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51  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: March 14, 2015, 07:58:09 PM
Levin points out that each time the liberals were cavorting with the communist enemy.

The difference now is that the Republicans are trying to stop a liberal President from cavorting with the enemy.

So not only will the MSM not point out the fact Democrats have done this many times they would never point the out this difference either.

And the Republicans should be out front and center pointing this out.  But what do they do instead - cave.  Like they always do.
52  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: March 14, 2015, 11:10:40 AM
All this proves the American Jews who are Democrats are Democrats first, Socialists or Communists second, and sadly Americans a very distant third, and Jews dead last.

I no longer identify with them and I am ashamed and embarrassed by them.

What else can I say.

They disgust me.   What back stabbers they are.

I was so proud as an American Jew to hear Netanyahu give that speech.  I recall texting my sister that I was proud to be Jewish again.

Then the phony liberal Jews support this President.  Why because he is a Democrat - no other reason.  If he was a Republican they would be attacking him till hell freezes over.



53  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: American History on: March 12, 2015, 06:40:02 PM
I never saw this picture before.  Is this real or contrived?

http://www.moderndags.com/Lincolns%20Family%2007_19_05.jpg
54  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / PS on: March 12, 2015, 05:19:26 PM
I just sent Sen Cotton an email of support.  Anyone else interested here is his webpage:

http://www.cotton.senate.gov/content/contact-tom
55  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: March 12, 2015, 05:15:12 PM
http://www.breitbart.com/

Cotton stands firm.   There is something strange about Fox News which is doing all it can to make this stand seem to be "misguided".   Well, IMO somebody has to make a stand.

Do we just spend the rest of the next 2 yrs watching our country unravel and be given away?

To the contrary of the MSM would have us believe, a couple of hundred thousand signatures means nothing.  No question we can find just as many who will sign in support of the 47 Senators who sent the letter to the Iranians.
56  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: March 12, 2015, 04:45:07 PM
Well this not coincidently timed scandal just before she and her mob were ready to seize the throne does allow her challenges from the left.

I don't think Warren is so worrisome.   O'Malley is more of a concern to me.  If he picks up steam she will  not be coronated.   If he doesn't we all know the LEFT will rally around her with pitchforks long nails, and growls.   The scandal will be brushed aside.
57  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: ACTION items on: March 12, 2015, 09:37:28 AM
Has she ever publically expressed in interest in running for office?
58  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Music on: March 12, 2015, 09:36:05 AM
It's about time someone actually won a copyright infringement in the music business.  If it wasn't a family of a famous artist the verdict almost certainly would have been different.   No names almost never win against the celebrities.   Unfortunately this is only the tiny tip of the iceberg.

***** AP • MSNBC • USA TODAY • FOX News • New York Times Movies • Movies • Music • TV • Entertainment News Videos
   
'Blurred Lines' verdict likely to alter music business

Mar 11, 11:07 AM (ET)

By ANTHONY McCARTNey

(AP) Marvin Gaye's daughter, Nona Gaye, talks to the media outside the Los Angeles U.S....

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A verdict saying Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke copied Marvin Gaye's music to create their hit song "Blurred Lines" could ripple across the music industry, potentially changing how artists work and opening the door to new copyright claims.

An eight-person jury determined Tuesday that Williams and Thicke copied elements of Gaye's 1977 hit "Got to Give It Up" and ordered the pair to pay nearly $7.4 million to the late R&B legend's three children.

Millions more in potential future profits for "Blurred Lines" are now also at stake.

The Gaye family will seek an injunction against the song, which will give them leverage to negotiate for royalties and other concessions such as songwriting credit, although Tuesday's verdict could face years of appeals.
 
While the verdict affects Thicke and Williams' finances in the short term, artists and music industry lawyers will likely face new constraints as they sort through the verdict and its implications.

Howard King, lead attorney for Thicke and Williams, said in closing arguments that a verdict for the Gaye family would have a chilling effect on musicians trying to evoke an era or create an homage to the sound of earlier artists. Williams contended during the trial that he was only trying to mimic the "feel" of Gaye's late 1970s music but insisted he did not use elements of his idol's work.

"Today's successful verdict, with the odds more than stacked against the Marvin Gaye estate, could redefine what copyright infringement means for recording artists," said Glen Rothstein, an intellectual property attorney.

He said the decision sets a precedent because "paying homage to musical influences was an acceptable, and indeed commonplace way of conducting business and even showing respect for one's musical idols, (but) after today, doubt has been cast on where the line will be drawn for copyright infringement purposes."

Music copyright trials are rare, but allegations that a song copies another artist's work are common. Singers Sam Smith and Tom Petty recently reached an agreement that conferred songwriting credit to Petty on Smith's song, "Stay With Me," which resembled Petty's hit "I Won't Back Down."
 
In the "Blurred Lines" case, the Gaye family will seek an injunction against the song, giving them leverage to negotiate for royalties and other concessions such as songwriting credits.

Nona Gaye, the late singer's daughter, wept as the verdict was read and later told reporters: "Right now, I feel free. Free from ... Pharrell Williams' and Robin Thicke's chains and what they tried to keep on us and the lies that were told."

