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3851  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Interesting Stratfor.com Read on: April 21, 2008, 09:40:18 PM
***. U.S. carrier deployment: The deployment of U.S. carrier battle groups is becoming interesting. There are currently three deployed off the Chinese coast. One has paid a port call in Hong Kong, so we would assume that this is all being viewed as benign by the Chinese. Nevertheless, the deployment is interesting and we should try to find out if there is any political message being sent. Certainly we need to know how Beijing is reading this situation. It may be nothing, but worry about it anyway.***

Gertz on the reason for the three carrier groups:


http://www.gertzfile.com/gertzfile/InsidetheRing.html
3852  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama's interpretation of the role of Supreme Court justices on: April 20, 2008, 09:01:19 AM
According to Jonah BO opinion:

"The Democratic front-runner and former lecturer on constitutional law at the University of Chicago has explained his thinking toward judicial appointments thus: “We need somebody who’s got the heart, the empathy, to recognize what it’s like to be a young teenage mom, the empathy to understand what it’s like to be poor or African-American or gay or disabled or old — and that’s the criteria by which I’ll be selecting my judges.”

What?HuhHuh?  How about justice?  How about victim's rights?  How about a nation of laws?
BO my friends, is *radical* left.  In my view he is nuts.  This talk about we have to get past the rhetoric falls in line with his own proclaimed learned way of dealing with white folks.  Hold their hand, talk sweet and deflect their "innermost fears".  We are being conned.  Another version of BS the likes of HC and BC.

This guy is worse than Dukakis.

Just we wait till shrillary is out of the picture.  The right is going to (rightly in my view) have a field day with this guy.

   
   

April 18, 2008 12:00 AM

Courting Disaster
In a very real sense, this election year we face the question: Do we want to live in a monarchy or a nation of laws?

By Jonah Goldberg

 

Every four years, we’re told that this is the most important election since a caveman asked for a show of hands. So some skepticism seems warranted when we hear the same refrain this year.

But then there’s the question of the Supreme Court. And here, at least for me, skepticism melts away into real anxiety, even panic.

Consider the stunning decision handed down from the Supreme Court this week.
The court ruled that the state of Kentucky may continue to use lethal injections when administering the death penalty. But that’s not what’s shocking. Nor was it surprising that for the first time Justice John Paul Stevens admitted he thinks the death penalty is unconstitutional.

What is staggering, or at least should be, is that Stevens freely admits that he no longer considers “objective evidence” or even the plain text of the Constitution determinative of what is or isn’t constitutional: “I have relied on my own experience in reaching the conclusion that the imposition of the death penalty” is unconstitutional.

Justice Antonin Scalia, in a blistering response, justifiably exclaimed that, “Purer expression cannot be found of the principle of rule by judicial fiat.”

I say “justifiably” rather than “accurately” because I think we hear purer expressions of the principle that “good” judges are those who make it up as they go along all the time. Consider Barack Obama. The Democratic front-runner and former lecturer on constitutional law at the University of Chicago has explained his thinking toward judicial appointments thus: “We need somebody who’s got the heart, the empathy, to recognize what it’s like to be a young teenage mom, the empathy to understand what it’s like to be poor or African-American or gay or disabled or old — and that’s the criteria by which I’ll be selecting my judges.”

When defending his vote against Justice John Roberts’ confirmation, Obama explained that the standard for a justice must be “one’s deepest values, one’s core concerns, one’s broader perspectives on how the world works, and the depth and breadth of one’s empathy.”

Now that  is a pure expression of the principle of judicial fiat.

Indeed, by Obama’s own words the best justices are those who will most shamelessly violate their own oath of office.

Supreme Court justices must “solemnly swear that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent on me as a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States under the Constitution and laws of the United States, so help me God.”

Note the bit about doing right to poor and rich alike. Feeling sorry for the poor guy who violates the Constitution or the law has no role in how a Supreme Court justice is supposed to make a decision. Legislators can write laws based on empathy. They can invoke their pet theories about “how the world works.” They can even, as Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsberg are fond of doing, consult foreign laws and court decisions in their efforts to make a more perfect union. But Supreme Court justices are supposed to decide what the written law requires, not pick winners and losers based upon some sense of noblesse oblige. That’s why all of those statues of Lady Justice show her standing blindfolded, not bent over kissing the boo-boos of the unfortunate and the downtrodden.

In a very real sense, this election year we face the question: Do we want to live in a monarchy or a nation of laws? Is this to be a country where justices serve as a reliable backstop against encroachments upon the constitutional order, or is this to be a country where the most undemocratic branch of government serves as the tip of the spear for such intrusions?

Five of the last seven presidents have been Republicans at least nominally committed to appointing conservative justices. Some have fallen short in that department (though not President George W. Bush), which is why the Supreme Court today hangs in the balance. John McCain could conceivably make the mistake of appointing a Souter or a Stevens or some other justice who sees the Constitution as an ink blot. But the key difference between McCain and his Democratic rivals is that he promises not to appoint such justices. Clinton and Obama consider it among their top priorities. That’s at least one reason for saying this is one of the most important elections in a very long time.

— Jonah Goldberg is the author of Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left from Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning.

(C) 2008 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

© National Review Online 2008. All Rights Reserved.


3853  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Does BO hate America? on: April 19, 2008, 08:05:19 AM
George Will:

Obama is American liberalism's evolutionary end result.   Blame America first because it is a downright mean country.  So now we must all come together to make it into something that would Michelle could be proud of:

http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/will041508.php3

If one believes this, and I am becoming convinced that it is true then in my view this guy cannot be allowed to run this country.
He is bluffing us. Let's all work together, compromise, we are one nation etc etc.  But what we are working for is his vision of America.   And that vision is extraordinarily liberal.

Can BO prove to me otherwise?
3854  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / McCain wants to simplify the tax code on: April 17, 2008, 11:02:27 PM
JM has if for some real change.  I'm impressed and pleasantly surprised.

I would like to hear Doug's thoughts on this since he is astute on tax policy: 

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/04/15/mccain.economy/index.html?eref=rss_politics&iref=polticker
3855  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Obama Phenomena on: April 14, 2008, 09:48:31 PM
John Fund is one of the most astute journalists in my view.

As for Obama I feel he is fooling a lot of people most of the time.

I suspect his public persona is a fraud and the real BO is an angry guy who really is an American despising liberal.
I for one no longer trust him as far as I can say "Clinton".
3856  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: April 11, 2008, 06:56:04 PM
Interesting.  I would rather have McCain negotiating this with a position of strength than Obama giving away the store with weakness.

"“Iraq is the convergence point for two of the greatest threats to America in this new century — al Qaeda and Iran.”

China is clearly the biggest threat we face.
3857  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Alicia Keys on: April 11, 2008, 06:50:11 PM
I still allege this chick couldn't write lyrics or come up with a melody to save her life.  Why No One has sold can only be testiment to finanically storng backers because 'no one' can tell me this is a good song.  The melody is obviously so strained.  So much a melody from someone who can't come up with a decent melody so goes up and down octaves trying to make it sound different. 

