53.

By land, sea and air

Nor are aircraft the only vehicles from which destructive electromagnetic pulses can be launched. BAE Systems, a British defence firm, is building a ship-mounted electromagnetic gun. The High-Powered Microwave, as it is called, is reported by Aviation Week to be powerful enough to disable all of the motors in a swarm of up to 30 speedboats. Ships fitted with such devices would never be subject to the sort of attack that damaged USS Cole in 2000, when an al-Qaeda boat loaded with explosives rammed it. A gun like this would also be useful for stopping pirate attacks against commercial shipping.

Land vehicles, too, will soon be fitted with electromagnetic cannon. In 2013 America hopes to deploy the Radio-Frequency Vehicle Stopper. This device, developed at the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate in Quantico, Virginia, is a microwave transmitter the size and shape of a small satellite dish that pivots on top of an armoured car. When aimed at another vehicle, it causes that vehicle’s engine to stall.

This gentle way of handling the enemy—stopping his speedboats, stalling his tanks—has surprising advantages. For example, it expands the range of targets that can be attacked. Some favourite tricks of modern warfare, such as building communications centres in hospitals, or protecting sites with civilian “human shields”, cease to be effective if it is simply the electronics of the equipment being attacked that are destroyed. Though disabling an aircraft’s avionics will obviously cause it to crash, in many other cases, no direct harm is done to people at all.

The logical conclusion of all this is a so-called “human-safe” missile, which carries an electromagnetic gun instead of an explosive warhead. Such a missile is being developed at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico, and will soon be tested at the White Sands Missile Range.

There is, however, at least one electromagnetic weapon that is designed to attack enemy soldiers directly—though with the intention of driving them off, rather than killing them. This weapon, which is called the Active Denial System, has been developed by the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate, in collaboration with Raytheon. It works by heating the moisture in a person’s skin to the point where it feels, according to Kelley Hughes, an official at the directorate who volunteered to act as a guinea pig, like opening a hot oven. People’s reaction, when hit by the beam, is usually to flee. The beam’s range is several hundred metres.

Such anti-personnel weapons are controversial. Tests on monkeys, including ones in which the animals’ eyes were held open to check that the beam does not blind, suggest it causes no permanent damage. But when a vehicle-mounted Active Denial System was sent to Afghanistan in May 2010, it was eventually shipped back home without being used. The defence department will not say exactly why. The suspicion, though, is that weapons like the Active Denial System really are reminiscent in many minds of the ray guns of science fiction, and that using them in combat would be a PR mistake. Disabling communications and destroying missiles is one thing. Using heat-rays on the enemy might look bad in the newspapers, and put civilians off their breakfast.

Cold showers are good for you

To every action there is, of course, an equal and opposite reaction, and researchers are just as busy designing ways of foiling electromagnetic weapons as they are developing them. Most such foils are types of Faraday cage—named after the 19th-century investigator who did much of the fundamental research on electromagnetism.

A Faraday cage is a shield of conductive material that stops electromagnetic radiation penetrating. Such shields need not be heavy. Nickel- and copper-coated polyester mesh is a good starting point. Metallised textiles—chemically treated for greater conductivity—are also used. But Faraday cages can be costly. EMP-tronic, a firm based in Morarp, Sweden, has developed such shielding, initially for the Gripen, a Swedish fighter jet. It will shield buildings too, though, for a suitable consideration. To cover one a mere 20 metres square with a copper-mesh Faraday cage the firm charges €300,000 ($400,000).

Shielding buildings may soon become less expensive than that. At least two groups of scientists—one at the National Research Council Canada and the other at Global Contour, a firm in Texas—are developing electrically conductive cement that will block electromagnetic pulses. Global Contour’s mixture, which includes fibres of steel and carbon, as well as a special ingredient that the firm will not disclose, would add only $20 to the $150 per cubic metre, or thereabouts, which ordinary concrete costs.

The arms race to protect small vehicles and buildings against electromagnetic warfare, then, has already begun. Protecting ships, however, requires lateral thinking. For obvious reasons, they cannot be encased in concrete. And building a conventional Faraday cage round a naval vessel would be horribly expensive.

Daniel Tam, of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command in San Diego, thinks he has a way to get round that. He proposes to use the electrical conductivity of the sodium and chloride ions in seawater to create a novel type of Faraday cage. A shroud of seawater around a ship, thrown up by special pumps and hoses if the vessel came under electromagnetic attack, would do the trick, he reckons.

It is an ambitious idea. Whether it works or not, it shows how much the nature of modern belligerency is changing. Bombs and bullets will always have their place, of course. But the thought that a cold shower could protect a ship from attack is almost surreal.

from the print edition | Science and technology
3415  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Fed, Monetary Policy, Inflation, US Dollar & other currencies, & Gold/Silver on: October 16, 2011, 08:03:04 PM
I think the 11th - tuesday.
3416  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the Republicans on: October 16, 2011, 07:49:05 PM
So what would be the policy solution to this gap? "

I don't want transfer of wealth.   

Simplify the tax code.  Get rid of loopholes that only the rich even know about.  How about getting rid of off shore tax havens.  Some estimates hold over 9 trillion off shore - more than all the combined holdings of all us banks are off shore in switzerland caman islands, mauritania and others.

Otherwise I admit I am not sure.   I can think of things but I don't know which or any that would work.  Humanity is just too corrupt.
3417  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / 2 trillion for the banks on: October 16, 2011, 07:33:52 PM
This news is a couple of days old but I didn't notice it get much press time.  I don't get this for example:

" The government will create a public-private entity that could buy $500 billion in toxic assets, and could be expanded to a trillion dollars."

I wonder if they include solyndra in this calculated brilliant use of tax dollars.  There is no end to kicking the can down the road is there?

****U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks during a news conference at the Treasury Department on Tuesday.
 
By Sue Kirchhoff and Pallavi Gogoi, USA TODAY
WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner unveiled a sweeping plan Tuesday to shore up the nation's troubled financial system.
It is designed to deliver as much as $2 trillion to troubled financial markets by having the government partner with the private sector to buy troubled assets from lenders, make more bank capital injections and expand a Federal Reserve lending program.