Larry Iser, an intellectual property lawyer who has represented numerous musicians such as Jackson Browne and David Byrne in music copyright cases, criticized the verdict.

"Although Gaye was the Prince of Soul, he didn't own a copyright to the genre, and Thicke and Williams' homage to the feel of Marvin Gaye is not infringing," Iser said.

King, the pair's lawyer, said record labels are going to become more reluctant to release music that's similar to other works — an assertion disputed by Richard Busch, the lead attorney for the Gaye family.

"While Mr. Williams' lawyer suggested in his closing argument that the world would come to an end, and music would cease to exist if they were found liable, I still see the sun shining," Busch said. "The music industry will go on."

So, too, will Williams' career, said Joe Levy, editor-at-large at Billboard.

"For Pharrell, the story moves on," he said. "It will move on quickly."

Williams, 41, is a seven-time Grammy Award winner whose songs he's performed or produced have sold more than 100 million copies worldwide. His hit "Happy" has helped make him a household name, as has his work as a judge on NBC's music competition show, "The Voice."

"It's much to Pharrell's advantage that he is at a high point in his career," Levy said.

Thicke's career may have more issues as a result of Tuesday's verdict — which came on his 38th birthday — because "Blurred Lines" was a global hit and his follow-up effort failed to connect with audiences, Levy said. Despite the song's popularity, feminists have criticized it, saying it promotes rape culture.

While the verdict will likely make musicians and record labels more cautious, it won't stop artists from using others' works as inspiration, Levy said.

Despite the decision, he predicted that "Blurred Lines" will continue to make plenty of money for Williams, Thicke and, in all likelihood, the Gaye family.

"People aren't going to stop playing it," Levy said. "It's not just going to disappear."****

---
 
59  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: March 11, 2015, 10:25:27 PM
The Ugly Civil War in American Medicine

By Kurt Eichenwald   3/10/15 at 12:04 PM

A group of doctors is charging that the American Board of Internal Medicine has forced them to do meaningless work to fatten the board’s bloated coffers. Blend Images/Alamy

Are physicians in the United States getting dumber? That is what one of the most powerful medical boards is suggesting, according to its critics. And, depending on the answer, tens of millions of dollars funneled annually to this non-profit organization are at stake.

The provocative question is a rhetorical weapon in bizarre war, one that could transform medicine for years. On one side is the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), which certifies that doctors have met nationally recognized standards, and has been advocating for more testing of physicians. On the other side are tens of thousands of internists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists and the like who say the ABIM has forced them to do busywork that serves no purpose other than to fatten the board’s bloated coffers.

“We don’t want to do meaningless work and we don’t want to pay fees that are unreasonable and we don’t want to line the pockets of administrators,’’ says Dr. Paul Teirstein, a nationally-prominent physician who is chief of cardiology at Scripps Clinic and who is now leading the doctor revolt.

 Try Newsweek for only $1.25 per week 

The physicians lining up with Teirstein are not a bunch of stumblebums afraid of a few tests. They include some of this nation’s best-known medical practitioners and academicians, from institutions like the Mayo Clinic, Harvard Medical School, Columbia Medical School and other powerhouses in the field.

This spat is hardly academic, though. Some doctors are leaving medicine because they believe the ABIM is abusing its monopoly for money, forcing physicians to unnecessarily sacrifice time with their patients and time for their personal lives.

A little history: For decades, doctors took one exam, usually just after finishing training, to prove they had absorbed enough medical knowledge to treat patients. Internists—best known as primary care physicians—would take one test while those who chose subspecialties of internal medicine—cardiovascular disease, critical care, infectious disease, rheumatology—sat for additional exams. Doctors maintained their certification status by participating in programs known as “continuing medical education,” which, when done right, keep physicians up on developments in their field.

The value to a doctor of being certified can scarcely be overstated. Many organizations will not hire uncertified doctors. And, without that stamp of approval, even doctors who open their own practices rarely receive permission from hospital boards to treat their patients in hospitals. It was a sensible way to make sure doctors stayed on top of their game and weed out incompetent clinicians.

Someone, of course, had to pay for the testing and continuing education, and it was usually the doctors. So physicians shelled out money to the ABIM to take the tests, and then ponied up more cash to attend conferences and other programs for continuing medical education. Few objected—it was worth the money to keep up the profession’s standards.

But then ABIM decided that rather than just having doctors take one certification test, maybe they should take two. Or three. Or more. Under this new rule adopted in the early 1990s, internists and subspecialists recertify every 10 years with new tests. In other words, a doctor certified at the age of 30 could look forward to taking an ABIM exam at least three more times before retirement. This was not cheap—doctors spend thousands of dollars not only for the tests, but for review sessions, for time away from their practices. And with each new test, the ABIM made more money.

Physicians sheepishly went along with the process, assuming their good old pal the ABIM was working hard to make sure medical practitioners were fully qualified.