I say there is something going here with this turn around about her shifting gears to policitics.  Even her mother is shocked at this stuff.  The reason I believe she is pouting this stuff is because she can't get anymore material other than this.  If she really could write she could and would be writing about whatever she chooses.  So now she has to play the game.  Make up stories about versatility.  That her interest has shifted focus and that explains this total change.  But I believe the truth is - that this is all the material that was stolen so this is what she has to use.   Anyway, that is the fraud behind the music "industry".

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20080411/D8VVUAHG0.html
3858  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants on: April 10, 2008, 09:38:22 PM
I'm incredulous to hear BO tell us we are less safe now than beofre 911.

I guess that is supported by the fact we have not had a single recureence since undecided

I spoke with a phsyician colleauge who is from Paskitan.  He felt the violence will never end there.

His from the eastern portion but the western Paskitani terrorists have been taking their Jihad accross the country and are now hitting targets all over.

He says you can't negotiate with them, you can't fight them, you can't do anything about it.  In part, because you don't even know who most of them are.  You don't know who sympathizes with them and who are your enemy. People are afraid to fight back.  They or their families might be next.  It is sheer terror.

Yet BO thinks we are worse off here.

I'll take McCain anyday.   
3859  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Boyfriend to girlfriend on: April 10, 2008, 09:20:24 PM
What a joke.  These bozos friends don't only steal the songs from Katherine they then steal them from each other.
http://news.aol.com/entertainment/music/music-news-story/ar/_a/daughtry-caught-in-plagiarism-scandal/20080410124709990002?icid=100214839x1159312959x1080115074
3860  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Internet is blazingly slow compared to new technology on: April 06, 2008, 11:51:43 AM
I wonder what Gilder says.  I wonder if my hugely disastrous holding level three (which is going the way of another one of "gg's" great picks globalstar) has a place with this:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article3689881.ece
3861  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Is Barack more like J. Wright then he lets on? Coulter on BO's own book on: April 06, 2008, 10:25:14 AM
I am not such a Coulter fan anymore since her remarks on Donny Deutsh about Jews, but she does raise my eyebrows with these excerpts from a book I didn't know BO wrote:

http://www.anncoulter.com/

This part does make me a little uncomfortable.  Are whites just being conned by BO and is he really another angry Black man more akin to Jesse Jackson and Jeremiah Wright.  For me I would have to hear more proof this guy has risen above this anger and as far as I am concerned reverse bigotry to even consider him as my President.  If anyone thinks Hillary's attacks on BO are severe then I would agree with those who say "we ain't seen nothing yet" and wait till "the Republicans go at him".  This piece is just for openers (I guess):

***When his mother expresses concern about Obama's high school friend being busted for drugs, Obama says he patted his mother's hand and told her not to worry.

This, too, prompted Obama to share with his readers a life lesson on how to handle white people: "It was usually an effective tactic, another one of those tricks I had learned: People were satisfied so long as you were courteous and smiled and made no sudden moves. They were more than satisfied, they were relieved -- such a pleasant surprise to find a well-mannered young black man who didn't seem angry all the time."***

***OBAMA'S DIMESTORE 'MEIN KAMPF'
April 2, 2008


If characters from "The Hills" were to emote about race, I imagine it would sound like B. Hussein Obama's autobiography, "Dreams From My Father."

Has anybody read this book? Inasmuch as the book reveals Obama to be a flabbergasting lunatic, I gather the answer is no. Obama is about to be our next president: You might want to take a peek. If only people had read "Mein Kampf" ...

Nearly every page -- save the ones dedicated to cataloguing the mundane details of his life -- is bristling with anger at some imputed racist incident. The last time I heard this much race-baiting invective I was ... in my usual front-row pew, as I am every Sunday morning, at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago.

Obama tells a story about taking two white friends from the high school basketball team to a "black party." Despite their deep-seated, unconscious hatred of blacks, the friends readily accepted. At the party, they managed not to scream the N-word, but instead "made some small talk, took a couple of the girls out on the dance floor."

But with his racial hair-trigger, Obama sensed the whites were not comfortable because "they kept smiling a lot." And then, in an incident reminiscent of the darkest days of the Jim Crow South ... they asked to leave after spending only about an hour at the party! It was practically an etiquette lynching!

So either they hated black people with the hot, hot hate of a thousand suns, or they were athletes who had come to a party late, after a Saturday night basketball game.

In the car on the way home, one of the friends empathizes with Obama, saying: "You know, man, that really taught me something. I mean, I can see how it must be tough for you and Ray sometimes, at school parties ... being the only black guys and all."

And thus Obama felt the cruel lash of racism! He actually writes that his response to his friend's perfectly lovely remark was: "A part of me wanted to punch him right there."

Listen, I don't want anybody telling Obama about Bill Clinton's "I feel your pain" line.

Wanting to punch his white friend in the stomach was the introductory anecdote to a full-page psychotic rant about living by "the white man's rules." (One rule he missed was: "Never punch out your empathetic white friend after dragging him to a crappy all-black party.")

Obama's gaseous disquisition on the "white man's rules" leads to this charming crescendo: "Should you refuse this defeat and lash out at your captors, they would have a name for that, too, a name that could cage you just as good. Paranoid. Militant. Violent. Nigger."

For those of you in the "When is Obama gonna play the 'N-word' card?" pool, the winner is ... Page 85! Congratulations!

When his mother expresses concern about Obama's high school friend being busted for drugs, Obama says he patted his mother's hand and told her not to worry.

This, too, prompted Obama to share with his readers a life lesson on how to handle white people: "It was usually an effective tactic, another one of those tricks I had learned: People were satisfied so long as you were courteous and smiled and made no sudden moves. They were more than satisfied, they were relieved -- such a pleasant surprise to find a well-mannered young black man who didn't seem angry all the time."

First of all, I note that this technique seems to be the basis of Obama's entire presidential campaign. But moreover -- he was talking about his own mother! As Obama says: "Any distinction between good and bad whites held negligible meaning." Say, do you think a white person who said that about blacks would be a leading presidential candidate?

The man is stark bonkersville.

He says the reason black people keep to themselves is that it's "easier than spending all your time mad or trying to guess whatever it was that white folks were thinking about you."

Here's a little inside scoop about white people: We're not thinking about you. Especially WASPs. We think everybody is inferior, and we are perfectly charming about it.

In college, Obama explains to a girl why he was reading Joseph Conrad's 1902 classic, "Heart of Darkness": "I read the book to help me understand just what it is that makes white people so afraid. Their demons. The way ideas get twisted around. I helps me understand how people learn to hate."