"Right now critical parts of our financial system are damaged," Geithner said at a Treasury Department press conference, warning that the nation faces the most serious economic crisis since the Great Depression. "Instead of catalyzing recovery, the financial system is working against recovery, and that's the dangerous dynamic we need to change."

The plan is just one part of overall efforts by the Obama administration, including a roughly $800 billion financial stimulus bill passed by the Senate Tuesday, to tackle the loss of millions of jobs, falling home and asset prices and a historic contraction in credit markets.

"It is essential for every American to understand that the battle for economic recovery must be fought on two fronts," Geithner said. "We have to both jump-start job creation and private investment and we must get credit flowing again to businesses and families."

Markets reacted negatively to the plan, however, with the Dow Jones industrial avereage down nearly 400 points in afternoon trading as investors and market analysts worried about the lack of specifcs in the broad proposal.

"The Financial Stability Plan outlined by Treasury Secretary Geithner this morning ... is obviously a work that is still very much a 'work in progress,'" economic consulting firm Stone and McCarthy said in a note to clients "It is quite possible that it may not be a finished product for an extended period of time."

Geithner's plan attacks the credit crisis on several fronts. First, the Treasury Department would use part of the $350 billion remaining from last year's $700 billion financial rescue fund as seed money, to induce the private sector to buy bad assets from banks. The government will create a public-private entity that could buy $500 billion in toxic assets, and could be expanded to a trillion dollars. Treasury has not yet settled on a final design for the program.

The administration will use another $80 billion in financial rescue funds to expand a recently created $200 billion Federal Reserve program. That program, designed to free up money for student loans, credit cards and auto loans, could also cover bonds backed by commercial real estate and privately issued mortgage-backed securities. The new funding is designed to leverage as much as $1 trillion in overall activity under the Fed program.

Geithner noted that 40% of the money for consumer lending has come through bundling loans into securities and reselling them in financial markets. As those so-called secondary markets have frozen, so has consumer and business lending.

Banks could receive more capital under the plan, which will be funded from the remaining $350 billion of last year's $700 billion financial rescue plan. Geithner said in order to get aid, banks would be subject to beefed up supervision or stress testing, especially big banks. Institutions that need additional capital will be able to access a new funding mechanism using money from the Treasury "as a bridge to private capital," Geithner said.

The renamed "Financial Stability Plan" rolled out by Geithner will also use at least $50 billion from last year's financial rescue law to help prevent home foreclosures. Details of that plan will be announced "in the next few weeks," Geithner said.

The plan relies on the Federal Reserve's willingness to expand current, historic programs to aid financial markets. But Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke faced some skepticism at a Tuesday afternoon hearing on Capitol Hill. Some lawmakers said they were worried that the Fed has already expanded its own balance sheet from about $800 billion to nearly $2 trillion as it created lending programs for stressed financial markets. The lawmakers also said the Fed has not released enough public information about its programs.

Rep. Spencer Bachus, R-Ala., accused the Fed and Treasury of using an "obscure and seldom utilized" provision of law to make unprecedented interventions into the financial markets.

"Not only has there been no disclosure or little oversight or accountability, but there's actually been an active resistance on the part of these agencies to explain their actions or disclose the terms," Bachus said. "We simply know almost nothing about these transactions. We can only guess as to their ultimate success or failure. In future years I'm sure those that write (about) these days will be intrigued and captivated by the question: How could such an unprecedented action have occurred without the consent of the governed?"

Bernanke said the vast bulk of Fed loans are safe and are generating profits. He said the central bank is reviewing its policies to ensure it is providing as much public information as possible. He also said the Fed might have to continue expanding its balance sheet in areas such as student loans, auto loans, and other areas where it could help open up markets.

"With our expansion, we're trying to create and stimulate credit markets where markets have broken down," Bernanke said, adding the Fed wants to "keep looking for opportunity" where it has the tools to get markets working again.

Geithner said he realizes the financial rescue represents a sizable commitment, but noted that many of the amounts were loans and loan guarantees, which means the government eventually will be repaid.

Still, the country should know that the program will involve costs to the government and risks, but he said the alternative of doing nothing would be far riskier.

"As costly as this effort may be, we know that the complete collapse of our financial system would be incalculable for families, for businesses, and for our nation," Geithner said.

The new administration's bailout overhaul seeks to address widespread criticism of how the Bush administration ran the $700 billion program Congress passed in October. Lawmakers in both parties say banks were getting billions of dollars in taxpayer support with few strings attached, and all the government aid was failing to accomplish its primary objective of getting banks to lend more.

Under the overhaul, the Obama administration seeks to deal with those issues by more closely monitoring banks to make sure the money they get is being used to increase lending.

President Obama, speaking at a prime-time news conference Monday night, said his overhaul of the financial rescue program would bring "transparency and oversight" to the heavily criticized program.

He said the overhaul would correct previous mistakes such as a "lack of consistency" and what he said was the failure to require banks to show "some restraint" in terms of executive compensation and spending in such areas as corporate jets.

The first $350 billion in the bailout program was committed by the Bush administration under the direction of former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. In part because of the political outrage over how the program has been run, the Obama administration decided for now against seeking any money beyond the $350 billion that is still to be spent.

Many economists believe $700 billion won't be enough to get the financial system operating normally and the administration will eventually have to ask for billions more. The administration, however, decided to try to increase the power of the program by using smaller amounts of money to harness bigger resources available at the Fed and in the private sector.

Asked about the possibility that his administration will ultimately need more money, Obama said Monday the goal now is to "get this right" because it is important to restore financial market confidence so banks will resume more normal lending.****

3418  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Finally? on: October 16, 2011, 07:14:33 PM
Off the lead story on Drudge at this time:

"A top Republican in Washington dramatically altered his stance on protesters involved in Occupy Wall Street just one week after comparing the movement to “angry mobs”. Eric Cantor, the Republican majority leader in the House of Representatives, told Fox News on Sunday that Republicans agreed there was “too much” income disparity in the country. “More important than my use of the word [‘mobs’] is that there is a growing frustration out there across the country and it is warranted. Too many people are out of work,” he said."