Then, something strange happened, doctors say. The tests started including questions about medical problems that had nothing to do with how doctors did their jobs. For example, anesthesiologists who worked exclusively with adults were required to answer questions about pediatric anesthesiology. To the layman, those might not sound like a big difference,  but it completely ignores how medicine is practiced. For the anesthesiologist, for example, the measurements, methods and almost every other element of putting a child to sleep for surgery is completely different than for an adult (what is the perfect measurement for an adult in a particular scenario could kill the child). And these aren’t calculations that are pulled off a chart; they involve very technical analysis that adult anesthesiologists don’t even know how to do, because they never use them. So the doctors have to spend hours reviewing issues they hadn’t seen since medical school to learn how to do something they have never—and will never—do. Then there are the internists, who are forced to learn details of a subspecialty that they would never use because, in the real world, the first thing they would do is call a subspecialist colleague for a consult—so again, the doctors have to spend time re-learning information that has nothing to do with the actual practice of medicine.

Videos and study sessions sold to help doctors prepare for re-certification exams often featured instructors saying physicians would never see a particular condition or use a certain diagnostic technique, but they needed to review it because it would be on the test. “Exam questions often are not relevant to physicians’ practice,” Teirstein says. “The questions are often out-dated. Most of the studying is done to learn the best answer for the test, which is very often not the current best practice.”

The result? According to the ABIM’S figures, the percentage of doctors passing the recertification test started dropping steadily. In 2010, some 88 percent of internists taking the maintenance of certification exams passed; by 2014, that had fallen to 80 percent. Hematologists dropped from 91% to 82%. Interventional cardiologists went from 94% to 88%. Kidney specialists, 95% to 84%. Lung experts, 90% to 79%.

Wow. Was it Obamacare? Ebola? A sign of the end times? What was turning so many American doctors so stupid all of sudden? Not to worry, the ABIM declares—the board could help doctors keep their certification. All they had to do was pay to take the tests again. Making doctors appear ignorant became big business, worth millions of dollars, and the ABIM went from being a genial organization celebrated by the medical profession to something more akin to a protection racket.

The ABIM disputes that characterization. Lorie B. Slass, a spokesperson for the ABIM, says “there have been and always will be” fluctuations in test results, since different groups of doctors are taking the exam each year. But in each of the categories cited above, there are no statistically significant fluctuations—the passing rate keeps going down. So the point remains: Either doctors are getting dumber each year, or the test that helps determine who gets to practice medicine has less and less to do with the actual practice of  medicine.

Slass says the suggestion that the ABIM is “purposefully failing candidates on their exams to generate more revenue is flat-out wrong.” Maybe so, but according to the Form 990s filed with the Internal Revenue Service, in 2001—just as the earliest round of new-test standard was kicking in, the ABIM brought in $16 million in revenue. Its total compensation for all of its top officers and directors was $1.3 million. The highest paid officer received about $230,000 a year. Two others made about $200,000, and the starting salary below that was less than $150,000. Printing was its largest contractor expense. That was followed by legal fees of $106,000.

Twelve years later? ABIM is showering cash on its top executives—including some officers earning more than $400,000 a year. In the tax period ending June 2013—the latest data available—ABIM brought in $55 million in revenue. Its highest paid officer made more than $800,000 a year from ABIM and related ventures. The total pay for ABIM’s top officers quadrupled. Its largest contractor expense went to the same law firm it was using a decade earlier, but the amounts charged were 20 times more.

And there is another organization called the ABIM Foundation that does...well, it’s not quite clear what it does. Its website reads like a lot of mumbo-jumbo. The Foundation conducts surveys on how “organizational leaders have advanced professionalism among practicing physicians.” And it is very proud of its “Choosing Wisely” program, an initiative “to help providers and patients engage in conversations to reduce overuse of tests and procedures,” with pamphlets, videos and other means.

Doesn’t sound like much, until you crack open the 990s. This organization is loaded. In the tax year ended 2013, it brought in $20 million—not from contributions, not from selling a product, not for providing a service. No, the foundation earned $20 million on the $74 million in assets it holds.

The foundation racked up $5.2 million in expenses, which—other than $245,000 it gave to the ABIM—was divided into two categories: compensation and “other.” Who is getting all this compensation? The very same people who are top earners at the ABIM. Deep in the filings, it says the foundation spends $1.9 million in “program and project expenses,” with no explanation what the programs and projects are.

There are some expenditures, though, that are easy to understand: The foundation spends $153,439 a year on at least one condominium. And it picks up the tab so the spouse of the top-officer can fly along on business trips for free.

The ABIM is not what it was. Its original mission was to make sure doctors provide patients with the best care. When condominiums and lavish salaries and free trips and making money off of physicians failing tests became a priority, the evidence suggests the organization lost its way.

But that may not matter soon. In January 2014, when the ABIM issued a series of new requirements for maintaining certification—that would have generated all new fees—Teirstein and his colleagues declared “enough.” They recently formed a new recertification organization called the “National Board of Physicians and Surgeons.” It will only consider doctors for recertification who have passed the initial certification exam that has been required for decades. Doctors must also log a set number of hours with programs that qualify under guidelines as continuing medical education. The group’s fees are much, much lower than those charged by the ABIM. And its board and management—all top names in medicine—work for free.

This new board is not just about breaking the ABIM monopoly, Teirstein says, but is also part of an effort to put the right people in charge of the profession’s future. Medicine has been “controlled by individuals who are not involved with the day to day care of patients,” he says. “It is time for practicing physicians to take back the leadership.”
60  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: March 11, 2015, 08:52:50 PM
Now Breitbart reports that almost no State Department officials used government email.