By contrast, Malcolm X's autobiography "spoke" to Obama. One line in particular "stayed with me," he says. "He spoke of a wish he'd once had, the wish that the white blood that ran through him, there by an act of violence, might somehow be expunged."

Forget Rev. Jeremiah Wright -- Wright is Booker T. Washington compared to this guy.

COPYRIGHT 2008 ANN COULTER
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE
4520 Main Street, Kansas City, MO 64111


3862  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Military Science on: April 04, 2008, 08:23:43 AM
Thanks GM

Interesting stuff.

My understanding from a career military person is the US military sees China as our number *one enemy*.  The remains of the former Soviet Union is no longer considered a serious threat.

My general undestanding is military electronic hardware is protected by three layers of defense.  If one layer is penetrated without authorization the other two automatically change configuration.  Assuming this is even remotely the case this still may not protect against a succesful intrusion by the patient, well placed spy who is on the "inside".

Who amongst us is our enemy pretending to be our friend?  Apparantly many more than we think. 

It is what my wife and I deal with on a daily basis with regards to her music lyrics that get stolen over and  over again.  There is simply no limit to who money can buy.  This is a fact I have learned the hard way.

How about celebrities who keep having their medical records stolen right out of the hospital only to show up in the National Enquirer?  As a doctor I could get fined or go to jail for such a breach.  Yet nothing happens to the Enquirer.  Why are not these people sent to jail for such an invasion to privacy.  So should the hospital employees for such unistakably deliberate acts IMO.  Not just lose their jobs.  Anyway I digress.
3863  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Morris: Clinton financial incentive to not quit on: April 03, 2008, 10:10:48 AM
WHY HILLARY WON’T QUIT
Apr 2 2008
Dick's Articles

***Hillary Clinton’s campaign currently owes vendors $8 million, exclusive of the $5 million she owes herself. She cannot use general election money to pay for this debt. If she begins to be anything less than certain that she will stay in up to the convention, she won’t raise any money and will be stuck with the debt. She also realizes that it is only by projecting an almost manic air of certainty that she has any chance at all of hanging onto super delegates. The first whiff they get of a withdrawal, they will all run screaming to Obama to get on the late train. Don’t think that Hillary is delusional. She knows she’s lost but she has no choice but to play the rest of the game. To fold now would leave her in an untenable situation.***

They need cash.  Not only to pay off their debts but to rake it in for future plans of inflicting themselves on the Democrats and this nation.

What a joke that Bill Clinton is outraged that Richardson told him "five" times he wouldn't do what he did [come out for Obama]
He and his accomplice are the world's biggest G..M liars and are ruining this country by making it respectable to lie incessantly.

Our children grow up being taught that this behavior is ok.  They are pigs as far as I am concerned

Hopefully after she loses their power with the Dems will forever dimisnish and they will just fade out over the years.




   
3864  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / From Gertz GPS/military on: April 01, 2008, 07:13:55 PM
From Gertz,

Shut down GPS and the US military is stymied.

http://www.gertzfile.com/gertzfile/InsidetheRing.html

Article:

***
Return to
The Gertz File

March 28, 2008
Notes from the Pentagon


Denial and deception
China's military is using "denial" and "deception" to mislead the United States and other governments about its military strategy and buildup, according to Pentagon officials.

The topic is discussed in the latest Pentagon report on China's military power, which defines Chinese disinformation as "[luring] the other side into developing misperceptions ... and [establishing for oneself] a strategically advantageous position by producing various kinds of false phenomena in an organized and planned manner with the smallest cost in manpower and materials."

A Pentagon official, elaborating on the report, said "denial" by the Chinese is excessive secrecy "surrounding almost every part of the PLA," or People's Liberation Army, as the military is known.

Evidence of denial is difficult to pinpoint because, the official said, "we don't know what we don't know."

Deception often is discussed in Chinese military writings, including those based on ancient writings that discuss its use in helping weaker powers defeat stronger ones. The analogy is used by China to discuss how it would defeat the United States in a conflict.

Strategic deception is "producing or portraying something that is false as being true in an effort to confuse the adversary or set the conditions for surprise," the official said.

"Denial and secrecy is used to prevent outside observers from gaining real insights into investment priorities, capabilities and intentions which can serve to hide either weakness or strength," the official said.

China's tactical denial and deception include using electronic decoys, infrared decoys, false-target generators and angle reflectors during electronic warfare. They also include the use of traditional concealment, camouflage and deception by military forces.

Some senior U.S. intelligence officials dispute the Pentagon's assertion that China employs strategic and tactical denial and deception, arguing that Chinese communist-style disinformation is no different from what non-communist governments use. The issue is being debated internally.

GPS threat
U.S. military and intelligence officials say one reason China's anti-satellite missile test of January 2007 was so alarming is that it highlighted a major strategic vulnerability: the reliance of the U.S. military on Global Position System satellites.

If China used its ground-based mobile ASAT missiles to destroy GPS satellites, it would cripple the ability of the U.S. military to use some of its most important weapons, like satellite-guided precision missiles. Additionally, navigation of ground-, air- and sea-based forces would be almost completely halted.

"Shut down GPS and we're basically left with throwing rocks," said one U.S. military official.

Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael Hamel, commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center, told reporters earlier this month that GPS also is vulnerable to electronic jamming.

"The Global Positioning System is literally ubiquitous," Gen. Hamel said. "I would argue that precise positioning and timing is the fundamental enabler of the information age. Being able to synchronize everything around the globe from timing and positioning is absolutely critical. Yet the only way that really functions is for user receivers to be able to collect the signal. Well, it is a very, very weak signal and it's very, it's relatively easy for commercial kind of devices and uses to be able to get disrupted."

Gen. Hamel said the military is considering how to protect GPS users. "We both want to improve the signals from the satellite, but you also have to improve the user equipment to be less susceptible and vulnerable," he said.

"Literally Radio Shack parts, together with a modicum of electrical engineering education, you can actually generate jamming and disruptive wave forms to particular types of GPS signals and user equipment," Gen. Hamel said.

Gen. Hamel said his command is building equipment for military users "that has greater protection and anti-jam capability to be able to deal with some of those kinds of threats," noting that it is not only satellites that need protection but user equipment as well.

Correction
A February 29 item entitled "Fight Over China" erroneously reported that Lonnie Henley, Deputy National Intelligence Officer for East Asia, indirectly supported the unauthorized disclosure of intelligence to China by writing a letter to the sentencing judge in the criminal case of former DIA analyst Ron Montaperto. Mr. Henley sent a letter to the court attesting to Mr. Montaperto's character during the sentencing phase of the proceeding, a common procedure in criminal cases that does not suggest support for the underlying crime. Additionally, Mr. Montaperto pleaded guilty to a charge of mishandling classified documents -- not espionage.