This is a FIRST from a top Republican spokeperson.  A recognition of the wealth gap.   This in my humble opinion is a good step.  We must start hearing more recognition from the right about this.  This IS what I have been hoping more of from the right.  Simply speaking about opening up the tax spiggots and let the wealth poor in for the producers and those at the top and let it trickle down is NOT enough.  I've said repeatedly that those independents and many others do not buy this argument.  The middle class is becoming the lower class in this country.  The rich are getting richer.  The game is rigged to some extent at the top.  Like to admit it or not that is fact.  As I have said before Repubs ignore this altogether at their own peril.  Even Buchanan rightly pointed out the growing disparity in wealth and the slow crushing burden on the middle and that neither the right nor the left has offered a decent answer for this.  The right simply ignores it altogether - BIG mistake.

And again (I hope not ad nauseum) I say that as long as the right keeps ignoring this they will always be struggling to get the vote majority.  Isn't this cleary demonstrated by the fact that Brock STILL has a real chance of winning again?

Like Crafty suggested the right can steal the Democratic thunder (at least some of it) by embracing some of the Wall Street protest anger.  They may actually win over some of the independents.

So I am glad that Cantor (who I like) has changed his tune - or at least according to this article he may have.

3419  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Anti-semitism & Jews on: October 16, 2011, 07:01:52 PM
I wonder if there has ever been any study of Black antisemitism.

Surely some Blacks resent and dislike Jews.  I don't know if it would be at a higher percentage overall than say other groups including whites who dislike Jews.

It seems Sharpton, Wright, Farrakan fit the mold.  I recall Jackson's "hymietown" comment.  I often wondered why liberal Jews seemed to need to make the point that Jews had much in common with Blacks because of a history of discrimination.

Such Jews misread the situation.  It is not the discrimination issue that has many Blacks resenting Jews.  It is the socioeconomic disparity.   Blacks feel patronized by the lib Jews who coddle up to them, I suspect.

I remember one of my Jewish ancestors who was by no means bigoted or prejudiced.  Yet he had no narcisstic need to prove what a good heart he had by "sticking up" for Blacks.  He would say I am not worried about the Blacks.   They are perfectly capable of taking care of themselves.  Just like we do.
3420  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: October 16, 2011, 06:48:46 PM
I too saw Gregory attempt another hit of a Republican.  My first thought is how does he get all these Repubs to even come on his show and give him airtime. 

I thought Cain tactfully threw it all back in his face.

Gregory doesn't interview Repubs.  He tries to ambush, embarass, confuse them.  The "gotcha moment" if you will.
He is obviously coached to trap them off the blocks.

Cain was very ready and very able to handle all the questions this time.

 
3421  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / psychiatry eval of OBrock on: October 14, 2011, 04:38:47 PM
This psychiatrist calls W Bush "distrubed" but Obama "troubled".   The choice of words right there exposes him.  Of course this guy did his psych training at Harvard.  He states Brock is seeking a father figure calling Rev Wright and that.  Rev. Wright "disappointed him".  Does he mention that he only "disappointed" him when he had to throw him under the bus for selfish political gain.  He didn't seem disappointed for the twenty plus years he sat in his church.  And, LOL he claims Brock picked Biden because he is still seeking that father figure.

I lke this one, "Take for example Obama's earlier willingness to compromise with Republicans, upsetting his liberal base".
I don't know what planet this guy lives on but I never heard any real offers of compromise.  The Dems love to promote him as a compromiser when the rest of us know that is false.

Or this statement, "The result is that he is overly protective of his own nuclear family, desires greatly to see national unity, and yet harbors anger that he took out on bin Laden."

What does he mean "overly protective of his family"?  I don't see any difference from any other President.  "Desires to see national unity"?  What planet is this guy on?  This is the most devisive President in my lifetime.
And, "anger he took out on Bin Laden"?  What?  I think this shrink needs a shrink.  The only anger this guy takes out is on America.

I would love to see a far brighter Harvard psychiatrist tear this analysis apart:  Charles Krauthammer.  I wonder how Charles survived Harvard and is still so normal.  Well I guess a few grads are.  W graduated from Harvard Business and OReilly graduated from there. 

*******US News & World Report  Shrink: Obama Suffers 'Father Hunger'

October 14, 2011 RSS Feed Print The abandonment by his father when he was an infant and by his stepfather at age 10 has left President Obama with a "father hunger" that influences everything from why he distances himself from pushy supporters, to his strong desire to compromise and bring people together, to his aggressive campaign to kill Osama bin Laden, says a psychoanalytic book out next week. In Obama on the Couch, George Washington University professor Justin Frank also reveals that Obama has spent much of his life seeking out father figures, but most, like Rev. Jeremiah Wright and Vice President Biden, have disappointed him. "Obama searched for a father, for someone to relate to who could help him—a strong man who knew what to do," Frank writes.

This is Frank's second psychoanalytical book about a president. While a sympathetic look at Obama, it follows Bush on the Couch, a sharply critical analysis that suggested then President George W. Bush was disturbed. In that book, he predicted that someone like Obama—"completely different," "someone not ... white"—would succeed Bush. What the nation ended up with, however, is "an almost tragic figure," Frank writes.

The general theme is that Obama has been affected both by being biracial and by the abandonment of his two dads during his childhood. The result is that he is overly protective of his own nuclear family, desires greatly to see national unity, and yet harbors anger that he took out on bin Laden.

Take for example Obama's earlier willingness to compromise with Republicans, upsetting his liberal base. Here Frank cites the negative influence of his parents, especially his mom, who often pressed him to do better in school. "He hates being pushed by supporters who want him to make good on his promises of universal healthcare and care for the poor, something that represents his mother and how she pushed him to study harder," Frank writes. And when he ignores his base, he is emulating his father, expressing annoyance but not worried they will desert him.

As for bin Laden, Frank writes that Obama's inner anger emerged: "He was able to pursue his action against bin Laden in part because bin Laden offered a displacement figure for Obama's rage toward his own parents."

Frank also calls Obama scared of the type of radical change he advocated in 2008. "He wants to be the father who makes change safe, the person he has waited for his entire life."

