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4001  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Would have Abraham Lincoln have survived his wounds with today's medicine? on: June 16, 2007, 10:31:19 AM
Very possibly.   He may have even had a shot at returning to a state he could have functioned as President:

http://cbs2chicago.com/homepage/local_story_138113430.html
4002  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: June 15, 2007, 10:51:10 PM
Rogt,

***Does that apply to corporate welfare too***

I hear this phrase a lot.  What exactly does this mean?   What is considered "corporate welfare"?

I am not sure giving tax breaks to companies is necessarily "welfare".

Does it mean money is taken from taxpayers and doled to corporations for votes (or campaign contributions)?  Or the concept that giving corporations a tax break is thus indirectly reducing the piece of the tax income pie that goes to others of lesser means?

4003  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: June 15, 2007, 08:41:23 AM
Rog,

Your right of course.  We all tend to vote our interests.  How much we vote in the "national interests" is certainly a good question.

I certainly do resent people who vote for pols whose quest for votes is appealing to them by promising to take more from me to bribe them with.   Am I being unreasonable?
4004  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: June 13, 2007, 07:30:10 PM
Lower income lesser educated women tend more often to be single mothers of illegitimate children who are struggling financially.  I doubt they are voting some idealistic view concerning abortion. 

Comon Rogt,

Of course they want benefits - bought and paid for by the government.  What issues do you think a woman of lower economic lower education is thinking about?  If they gave a rats behind about Iraq they would be voting Obama or Edwards.
4005  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / girls can marry a guy to take care of them - or vote for the Hillary on: June 13, 2007, 01:08:44 PM
    
Can't get any more obvious then this.  If one can't land a guy to take care of their needs then one can always count on the government to take care of their *issues*.  Who better to make sure government does this than H. Clinton?  Of course she married Bill to get her needs - fame, fortune, and most of all political aspirations.   

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/11/AR2007061102216_pf.html
4006  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / What to do with Einstein (or Cao) on: June 13, 2007, 12:15:29 AM
The question of how do we deal with immigrants who have special quailities that can serve our national interest.

Article by Charles Krauthammer on immigration bill:

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/krauthammer060107.php3
4007  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Dick Morris; this could be included on maplight.org on: June 09, 2007, 09:37:52 PM
The site should expand to include the nepotism going on with our idealistic pols in DC.  Like how many have family memebers who get what any rational person can conclude are bribes for to lobby on the behalf of those paying for influence:

http://www.townhall.com/columnists/DickMorrisandEileenMcGann/2007/06/08/bill_clinton_and_nancy_pelosis_son_get_paid_big_bucks_by_infousa
4008  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: June 09, 2007, 11:36:36 AM
Yet we hear from some that the Jews in America control the media and our pols.

Israel cannot count on the US to be there if push comes to shove.  Americans will not want to risk life and limb for Jews.

But, I see this as good news:

http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/thomas052407.php3
4009  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Celebrities - Paris on: June 07, 2007, 01:11:17 PM
 wink

Every day people go to prison.  They teach us in medical school going to prison is one of the worst stresses a person can go through.   This is a perfect example what money can do.  If one can afford to pay for the best lawyers the justice system can be and is skewed.  Why am I not entitled to world class legal care like all of us are entiltled to world class medical care?  Food for thought.  Not a dig against attorneys at all but just a complaint at the lack of accessiblity to great attorneys because of costs.

I don't usually agree with Reverend Sharpton but he is clearly right on this:

http://www.drudgereport.com/flash5.htm
4010  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Chavez likes to distort the numbers on: June 05, 2007, 10:13:31 PM
Naturally (no pun intended) Chavez fails to mention that the hispanic population according to the US census in 1993 was 22.8 million.  Only seven years later it was 35 million in 2000.  At that rate by now it is 48 million!  I can only assume that doesn't include
people who are here illegally.  To say the Latino population is not *exploding* (now more than the number of Blacks in the US) is pure and unaldulterated BS.   Of course she desires to sugar coat it.  Of course she makes this into a racial war.  What about the people here illegally from Europe, Middle East, and Asia?  How many millions are we talking about?  There is no end.   There is no limit.  From my place in the NYC metro area almost every single business I go into has people who are obviously from somewhere else.  I don't get it.  Are all these people here legally or not?   The government is failing the people who are here  legally whether they were born here or elsewhere.  My beef is not with reasonable immigration.  But what I see is crazy.  Decades ago when we had waves of Irish, Italians, Jews, there was no medicaid, medicare, emergency rooms, etc.   I just don't get any of it.  One doesn't know how to believe or what information to trust.  I heard that it is estimated that 40% of illegals are going around using SSN.   What the hell is going on?  Why do I have to be afraid to express outrage?

http://www.census.gov/population/pop-profile/2000/chap02.pdf
4011  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / CD I hear you but, on: June 03, 2007, 10:13:29 PM

Crafty,

I understand what you are saying and

Well yes that's the argument that is made.   And I would submit this has *obvious validity*.  For example we made exceptions after WWII to obtain brilliant minded scientists like Von Braun. [ot: I just saw a cable show that (sadly as far as I feel) we allowed not only people who were swept up by the Nazi tidle wave but advid supporters and architects into the US as well.] Von Braun of course was  great to have for us a nation.

I still am not convinced that Cao cannot apply for or receive citizenship like everyone else.

There is no shortage of Asian/Middle Eastern American doctors from my vantage point!  They are here by the tens of thousands at least in the NYC metro area.  I don't see how they could be practicing with a license if they were not legal.

If Cao is so smart he can marry a Chinese American girl?  I have a South African niece.  It took work, a lawyer, money, time and sweat but she is an American Citizen now.

Like Schwarzenegger.

Was GG protesting this about Cao? GG was the same guy who was proclaiming on his website (in the late 90's) that the export and stealing of military secrets to China was a bogus complaint. He typed on the message board more or less that the Chinese could figure this out anyway so what's the big deal.  But if I had to choose I would keep Cao and send Gilder to China.
To set my opinion straight GG is obviously a genius.  And he seems an honorable man. He invested his own money with us on his stock picks and his business. He made and lost money with us subscribers to his newsletters.  I wonder how many other gurus do this.  He was right about the telecosm just off by an unknown number of years.  But some of his political ideas are based in fantasy and naivity like some his investment ideas - like "listen to the technology" as the key to investing success.  He called Intel, ATT, and Microsoft a bunch of dinosaurs.  Maybe they can be viewed that way froma technology point of view but they are not going away.

Somewhat off the topic: I notice Cao left Avanex before it crashed to one dollar a share.  Or did someone at the immigration office lose their shirt in Avanex and get him deported?  Sorry for my wiseguy remarks here.  I lost a lot on Avanex.  I take responsibility but it is hard not to be annoyed.

As always I appreciate the divergence of views and being able to express them here.