# Bill Gertz covers national security affairs. He can be reached at 202-636-3274, or at InsidetheRing@washingtontimes.com.
3865  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / US military GPS on: March 31, 2008, 09:40:01 PM
From Gertz,

Shut down GPS and the US military is stymied.

http://www.gertzfile.com/gertzfile/InsidetheRing.html

Article:

***
Return to
The Gertz File

March 28, 2008
Notes from the Pentagon


Denial and deception
China's military is using "denial" and "deception" to mislead the United States and other governments about its military strategy and buildup, according to Pentagon officials.

The topic is discussed in the latest Pentagon report on China's military power, which defines Chinese disinformation as "[luring] the other side into developing misperceptions ... and [establishing for oneself] a strategically advantageous position by producing various kinds of false phenomena in an organized and planned manner with the smallest cost in manpower and materials."

A Pentagon official, elaborating on the report, said "denial" by the Chinese is excessive secrecy "surrounding almost every part of the PLA," or People's Liberation Army, as the military is known.

Evidence of denial is difficult to pinpoint because, the official said, "we don't know what we don't know."

Deception often is discussed in Chinese military writings, including those based on ancient writings that discuss its use in helping weaker powers defeat stronger ones. The analogy is used by China to discuss how it would defeat the United States in a conflict.

Strategic deception is "producing or portraying something that is false as being true in an effort to confuse the adversary or set the conditions for surprise," the official said.

"Denial and secrecy is used to prevent outside observers from gaining real insights into investment priorities, capabilities and intentions which can serve to hide either weakness or strength," the official said.

China's tactical denial and deception include using electronic decoys, infrared decoys, false-target generators and angle reflectors during electronic warfare. They also include the use of traditional concealment, camouflage and deception by military forces.

Some senior U.S. intelligence officials dispute the Pentagon's assertion that China employs strategic and tactical denial and deception, arguing that Chinese communist-style disinformation is no different from what non-communist governments use. The issue is being debated internally.

GPS threat
U.S. military and intelligence officials say one reason China's anti-satellite missile test of January 2007 was so alarming is that it highlighted a major strategic vulnerability: the reliance of the U.S. military on Global Position System satellites.

If China used its ground-based mobile ASAT missiles to destroy GPS satellites, it would cripple the ability of the U.S. military to use some of its most important weapons, like satellite-guided precision missiles. Additionally, navigation of ground-, air- and sea-based forces would be almost completely halted.

"Shut down GPS and we're basically left with throwing rocks," said one U.S. military official.

Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael Hamel, commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center, told reporters earlier this month that GPS also is vulnerable to electronic jamming.

"The Global Positioning System is literally ubiquitous," Gen. Hamel said. "I would argue that precise positioning and timing is the fundamental enabler of the information age. Being able to synchronize everything around the globe from timing and positioning is absolutely critical. Yet the only way that really functions is for user receivers to be able to collect the signal. Well, it is a very, very weak signal and it's very, it's relatively easy for commercial kind of devices and uses to be able to get disrupted."

Gen. Hamel said the military is considering how to protect GPS users. "We both want to improve the signals from the satellite, but you also have to improve the user equipment to be less susceptible and vulnerable," he said.

"Literally Radio Shack parts, together with a modicum of electrical engineering education, you can actually generate jamming and disruptive wave forms to particular types of GPS signals and user equipment," Gen. Hamel said.

Gen. Hamel said his command is building equipment for military users "that has greater protection and anti-jam capability to be able to deal with some of those kinds of threats," noting that it is not only satellites that need protection but user equipment as well.

Correction
A February 29 item entitled "Fight Over China" erroneously reported that Lonnie Henley, Deputy National Intelligence Officer for East Asia, indirectly supported the unauthorized disclosure of intelligence to China by writing a letter to the sentencing judge in the criminal case of former DIA analyst Ron Montaperto. Mr. Henley sent a letter to the court attesting to Mr. Montaperto's character during the sentencing phase of the proceeding, a common procedure in criminal cases that does not suggest support for the underlying crime. Additionally, Mr. Montaperto pleaded guilty to a charge of mishandling classified documents -- not espionage.

# Bill Gertz covers national security affairs. He can be reached at 202-636-3274, or at InsidetheRing@washingtontimes.com.
3866  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / David Brooks on: March 28, 2008, 09:54:57 AM
Limbaugh's strategy is working for now.  Leave Clinton in the race and this is continuing to hurt the Crats.  But this will be all resolved by the time of election.  And the polls that show some crats would not vote for either BO or Clinton mean nothing.  Come november they will all vote for whoever the crat candidate is.  Remember Republicans are worse than Nazis in the eyes of most crats.

With that said I still disagree with Rush.  Anytime anyone has a chance to get rid of the Clintons, do so.  This country has to get them off the stage.   They are damaging this country.  Knock them out once and for all.  Get rid of them.  Go away.  Stop torturing us with their sick personalities. 

An excerpt from David Brooks says it all:

"For nearly 20 years, she has been encased in the apparatus of political celebrity. Look at her schedule as first lady and ever since. Think of the thousands of staged events, the tens of thousands of times she has pretended to be delighted to see someone she doesn’t know, the hundreds of thousands times she has recited empty clichés and exhortatory banalities, the millions of photos she has posed for in which she is supposed to appear empathetic or tough, the billions of politically opportune half-truths that have bounced around her head."

The full piece:


****The Long Defeat

By DAVID BROOKS
Published: March 25, 2008

Hillary Clinton may not realize it yet, but she’s just endured one of the worst weeks of her campaign.
Skip to next paragraph

David Brooks
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Blogrunner: Reactions From Around the Web

First, Barack Obama weathered the Rev. Jeremiah Wright affair without serious damage to his nomination prospects. Obama still holds a tiny lead among Democrats nationally in the Gallup tracking poll, just as he did before this whole affair blew up.

Second, Obama’s lawyers successfully prevented re-votes in Florida and Michigan. That means it would be virtually impossible for Clinton to take a lead in either elected delegates or total primary votes.

Third, as Noam Scheiber of The New Republic has reported, most superdelegates have accepted Nancy Pelosi’s judgment that the winner of the elected delegates should get the nomination. Instead of lining up behind Clinton, they’re drifting away. Her lead among them has shrunk by about 60 in the past month, according to Avi Zenilman of Politico.com.

In short, Hillary Clinton’s presidential prospects continue to dim. The door is closing. Night is coming. The end, however, is not near.

Last week, an important Clinton adviser told Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen (also of Politico) that Clinton had no more than a 10 percent chance of getting the nomination. Now, she’s probably down to a 5 percent chance.

Five percent.

Let’s take a look at what she’s going to put her party through for the sake of that 5 percent chance: The Democratic Party is probably going to have to endure another three months of daily sniping. For another three months, we’ll have the Carvilles likening the Obamaites to Judas and former generals accusing Clintonites of McCarthyism. For three months, we’ll have the daily round of résumé padding and sulfurous conference calls. We’ll have campaign aides blurting “blue dress” and only-because-he’s-black references as they let slip their private contempt.