Check out: our editorial cartoons on President Obama.******
3422  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Economics, the stock market , and other investment/savings strategies on: October 14, 2011, 02:30:31 PM
It certainly seems we hit a nearterm bottom which of course can change tomorrow with Soros' latest rumor.

I don't recall a weirder situation wherein some companies and investors are making money hand over fist yet nearly everyone I know personally is financially worse off.

The recent drop was I think due to the concern Europe banking would collapse.  Now the rumors are they are working on some sort of "deal" to kick the can down the road everything is back to hunky dorry?!

Perhaps BLoomberg can get Brian to go down to the Wall Street protesters and convince them all not to worry everything is really great.

What I screwed up country this is becoming.  More then once I have senior citizen patients coming in and telling me they are glad they don't have much time left.  They cannot stand what is going on.

3423  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / WW2 vets are turning over in their graves on: October 12, 2011, 03:02:16 PM
God I only hope we run this guy out of office for good.  It just keeps getting worse:

Apologies Not Accepted
 
Posted 10/11/2011 06:29 PM ET
 
In November 2009, Barack Obama became the first U.S. president to bow to Japan's emperor. View Enlarged Image
Leadership: Leaked cables show Japan nixed a presidential apology to Hiroshima and Nagasaki for using nukes to end the overseas contingency operation known as World War II. Will the next president apologize for the current one?

The obsessive need of this president to apologize for American exceptionalism and our defense of freedom continued recently when Barack Obama's State Department (run by Hillary Clinton) contacted the family of al-Qaida propagandist and recruiter Samir Khan to "express its condolences" to his family.

Khan, a right-hand man to Anwar al-Awlaki, was killed along with Awlaki in an airstrike in Yemen on Sept. 30. We apologized for killing a terrorist before he could help kill any more of us.

It's yet another part of the world apology tour that began with Obama taking the oath of office to protect and defend the United States and its Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, something he immediately felt sorry for.

One stop on his tour was Prague in August 2009. There he spoke of "America's commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons," ignoring that before 1945 we lived in such a world and it was neither peaceful nor secure.

Another stop on the tour was in Japan, where Obama in November 2009 bowed to the emperor, something no American president had ever done. It could have been worse if plans to visit Nagasaki and Hiroshima to apologize for winning the war with the atom bombs had come to pass.

A heretofore secret cable dated Sept. 3, 2009, was recently released by WikiLeaks. Sent to Secretary of State Clinton, it reported Japan's Vice Foreign Minister Mitoji Yabunaka telling U.S. Ambassador John Roos that "the idea of President Obama visiting Hiroshima to apologize for the atomic bombing during World War II is a 'nonstarter.'"

The Japanese feared the apology would be exploited by anti-nuclear groups and those opposed to the defensive alliance between Japan and the U.S.
3424  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The congnitive dissonance of the left on: October 10, 2011, 02:59:01 PM
"Lured by cheap drugs and free food, creepy thugs have infiltrated the crowd of protesters camped"

Well, what were drugs doing there to start with?  Who is giving the "free" food.  Nothing is free.  Who is paying for this?

As though the people who began this noble, just, righteous, cause were all just a bunch of saints and then some bad elements just happen to show up later.  Oh I get it.

As usual the taxpayers will be stuck with the bill for this mess and not to say anything about the overtime for city employees.

I assume the ones who can ring the register up top increase their pay just before they retire.
3425  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The congnitive dissonance of the left on: October 10, 2011, 11:18:37 AM
"And the pay is $350-$650 a week depending on the responsibility and length of time of staff."

I keep wondering every time I see these losers on TV how they can afford to sit around for weeks on end yet they claim poverty.

Lets see.  They are already getting unemployment, they are sponging off their parents, they are selling drugs, on federal disability,
stealing, or are independently wealthy, retired.

I don't know.  You tell me.

I agree with the point (of some of them) about some unfairness in our system.  The rest are just there for the "experience", its "coolness", to meet girls and guys, push for free doles.

This is the group of people who no matter what no matter when or forever will always vote Democrat.

You see them at all Democratic political rallies.  I remember going to a Bill Clinton rally in Florida.  I was probably one of a handful of Republicans.  The rest looked similar to this crowd.

It is the handout you owe me entitlement "nation".


3426  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: October 10, 2011, 09:24:46 AM
GM your point about media hypocracy also finds fodder with the Wall street thing.  Especially trying to compare it to the Tea Party.

The left wing media keeps making this into a left version of the Tea Party.  Yeah right this is just like the tea party.   Professional hippies and union thugs demading handouts from succesful people is not the same as those paying the bills having a beef:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2047168/Occupy-Wall-Street-Its-just-politics--Sex-drugs-love-brigade-hijack-Wall-Street-protest.html

I am not sure what to make of the media silence about the drone killing and American citizen.  Personally I am all for it.  Yet the uproar over water boarding yet silence over this is prima faciae evidence of a two faced liberal democrat party media complex.
3427  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: October 08, 2011, 01:24:40 PM
Well Fox and Hannity are asking.

The MSM won't until they have to of course.

They are not interested in morality as much as their political and financial interests obviously.

Yet the MSM pretend they are all about morality.  We have SoloDAD giving us more "Latino in America" nonsense.  Yet not a peep from the queen of feeling sorry for illegals when it comes to the Latinos budgeoned in the streets of Mexico. 

Then again if Bush were Prez she and the silver haired Rothschild would be on every day screaming ther outrage for the poor of South of the border.

Of course what gays go through here in the US is far worse then any suffering in Mexico due to the terror of these bastard drug cartels. wink



3428  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / To PSA or not PSA on: October 08, 2011, 01:17:21 PM
That is the question without an answer.

Just we know, universal single payer government sponsored health care would not be recommending that we not do this test.  It would be *dictating* and refusing to pay for this. 

The talking heads on all the cable shows will have a field day with all their usual specialist guests, et. al. "debating" the cons and pros ad nauseum.