4012  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / CD I hear you but, on: June 03, 2007, 10:10:21 PM
CD I hear you but,
« Reply #109 on: Today at 09:10:44 AM »
   
Crafty,

I understand what you are saying and

Well yes that's the argument that is made.   And I would submit this has *obvious validity*.  For example we made exceptions after WWII to obtain brilliant minded scientists like Von Braun. [ot: I just saw a cable show that (sadly as far as I feel) we allowed not only people who were swept up by the Nazi tidle wave but advid supporters and architects into the US as well.] Von Braun of course was  great to have for us a nation.

I still am not convinced that Cao cannot apply for or receive citizenship like everyone else.

There is no shortage of Asian/Middle Eastern American doctors from my vantage point!  They are here by the tens of thousands at least in the NYC metro area.  I don't see how they could be practicing with a license if they were not legal.

If Cao is so smart he can marry a Chinese American girl?  I have a South African niece.  It took work, a lawyer, money, time and sweat but she is an American Citizen now.

Like Schwarzenegger.

Was GG protesting this about Cao? GG was the same guy who was proclaiming on his website (in the late 90's) that the export and stealing of military secrets to China was a bogus complaint. He typed on the message board more or less that the Chinese could figure this out anyway so what's the big deal.  But if I had to choose I would keep Cao and send Gilder to China.
To set my opinion straight GG is obviously a genius.  And he seems an honorable man. He invested his own money with us on his stock picks and his business. He made and lost money with us subscribers to his newsletters.  I wonder how many other gurus do this.  He was right about the telecosm just off by an unknown number of years.  But some of his political ideas are based in fantasy and naivity like some his investment ideas - like "listen to the technology" as the key to investing success.  He called Intel, ATT, and Microsoft a bunch of dinosaurs.  Maybe they can be viewed that way froma technology point of view but they are not going away.

Somewhat off the topic: I notice Cao left Avanex before it crashed to one dollar a share.  Or did someone at the immigration office lose their shirt in Avanex and get him deported?  Sorry for my wiseguy remarks here.  I lost a lot on Avanex.  I take responsibility but it is hard not to be annoyed.

As always I appreciate the divergence of views and being able to express them here.

4013  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / CD I hear you but, on: June 03, 2007, 11:10:44 AM
Crafty,

I understand what you are saying and

Well yes that's the argument that is made.   And I would submit this has *obvious validity*.  For example we made exceptions after WWII to obtain brilliant minded scientists like Von Braun. [ot: I just saw a cable show that (sadly as far as I feel) we allowed not only people who were swept up by the Nazi tidle wave but advid supporters and architects into the US as well.] Von Braun of course was  great to have for us a nation.

I still am not convinced that Cao cannot apply for or receive citizenship like everyone else.

There is no shortage of Asian/Middle Eastern American doctors from my vantage point!  They are here by the tens of thousands at least in the NYC metro area.  I don't see how they could be practicing with a license if they were not legal.

If Cao is so smart he can marry a Chinese American girl?  I have a South African niece.  It took work, a lawyer, money, time and sweat but she is an American Citizen now.

Like Schwarzenegger.

Was GG protesting this about Cao? GG was the same guy who was proclaiming on his website (in the late 90's) that the export and stealing of military secrets to China was a bogus complaint. He typed on the message board more or less that the Chinese could figure this out anyway so what's the big deal.  But if I had to choose I would keep Cao and send Gilder to China.
To set my opinion straight GG is obviously a genius.  And he seems an honorable man. He invested his own money with us on his stock picks and his business. He made and lost money with us subscribers to his newsletters.  I wonder how many other gurus do this.  He was right about the telecosm just off by an unknown number of years.  But some of his political ideas are based in fantasy and naivity like some his investment ideas - like "listen to the technology" as the key to investing success.  He called Intel, ATT, and Microsoft a bunch of dinosaurs.  Maybe they can be viewed that way froma technology point of view but they are not going away.

Somewhat off the topic: I notice Cao left Avanex before it crashed to one dollar a share.  Or did someone at the immigration office lose their shirt in Avanex and get him deported?  Sorry for my wiseguy remarks here.  I lost a lot on Avanex.  I take responsibility but it is hard not to be annoyed.

As always I appreciate the divergence of views and being able to express them here.

4014  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: June 02, 2007, 07:06:22 PM
Milt,

I agree with your suspicions.  It is akin to "we need all these South of the Border illegals because they are filling jobs we Americans won't do".

To think these people are not taking jobs from Americans is till I see otherwise an urban myth.  It's cheaper labor for business and Repubs and cheap votes for Dems.
4015  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Newt: Rove is dumb on: June 02, 2007, 11:38:42 AM
***What did Newt say about Rove?***  (article below)

Well it seems to be a calculated move to separate himself from Bush as he plans his bid to run for President.  It appears he got the confidence to do this from watching the recent election in France.  David Brooks has written an article titled something to the effect that the Republicans need a person of Newt's mind with Fred Thompson's temperment but since I don't subscribe to the NYT or NYT select I can't pull it up.  This latter article seems to express my reservations about Newt.  I fear he would be unable to broaden his appeal beyond a strictly Republican base.  I don't know if he could win against Hillary's dogged determination to babble anything to bribe as many voters as possible to win. 

At this time though I'm with you.  I would likely vote for Newt.  Second would be Romney.  But there is something about Romney that he lacks that natural charismatic leadership quality.  Perhaps he can yet overcome this with continued careful study
and work, but there is something about the truly great leaders that just can't be taught or learned.  It is some innate quality.  Reagan had it.  Schwarzenneger comes close.  Colin Powell had it.  I am not a student of him but it appeared Tony Blair had it.  I don't think Clinton had it at all.  Being a great BS artist is not what I am talking about.  Besides he never won more than 48% of the popular vote.  Without a great leader our country will go the way of Rome.  Newt is the only one with that "it" IMHO.  Obama, well as Noonan says, he ain't no Abe Lincoln.  On the other hand it may not be obvious who has that "it" until afterwards. 

   *****Gingrich Lambastes President and Rove

Article Tools Sponsored By
By JIM RUTENBERG
Published: May 30, 2007

WASHINGTON, May 29 — President Bush has presided over a Republican Party in “collapse,” and Karl Rove’s strategy in the 2004 presidential election was “maniacally dumb” for focusing so heavily on the conservative base.

The words, perhaps, of Howard Dean, the Democratic national chairman? Or John Edwards? Nancy Pelosi, maybe?

None of the above.

That harsh assessment of the president and his chief political adviser is being offered rather by former Representative Newt Gingrich, who engineered the Republicans’ Congressional election victory of 1994 and went on to become speaker of the House.

Mr. Gingrich made the comments in an interview with The New Yorker, parts of which were published in this week’s issue. They opened a new feud between himself and the White House, which replied with a stiff defense late Tuesday.
criticism speaks to a question that has hung over the race for the Republican presidential nomination since its early start this year: How will the candidates contend with the unpopularity of the president who heads their party? And will any of them break from him forcefully?

Mr. Gingrich is not in the race at the moment, but he has dropped many hints that he might eventually be. Should he get in, he suggested, he will be considerably more willing than the others have so far been to critique the competence of the incumbent.