What the heck is going on?  These people are supposed to working for us and what they do is public record.

This is a joke.   A slap in our faces.   And what the heck are all these people using email all day long for personal use while on the job anyway.

How many other government agencies are so corrupt.  I thought it was just Copyright and Patent Offices.  

For God's sake we need people to start oversight and minding the store.

As for Hillary, she will run.  And her mafia mob will ram her ahead.

The news of corruption just gets worse every darn day.   
61  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / I have said for years the Republican message sucks on: March 11, 2015, 08:48:38 PM
No party represents me.  Not even the Tea Party.
And many others feel the same way:

Poll: Jeb Bush Fares Horrendously With Middle Class Voters, Only 4 Percent Think He Represents Them

Jeb Bush
Gage Skidmore

by Matthew Boyle11 Mar 2015Washington, DC236

A minuscule 4 percent of Americans think that former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush represents middle class values well, numbers far worse than Hillary Clinton, President Barack Obama or either political party, a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll finds.

Bush’s biggest electability problems would come if he does survive what will be a bloodbath GOP primary, as it’s unlikely conservative Republican voters would even turn out for him in a November general election should he get the nomination. This poll shows yet again why that’s the case.

Respondents were asked the following question about Obama, Clinton, Bush, the Republican Party and the Democrat Party: “Let me read you a list of some groups and individuals, and I would like you to tell me how well each one represents the values of the middle class–very well, fairly well, just somewhat well, or not very well. If you don’t know the name, please just say so.”

A whopping 22 percent gave Obama a “very well” rating, and 18 percent did so for Clinton. The Democratic Party got 15 percent “very well” rating and Republicans got 7 percent. But Bush only managed to muster 4 percent, an abysmally low performance among arguably the most important part of the American public for any political candidate: the middle class.

A total of 40 percent responded Bush doesn’t represent middle class values, and 38 percent were somewhere in the middle between “very well” and “not very well.”

Bush’s spokeswoman Kristy Campbell hasn’t responded to an emailed request for comment in response to these numbers.

The survey was conducted from March 1 through March 5 with a sample of a 1,000 adults with a margin of error of 3.1 percent.
62  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: March 11, 2015, 07:48:17 PM
Judge Nepolitano basically said on the Kelly file last night there is nothing that we can do to compel her to turn over this server.

Which to me is astounding.   How is that possible?  A government (of the people for the people and by the people) official conducts business from her own computer and can tell us to go take a hike when we demand to know what she was doing while supposedly representing the United States.   The outrageousness  of it all.

63  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: March 10, 2015, 07:39:46 AM
Someone called into the Mark Levin radio broadcast and brought up an excellent point.  The US government has severe restrictions on peaceful use of nuclear power here in our country yet they support the use of nuclear power in Iran.

Anyone see a contradiction?
64  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / How did Lincoln become a lawyer? on: March 10, 2015, 02:18:41 AM
http://www.answers.com/Q/Where_did_Abraham_Lincoln_go_to_law_school
65  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: March 08, 2015, 09:47:41 AM
This is one article from the organization the speaker (I noted in the previous post) was promoting.  I am not a member and would not. 

A rather socialistic group.  Yet they are right about pointing out the large layer of administrative costs.   

He thinks the AHA is going to fail in a few years.   One could argue it is designed to fail in the march to single payer.  I don't know.

http://www.pnhp.org/news/2015/march/health-care-law-did-not-end-discrimination-against-those-with-pre-existing-condition
66  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: March 07, 2015, 02:39:16 PM
So six foreign students get to decide if the flag can be flown in UC Irvine?

More dismantling from within.

I suppose the professors give their whole hearted support.


67  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: March 07, 2015, 02:33:57 PM
If it isn't obvious by now that there is only one way to stop them?

68  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: March 06, 2015, 07:07:40 PM
The speaker I heard today could answer this.   The numbers and stats above are probably all distortions.  The Affordable Health Care Act has done little if anything to reduce costs.  The administrative costs could be as high as 30%.  The only ones who did well are the same ones who havce done well in the rest of the economy - big companies who have the resources to squeeze out all competition and soak the system.   Without the input of tax dollars to supplement these companies they would go out of business.  We are supplementing them with tax money.

I ask everyone who reads this board:

How much less are you paying for your insurance and is your plan better than last year or the year before that?

I know the answer.

The speaker I heard advocates for single payer.   He made a strong case and almost has me convinced he may be right.

If I can find the website he recommended I'll post but I lost the site when I left a piece of paper somewhere while answering a page.


Based on what his presentation concluded based on a lot of statistics and sources the Newsweek piece is exactly what one would expect from a veiled Democrat outlet - pure propaganda.




69  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: March 06, 2015, 06:52:03 PM
"The Associated Press
 and Judicial Watch announced they’re considering bringing lawsuits"

Judicial Watch probably will.  Thank God for them but
 
does anyone really think for one second the *AP* will sue Hillary?