Thanks to the greats from Harvard who have seemed to have decided on the future of the world for the rest of us:

****prostate cancer test advice overturns dogma
Oct. 7, 2011, 5:36 p.m. EDTAPWASHINGTON (AP) — Men finally may be getting a clearer message about undergoing PSA screening for prostate cancer: Don't do it.

They may not listen. After all, the vast majority of men over 50 already get tested.

The idea that finding cancer early can harm instead of help is a hard one to understand. But it's at the heart of a government panel's draft recommendation that those PSA blood tests should no longer be part of routine screening for healthy men.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force examined all the evidence and found little if any reduction in deaths from routine PSA screening. But it did conclude that too many men are diagnosed with tumors that never would have killed them and suffer serious side effects from resulting treatment.

That recommendation isn't final — it's a draft open for public comment. But it goes a step further than several major cancer groups including the American Cancer Society, which urges that men be told the pros and cons and decide for themselves.

The new advice is sure to be hugely controversial. Already some doctors are rejecting it.

"We all agree that we've got to do a better job of figuring out who would benefit from PSA screening. But a blanket statement of just doing away with it altogether ... seems over-aggressive and irresponsible," said Dr. Scott Eggener, a prostate cancer specialist at the University of Chicago.

In the exam room, explaining the flaws in PSA testing has long been difficult.

"Men have been confused about this for a very long time, not just men patients but men doctors," said Dr. Yul Ejnes, a Cranston, R.I., internal medicine specialist who chairs the American College of Physicians' board of regents.

He turned down his own physician's offer of a PSA test after personally reviewing the research.

"There's this dogma ... that early detection saves lives. It's not necessarily true for all cancers," Ejnes said.

That's an emotional shift, as the American Cancer Society's Dr. Len Lichtenfeld voiced on his blog on Friday.

"We have invested over 20 years of belief that PSA testing works. ... And here we are all of these years later, and we don't know for sure," Lichtenfeld wrote. "We have been poked and probed, we have been operated on by doctors and robots, we have been radiated with fancy machines, we have spent literally billions of dollars. And what do we have? A mess of false hope?"

Too much PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, in the blood only sometimes signals prostate cancer is brewing. It also can mean a benign enlarged prostate or an infection. In fact, most men who undergo a biopsy for an abnormal PSA test don't turn out to have prostate cancer.

Screening often detects small tumors that will prove too slow-growing to be deadly — by one estimate, in 2 of every 5 men whose cancer is caught through a PSA test. But there's no way to tell in advance who needs treatment.

"If we had a test that could distinguish between a cancer that was going to be aggressive and a cancer that was not, that would be fabulous," said Dr. Virginia Moyer of the Baylor College of Medicine, who chairs the task force, an independent expert group that reviews medical evidence for the government.

About 1 in 6 U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their life. Yet the cancer society notes that in Western European countries where screening isn't common, 1 in 10 men are diagnosed and the risk of death in both places is the same. In the U.S., about 217,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, and 32,000 die.

Why not screen in case there's a mortality benefit that studies have yet to tease out? The task force outlined the problem with that:

—Up to 5 in every 1,000 men die within a month of prostate cancer surgery, and between 10 and 70 more suffer serious complications.

—At least 200 to 300 of every 1,000 men treated with surgery or radiation suffer incontinence or impotence.

—Overall, Moyer said 30 percent of men who are treated for PSA-discovered prostate cancer suffer significant side effects from the resulting treatment.

Among the questions sure to be raised during the public comment period are how doctors should advise men with prostate cancer in the family or black men, who are at increased risk.

PSA testing also is used to examine men with prostate symptoms, and to check men who already have had prostate cancer. The new recommendation doesn't affect those uses.

Congress requires that Medicare cover PSA tests, at a cost of $41 million in 2009. Other insurers follow Medicare's lead, especially in light of conflicting recommendations.

Nor does the new recommendation mean that men who want a PSA test can't have one. If the rule is adopted — something the government will review once the task force hears comments and finalizes its guidance — it would just advise against doctors pushing it routinely.

"The truth is that like so many things in medicine, there's no one-size-fits-all," said Dr. Michael Barry of Massachusetts General Hospital who heads the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision-Making that backs ways to help patients make their own choices.***
 
 
3429  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: October 08, 2011, 12:22:46 PM
"Why the lack of MSM outrage at “dead Mexicans”?"

Good question.

The stories coming out of Mexico are truly shocking.  The brutality, the cruelty is unbelievable.  And no one can stop it.
We in this country are doing the drugs that are feeding this.  Yet I hear no shame on our part, no guilt, no remorse.

Just blame the drug cartels for dealing us drugs.

The "fast and furious" guns trafficking is a big scandal with a big cover up probably all the way to Brock - However this is really only a small part of the overall problem.

The gang violence in the US is nothing like that seen south of the border in Mexico Central and South America.

I cannnot blame the Mexican government every time they point out the drugs are coming here and we pay for it.  Sure they are corrupt but so are we.

All we hear is the libs saying how we have so many people in jail for drugs when they should be getting "treatment".

What a joke.  That's not the answer either or is only a fraction of the answer.



3430  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / deflect the heat from Brock on: October 07, 2011, 04:04:36 PM
The title of this should be Dems seeking revenge and to deflect attention away from Brock's corruption issues with Solar and Fast and Furious by making a mountain out of a non issue over a conservative judge:

****Democrats mobilize over Clarence Thomas ethics investigation
Clarence and Ginni Thomas (Charles Dharapak/AP)

Forty-six House Democrats have joined forces this week to ask the chamber's Judiciary Committee to investigate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas for ethics violations. The Democratic lawmakers' complaint argues that reports of Thomas' actions--including those related to the high-profile political activism of his wife, Virginia "Ginni" Thomas--have raised concerns about potential conflicts of interest.

"Public records clearly demonstrate that Justice Thomas has failed to accurately disclose information concerning the income and employment status of his wife, as required by law," Democrats led by Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) and Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.) wrote in a letter (pdf) Wednesday to leaders of the Judiciary Committee. The Democrats also question whether Thomas accurately reported gifts and inappropriately solicited donations.

Blumenauer's office confirmed to The Ticket Thursday afternoon that 46 lawmakers have signed on.