He is quoted in The New Yorker as suggesting that a Republican will win the White House by running against Mr. Bush as Nicolas Sarkozy won the presidency in France by running against his fellow party member Jacques Chirac, in whose cabinet he had served.

“What’s fascinating about Sarkozy is that you have an incumbent cabinet member of a very unpopular 12-year presidency,” Mr. Gingrich said, “who over the last three years became the clear advocate of fundamental change.”

He compared the state of the Republican Party now to its state after the Watergate scandal and blamed in part Mr. Rove’s election strategy in 2004.

“You can’t be a governing national party and write off entire regions,” Mr. Gingrich said. “All he proved was that the anti-Kerry vote was bigger than the anti-Bush vote.”

Rick Tyler, a spokesman for Mr. Gingrich, said his remarks had been reported accurately.

Dana Perino, deputy White House press secretary, disputed Mr. Gingrich’s assessment.

“It was President Bush who in 2004 got 25 percent more votes than in 2000,” Ms. Perino said. “He had the largest number of votes ever, and he led his party to increases in seats in both houses of Congress based on a strategy that showcased the president’s vision for the country.”

The 2004 strategy “defined differences between the president and his opponent on major issues like taxes, security, freedom and personal choice,” Ms. Perino said. “It was not at all a strategy about being against something; it was about being for something.”

Ms. Perino had no comment on Mr. Gingrich’s judgment that the Republican nominee would essentially have to run against Mr. Bush to win the election.*****

4016  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: June 02, 2007, 09:01:24 AM
Doug,

Neither Bush senior or Bush junior could communicate very well.

I remember hearing Bush senior after listening to Clinton give a speech on the reasons for and benefits of globalization lament something to the effect, why couldn't I say that (or more or less express myself like that)?

You may be right about Newt.  He has great oratory skills but can't seem to put a lid on off handed comments that come off badly in soundbites.  Like his recent comments about Rove.  While they are not necessarily wrong it is the way he says them that comes off badly.  He rose to prominence in the Republican party for being an attack dog not because of diplomatic skills.  There is something about his personality that always eventually seeps through that is a turn off.  He may be a better policy man then "front man".
4017  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: June 02, 2007, 08:48:10 AM
Crafty,

I don't understand why we can't get enough of our own people here to become highly educated.  Why do we have to import them?
4018  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Drug resistant TB on: May 31, 2007, 11:01:08 PM
We have all seen the news about the lawyer who flew around with this.  What I have not seen is any conjecture as to where *he* picked up the bug.   I find the furor over his travelling with it of no less a concern than the question of how he aquired it.. 

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/story?id=3231184&page=1
4019  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Hillary's plans for tech on: May 31, 2007, 10:53:07 PM
I can't agree with most of it.  Bring in and keep more foreigners? ( Don't we have enough people not born here coming in?)   Provide financial support to schools who encourage minorities and girls to go into science? (Why not just put all white men into jail and get it over with. Or what about giving financial support for schools that encourage boys to go into arts and literature?)  Establish a 50 billion energy fund by taxing oil companies? (Why not just pay for it with the gasoline tax already present?)  Tax incentives to pay for broadband access?  (Why, people who can't pay for a monthly fee for broadband already don't pay taxes.)   

***Increase federal research and development budgets 50 percent over the next 10 years at the
National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy's Office of Science and the Defense Department.***

Ok, maybe this I could agree with this one.

What kind of leadership is this?
She will definitely turn us into Europe.  Maybe I could just hit the lottery and move into the mountains and not listen to the news anymore once she is president.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070601/ap_on_el_pr/clinton_silicon_valley_2

AP
Clinton outlines technology plan

By RACHEL KONRAD, Associated Press Writer 2 hours, 23 minutes ago

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -
Hillary Rodham Clinton wooed Silicon Valley campaign donors and voters Thursday with a plan to create more high-paying jobs and maintain U.S. dominance in technology.
ADVERTISEMENT

The New York senator and Democratic presidential hopeful said she's trying to increase the number of so-called H1B visas aimed at highly educated workers. Silicon Valley companies use H1Bs to sponsor thousands of software engineers from Russia, India, China and other countries, but many must return home when their temporary work permits expire.

"If you think you have a skills shortage now, project it out a decade and we're going to be in real trouble," Clinton said to applause from more than 200 executives attending a half-day CEO Summit by the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. "We need to guide immigration reform to attract and retain foreign-born students who want to work in the United States."

If elected, Clinton said, her administration would provide financial support to schools that encourage girls and minorities to study "STEM" subjects: science, technology, engineering and math.

Clinton's plan would:

• Increase federal research and development budgets 50 percent over the next 10 years at the
National Science Foundation, the
Department of Energy's Office of Science and the Defense Department. She would triple the number of NSF fellowships and create an award structure to encourage working engineers and scientists to teach classes and mentor students in public schools.

• Establish a $50 billion "Strategic Energy Fund" that would create a research agency focused on reducing the threat of global warming. The R&D windfall and energy agency would be funded in part from closing tax loopholes and ending subsidies to oil companies, she said.

• Provide tax incentives to increase the number of U.S. homes with broadband Internet connections.

The senator — who spent the morning raising money at a private fundraiser — largely avoided the subject of the
Iraq war. Her support of the war was expected to draw protesters at another private fundraiser Thursday evening.

Executives attending Clinton's speech said she hit the right tone with Silicon Valley power brokers. Executives in the nation's technology hub — where 53 percent of all engineers are foreign-born — worry many workers will return to India, China and other countries developing tech sectors.

"We are clearly on common ground," Adobe Systems Inc. CEO Bruce Chizen said.

Carl Guardino, CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, said the organization doesn't endorse candidates and invited all presidential hopefuls to address members. Republican candidate John McCain (news, bio, voting record) spoke to an SVLG forum several weeks ago.

 
4020  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Great thought provoking site. Some thoughts on: May 30, 2007, 09:29:10 PM
Fascinating site.  A couple of thoughts about the site.

I perused numerous Cal. Legislatures.  It seems to illustrate with special clarity the power of the unions in California.  Isn't that what Schwarzenegger learned?

When the government is the largest or one of the largest employers of a state, and these employees have the right to unionize then the rest of the taxpayers are at their mercy.

What the site doesn't address per se is whether these candidates were truly influenced by the money or were inclined to vote that way anyway and *that* is why they garnered such support.   Similarly, these people were probably elected with the financial support of said interests, and are merely voting the way that was intended all along.  It makes sense for special interests to keep in power "their" guys and gals rather then waste money on those legislaters who will likily use their own money to vote against them.

4021  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Government is already full of lard and excess. It's incurable. on: May 30, 2007, 07:31:17 PM
Hi Doug,

I'm not against serving nutritional, healthy food in schools where the environment is controlled, per se.

But this is clearly the proverbial slippery slope.  Isn't Clinton involved in obesity causes and the Hill of course wants to revamp all of health care.  Well we can see where this is all heading.