I don't. 
70  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / I hear a challenge on: March 05, 2015, 02:12:00 PM
http://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mma/ronda-rousey-theoretically-i-could-beat-100-percent-of-ufc-mens-bantamweights/ar-BBigDvo
71  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Chomsky on: March 05, 2015, 10:22:13 AM
States it was the Iraq invasion by the US that beget ISIS.   Wait I thought ISIS birthed in Syria not Iraq.   Also no mention of course that Baraq's removal of Americans out of Iraq left a void being filled by ISIS in the West of Iraq and Iran in the East of Iraq.  I suspect that ISIS would not have invaded Iraq if we had a real US force still there and Iran would not suddenly be a ally in the fight against them.   

****Monday, March 2, 2015 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | PREVIOUS: Noam Chomsky: After Dangerous Proxy War, Keeping...

Noam Chomsky on How the Iraq War Birthed ISIS & Why U.S. Policy Undermines the Fight Against It
Noam Chomsky: To Deal with ISIS, U.S. Should Own Up to Chaos of Iraq War & Other Radicalizing Acts

Noam Chomsky, world-renowned political dissident, linguist and author. He is institute professor emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught for more than 50 years. His forthcoming book, co-authored with Ilan Pappé, is titled On Palestine.

Who Bankrolls the Islamic State? Private Donors in Gulf Oil States Cited as Key to ISIS Success
Feb 26, 2015 | Story

Endless War? Obama Sends Congress Expansive Anti-ISIS Measure 6 Months After Bombing Began
Feb 12, 2015 | Story

Rep. Keith Ellison on Obama’s Push to Sign TPP & Seek Authority to Expand War in Iraq & Syria
Jan 21, 2015 | Story


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As Iraq launches a new military operation to retake the city of Tikrit from the self-proclaimed Islamic State, thousands of Iraqi forces and militia fighters have converged in the city Samarra to strike nearby ISIS strongholds. The United States is expected to provide air support as part of its continued bombing campaign. The offensive comes as the Iraqi military prepares for a major U.S.-backed operation to retake Mosul from ISIS in the coming weeks. ISIS "is one of the results of the United States hitting a very vulnerable society with a sledgehammer, which elicited sectarian conflicts that had not existed," says Noam Chomsky. "It is hard to see how Iraq can even be held together at this point. It has been devastated by U.S. sanctions, the war, the atrocities that followed from it. The current policy, whatever it is, is not very likely to even patch up or even put band-aids on a cancer."



Transcript


This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Aaron Maté. Noam Chomsky is our guest for the hour, the world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author of over a hundred books, MIT professor emeritus. Aaron?

AARON MATÉ: Yes. Noam, I wanted to ask you about ISIS. The big news is that Iraq is planning a major offensive to retake Mosul. It’s currently launching strikes to recapture Tikrit with U.S. support. My question is about the effectiveness of the U.S. strategy. To what extent is the U.S. constrained by its own policies in terms of the effectiveness of defeating ISIS, constrains in terms of its ties to Saudi Arabia and its refusal to engage with Iran and groups like Hezbollah, which have been effective in fighting ISIS?

NOAM CHOMSKY: Patrick Cockburn, who has done by far the best reporting on this, describes it as an Alice in Wonderland strategy. The U.S. wants to destroy ISIS, but it’s opposing every force that’s fighting ISIS. So, the main state that’s opposed to ISIS is Iran. They support the Iraqi government, the Shiite government. But Iran is, you know, on our enemies list. Probably the main ground forces fighting ISIS are the PKK and its allies, which are on the U.S. terrorist list. That’s both in Iraq and in Syria. Saudi Arabia, our major ally, along with Israel, is both traditionally, for a long time, the main funder of ISIS and similar groups—not necessarily the government; rich Saudis, other people in the emirates—not only the funder, but they’re the ideological source. Saudi Arabia is committed, is dominated by an extremist fundamentalist version of Islam: Wahhabi doctrine. And ISIS is an extremist offshoot of the Wahhabi doctrine. Saudi Arabia is a missionary state. It establishes schools, mosques, spreading its radical Islamic version. So, they’re our ally. Our enemies are those who are fighting ISIS. And it’s more complex.

ISIS is a monstrosity. There’s not much doubt about that. It didn’t come from nowhere. It’s one of the results of the U.S. hitting a very vulnerable society—Iraq—with a sledgehammer, which elicited sectarian conflicts that had not existed. They became very violent. The U.S. violence made it worse. We’re all familiar with the crimes. Out of this came lots of violent, murderous forces. ISIS is one. But the Shiite militias are not that different. They’re carrying out—they’re the kind of the—when they say the Iraqi army is attacking, it’s probably mostly the Shiite militias with the Iraqi army in the background. I mean, the way the Iraqi army collapsed is an astonishing military fact. This is an army of, I think, 350,000 people, heavily armed by the United States and trained by the United States for 10 years. A couple of thousand guerrillas showed up, and they all ran away. The generals ran away first. And the soldiers didn’t know to do. They ran away after them.

AMY GOODMAN: We have 20 seconds.

NOAM CHOMSKY: Hmm?

AMY GOODMAN: We have 20 seconds.