Liberal watchdog group Common Cause recently reported that Thomas' wife earned around $1.6 million between 1997 and 2011--and that Justice Thomas did not report her income over the same time span. Thomas said he "inadvertently" failed to file information on wife's employment "due to a misunderstanding of the filing instructions."

 A Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg told the Huffington Post this week that justices are not required to disclose the amount earned by spouses--only the source of their spouses' income.

But Democrats argue that Thomas may have been intentionally withholding the information.

"There is now more than enough evidence to merit a formal inquiry as to whether Justice Thomas willfully failed to make legally required disclosures, perhaps for as long as 13 years," Common Cause president Bob Edgar said in a statement Wednesday. "Given that we now know he correctly completed the reports in prior years, it's hardly plausible--indeed, it's close to unbelievable--that Justice Thomas did not understand the instructions."

Democrats contend that the Supreme Court's protocols for such disclosures should be more transparent. "Because the Court continues to operate without a binding code of ethics or a transparent recusal process, it is time for Congress to exercise its Constitutional role and become involved in this process," Blumenauer said in a statement.

Ginni Thomas has become embroiled in several scandals over the past year.

In Oct. 2010, Thomas made headlines for calling the office of Anita Hill-- the woman who gained national exposure 20 years ago when she testified during Clarence Thomas' confirmation hearing that the nominee sexually harassed her. In last year's call, Ginni Thomas left a voicemail message seeking an apology from Hill.

Soon after, Ginni Thomas stepped down from conservative group Liberty Central, which she founded, citing "distractions" caused by her celebrity.

Her role at Liberty Central and her work with other conservative advocacy groups had raised questions about possible conflicts-of-interest for her spouse. The New York Times' Jackie Calmes last year said Thomas had "the most partisan role ever for a spouse of a justice on the nation's highest court."

Common Cause reports that most of the undisclosed funds earned by Ginni Thomas came from the conservative Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank based in Washington.***


3431  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Way Forward for the American Creed on: October 07, 2011, 02:35:16 PM
"Instead of focusing on the anti-free market element, I would focus on the correct anger at bailouts of some people, bank, and businesses that have acted very badly and communicate that what we see here is the natural result of the progressive/liberal fascist ideology."

I agree.  It is not simple class warfare, envy, or incorrect to do something about the inherent reality and truth that some of those fabulously wealthy peolpe have gotten away with things none of the rest of us could or should get away with.

I don't think that any Republican who points this out and is willing to at least give credence about a concept that works in practice as well as in theory to a "level playing field" is going against any core principle of hard work, risk taking, reward those who do well, personal responsibility or the rest.

One can be populist in this regard and conservative.  One of the tenets of our society, culture, political makeup is we all have an "equal chance".  Of course that is not really true but at least we should all have to play by the same rules.  Those at the top can clearly get around rules that the rest of us cannot.

This theme would in my view capture some of the independent voters who are on the fence not sure which side is better.

Those on the left want redistribution and point out that the wealthy are always keeping everyone else down and ripping us off.

Those on the right don't support this view and talk only about equal opportunity and personal responsibility.

I agree in theory with the right's view but also realize that is not recognizing that a lot of powerful people also are unethical.

It seems to me most in the US want to be responsible and want not be envious of wealth, success and achievement.  Yet many also realize some are ripping the rest of us off and they cannot and should not simply look the other way.

I liked Newt's comment about how Republicans should stop social engineering as well as those on the left.

I agree if I understand what he meant.  But he was never given the chance to explain.  The conservatives simply jumped all over him.  They ignore this at their own peril (by which I mean lost votes).

"The flat tax should have been implemented years ago."  No question.  It seems for the first time thanks to Herman Cain we have a spokeperson who is getting press over the idea of a flat tax.  Though I prefer a little higher income tax and no federal sales tax as in his 9 9 9 idea.

Thank God for Cain!  Now if he can brush up on foreign policy....

We need a cure for colon cancer just in case... and soon.


3432  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: October 07, 2011, 11:05:50 AM
From Doug:

"He was the lyricist who could put out words that people could fill with their own meaning.  Amazing that it worked once or worked twice."

From another genius:

"You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time."
[Abraham Lincoln, (attributed)
16th president of US (1809 - 1865)]

The some of the people all of the time are apparantly the 42% or so who still would vote for Brock.  Despite the disaster we are witnessing in the White House there are still that many in our country - virtually all who want payouts - who still believe in this con artist. 

The all of the people some of the time where the other 10 or 15 % who voted for him to begin with who hav since realized they were wrong to do so.  Brock is no longer fooling that group.  There were people like me and most on this board who were never taken in by the con in chief.

And of those 15 or 20% who have changed their minds many of them have done so because he is not liberal enough in his policies although he certainly would be if he could get away with it.

Mark Levin is finally calling it a political civil war.  Others including me have been stating this for a decade now.

Michael Savage has pointed out that in history their will not be blood in the streets till people are starving.

I don't know.  But threatening entitlements may be enough in our society.  I do agree with Brock that we are soft.  I don't agree with the reasons or what we do about it.
3433  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / What is the real unemployment rate? on: October 07, 2011, 10:54:19 AM
Doug what is your take on this:

As noted on Drudge the payroll rate up 103K this month.  Yet 45K is simply Verizon workers going back to work after a strike!

What kind of crap is this?  Those are not 45K new jobs.
What are we all this stupid?  Why can we not have honesty if nothing else in our government?
3434  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Soros insider trading on: October 07, 2011, 09:36:19 AM
Of course he uses his international reach to insider trade.  How else does he alsways make billions?
That said I put this under the socioeconomic class thread for a reason.  This is exactly what is unfair about our system.  He is so wealthy can hire armies of 1000 hr attorneys and fight this off and what is going to happen to him.  A bit embarrassed perhaps.
Anyone think he will go to jail?  A fine that for him is not more than a parking ticket for anyone else?

Santorum who is not getting any traction was talking about how the bankers got off without a scratch.