Our desire to eat and eat well has backfired from an evolutionary point of view.   When we were hunters and gatherers or farmers we expended trememdous amounts of energy to secure food.   We needed tremendous internal controls that would drive us to seek food in order to survive.  We didn't have lots of good tasting fatty and sugary foods simply lying around for the picking.  We burned more calories and ingested less.  Now those days are gone.  Yet we still have the internal controls that drive us to eat.  We really do not understand these controls very well at all.  Years ago I read there were over 30 genes associated with being overweight.  There must be more now.   an endocrine friend researcher told me that all the studies he participated in appear to show that any one particular drug will cause ~ 7% weight loss before other metabolic factors begin to overcome this preventing further weight gain.  "It's amazing, that 7% number keeps coming up," he says.

It is well known but rarely for whatever reason admitted in health care that getting people to lose weight and keep it off is extraordinarily difficult.  The only effective means we have that often will work in the long term is bariatric surgery.  Yet we all know how drastic this is and always with its own risks.

Until we have a better understanding on energy metabolism and weight metabolism all other methods are doomed to fail.  Sure, low carb diets may work for a few, exercise will work for a few, but for every success story on long term weight loss and maitenance there are 19 that end in failure.

All these politicians with their political grandstanding.  It drives me to eat!  If they want to raise money for research or grants for the NIH or other university sponsored research than fine.  Pharmaceutical research is done in private.  There must be a lot of duplication going on.  Data is not shared.  We really don't need separate governmental "agencies" for this. 

And *what about* all the abundance of fattening foods?  You simply can't eat pizza and lose weight. (well maybe one slice) Will people have to show IDs at pizza parlors, Chinese restaurants, Jewish delis, and Dunkin Donuts?

Just my thoughts on the matter.

Glad to see you on the board.
4022  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / NJ-government department on obesity on: May 30, 2007, 09:37:51 AM
Here it comes.  The government division on lard.

I get a kick about "mulling" the idea around to have on a child's report card that they are overweight (parents certainly need this).

Or the part with the nutritionist who thinks the idea is "commendable" (they always do).

Why don't they simply outlaw high caloric food?  They could shutdown half the businesses in NJ.  Instead of a pizza parlor on every corner for thousands of square miles we could have salad bars on every corner.  Or tax each calorie served by one cent.  Democrat Gov. Corzine must love that idea.

http://www.philly.com/philly/health_and_science/7722237.html

The treament for obesity is going to come from medicine and only medicine.
4023  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Homeland Security on: May 29, 2007, 01:04:03 PM
***There are autrocities that the media does not report on.***

Why not in your opinion?
4024  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / MajorMedia distortion of facts on: May 27, 2007, 02:39:51 PM
Really is sickening how MM can and *willingly and knowingly* does distort facts:

The WSJ's information will never appear in the NYT (or if it did it would be buried somewhere deep on page 50 or so):

http://washingtontimes.com/commentary/20070113-103432-9181r.htm
===============

Tax cuts and the rich
By Alan Reynolds
January 14, 2007


The New York Times headline -- "Tax Cuts Offer Most for Very Rich" -- said it all. That claim was uncritically repeated by CNN, posted on Brad DeLong's blog and so on. But was it true?
    The report by Edmund Andrews was about the latest "Historical Effective Tax Rates" from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).
    The CBO shows that from 2000 (the year before President Bush cut tax rates) to 2004, the after-tax income of the very richest 1 percent fell by 7.9 percent. After taking into account the Bush tax cuts, the 8.3 percent drop in after-tax incomes of the top 1 percent was even worse. From 2000 to 2004, average real incomes of the middle three-fifths rose 4.1 percent after-taxes, but only 0.5 percent before taxes. In other words, 88 percent of middle-income gains between 2000 and 2004 were due to those nefarious Bush tax cuts of 2003.
    Those who rely on the New York Times (unlike readers of The Washington Times), will never find out what the CBO report reveals unless they go to cbo.gov and read it. To have any chance of his story appearing in the New York Times, Mr. Andrews had no choice but to dissemble.
    He began by saying, "Families earning more than $1 million a year saw their federal tax rates drop more sharply than any group in the country as a result of President Bush's tax cuts, according to a new congressional study." But the top 1 percent of households (not families) are those earning more than $266,800 -- not more than $1 million. The average income for everyone earning more than $266,800 exceeds $1 million, but such a mean average is bloated by a small number of very high incomes, particularly distributed earnings of Subchapter S-corporations.
    This is why we use median income to describe typical income in other cases, and should also do so when describing average income of top income groups (which differ from lower groups because income has no upper limit).
    Mr. Andrews continued, "Though tax cuts for the rich were bigger than those for other groups, the wealthiest families paid a bigger share of total taxes. That is because their incomes have climbed far more rapidly, and the gap between rich and poor has widened in the last several years."
    Unless "last several years" excludes 2000, the statement is brazenly false. It makes no sense to start with any year except 2000 because we can't possibly compare incomes and taxes before and after the Bush tax cuts unless we begin with the last year of the Clinton presidency. That is, after all, the tax regime congressional Democrats set up as their ideal when they criticize the Bush tax changes as unduly generous to the top 1 percent.
    Measured in constant 2004 dollars, average income of the top 1 percent was $1,413,000 in 2000, but only $1,259,700 in 2004 -- a drop of 7.9 percent. Tax cuts did not help a bit. After-tax income of the top 1 percent fell from $946,300 to $887,800 -- an even larger 8.3 percent decline.
    Mr. Andrews says, "Economists and tax analysts have long known that the biggest dollar value of Mr. Bush's tax cuts goes to people at the very top income levels." You don't need to be an economist to discern that "the biggest dollar value" of any equiproportionate tax cut must go to those with the "biggest dollar value" of taxes paid. Yet the top 1 percent did not get anything remotely close to a proportionate share of the tax cuts after 2000.
    The article says "the wealthiest families paid a bigger share of total taxes," but what is remarkable is that they even paid a larger share than they did in 2000, although their before-tax incomes were 7.2 percent smaller. That explains why the top 1 percent's after-tax income fell even more than their before-tax income. The top 1 percent ended up with 14 percent of after-tax income, down from 15? percent in 2000, and that includes one-time capital gains and a seriously exaggerated share of corporate profits.
    Mr. Andrews added that "two of [the president's] signature measures, tax cuts on investment income and a steady reduction of estate taxes, overwhelmingly benefit the wealthiest households."