NOAM CHOMSKY: Yeah. Well, now, it’s basically—the effect, it’s hard to see how Iraq can even be held together at this point. It’s been devastated by U.S. sanctions, the war, the atrocities that followed from it. The current policy, whatever it is, is not very likely to even patch up, put band-aids on the cancer.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to have to leave it there, but we’ll continue this discussion tomorrow on Democracy Now! Our guest, Noam Chomsky, institute professor emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
72  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama called out by a famous liberal on: March 04, 2015, 08:00:11 PM
I wonder if Dershowitz is becoming a conservative?   He even showed up on Fox's REDEYE one evening:

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsmax-Tv/Alan-Dershowitz-Benjamin-Netanyahu-Obama-Iran/2015/03/04/id/628190/?ns_mail_uid=95994711&ns_mail_job=1611692_03042015&s=al&dkt_nbr=zs7ii81q
73  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Giuliani on commie Frank Marshall Davis, Obama mentor on: March 04, 2015, 07:48:14 PM
http://spectator.org/articles/61849/here%E2%80%99s-guy-rudy-talking-about-frank-marshall-davis-communist-party-no-47544
74  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America on: March 04, 2015, 07:06:59 PM
I dunno.  We had a substantial Jewish population in my junior high and when it came to Passover and Yum Kippor we just stayed out to go to synagogue.  It was not a big deal and no one that I recall demanded the entire city's public schools close down for those holidays:

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2015/03/04/de-blasio-to-announce-addition-of-muslim-holidays-to-city-schools-schedule/
75  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: March 04, 2015, 07:47:05 AM
"A Clinton spokesman, Nick Merrill, told the newspaper that Clinton complied with the letter and spirit of the law because her advisers reviewed tens of thousands of pages of her personal emails to decide which ones to turn over to the State Department after the agency asked for them."

Here we go again.   More sleaze.
76  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: March 04, 2015, 07:07:23 AM
This fix for this is to start accelerating our burning of fossil fuels and especially coal to warm the Earth back up.
77  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: March 03, 2015, 01:03:40 PM
Obamster "warns" Benjamin not to release details of the deal he is pushing for .

Yet Obamster had  no problem leaking Israel's plans to attack Iran such as releasing the deal to use Khazakastan ( I think) as a base to launch a strike.

It is never a problem what Obamster does but how dare anyone cross him when he does the exact same to anyone else.

Yet the MSM surrounds the sleeze ball in chief.
78  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Anti-semitism & Jews on: March 02, 2015, 07:44:53 PM
Just a matter of time before we see violence on college grounds.
79  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Israel, and its neighbors on: March 02, 2015, 07:41:59 PM
Very sobering.
80  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: March 02, 2015, 07:33:20 PM
point well taken
81  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Legal issues on: March 01, 2015, 04:19:28 PM
Well it was a lawsuit against the hospital.  Attorney on Cable just finished saying how hospitals need to protect their employees.   I guess the President doesn't have to protect Americans.   Hospitals do.
82  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc on: March 01, 2015, 04:18:06 PM
Well wait a second.  It was Obama's policies that allowed the Ebola virus into the US that led to her infection.   This was the same girl shown hugging Obamster.  She should be blaming him.  Not the hospital.

http://res.dallasnews.com/interactives/nina-pham/
83  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / second thought on this on: March 01, 2015, 01:44:47 PM
Benjamin N has more guts to stand up to Obama the tyrant than the vast majority of Republicans.   Sad commentary on our politicians.
84  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud, SEIU/ACORN et al, etc. on: March 01, 2015, 01:35:18 PM
ID cards for this is great but ID cards to vote is "disenfranchising".   The left has made us into a laughing stock:

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/02/28/ny-id-cards-a-smash/
85  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / My sentiments too on: March 01, 2015, 12:57:57 PM
Unbelievable.  That wart hog face again.  The one with his anti-Semite daughter on MSLSD.   To think he was not given a job with Obama because he was viewed as anti-Israel.

They thought he would cost them a few Jewish voters.   

What a laugh.  We just got Obama.   And the Jewish Democrats are silent.   Indeed many are lashing out at Netenyahu.   Not Obama who is selling down the radioactive Iranian freeway but the one guy who is trying to prevent the possibility of another holocaust.

They claim the Zionists don't speak for them on ads in between Mark Levins radio show.   That they are Jews who support their country and their President.   They are kidding themselves.  They are not Jews.  They are Democrats.  They would be trashing the President if he was a Republican.   
86  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / police treats herion OD on: March 01, 2015, 12:47:07 PM
I didn't realize it is just a nasal spray.  I wouldn't think it fair for a police officer to be expected to start IV access and push a drug IV but this seems easy enough:

http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2015/03/police_using_narcan_save_another_woodbridge_overdo.html
87  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: March 01, 2015, 11:18:28 AM
The country has 18 trillion debt and the MSM as always turns it around and blames Republicans in Congress for trying to reign in some costs as a "dark cloud".  I don't understand why the Cans are not out in public every second they get debunking this.

http://news.yahoo.com/homeland-security-funding-drama-darkens-u-fiscal-outlook-060358268--business.html
88  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Jeb Bush on: March 01, 2015, 11:01:39 AM
"As we call for a return to a strong foreign policy, we are going to be accused of wanting to redo what did not work in Iraq under Bush 2, and Jeb, an honorable man, will have a hard time criticizing him and distinguishing himself from his brother"