For three more months (maybe more!) the campaign will proceed along in its Verdun-like pattern. There will be a steady rifle fire of character assassination from the underlings, interrupted by the occasional firestorm of artillery when the contest touches upon race, gender or patriotism. The policy debates between the two have been long exhausted, so the only way to get the public really engaged is by poking some raw national wound.

For the sake of that 5 percent, this will be the sourest spring. About a fifth of Clinton and Obama supporters now say they wouldn’t vote for the other candidate in the general election. Meanwhile, on the other side, voters get an unobstructed view of the Republican nominee. John McCain’s approval ratings have soared 11 points. He is now viewed positively by 67 percent of Americans. A month ago, McCain was losing to Obama among independents by double digits in a general election matchup. Now McCain has a lead among this group.

For three more months, Clinton is likely to hurt Obama even more against McCain, without hurting him against herself. And all this is happening so she can preserve that 5 percent chance.

When you step back and think about it, she is amazing. She possesses the audacity of hopelessness.

Why does she go on like this? Does Clinton privately believe that Obama is so incompetent that only she can deliver the policies they both support? Is she simply selfish, and willing to put her party through agony for the sake of her slender chance? Are leading Democrats so narcissistic that they would create bitter stagnation even if they were granted one-party rule?

The better answer is that Clinton’s long rear-guard action is the logical extension of her relentlessly political life.

For nearly 20 years, she has been encased in the apparatus of political celebrity. Look at her schedule as first lady and ever since. Think of the thousands of staged events, the tens of thousands of times she has pretended to be delighted to see someone she doesn’t know, the hundreds of thousands times she has recited empty clichés and exhortatory banalities, the millions of photos she has posed for in which she is supposed to appear empathetic or tough, the billions of politically opportune half-truths that have bounced around her head.

No wonder the Clinton campaign feels impersonal. It’s like a machine for the production of politics. It plows ahead from event to event following its own iron logic. The only question is whether Clinton herself can step outside the apparatus long enough to turn it off and withdraw voluntarily or whether she will force the rest of her party to intervene and jam the gears.

If she does the former, she would surprise everybody with a display of self-sacrifice. Her campaign would cruise along at a lower register until North Carolina, then use that as an occasion to withdraw. If she does not, she would soldier on doggedly, taking down as many allies as necessary.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company****
3867  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / one last word on ferraro on: March 12, 2008, 11:33:45 PM
She states Obama would not be where he is if he were not *black*.

Well she would never have been chosen as a vice-presidential candidate if she were not a *woman*.

It certainly wasn't for her political skills, name power, or accomplishments that she was chosen.

Talk about chuzpuh!

Just another nag.
3868  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / great humor and satire on: March 12, 2008, 09:47:24 AM
GM,
Excellent.  LOL.
Hypocrisy plus!
We see it with Geraldine Ferarro too.  Saying Obama would not be where he is today if he were not black.  Instead of lauding him and being happy a black can get support from many non blacks and be a real contender she comes out with this.  I don't think he is where he is because he is black but even so - these are the same liberals who fought for affirmative action for decades!
I don't know how any black person in this country could vote for the Clintons.

They are the most despicable characters on the national political stage in my lifetime.
3869  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / My advice is to stay as far away from Gilder on: March 12, 2008, 09:35:12 AM
Well, I am a major bagholder of LVLT from broadwing from corvis and can empathize with you.  I do share your pain.

I am staying away from Gilder.

His model just doesn't work.  Too many unforseen factors.  Too many competitors.  No one can know all that's going on behind closed doors, as well as the free market place, etc.  Maybe EZCH will still do ok, but at my age its nuts to put any more into these companies which are really no more than patent or pending patent ideas.

He's toast for me.

He really does play into our emotional greed with his salesmanship.
3870  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Why is GG suddenly cooled to EZCH? on: March 11, 2008, 08:20:28 PM
He's promoting it for years.

3871  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The crats defend theirs in office while cans expect them to resign on: March 11, 2008, 11:16:09 AM
Just more proof the crats have no shame whatsoever.  I for one am sick of this crap.

How in the world can anyone claim he should stay as governor is just testiment to the damage these guys are having on our country?

We already hear the talking Democratic heads on the circuit vigorously defending his "right" to stay in office.

Dershowitz has the nerve to claim that it is a "stupid" law therefore he should definitely not resign.  I don't recall seeing him vigorously defend any Republican in the same boat.

James Carville is also proclaiming it's just sex so what.

The nags are of course as silent as ever when talk is of a Democrat.

Spitzer's wife also stands by her man.  Why do these wives make idiots of themselves and stand next to their guy while he makes his BS speech?
3872  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama scandal? on: March 06, 2008, 11:29:22 AM
http://www.gertzfile.com/gertzfile/InsidetheRing.html
3873  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Dean now changes the rules in the middle of the game for Clinton on: March 06, 2008, 10:25:11 AM
Dean's been bought off.  Anyone can be bribed if the price is right.  And Clintons are rich with power and money.   Clinton would have had their army of lawyers sue for this anyway.  I am telling you she would have Obama assisinated if that is what it takes.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080306/ap_on_el_pr/primary_scramble
3874  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Bob Novak on why Hill won on: March 06, 2008, 09:38:35 AM
I couldn't agree with you more Crafty.   I believe Obama will have to start attacking Clinton and have his surrogates go negative and hard.  "Do we really want another four or eight more years of deception, sleeziness, manipulation, outright lies, narcissism, etc?'

His campaign's "hope" and "unity" theme seems to have run out of gas when up against the slime machine of the grifters.

Limbaugh was totally wrong.  We should get rid of the Clintons anytime we are able.  Indeed McCain may be facing both of them now.
(Hill and Obam). 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/05/AR2008030502888_pf.html
3875  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Well Rush - you got what you wished for. on: March 05, 2008, 07:10:32 PM
"For its part, the Obama campaign is no less ready to return fire on Clinton ethics and finances, according to Obama strategist David Axelrod: "I've said before I don't know why they'd want to go there, but I guess that's where they'll take the race.''

No doubt the Obama campaign will have to stoop to the Clinton lows.  Morris on the obvoius:


« HILLARY UNMASKED
OBAMA BETTER BATTLE BACK BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE
Mar 5 2008
|
Published in the New York Post on March 5, 2008.

With big wins in Ohio and Texas last night, Hillary Clinton has finally broken her losing streak and sent a clear message to Barack Obama: I’m not getting out.

For the Illinois senator, the meaning of the primaries is clear - he has to get tough. Hillary can still win this nomination. The proportional representation system of allocating delegates chosen by primaries and caucuses mutes the impact of the popular vote.

By the time the Texas caucuses are fully counted, Obama may have maintained or even expanded his delegate lead, despite Hillary’s victories in three out of four states.

Among the remaining 600 delegates to be chosen, Obama should be able to add to his lead.