  That sentence is half irrelevant, half mistaken.
    The CBO does not attempt to assign the estate tax by income group. To do that, they would have to know who received the money, not who died. Dead people cannot receive more income, before or after taxes, just one reason death is a highly undesirable tax avoidance strategy. If Hugh Jassets dies and leaves $10 million to be split among 10 young grandchildren, those youngsters are likely to be either invisible or poor in terms of income showing up in CBO tax data.
    Second, taxes on capital gains and dividends are surprisingly hard on older retirees with low incomes. Those with incomes below $15,000 paid more than 7 percent of the federal taxes on dividends in 2002, and those with incomes below $200,000 paid 62 percent of that tax.
    Third, lower tax rates on taxable dividends and capital gains generally result in investors paying more taxes on their investment income, not less. Nobody has to hold dividend-paying stock in a taxable account, and nobody has to report capital gains by selling assets from a taxable account.
    The amount of dividend income reported to the IRS doubled from 2002 to 2004. Upper-income taxpayers are bound to be reporting relatively less income from tax-exempt bonds than they did before 2003. Moving income from nontaxable to taxable investments looks like an increase in top incomes in the CBO estimates, but it isn't.
    There has been a lot of chatter lately about raising Social Security taxes only on those with incomes above $100,000 while cutting the same group's Social Security benefits again (their benefits were deeply slashed in 1993 through an extra tax on benefits). Can anyone really pretend that sounds "fair"?
    The CBO calculates the effective tax rate for all federal taxes -- including Social Security and Medicare taxes, income taxes and excise taxes. For the bottom 80 percent as a group, that total federal tax fell from 14.1 percent in 2000 to 11.4 percent in 2004 -- a 19.1 percent tax cut.
    The tax cut was deepest among the poorest fifth (29.7 percent), largely because of the Bush administration's refundable tax credit for children. For the middle fifth, the total tax rate fell from 16.6 percent to 13.9 percent -- a 16.3 percent cut. As for the top 1 percent, their overall tax rate was merely trimmed from 33 percent to 31.1 percent -- a 5.8 percent cut
    A courageous (willing to be fired) New York Times ombudsman would insist on the following correction to Mr. Andrews' upside-down article: "Households earning more than $266,800 a year saw their federal tax rates drop less sharply than any other group in the country as a result of President Bush's tax cuts, according to a new Congressional Budget Office study."
     
    Alan Reynolds is a nationally syndicated columnist and a senior fellow with the Cato Institute.
   





4025  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: North Korea on: May 18, 2007, 01:26:00 PM
 bit outdated but Gertz On NK - still producing nukes - gee - what a surprise.

http://www.washtimes.com/national/20070424-104648-6053r.htm

I have trouble of thinking of any Presidential candidate with the strength and clear track record to prove that he can stand up to these foreign threats - except for Gingrich.  Let's hope he runs IMO.

McCain maybe, but enough leadership skills.  Romeny maybe - but not proven.

I can't think of a single Dem who I feel would not sell the US out for expediency.
4026  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Anatomy of a hit job: The Wolfowitz Affair (formerly Paul's Girl) on: May 16, 2007, 01:19:20 PM
Thanks Crafty.  Your posts show anothyer story totally ignored in the MM.   If this was a Clinton appointee and Billary were President we would see the talk shows flooded with the likes of Lanny Davis repeating over and over their side of the story.   With the Bush Presidency we hear very little.  He seems to have thrown Wolfowitz to the wolves.  Perhaps he feels he cannot defend him since he was a prime architect of the Iraq invasion and/or he risk pissing off the Europeans who appear to like their influence at the WB for whatever reasons some probably corrupt.  In any case W. appears to feel the political fallout is not worth the risk of defending Paul.  I agree it would be a terrible personal tragedy for Wolfowitz if his reputation is tarnished as a result of the very same corruption he was trying to clean up.

I have not seen this side of the story on CNN.  It's amazing.  Every time I turn on CNN it has a story that has a negative slant towards Bush.  It is never partial or objective but always the Left's point of view.  Always.  To think my nephew dated Wolf Blitzer's daughter.  He has since moved on and married.  (Actually I hear she is a nice girl and he is probably a very good father.)  But he is clearly politically left - not partial.

George Will's piece:

http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/will051007.php3
4027  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Blankley September crunch time for Repubs on: May 12, 2007, 12:33:31 PM
Blankley points out the Cans prospects look bleak for 2008.  All the Cans are slipping in the polls including Guliani and McCain.  Depending on how things look in September many Cans may break ranks with W.  Of course our enemies know this as well,and will work diligently towards that goal.  Can any serious thinker believe that radical Muslims, nad Iranians would not rather deal with the dovish Crats than Can hawks?

I couldn't agree more with Tony's (and Cheney's) hardline stance.  But I am now apparantly in the minority.   For fun:  my predictive guess.   We will get Hillary.  The slight majority will adore her gifts *stolen* (IMO- according to George Will we pay more in gasoline tax than the oil companies make in profits- you won't hear that from the Hill)  from those who make more and this will continue till we get another exogenous threat.  Maybe then Newt will have a shot in 2012 or even 2016?  As always time will tell.   Two cents for other thoughts:

http://www.washingtontimes.com/op-ed/tblankley.htm
4028  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Newt for Prez! on: May 07, 2007, 09:00:15 PM
CD,

I don't know if I am alone but I wish Newt would run.

He is the only one who when I hear him speak I hear a visionary.

He is the only one with ideas and the leadership qualities to carry them out.

I can see why he made it to Speaker of the House.  If only he can keep his ego in check...

4029  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / TSA Hard drive disappears on: May 05, 2007, 12:16:16 PM
Most likely stolen.  Most likely inside job.  Most likely bribery.  Don't believe the excuses.  Don't believe that anyone can know if a hard drive is copied.  They can be copied with no trace.   It just goes to show the incompetence and potential corruption of information that is supposed to be secure.  Did anyone see the Fox report on Sandy Berger repeatedly going to ther National Archives and stealing documents?  Outrageous.  And he gets off with a slap on the wrist!  Why did a Bush Justice Department allow this to get swept under the rug?

While I can't *prove* it, I know bribery happens at the US Copyright Office.  Things have disappeared.  It seems to be less known that it happens there.  The Patent Office was notorious for documents getting "lost".

***TSA Loses Hard Drive With Personal Info
 Email this Story

May 4, 10:03 PM (ET)

By MATT APUZZO

(AP) Transportation Security Administration chief Kip Hawley is shown in this 2006 file photo. The TSA...
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WASHINGTON (AP) - The Transportation Security Administration has lost a computer hard drive containing Social Security numbers, bank data and payroll information for about 100,000 employees.

Authorities realized Thursday the hard drive was missing from a controlled area at TSA headquarters. TSA Administrator Kip Hawley sent a letter to employees Friday apologizing for the lost data and promising to pay for one year of credit monitoring services.

"TSA has no evidence that an unauthorized individual is using your personal information, but we bring this incident to your attention so that you can be alert to signs of any possible misuse of your identity," Hawley wrote in the letter, which was obtained by The Associated Press. "We profoundly apologize for any inconvenience and concern that this incident has caused you."

The agency said it did not know whether the device is still within headquarters or was stolen.

TSA said it has asked the FBI and Secret Service to investigate and said it would fire anyone discovered to have violated the agency's data-protection policies.

In a statement released Friday night, the agency said the external - or portable - hard drive contained information on employees who worked for the Homeland Security agency from January 2002 until August 2005.