Yes indeed.   
89  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Another warrior against union-government corruption on: March 01, 2015, 10:52:52 AM

Akin to Scott Walker and to a much smaller degree Christi is the Illinois governor:
http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/will022615.php3
90  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Legal issues on: March 01, 2015, 10:01:49 AM
Well wait a second.  It was Obama's policies that allowed the Ebola virus into the US that led to her infection.   This was the same girl shown hugging Obamster.  She should be blaming him.  Not the hospital.

http://res.dallasnews.com/interactives/nina-pham/
91  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / J, like H, like W just not equipped to deal with the threat to US as a nation on: March 01, 2015, 08:53:04 AM
Kind of bizarre that Drudge reports Bush had "supporters" bused in to CPAC from DC.   One can wonder if all these "supporters" were people who had jobs with a Bush at some point and are vying for jobs with this Bush now.  

I was wondering why he got significant (though not huge) audience applause at times during the actually very good interview by Sean Hannity.  

Crafty, thanks for your always logical and reasoned thoughts.  Let me explain why I am against J.  Not because I don't like him.  He and is family are wonderful people, very smart, appear to be very honest, and are doing their best and what they think is right throughout their public service.   Yet they are inadequate to confront the "transformation" the liberals are doing to the United States, and actually the world.  Obama is just the "front man".

Let me explain:

"I could live with a compromise that AFTER THE BORDERS ARE CONTROLLED"

I used to think this way too.   I recall Doug once calling me a rhino some years ago.   He was probably right.   Then I learned.   The problem with compromise it is only a temporary rear guard action the delays but never rolls back the progressive onslaught.   It won't stop till the concept of country, sovereignty, borders, and real free will is gone.
One world nation under the new God, which will be ONE world GOVERNMENT with total control over every aspect of humanity on this planet.  Oh, they will say representatives are elected and it is some sort of Democracy but can anyone not imagine the totalistic control government and their favorite companies and people will have over all of us.  There already is quite a bit of that now particularly with this tyrant in the WH but just imagine what it will be like then.  Listening to that NYU professor (Jeffrey Sachs)  give his talk at my nephews graduation awakened me up to this goal of the liberal elite.  Ironically I was the only one of my clan there who even realized what he was saying.   My nephew who now works with Bobby Jindal thought the speech was not political!  Wow.  This is important to me when I think of the prospect of another Bush.   A  Bush will not turn back this onslaught to any real measure.   Yeah they may put in a few fingers to plug up  the leaks in the dam but will not really rebuild the dam and the water it holds.  

J Bush will govern the same way his brothers did.   Compromise and appease.   Remember who followed both his immediate family members in the WH!   If there was something great (like Reagan) about them this would not have happened.  Indeed, Reagan got H swept in only for him to squander the conservative wave to Clinton.  And that was after he earned a short lived 90+ approval ratings from the successful the invasion of Iraq and liberation of Kuwait.  

It is early.  I am not ruling J out.  Just very skeptical and leery.  He is going to have to put more than his words out there for me.
One more thing.  I don't like his calling himself a "grownup" whenever he implies the conservative Tea Party types are not.   What an insult.  We have a reason to be angry.   We have reasons to want to really put our feet down.  We have a reason to want to fight.  "Conversations" are not enough to fight back the left.
92  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Environmental issues on: February 28, 2015, 08:28:56 PM
Appreciate the opinions.

I just don't know.

Got my latest National Geographic magazine and the lead article is about "deniers" of science from those who still link vaccines with autism to of course those who deny Climate Change or Global Warming is man made.

Scientific American has been replete with references to this from front to back almost no matter what the article topic is.   It is really annoying how EVERTHING somehow gets tied to man made Climate change.

Can this many people be this crazy or am I missing something?   How is nearly the entire academic world making this their reason d' etre?
93  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Jeb Bush on: February 28, 2015, 08:24:28 PM
"He answered the questions directly and without flinching, with vigor, and calls to economic growth for all. "

Too bad he is a believer in big government.   He is absolutely ridiculous with the immigration thing.  What a sell out.   No other way to call it. 

But yes he has some positives.   The Bushes are great Americans but I hope we can get someone who is not an appeaser.   He is.   

Remember his father:   "voodoo economics".   Yet Jeb claims he is for tax cuts to spur the economy even with the astronomical debt load.   I just don't believe he means it.

 
94  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Climate change on: February 25, 2015, 06:59:28 AM
So what do you think Crafty, Doug, GM, Objectivist and anyone else on the board?

Is climate change man made?   Are the lefties right?

I find it hard to just dismiss them out of hand although turning it into a religion etc and a political excuse to puch for all the centralized control I refuse to accept.
95  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Nuclear War, WMD issues on: February 25, 2015, 06:55:27 AM
First if anyone actually believes it will take Iran 10 yrs to get a bomb must not have been reading the news the last 10 yrs.
If anyone thinks we will be able to contain them for 10 yrs must also have not been reading anything the last decade.

This reminds me of the handling of our economy.  Keep throwing money at the debt and hope we can keep pushing off the inevitable because something totally unforeseen or unexpected will miraculously come out of know where to save us.