I guess one could use this story as the poster story for those people marching on wall street.  Notwithstanding most of them are a bunch of losers and party animals and otherwise in the words of Donald Trump looking for dates:

****October 6, 2011 9:34 pm

Soros fails to quash insider trading conviction
By Sam Jones in London and Stanley Pignal in Brussels
ReutersGeorge Soros, the billionaire hedge fund manager, has lost a case at the European Court of Human Rights to have his criminal conviction for insider dealing quashed.

The failed appeal in a 4-3 decision by the Strasbourg-based court is the latest twist in a nine-year battle by the 81-year-old Mr Soros to clear his name following his conviction in France in 2002.

Soros insider trading case to be reviewed
Soros fund closes, but influence remains
Lex Quantum of Soros
Soros appoints new CIO to family office
World’s rich families face US asset disclosure
The French criminal case hinged on trades that the Hungary-born investor had executed 14 years earlier in the stock of Société Générale that reaped his hedge fund, the Quantum Fund, $2.9m in profits.

Mr Soros was found by the court in 2002 to have had inside knowledge about the intentions of a group of super-wealthy French investors – the “golden granddads” – to bid for the bank.

Although the bid failed, Mr Soros’s fund profited by buying shares before – and selling after – the group’s intentions became public and resulted in a spike in SocGen’s share price.

Mr Soros was fined €2.2m (£1.9m), later reduced to €940,507 on appeal.

At the time, Mr Soros described the guilty verdict as a “gift to my enemies”.

He is now left with one final, unlikely, chance to rid himself of his conviction: an appeal to the grand chamber of the ECHR. Such appeals are only heard on an “exceptional basis”, according to the court’s rules.

Mr Soros had based his initial appeal to Strasbourg on an argument that French insider-trading laws in the late 1980s were too vague for him to know that he was in breach of them.

In its decision, the ECHR conceded that “the wording of the statutes was not always precise” but said that Mr Soros, as a “famous institutional investor, well-known to the business community  . . . could not have been unaware that his decision to invest . . .  entailed the risk that he might be committing the offence of insider trading”.

Mr Soros’s lawyers lamented the ECHR’s close decision, pointing out that even the former French market regulator, the Commission des Operations de Bourse, had found France’s insider trading laws too ill-defined to warrant a civil case.

“It is inconceivable to expect that the citizen has a better understanding of the law than the authority in charge,” Ron Soffer, Mr Soros’s lawyer, said on Thursday, referring to the billionaire’s criminal conviction by jury.

“The opinion of the regulatory authority is an irrebuttable presumption as to the lack of clarity of the law,” Mr Soffer said.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2011. You may share using our article tools.
Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.****
3435  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: October 06, 2011, 05:38:16 PM
I don't think I need to go into detail on Brick Brock's political diabtribe this AM.

He continues to demonstrate why he is far of a worse President than Jimmy Carter ever was - not only totally in over his head but continuues to deceive, lie and mislead.  At least Carter was honest if not competent.

Can anyone tell me we need to emulate China by wasting government money on solar?

We should to the exact opposite.  Let the Chinese waste their money and we copy and steal any scientific gains THEY get from it.  Just like they do to us. 

"F" (I mean "forget")  solar.  For God's sake why can't we use our oil, gas coal?
3436  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The United Nations/ US Sovereignty/International Law on: October 06, 2011, 05:31:20 PM
Yet Leon Panetta and other liberals have no problem lecturing Israeli leadership that they need to be more creative and open minded with *their* diplomacy and communication with the Arab countries.

Who the hell are these people to talk?

Like the rest of the world is not walking all over us with our great diplomacy?
3437  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: October 03, 2011, 06:38:30 PM
Crafty this verbiage from Panetta is very bad.  What the heck does he want Israelis to do?

A large portion of the Muslim world wants then dead or driven to the sea.

How does one communicate with people who think this? 

Does he give as examples US communication with Pakistan, with China, with Egypt, with Syria, with Saudi Arabia? 

He sounds like a condescending jerk.  "They need to do this they need to do that".  Thanks alot.

So he concludes it is Israel's fault they are getting more isolated.  He advocates more talks and more talks and more communication and more diplomacy.  We've been hearing this crap from the left for 40 years.  What is new since Brock is in is that now it is mostly the fault of the Jews.

I think he just cost the Brock man another 5 % or so of the Jewish vote.

Keep it up.  I am an American first but I am not going to sit quietly and watch my heritage get wiped out which is the road it is heading in.

3438  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / there he goes again! on: October 03, 2011, 04:16:01 PM
Wesbury did the same thing during the tech crash of 2000.  Talk up the economis numbers all the while tech stocks lost 90% of their value.   His synopses are concise with all sorts of data and stats and numbers.  With regards to the stock market these numbers are obviously worthless.   I don't know what to do with them or what purpose or good they serve.

Get twenty economists in a room and they will give different ideas about where the economy is going.

His numbers don't mean anything for stock investors from where I sit. 

3439  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: October 03, 2011, 09:46:55 AM
Doug says:

"The wife some say is sick of the routine, most recently sent strategically to shop at Target while tipping off AP cameramen is about as low as it gets."

yes, agreed, see my post on cognitive dissonance.

I don't think Brock will leave the 2012 race.  My belief is people give Brock too much credit for being rational and insightful.

He has a personality disorder.  He will continue to deny to the end IMHO.

I hope so too.  Let him take the progressive movement down with him and they all get trounced at the polls for a while till the Republicans screw it up and become corrupt so much that the pendulum swings back the other way at some point.
3440  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / First broad quietly shops at the ritzy places not target on: October 03, 2011, 09:42:37 AM
Please refer back to five posts ago by ccp.  The time has come for the politicians to stop staging and manipulating the media and us.

She is no more than the first broad.  No respect from me.

Obviously it was staged yet the lame stream media reports that the first broad "quietly" slipped out to Target to shop.
No more likely when she shops on Rodeo (sp?) Drive in LA, or Madison Ave in NYC she quietly slips out.
No end to the deceit from this WH:
 
***Figures. White House Tipped Off AP Reporter Ahead of Michelle Obama’s Target Photo-Op
Posted by Jim Hoft on Saturday, October 1, 2011, 11:35 PM
 
Another staged moment in the lives of Barack and Michelle Obama.
Michelle Obama just had to get out to Target to do a little shopping last week. But, before the shopping run the White House tipped off AP photographer Charles Dharapak so that he would be at the store to memorialize the moment.