TSA, a division of the Homeland Security Department, employs about 50,000 people and is responsible for security of the nation's transportation systems, including airports and train stations.

"It's seems like there's a problem with security inside Homeland Security and that makes no sense," said James Slade, a TSA screener and the executive vice president of the National Treasury Employees Union chapter at John F. Kennedy International Airport. "That's scary. That's my identity. And now who has a hold of it? So many things go on in your mind."

The agency added a section to its Web site Friday night addressing the data security breach and directing people to information about identity theft.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, whose Homeland Security subcommittee oversees the TSA, promised to hold hearings on the security breach. She said Homeland Security buildings are part of the critical infrastructure the agency is charged with protecting.

"We should expect it to be secure," she said.

House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie G. Thompson, D-Miss., called the security breach "a terrible and unfortunate blow" for an agency he said already suffered from low morale.

It's the latest mishap for the government involving computer data. Last year, a laptop with information for more than 26.5 million military personnel, was stolen from a Veterans Affairs Department employee's home. Law enforcement officials recovered the laptop, and the FBI said Social Security numbers and other personal data had not been copied.***

***TSA has no evidence that an unauthorized individual is using your personal information***

This is the line we always hear.  Yet it has also been stated that approximately 40% Of illegal aliens are using phoney social security numbers.  What a joke.  The laugh is on the honest tax paying law abiding citizens.  Although sadly most of them would glady take a bribe too.

---
4030  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Tony Snow on: April 29, 2007, 04:37:27 PM
Not too long ago having colon cancer metasize to the liver usually meant one had less than six months to live.  Now however treatments have improved so a person can live a few years or so with this condition.  From what I have seen Tony has done a good job for the White House.  Let's hope there will be even more and better treatments that come out the next few years for the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. Hang in there Tony:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070429/ap_on_go_pr_wh/tony_snow_cancer
4031  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Geo Political matters on: April 29, 2007, 04:29:28 PM
Well, I recall George Will pointing out around 1990 or so how George Herbert Bush's seeking the World's approval before forcing Hussain out of Kuait was a dangerous precendent that would forever leave the US impotent to act without the tacit approval of the"World". 

So now the US is not supposed to act without the UN's approval.  We can thank Bush senior for that precedent which was gloriously promoted for the next eight years by the greatest con artist of our generation.  Even our enemies welcomed this. Gee, I wonder why that would be. rolleyes

As for SB's second question I have not read about any alternative posed by anyone that is satisfactory. 

This all said I am not sure WW3 is going to be West vs radical Islam anyway, and not West vs. China.

     
4032  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Blankley: Well, is radical Islam a big threat or just a nuisance? on: April 29, 2007, 03:07:33 PM
That is the question.   TB: 

Everyone seems to have their own answer and their opinions cannot be changed.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/op-ed/tblankley.htm
4033  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin on: April 26, 2007, 06:19:00 PM
Stringer is reported to be writing a book.

Imus should get a big cut for all the attention he brought her and her team.

I wonder where he got that phrase from anyway. wink
4034  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / massive black holes on: April 21, 2007, 09:01:57 PM
I was watching the
"Science" channel on cable the other night.  They had a show on supermassive black holes.  I didn't realize that present theory holds that there is a black hole in every galaxy and is in some way related to the clustering of the stars in that galaxy.  It is also theorized that quasars are also related to supermassive black holes.

I remember in my astronomy classes in the 70's (ugh!) that quasars were the farthests objects in the universe and there was absolutely no explanation as to what they were.  A lot of discovery has happened since then.  A lot of theories formulated.

Yet every time I read about space I am left with this empty feeling.   I feel like we will never be able to understand "where it all began".   It seems unanswerable.  It seems incomprehensible.  Should this thread be headed under religion or God?   But to me the concept of God doesn't really answer the great questions since the beginning of man.   But it is more comforting.

This link is not to the particular show but to another space site which came up today on a news link:

http://www.space.com/bestimg/index.php?guid=4499b3474b769&cat=strangest

 huh
4035  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Virginia Tech Shooting... on: April 19, 2007, 01:19:33 AM
Over twenty five years ago I took a class in forensic psychiatry.  We took a tour of St Elizabeth hospital for the crimnally insane.

I still remember many of the stories the psychiatrist told us.  I also remember him distinctly saying that most of the patients *appeared* dangerous, but were not.   Most of them, if released, would cause no harm.  The problem was being able to predict or figure out which ones would go out and harm others.   He said this was often impossible.   Thus, many of the inmates/patients would spend their lives there - because the psychiatrists coud not predict the harmless from the dangerous.   It is always easier in retrospect.  In my experience  in evaluating patients for mental hosptial commitment the psychiatrist simply interviews the patient to determine potential harm to him/herself and if they don't find clear evidence of delusions or hallucinations, and if the patient simply denies suicidal or homicidal intent then the patient is released.   

Of course now we'll hear how the "system" failed, the college president should be fired, the teachers should have been more proactive, it's bush's fault, it's the NRA's fault, it is our decadant culture, and on and on and on for weeks or months,  Time and Newsweek will come out with their version of the *real* truth behind the headlines, Geraldo, O'Reilly will have more to blab about ad nauseam on Fox, CNN will interview the Dems candidates side of the story giving them a platform describing how we need them to protect "our children" - all this and more - until we get new headlines.

Of course I can just turn off the news for a while or come here and chat and read up on other topics  smiley
4036  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Buchanan op on Wolfowitz and World Bank on: April 19, 2007, 12:52:27 AM
http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=20290
4037  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Paul's girl-woops try this on: April 19, 2007, 12:34:22 AM
http://www.ibtimes.com/photonews_new2.htm?image=72474
4038  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / World Bank Anatomy of a hit job: The Wolfowitz Affair (formerly Paul's Girl) on: April 19, 2007, 12:33:11 AM
ttp://www.ibtimes.com/photonews_new2.htm?image=72474
4039  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Jewish Genius on: April 14, 2007, 12:10:51 AM
I was recently wondering when Abraham lived.  Looking online the best estimates suggested he lived sometime between 1600 to 2100 BC.   Of course who really knows if he even really existed.   I mean he is supposed to have lived to 175 years old.

Here is one site:

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/abraham.html

I perused through Bell Curve some years back.  With regard to intelligence the Asians were thought to have the curve at the highest end followed by whites than blacks.   The authors pointed out that there is mostly overlap though.

I wonder how much of Jewish "success" is cultural rather than some innate superior intellect.  I mean hasn't it been standard for hundreds of years for Jewish parents to push their kids to get educated.   You didn't see other groups doing this to the same degree as far as I know.   

I notice a lot of Asians who come here encourage their kids into educational endeavors.   But both Jews and now others seem to know education is one path to financial success, and not necessarily the means to solving the mysteries of the universe.

Just thinking "out loud".
4040  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Contrast on: April 09, 2007, 10:26:59 AM
While Iran teaches children to be warriors willing to die and go to heaven for their God our children sell their stories for a quick buck.  Remember the descriptions of Iran sending 100,000 teenage boys accross no-man's land in their war with Iraq.  The boys' mission was to clear the mine fields for the older soldiers.  Even the Iraqis were aghast at seeing this.