But there remain 800 superdelegates, each entitled to a full vote. No matter if Obama leads among elected delegates, they can still deliver the nomination to Hillary.

Do they dare?

If Clinton is able to score a series of popular-vote victories in these late primaries, she could lay the basis for an appeal to the superdelegates to disregard the results of January and February and look instead at her success in the later contests.

The battle of Hillary is over. The battle of Obama has begun.

The question of his readiness and experience looms ever larger in the minds of the media and of voters.

Her red-phone ad, citing her supposedly superior readiness to be commander in chief, evidently cut deeply among the electorate.

It’s time that Obama counters her strategy by hitting back. His lofty politics of hope will avail him little in the aggressive, rough-and-tumble world of modern politics.

He’s got to spell out the special-interest connections that stigmatize Hillary as the tool of the lobbyists.

He must underscore the need for her to release her tax returns for 2007 and 2006 to show the source of her new-found wealth.

He’s got to learn to trade blows with the Clintons, the best counterpunchers in the business.

Looming above the primaries is the specter of the unseated delegations from Michigan - chosen in a primary with only Hillary’s name on the ballot - and Florida.

Obama needs to stop her gathering momentum by shedding his ingenue status and fighting hard for the nomination his previous victories have earned him.

Copyright © 2008 DickMorris.com
3876  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Don't do it Obama on: March 05, 2008, 07:35:19 AM
Naturally...

She'll buy him off with the VP but of course she's the p:

http://wcbstv.com/topstories/clinton.obama.ticket.2.669799.html
3877  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I share Pat's frustration on: March 02, 2008, 11:04:48 AM
http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=25262

***
      
   
   
   

Comments
Patrick J. Buchanan
Katrina Nation
by Patrick J. Buchanan
Posted: 02/29/2008
   
When Woodrow Wilson went to Congress to ask for a declaration of war in 1917, the U.S. Army was ranked 17th in the world, behind Portugal.

On Armistice Day, 19 months later, there were 2 million doughboys in France, where they had helped to break the back of Gen. Ludendorff's theretofore invincible army in its final offensive, and 2 million more in the United States ready to march on Berlin.

No other nation could have done that.
Continued

After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941, FDR demanded that a disarmed America "build 50,000 planes" -- a seemingly impossible number, but one America met and exceeded.

Starting from scratch in 1941, the Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos designed, built, tested and detonated three atomic bombs by August 1945 to end the war.

After Sputnik humiliated America, Wernher Von Braun and the boys at Redstone Arsenal had a satellite up in three months. In 1961, JFK declared we were going to the moon and would be there before the decade was out. Cynics scoffed. This writer was at Canaveral to watch Apollo 11 lift off in the summer of 1969.

Whatever became of that can-do nation?

In August 2005, Katrina swept through New Orleans and left 30,000 people stranded at the Superdome and Convention Center. Though the floodwater was shallow and stagnant and New Orleans is a port city with boats all over the place, it took six days and the 82nd Airborne to rescue the stranded.

Compare our performance in Katrina with that of the Brits in 1941, who sent hundreds of boats across the Channel to pull 350,000 British and French troops off the continent in one week in the Miracle of Dunkirk. The Brits weren't going to let Goering's fighters deter them from going across and bringing their boys home.

What occasions these reflections is this morning's lead story in The Washington Post: "'Virtual Fence' Along Border to Be Delayed: U.S. Retooling High-Tech Barrier After 28-Mile Project Fails."

The opening paragraphs:

"The Bush administration has scaled back plans to quickly build a 'virtual fence' along the U.S.-Mexico border, delaying completion of the first phase of the project by at least three years and shifting away from a network of tower-mounted sensors and surveillance gear. ...
"Technical problems discovered in a 28-mile pilot project south of Tucson prompted the change in plans. ..."

Thus, building the first 100 miles of "virtual fence" will take Bush longer than it took FDR to win World War II. The admission of failure comes two years after Bush announced plans for "the most technologically advanced border initiative in American history."

"The virtual fence," writes the Post, "was to complement a physical fence that the administration now says will include 370 miles of pedestrian fencing and 300 miles of vehicle barriers to be completed by the end of this year. The GAO says this portion of the project may also be delayed and that its total cost cannot be determined. The president's 2009 budget does not propose funds to add fencing beyond the 700 or so miles meant to be completed by this year."

In short, these characters cannot build a virtual fence and won't complete a physical fence.
If the nation is fed up with Republicans, who can blame them?

Securing a border is not that difficult. In 1954, President Eisenhower sent an Army general to Texas to do it. He began repatriating thousands of Mexicans and had the situation in hand within a year. Along the San Diego corridor, a crude fence of corrugated steel matting from U.S. airfields in Vietnam has stopped illegal trucks from crossing, cut back 90 percent on the illegal alien traffic, and virtually eliminated murders and assaults in the border area.

Measures taken lately at the state and federal level, though grudgingly by the administration, have begun to bear fruit.

After Arizonans voted to cut off all social benefits to residents who could not prove they were in the country legally came reports of people pulling their kids out of public schools and leaving the state.

From the border come reports that added Border Patrol agents have reduced the number of illegal aliens apprehended, suggesting word has gone out south of the border that it is no longer so easy to walk in. And deportations of criminal aliens, long demanded, is actually going up.

Let it be said: Our border can be secured; the illegal aliens can be sent home; the magnets that draw them here can be turned off. This crisis can be resolved if the courage and will are there. Unfortunately, we have a government that does not seem to care and probable nominees neither of whom is committed in his heart to doing it.

Given the manifest will of the people that this invasion from the south be halted and rolled back, the 2008 election is shaping up as yet further confirmation that American democracy is a fraud.

Mr. Buchanan is a nationally syndicated columnist and author of "The Death of the West," "The Great Betrayal," "A Republic, Not an Empire" and "Where the Right Went Wrong."
 

Here are a few of the comments submitted by our readers.Click to view all
 
Report Abusive PostGreat article Pat, always on the money. Problem is, no one cares or those that do and make policy have directly opposite views and wish to have no borders with Mexico. Sadly, we're on this ride and can't get off.
Joe, Kansas City, Missouri
Feb 29, 2008 @ 09:45 AM
Report Abusive PostIt's not that we can't secure the border... it's simply that we WON'T secure the border, and that's an entirely different matter. A physical fence would be better than a virtual fence because even if the technology catches border crossers, we would still need the willpower to turn them back. A virtual fence enables the politicians to give lip service to border security without having to enforce the laws on the books. It takes actual willpower to build a fence and enforce the law.

It would be very easy to do; hire ten contractors, each with its own section of fence/wall to build. Whoever finishes his section first gets a multimillion-dollar bonus. You can bet the fence would be built in record time, and under budget.
JKM, South Carolina
Feb 29, 2008 @ 09:49 AM
Report Abusive PostOur political leaders defiantly lie to us with great hubris.