Michelle Obama checks out at Target. That’s her assistant behind her carrying the bags. (AP)

At least she wore a shirt that is reportedly from Old Navy(?) and not a designer T-shirt like she wears out when she paints community centers.***

 
3441  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The narcissist personality disorder full blown on: September 30, 2011, 04:24:13 PM
"I mean, there are a lot of things we can do," Obama said. "The way I think about it is, you know, this is a great, great country that had gotten a little soft and, you know, we didn't have that same competitive edge that we needed over the last couple of decades. We need to get back on track."

Recall I pointed out how a narcissistic personality disorder is totally incapable of accepting any blame, will twist all logic to blame everyone else, will never admit to anything, continue to lie and deceive and play the same con game till death do us part.

He blames the country on going soft.  He blames blacks for whining.  He blames the tea party.  The racists.  And so on.

What is totally mind boggling about his above statement that if one agrees the country has gone soft in the "last couple of decades" one can ask why that would be.  The answer is obvious.   What has happened in the last couple of decades?

Well remember we have had the great society, more welfare, more liberal benefits to government employees, the endless entitlement increases, the demographic wave of senior citizens reaching sit on their ass and collect time, more people letting the immigrants take many of the jobs they won't do.  It is all this entitled mentality which Brock himself has done more to promote and expand upon!

True to form a personality disorder is unable to be objective.  The fault is always someone or something else.
Unfortunately he brings all of us down in his delusional crazy thinking.

3442  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / first broad *quietly* shops on: September 30, 2011, 02:46:51 PM
What are we stupid?  The first broad "quietly" shops at Target.  It is so quiet the pictures get out all over the internet.  Check it out.  She shops at Target just like you and me.  She IS so down to Earth. rolleyes wink

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2011/09/30/first-lady-steps-out-quietly-does-some-shopping-at-target/
3443  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Brock payoff to Pelosi family? on: September 28, 2011, 06:35:50 PM
I wonder if health food fanitic Brock likes Brockly...anyway -

Hat tip to Michael Savage radio today for this:

****Crony Socialism: Obama Gives $737 Million to Solar Firm Linked to the Pelosi Clan
Posted by Jim Hoft on Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 12:14 PM
 
It’s as if Solyndra never happened. The Obama Administration is giving $737 million to a Tonopah Solar, a subsidiary of California-based SolarReserve. PCG is an investment partner with SolarReserve. Nancy Pelosi’s brother-in-law happens to be the number two man at PCG.

Team Obama is spending $737 million to create 45 permanent jobs.
The Hill reported, via Free Republic:

The Energy Department announced Wednesday that is has finalized a $737 million loan guarantee for a Nevada solar project.

The decision comes several weeks after a California-based solar manufacturer that received a $535 million loan guarantee from the Obama administration in 2009 filed for bankruptcy and laid off 1,100 workers, setting off a firestorm in Washington.

The $737 million loan guarantee will help finance construction of the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project, a 110-megawatt solar-power-generating facility in Nye County, Nev. The project is sponsored by Tonopah Solar, a subsidiary of California-based SolarReserve.

Crescent Dunes is the latest solar project to receive a loan guarantee from the Energy Department in recent weeks. The department announced a $1.2 billion loan guarantee to Abengoa Solar for a solar generation project in California and a $150 million loan guarantee to 1366 Technologies for a Massachusetts solar manufacturing project earlier this month.

The Energy Department says the project will result in 600 construction jobs and 45 permanent jobs.

It looks like Rep. Allen West was right.
Obama IS trying to destroy the economy.
3444  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / It mostly comes down to money on: September 27, 2011, 02:36:51 PM
"I don't think you get it; they hate us BECAUSE of our (Obama) support for Israel.  Not my words, but our Secretary of Defense, our Generals, et al....."

Well I have been wondering why so many UN nations feel it necessary to bash Israel.  The answer is probably quite simple.

Arab oil money being spread around.  Why else would so many of these countries always vote against Israel?  What the heck, do they care about Jews one way or another.  Or for that matter they love the Palestinians so much? undecided  It has nothing to do with either.  Saudis are spreading around the cash to these countries.  It is probably just that simple.

Just like Brock is all of a sudden selling Israel bunker busters.  He wants the stupid liberal American Jew's to keep sending him money and political support.

Maxine Waters has a point.  Probably the first and last time I will agree with her:
Brock takes the Black vote for granted.  He would never had said to the Jews, to the Latinos what he told the Black Caucus. 
3445  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: September 26, 2011, 04:46:38 PM
that "abolish the EPA" thing will kill it on the spot

Yes MSLSD has already showing us 1960s versions of multicolored chemically polluted rivers, dumps with thousands of barrels of chemicals, people dying in India from chemical disasters, dying animals in oil spills and claiming that Republicans want to go back to *this!* 
3446  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cain on: September 26, 2011, 11:50:34 AM
Cain must have had a metastatic colon cancer lesion to the liver.  I believe it may be curable if that lobe of the liver is removed and the rest is surgically removed.  I'll have to run it by my oncology colleagues.
3447  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Great!LOL;eom on: September 26, 2011, 09:36:09 AM
eom
3448  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Dershowitz is good on this subject on: September 25, 2011, 11:05:33 AM
Good article

"Imagine what the status of gays will be under Sharia law!"

That is a good idea fpr a new strategy.  Send the American gay infatada to the West bank and stir up trouble there.
3449  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Afpakia: Afghanistan-Pakistan on: September 25, 2011, 10:21:12 AM
Well we can't help those who are willing to die and have their entire country wiped out.

I still think we make it clear of dire consequences to even try.

I guess a dirty bomb could go off and we don't know who did it or the claimant is not technically a state sanctioned entity.

Do our enemies have the capability to cause an EMP that can knock out our military hardware?

3450  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: September 25, 2011, 10:13:51 AM
Does anyone here have the impression that at least some females who volunteer are looking for guys?

Or if lesbian just the opposite?

OTOH, I don't know any male volunteers who do so to find girls.
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