I do not want to disparage our brave men and women who serve for us or those of our closest ally Britain, but I feel the contrast serves to underscore what in my opinion is the misjudgement of some our leaders/pols who think they can chat their way out of this:

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23391981-details/Outrage+as+Iran+captives+cash+in/article.do

I couldn't agree more with Sen Leiberman or Bolton on this issue.
4041  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants on: April 08, 2007, 01:07:50 PM
SB_Mig,

It sounds like we are mostly on the same page.   You take issue with a minor point on my part and ignore the main point of my post that is that Pelosi's trip plays right into the hands of our enemies.

I think you know full well the Demorcrats lead en mass (except for a few like Lieberman) in conveying to our enemies our weaknesses.
So a few cans went there as well.  Why you harp on this beats me.  Does this make you feel superior?  Wise guy.
4042  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants on: April 06, 2007, 01:06:15 PM
Nice try

No I didn't miss part of the article.
4043  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants on: April 05, 2007, 11:33:20 PM
***Abu Abdullah, a leader of Hamas' military wing in the Gaza Strip, said the willingness by some lawmakers to talk with Syria "is proof of the importance of the resistance against the U.S."***

This says it all.  It verifies exactly what W. says, and that is that Pelosi and the crats undermine us all.  You won't see this statement on the clinton news network!  Maybe on Fox.  But you will hear them quote W. as though he is an idiot.

I know. Our freedom of speech and diversity makes us strong.

While we talk - they build nuclear bombs.
4044  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Economics on: March 29, 2007, 09:55:19 PM
Crafty

Remember the days when some argued "it is different this time" when the tech market peaked and the graph looked eerily like October 1929?

I made a killing.  Then gave it back.   I sold Terayon about a year ago.  Remember when he touted this $200+ stock as being over the rainbow?  Now it is about $2.
4045  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: March 27, 2007, 12:40:49 PM
Well I guess learning how to salute is going to win over the military and erase decades of disdain for the people in uniform.  It would be like Jane Fonda saluting for the cameras.  Hypocracy for the ages.  Yet she may win the election with promises of gifts to every group of constuents that she needs to win.

 The New York Times
Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By

March 27, 2007
Mindful of Past, Clinton Cultivates the Military
By PATRICK HEALY

Of all the early problems Bill Clinton faced as president, few stand out to Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton as more frustrating and avoidable than his rocky relationship with the military, her advisers say.

During his 1992 campaign, Mr. Clinton was attacked for avoiding the Vietnam draft and organizing antiwar marches in the 1960s. After taking office, his early focus on gay men and lesbians in the military drew sharp criticism from the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Colin L. Powell, and other officers. Even his ability to salute properly was called into question.

Mrs. Clinton, to use a phrase, has been practicing her salute. As a senator and now as a presidential candidate, she has cultivated relationships with generals and admirals, prepped herself on wartime needs and strategy, and traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan.

“I think eight years in the White House, traveling the world and seeing the United States military doing the nation’s business, and now her time in the Senate, has given her a significant appreciation of the military that maybe her husband didn’t have before the White House,” said Jack Keane, the retired general and former Army vice chief of staff who has become close to the senator.

For Mrs. Clinton, exhibiting a command of military matters is not just about learning from her husband’s experience. It could be vital to her, as a woman seeking to become a wartime commander in chief, to show the public that she is comfortable with military policy and culture — and with the weight of responsibility that accompanies life-and-death decisions.

It is also part of an effort to shed the image some voters hold of her as an antimilitary liberal, defined by her opposition to the Vietnam War and, now, by her criticism of the Bush administration’s conduct of the war in Iraq.

A Time magazine poll in July asked adults to assess whether Mrs. Clinton would keep the military strong. Asked how much that description fit Mrs. Clinton, 33 percent said a lot, 25 percent said a little, 15 percent said not much, 18 percent said not at all and 10 percent had no answer.

Some uniformed officers, too, said that the Clintons were more associated with a ’60s culture than a military one, and that only time would tell if Mrs. Clinton’s appreciation of the military would go beyond niceties and expressions of concern.

Donald L. Kerrick, a retired general and former deputy national security adviser to President Clinton, acknowledged that some people inside and outside the military were skeptical of Mrs. Clinton’s intentions and wary that she would shift federal dollars to domestic programs like health care.

General Kerrick, who is close to Mrs. Clinton, said he believed that her appreciation of the military was genuine, but that it would take time and effort for that to come across.

“If, as president, she treats commanders and troops the same way she does now, she will quickly gain their support and respect,” General Kerrick said. “Military people are very loyal to the chain of command, and to people who understand them.”

In the Senate, Mrs. Clinton has supported expanding medical benefits for National Guard members and reservists and providing aid to those with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. She has also defied liberals in her own party at times, endorsing the expansion of the Army, supporting financing for missile defense, and refusing to support a total ban on land mines.

But just as she has encountered some hostility from the left for not being a critic of the Iraq war earlier and for not renouncing her vote in 2002 to authorize it, Mrs. Clinton could also risk coming off as too hawkish to some Democratic voters for her vociferous support of military initiatives.

Some on the left ask if she is engaging again in the Clinton strategy of political triangulation: reaching out to military leaders while also trying to appease the left with her criticism of the war in Iraq. During her Senate re-election race last year, some liberals criticized her as currying favor with pro-military conservatives and independents by fiercely supporting Israel and taking a tough line against Al Qaeda and Iranian operatives in Iraq, similar to what her husband did during his presidency on social issues like welfare.

“Some days she sounds like a total hawk, and other days she’s saying, ‘I’m against the war and it’s been mismanaged,’ ” said Jonathan Tasini, who ran against Mrs. Clinton for the Senate Democratic nomination last year on an antiwar platform.

“But I don’t see how this helps her in the primaries,” Mr. Tasini continued. “So many people have turned against the war.”

Of the other main Democratic presidential candidates, only Senator Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut has served in the military, as an Army reservist. Like Mrs. Clinton, most of the candidates rely on their service on Senate committees for their foreign policy credentials. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois serves on the Foreign Relations and Veterans Affairs Committees; former Senator John Edwards of North Carolina served on the intelligence committee; Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware is chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee; Mr. Dodd is a member of that committee.

Essential to Mrs. Clinton’s courtship of the military was winning a seat in 2002 on the Senate Armed Services Committee, which she had vigorously sought. In that role, she regularly meets with military officers, has traveled three times to Iraq and has attended hearings on global conflicts and the needs of the armed services.

Privately, two current military leaders who have testified before the Armed Services committee, and who by custom do not comment publicly on political figures, said they both found Mrs. Clinton conversant about the military and thoughtful in her questions.