Clearly, we need a third or fourth political party to defiantly say "goodbye" to these arrogant elitists.

Gary, Eastern Shore
Feb 29, 2008 @ 09:51 AM

 
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3878  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Maybe Jolie's politicking isn't some gimmick afterall on: February 29, 2008, 08:04:58 AM
I am usually skeptical of celebrities who speak out about foreign affairs but I have to say that Jolie has won me over with this piece.  I wonder if she wrote it or had someone else write it but I guess it doesn't matter since it is her name on it.
It certainly speaks of the insanity it would be for the US to pull out immediately or in any short time frame:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/27/AR2008022702217_pf.html
3879  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War? on: February 25, 2008, 11:29:27 AM
Couple this with the Iranians guy continued statements that Israel's existence  is close to an end and one can conclude only *one* thing.  I have a feeling Israel cannot successfully destroy Iran's nuclear weapons program without US help.  If a crat wins Israel can forget any chance of that.

The only hope is that the leadership of Iran will be toppled and a more moderate regime come into power.  I am not real optimistic about this.  It is like hoping a Gilder stock will come back from the dead.
3880  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Our records are easily accessible on: February 23, 2008, 07:04:43 PM
I've posted before how our records are easily accessed by many people.  As I've mentioned I know for certain our phone records, bank records, credit information, pay information, and other information as all readilly available to crooks who can easily birbe employees of various companies to snoop on us and supply them with information.  In my experience companies always deny it occurs, deny their employees don't do this, cover it up, not investigate, etc.

I have to grimace every time I hear the darn ACLU talk about how our government is invading our privacy when it is rampant in the private sector.

This is along the lines of what I have experienced for several years now:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080223/ap_on_hi_te/snooping_workers
3881  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / How Repubs would beat BO in the general election, imho on: February 23, 2008, 06:52:08 PM
I recently criticized a post of Newt's theory that another contract with America will be what McCain needs to beat Obama.  I agree with the need for real ideas and roadmaps on how to get there.  However, I don't think that alone will defeat BO.  I think this Peggy Noonan's piece is the other half of the puzzle.  I feel she hits on something big here that can and should be used full court press to focus Bo's whole thesis of hope as totally misplaced, misaligned and definitely not in the interests of Americans.

http://online.wsj.com/article/declarations.html
3882  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: February 22, 2008, 09:29:51 AM
Being a politician on the national stage has certainly become a way to glorius riches hasn't it?

They all cash in after they leave.  I remember when Reagan went to Japan to speak for 2 million and how the crats tried to turn that into a scandal.  That's pennies compared to the riches these people get giving speeches, working as "lobbyists", consultants, and token positions in companies that need political connections.

I still wonder what the inside deal is with Chelsea and the hedge fund.

Where is the reporting for that?

3883  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: February 20, 2008, 07:01:44 PM
***- Sens. Obama and Clinton: Some doctors and hospitals are worried about your plans to make electronic record-keeping compulsory. What will be the penalty for a doctor who doesn't get computerized?

In the California primary debate, Sen. Clinton claimed a Rand study shows that savings due to information technology could pay for half of her $110-billion-a-year universal health coverage plan. What the Rand study actually says is that information technology will produce savings, estimated at $77 billion a year, but not until year 15 -- and not necessarily for the thousands of doctors and hospitals who are forced to spend $125 billion (Rand's estimate) up front for the equipment.***

I can tell you now that the cost of going electronic is a lot for many physicians including myself.   It is not even feasable.
Additionally, I have yet to see anywhere wherein it produces any savings, cost efficiencies, extra income, or much of any other benefit to providers who will soon be forced to do it.

It is obviously too much to ask before an election why we can't just stop illegals from coming here and having babies at the expense of citizens.  It ain't just in Texas.  I see it all the time here in Jersey.   I would not be surprised to find out that a large percentage of the 47 million number we hear about is simply this.  That said I have people born here who can't afford care because of pre-existing conditions, or they earn too little.  Yet instead of helping them we have people waltzing into the country and getting free hospital care.
3884  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: February 20, 2008, 09:02:05 AM
Hi Crafty,

Yes I agree with your thoughts.

It will be interesting to see how the two of them handle it if they go on to  lose.

You know at least behind the scenes they will play the blame game.. It is the media's fault, Penns fault, or blame anybody but themselves.  Would this mean they are done with politics?  My guess is they will run again someday.  How old is Evita? 60?  She is still a Senator.  He can't handle the private life. 

Or maybe they'll kick him out of Harlem and he'll move to Hollywood and go onto making movies.  They will love him there.  He would love the paparazzi, and the girls.

BTW, what is the story about hedge funds and politicians?  John Edwards made a kiilling.  Now Chelsea.  We need a good journalist to look into this. 
3885  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Krauthammer: Clinton's dream (not ours) on: February 19, 2008, 07:12:37 AM
This is how I see it too.  I think Charles is right on this.   His point about short memories is what the Clintons are counting on.  Finagle the nomination.   Blacks and other Obama fans will fall right back into line when faced with the prospect of  choosing Hillary or McCain. Then he and she will soothe anger by praising Obama and promise he has a great *future* and his time will come but now we need someone with more experience and of course they are what we *all* need:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/31/AR2008013102627_2.html
3886  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / More Democrat corruption on: February 19, 2008, 06:22:32 AM
Pundits who think the Clinton people wouldn't dare go after superdelegates and (now it is revealed) even pledged delegates (who we now learn are not really pledged) better think again.  If necessary the Clintons *will* steal the election and then con every fool who ever followed them into believing it was really the right thing to do for the party and the country:

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0208/8583.html
3887  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Harold Ickes on: February 16, 2008, 10:42:41 PM
Now this "superdelegate" wants to change the rules in midgame.   Why is the press not pointing out that this guy (who has worked for the Clintons since 1992 and who helped HC get the NY State Senate seat) is now poised to be one of those who votes as a superdelegate.  Is this not corrupt or what?   

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20080216/D8URLU1O0.html
3888  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / reshaping conservatism on: February 16, 2008, 02:47:44 PM
Reagan is dead.  So is the past.  Now a vision for the future:

http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/thomas021208.php3
3889  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / OBama is not just "change" on: February 14, 2008, 09:23:40 PM
Well can McCain beat BO at his own game?  Or is he going to sound as old as he looks and continue the Repub'Can mantra, "I'm for tax cuts!"?  That won't do it this time.  I think Newt is on the right tract about the need for 'Cans to sound like they are for change. However, I think he seriously underestimates the intangible element to OB's appeal.  It's far more than change.  It's far more than another "Declaration of Independence" or "Contact with America" redux.

I don't think Newt gets it .