Nonetheless the Dem party will naturally rally round their guy to promote this as some sort of gigantic ingenious breakthrough giving the Nobel Peace Prize winner infinite praise and a earned monument in the pantheon of the world's great leaders.
96  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / This is becoming a race "riot". But I mean a laughing riot! on: February 23, 2015, 09:10:13 PM
This is getting weirder by the day.  Now he is being sued for discrimination by some Black organization for "looking the other way" when Time Warner and Comcast
allegedly discriminate against Black owned media.   It couldn't be their product doesn't sell.  It is of course because they are black owned.   Of course.  So let me try to get this straight.   We have a street thug shaking down companies to pay him off so he doesn't call them racists.  Yet he himself is a total goes around accusing anything that breathes and is white racist.   Then we have another Black group calling him a discriminator because he doesn't call the companies they claim are discriminating them as racist.

And I would assume because this group now suing him cannot be called racist (his usual offensive move) because they are black.  Are they hiring Black or Jewish lawyers.   cheesy

******Rev. Al Sharpton Being Sued $20 Billion in Racial Discrimination Lawsuit

By Robert Hoggard -
 
Feb 23, 2015
 
Allegedly, Rev. Al Sharpton, founder and president of National Action Network, is being sued $20 billion dollars by the National Association of African-American Owned Media, a California limited liability company; and Entertainment Studios Networks, Inc., a California corporation.

Mediate reports, “Comcast and Time Warner Cable were served with a lawsuit from a group of African-American media owners seeking $20 billion — yes, “billion,” with a “b” — for discriminatory practices, and alleges that Al Sharpton and his organizations received big money to look the other way.”

The Hollywood Reporter writes, “Even though the FCC hasn’t yet ruled on the proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner Cable, one group has already filed a lawsuit claiming at least $20 billion in damages from the way the two giants allegedly discriminate against black-owned media.”

The Hollywood Reporter also reports that “Sharpton objects that the budget for National Action Network is not even $4 million, and as for his MSNBC show, he believes he has the most successful show in the 6 p.m. hour at MSNBC, that ‘the numbers speak for themselves.’ The lawsuit seems to count Sharpton’s reported $750,000 annual salary at MSNBC as part of the $3.8 million and leverages past criticism of the noted civil rights leader that’s rooted in him allegedly turning an eye and forgoing boycotts and protests on corporations upon receiving monetary contributions to the National Action Network.”

Sources tell The Buzz that perhaps Rev. Al plans to share with the press these looming accusations specifically. His show “Politics Nation” airs every evening at 6pm.

The 30 some page lawsuit against Rev. Al, Comcast/Time Warner, N.A.A.C.P, and others which is seeking a trial can be viewed here.*****
97  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: February 23, 2015, 08:53:15 PM
"Well, she is right about one thing: Obama is anti-Semitic"

I agree but,

1)   That wouldn't have been why she would have been ousted.   She is incompetent.

2)   She is not really Jewish.   She is a Democrat.
98  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: February 22, 2015, 08:51:58 AM
Well, I can say I don't recall anyone who headed the DNC who garnered my appreciation or admiration.   It is interesting when we occasionally hear stories of unethical behavior from Democrats when one of more of them are pissed off by another one of their kindred.   

The phony anti-Semitic and anti-woman card:

**********In 2013, Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz “sensed” President Barack Obama might try to replace her as chair — and it led her to set in motion an ethically questionable plan to prevent her ouster, according to a new Politico report.

She “began to line up supporters to suggest the move was both anti-woman and anti-Semitic,” the report states, citing anonymous sources.

Schultz did indeed keep her position as DNC chair and sources who have reportedly spoken with the Democratic congresswoman said she believes no one will remove her before her term ends in 2017.

The Politico report also outlined Schultz’s isolation within the Democratic Party and indicates she has barely even talked to Obama since 2011:

Throughout her time as chair, Wasserman Schultz has turned off colleagues, other top Democrats and current and former staff for a management style that strikes many as self-centered — even for a politician — and often at the expense of the DNC or individual candidates or campaigns. Many top Democrats, including some she counts as supporters and friends, privately complain about her trying to use the DNC as a vehicle for her own personal promotion, and letting her own ambition get in the way of larger goals.******
99  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Senator Marco Rubio on: February 20, 2015, 09:00:05 PM
One has to have the temperament of iron I suppose.   Can't say the truth to the "left".  Just can't.   They come after you like a brick s..t-house.

Look at the way they are going after Gulliani even though he states the obvious.   Everything he said he backs with facts.   So he can't voice his opinion?

I could almost but not quite let Rubio off with the "I believe [Obama] loves American.  I have a harder time doing that when he essentially calls Gulliani's remark "embarrassing".

We all have our opinions and those are mine.  I am not embarrassed.   I am more embarrassed by the cave ins on the right.   



100  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin, LGBT, "discrimination", & discrimination. on: February 20, 2015, 08:49:47 PM
I wasn't aware of the lynchings either.   It is just annoying to hear this guy using this to make some sort of equivalency point about present day problems.

If we were so rotten to those South of the  border they wouldn't be flocking here by the millions.
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