Active-duty generals have sought her out, and she has reached out to them. Among those with whom she has built relationships are Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top commander in Iraq, and Adm. William J. Fallon, the new head of Central Command. Recently, too, James T. Conway, the commandant of the Marines, invited her to be his guest of honor at the “Sunset Parade” at the Marine Corps War Memorial in Washington, a high-profile tradition. (She has accepted.)

Some military analysts said that building ties with generals was only part of building a leadership image on military issues. Ted Galen Carpenter, vice president for defense and foreign policy studies at the Cato Institute, the libertarian research group, said Mrs. Clinton’s political shift to opposing the war in Iraq — combined with some voters’ skepticism about the Clintons and the military — posed a challenge for her, especially when she needs to prove that a woman is tough enough to be commander in chief.

“By surrounding herself with military brass, it reinforces an image of her as strong and hawkish,” Mr. Carpenter said. “But is that an authentic image? Would she really give dollars to the Pentagon instead of to cherished domestic programs?”

The Republican National Committee’s research staff members have already compiled a series of examples that they say show Mrs. Clinton at odds with military interests, including her Iraq war positioning and her opposition to sending additional troops there.

General Keane — whose support for sending more troops to Iraq is at odds with Mrs. Clinton’s view — and other admirers of hers see these skeptical or critical portrayals of her as playing into false stereotypes. He recalled how his own initial impression of her changed after their first meeting: It was supposed to last 15 minutes, but continued for a half hour longer as they talked about West Point and moved onto global hot spots.

John Batiste, a retired major general and former commander of the First Infantry Division, who also consults with Mrs. Clinton, said, “Very, very few politicians have any military experience, and they’re naďve — they don’t understand what it takes to develop a big picture, unified strategy to take a country to war.

“She’s the kind of person who would listen to sound military advice,” General Batiste said, “and not dismiss it or discard it. And I’m a lifelong Republican.“

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4046  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: March 24, 2007, 10:12:28 AM
The article makes sense.  Iran has now taken the Brits as hostages.  The Brits mistake was allowing this vessel to be taken to start with.

Perhaps Iran has calculated that the timid US will spend the rest of Bush's and Blair's tenures negotiating the hostages release.  AFter '08 they know the Dems will do nothing while they continue on with their nuclear goals.  As far as I can tell only W. has the guts to stand up to them.  But he doesn't have the political support.  And with an election coming up he won't get it.
4047  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Messiah complex on: March 19, 2007, 08:55:57 PM
***Messiah Complex***

I always thought Bill Clinton had this notion that he was going to save humanity from itself.  The great man who would fix everything.

Gore more pompous.  Clinton more narcissistic.  Hillary is both.
4048  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Professor Pino - enough is enough - I've had it. on: March 08, 2007, 10:06:15 PM
***Now your argument becomes that we need censorship in order that there be action even when the country is evenly divided???***

No my argument has become that this country is in trouble because it is evenly divided.   The theory is majority rule.  But there is no consistent majority.  I don't know how to resolve this.  We can celebrate our freedom of speech all we want but that won't make the problems I point out go away.

Because the task is difficult doesn't mean I don't believe the premise of what I said - that free speech has paralized us.  I disagree that the lack of dialogue has done more harm.   It has led to lack of resolve.  Indecision.

Endless arguing and debating just leads us down the road to defining what is is.



4049  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Professor Pino - enough is enough - I've had it. on: March 07, 2007, 08:39:42 PM
To Rogt,

No your not being nitpicky. But...  I don't think Hannity or Limbaugh have called for Jihad against the resident citizens, immigrants, and  illegals of the United States or other Western countries.

I am also under the impression, as I suggested, that the ACLU would stop law enforcement's investigation of those enemies of the US who choose to out themselves. Yes I do think they can lawyer us to powerlessness, to inaction, to not defending ourselves.  IMO posting calls for Jihad *is more* than just words.  It *is* a call to arms.  It *is* communicating with potential armies of combatants.  It *is* a plan.  It *is* a conspiracy to commit crimes.

To_Mig,

I am not sure I could come up with a Supreme Court Justice's level of clarity and specificity in formulating a definition of what should be considered treason using legally acceptedl parameters.  To ask me to come up with a broader definition skirts my point that calling for jihad on the internet is clearly a conspiracy to incite violent acts against us. On the other hand, I do admit that I broadened the argument myself by attacking unlimited free speech. Perhaps I took on too difficult a task but my overall hunch on this stands (in my mind).  Also (and frankly), I am not a legal genius  cry.  So who should dictate who gets censored - perhaps the nine the Supreme Court Justices.

And are you actually telling me the cacaphony of views in this country has *not* resulted in inaction on numerous issues?  How can anything get accomplished with so much hot air out there?   This country is more or less evenly divided.  A house divided against itself cannot stand.  (A. Lincoln: circa ~1856)  Are you also suggesting Iran is not hell bent on becoming a military power?   And China as well?

BTW, I got a kick at your pointing out Hillary is running for "re-election".  smiley

To Crafty and all,

I will try to read more on the legal doctrine as suggested.  Many thanks.   

4050  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Professor Pino - enough is enough - I've had it. on: March 06, 2007, 09:43:41 PM
Wow.

Some very thoughtful replies.  Let me think about this a bit.

If someone is calling for Jihad at an airport I would think he would be carted off to be questioned.

I don't know if such speech would warrant an arrest by itself.  I remember a Guatemalan tourist who boarded an airplane in Orlando to fly home for Christmas with his family.  He made a joke to the stewardess that his carry-on had a bomb in it.  Well, to make a long story short he spent his Christmas in jail for his poor sense of humor.

If someone calls for Jihad on the internet we speak of ostracism. 

Now someone gets on the internet and essentially calls for Jihad which as I understand it means a calling to arms against the infidels in the country he lives in.  Is this not what we could define as terrorism?   Should we defend our country against such verbal threats by simply having the student Republican club at the school where he teaches roundly ostrasize him?  Should the student Democrat club all come charging to his defense by pointing out that his right to free speech trumps all else while of course prefacing said defense with the fact that they of course all find the content of his internet posts as reprehensible?

To me it is common sense.  If someone starts advocating others to rise up and kill us it is time to put a stop to this. 

With regards to Rogt's post Crafty would be right that I was referring more about the professor's call for Jihad.  About his statements concerning the treatment of woman I do agree his points have some merit.  No doubt sex sells and this is not necesarily with good results.  I would disagree only in that we could find examples of maltreatment of women (almost?) anywhere.   While he argues that the use of drugs in the US is immoral I could argue that the agricultural industry in Central America, South America, and Asia that exports many of these drugs to the West for profit is just as immoral.  Does not drug addiction and prostitution exist in these places as well?

 
As Crafty points out the freedom to express allows those so inclined to come out of the closet.
From a strategic point of view this professor just outed himself.  I would only hope that law enforcement is now, if not already, watching him closely.  Unless of course we now want to have another debate about his right to privacy.  It seems to me if the ACLU had their way we could simply chat and bicker our way to powerlessness.   The evil forces in China, Iran, and elsewhere are chuckling at our cachophony of different points of view while they bide their time and get stronger.

 

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