OB is more than change.  He is aspiring to people's hopes, their dreams their aspirations.  Clinton is right about it being a fairy tale.   For goodness sakes, it is spiritual, or worse, blind faith.  Some have already called BO a Messiah.   But like it or not that's what BO's opponents are up against. McCain is going to have to do the same.  Be inspirational, be the figure who can take us to the promised land.  Use his life which in my opnion is more remarkable than OBs' and prove to the country he can take us to the next level.

I just don't know if a 70 year old warhorse can do that.  In China they revere their elders. Here we throw them in the trashbin.

In any case according to Zogby (poll f
rom a Dem superdelegate) BO is already wiping McCain up:

http://www.zogby.com/news/ReadNews.dbm?ID=1449
3890  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The Democrats finally have their *new* and revised anti-republican champion on: February 13, 2008, 07:37:14 AM
I believe without hesitation that the Clintons would have Obama assasinated if they thought they would get away with it.
And then Hillary would get on her soapbox and accuse Repbulicans of, "why, they are even accusing us of murder!"

The Clintons can fire all their help but eventually it will dawn on them that *they* are being rejected.  This is a prime example of how they think *everything* can be managed.  (Extrapolate that to national and world affairs.)

The crats (and the country) are realizing Obama is more likely to beat McCain then the  grifter couple.  As a result they are fleeing like sheep to a new and better point man.  They would vote for a rhinosaorus if it could "beat the Republicans".

10 years ago I remember talking to a lady I worked with and I exasperatingly exclaimed how I could not fathom how the Crats can support sleazy Clinton characters and reward them with the highest office in the world.  Her answerwas right on  - "well that's because that's all they [Democrats] have".

Not anymore.

It's a long time till the convention.  If OB can stay out of trouble he's looking good.
Don't count on the Clinton's to show real humility.  They'll pretend and she'll put on that phoney glued on smile but.....
3891  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Mitt's undecided this soon out on: February 12, 2008, 09:05:36 PM
Word is Mitt is undecided as to whether he would stay in public or go back to private life.
I hope he gives it another shot.
It is thought he tactically erred by going "negative" too soon.

That may be why he seemed to be loathed by the others in the race.

Additional evidence towards this conclusion is that BO's success is partly due to his "positive" message.  He is the "uniter" yada yada yada....

Mitt is smart and a fast learner.  He won't make the same mistake twice from what I have heard.
3892  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: February 12, 2008, 09:08:42 AM
Hi Doug,
Yeah I like Mitt too.  I have a relative who worked closely with his campaign.  I'll try to find out his plans.  Maybe he could run for congress for two years than run again.

Obama is no Abe Lincoln (never will be) and no McCain (yet) but the emotion he invokes is rare among politicians.  It must be emotional with Blacks who are witnnessing history before their eyes.  The last and probably only politician who invoke emotion with me was Ronald Reagan.  No one else before or since.   I like Bush senior.  I like Bush junior though he annoys me with illegals and the deficit.

It certainly is true that the offspring of Latinos many who were here illegally are going to influence our elections now.  We really have to get rid of the 200 year law that people born here are automatically citizens IMO.
3893  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Morris on superdelegates on: February 09, 2008, 10:26:15 AM
Morris and others think that if Obama has a sizable lead the Clinton superdelegates will have to vote for him.

I'm not so sure.  I find this surprising from one who is clear that there is absolutely nothing that the Clintons won't do to win.  Will their superdelegate cronies do the same?  I think many would  vote for HC anyway expecting the payoffs.
3894  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Noonan on Obama circa 2005 on: February 08, 2008, 09:10:55 PM
Contrast this piece to one Noonan wrote in 2005 essentially saying, Obama you ain't no Abraham Lincoln:

http://www.opinionjournal.com/columnists/pnoonan/?id=110006884
3895  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc) on: February 07, 2008, 11:00:09 AM
Your article is correct in pointing out some confusion with regard to treating prostate cancer.   Screening for prostate cancer is also with controversy.  A few experts are starting to wonder if we should do away with the screening blood test - PSA- altogether.  This after some published reports that we should use 2.5 as the "normal" rather than the higher, less strict 4 which has been used for around 15 years or so.

When talking to patients who have never had a psa I try to point out the controversy in interpretation of the PSA. 
I still recommend it.  One reasonable rec is to offer it to men whose life expectancy is at least 10 years. 

Speaking of confusion in medicine there was a study that just came out saying that calcium supplements may increase the risk for heart attacks in women taking it for the bones.  Ughhhh!!!   
3896  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / This kind of says it all about the delegate process on: February 07, 2008, 08:15:19 AM
You know the Clintons have been working the superdelegate process for years.  This is crazy.   

http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_rob_kall_080114_superdelegates____ba.htm
3897  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Guess who are some of the superdelegates? on: February 07, 2008, 08:02:03 AM
How many people know this:

Included on the list are Harold Ickes and none other then Terry MaCuliffe.  Also is John Zogby?  Does he announce his potentail conflict of interest with the announcement ofl his pol results that he also happens to be a superdelegate for the Democratic convention/party?!?!?

Talk about conflict of interests.

http://superdelegates.org/SuperDelegates
3898  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Wow - I wonder how many voters truly understand this on: February 07, 2008, 07:44:31 AM
The Democrat delegate process.  Tell me the Clintons are not bribing delgates as we speak.  Some key points

***Pledged delegates are those won in primaries and cacucuses. Superdelegates are party big-shots.***

Party bigshots???

***Being a superdelegate is usually just a way of getting to go to the convention, cast a meaningless vote and have a good time.***

***But that could change this year.***

***And that’s because superdelegates make up one-fifth of all the delegates at the convention, and this year they could determine the nominee.***

***As Clinton spokesman Howard Wolfson puts it: “The process is designed really to avoid picking a nominee rather than pick one.”***

And there you have it - right from the horses mouth!!!!!!!!

***The system of superdelegates was invented not just to reward party fatcats, but to make sure “fairness” did not get out of hand.***

Open up the dictionary and look up fatcat - who do you find?  The Clintons and their team!

That may be one reason the Clinton's want to avoid a spectacle of the true depth of the corrupted process. If Clinton gets the nomination in a really close race it will be Florida all over again.  So what to do?  Make Obama your VP and queit down the "disenfranchised".

 
3899  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The delegate thing on: February 06, 2008, 08:58:00 AM
One can only wonder what kind of backroom bribery, and other means goes on for the fight for delegates.  Obviously it ain't going to be "let the best man win".  Not with the Clintons anyway:

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0208/8358.html
3900  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Yeah, I know what you mean on: February 05, 2008, 11:43:46 AM
After hearing her story ad nauseum for months (years?) I do find this an interesting finale.  Hey put me on a jury.  I'll send this guy to jail.  Enough evidence for me - now.

But your point is well taken, she does fit the mold for Fox.  Cute white and blonde.  Heck if she was alive she would get a job with them.

If I see one more natural or dyed blonde "journalist"...........why they even have this blond (made up and dripping and oozing narcissism) psychiatrist (maybe it wasn't Fox?) - when will it all end?
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