Dog Brothers Public Forum
Return To Homepage
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 21, 2014, 11:06:16 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the Dog Brothers Public Forum.
83742 Posts in 2261 Topics by 1067 Members
Latest Member: Shinobi Dog
* Home Help Search Login Register
  Show Posts
Pages: 1 ... 36 37 [38] 39 40 ... 44
1851  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Palin emails to be released on: June 10, 2011, 05:45:51 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43281157/ns/politics-more_politics
1852  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: June 10, 2011, 05:44:31 AM
The answer is that it depends.  The budget itself can be broken down into pieces, hence the theoretical ability for a line item veto.  However, there are many instances, most famously in places like the NSA and CIA funding, where the budget simply says something like "operations."  This is for funding, but a very select few know how the funding actually is used.

A pretty good place to begin is here: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy12/pdf/BUDGET-2012-BUD-7.pdf (defense specific) or http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy12/index.html (with links to many different portions of the budget). 

Is this the info you want Guro and/or GM?
1853  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues and LE in action on: June 09, 2011, 05:35:26 PM
I am not supporting him being fired.  Let me say, however, that you can reverse your earlier question.  How do you, as a Rice administrator, explain a campus shooter and being a man short at the time?
1854  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues and LE in action on: June 09, 2011, 11:50:41 AM
I have heard from people in the know that retired police officers make bad body guards because their attention can be drawn away from their protectorate by situations such as arguments, fights, and other real or simulated issues.  The desire to help is not a bad thing, but situations can dictate the type of help given.  In this case, I think he was morally correct to enter the fight.  However, JDN is right about the hole in the Rice security due to his departure. 
1855  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / TE law bans emotional distress images on: June 09, 2011, 05:53:24 AM
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/06/tenn-law-bans-posting-images-that-cause-emotional-distress.ars
1856  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Privacy, Big Brother (State and Corporate) & the 4th Amendment on: June 08, 2011, 08:26:23 PM
Well, that is good news.  Thanks GM.
1857  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / SWAT busts into house over student loan default on: June 08, 2011, 11:48:04 AM
http://www.rawstory.com/rawreplay/2011/06/swat-team-busts-into-house-over-student-loan-default/
1858  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Fall Dog Brothers Open Gathering of the Pack 9/18/11 on: June 08, 2011, 11:46:04 AM
I am 44 cents lighter as of this morning.  Looking forward to it!
1859  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / War Dog (1 and 2) on: June 08, 2011, 08:41:25 AM
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/05/04/war_dog

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/05/12/war_dog_ii
1860  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / More on German Nuclear Power on: June 08, 2011, 06:17:30 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43318496/ns/us_news-christian_science_monitor
1861  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: States Rights on: June 07, 2011, 08:32:09 PM
I appreciate the distinction.
1862  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: How to cut government spending on: June 07, 2011, 08:11:40 PM
I use Congress's definition because Congress passed the law with the description, passes the budget, and raises the money.  You don't have to like the definition, but I will accept it because I am not an activist president.

1863  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: States Rights on: June 07, 2011, 08:08:57 PM
The term can be traced to the Articles of Confederation.  The term is not in the Constitution.  I would hesitate to say that states do not have rights.  There is nothing preventing a state to have powers and rights. 
1864  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: June 07, 2011, 08:04:20 PM
There are a great many who feel that the WPR is unconstitutional.  Levin is hardly the only one, and not all of those who feel this way are former adminstration members. 
1865  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama killed the War Powers Resolution on: June 07, 2011, 12:02:16 PM
http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/268973/obama-kills-war-powers-act-rich-lowry
1866  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics: What policies to dig us out of our economic crisis? on: June 07, 2011, 05:27:24 AM
From GM. Moved here at the request of our host: "An outstanding question".  Open to EVERYONE, not just BD.

"Ok, BD. You are the new president to be sworn in 1/2013. What policies would you want to dig us out of our economic crisis."



Let me begin with some caveats and such.  1, I do not have a staff of economists and policy experts whose sole job is to inform me on the issues.  2, I do not currently have as much time to divulge in non-professional research as I would like.  3, I will likely be unable to respond to the inevitable criticisms I face for at least a few days.  4, as a new president, I must remind you that I am new kind of president.  In this case, I ran because I fear the accumulated powers that this office has gained in the era of the "modern presidency."  5, and related to 4, the Constitution does not have a place for the president in the budget process.  The president's role, most directly is related to the 1921 Budget and Accounting Act.  I would like to cede some of the budgetary powers back to Congress.  This stance will generally help to inform many of my budget stances.

So, here goes:

According to
http://nationalpriorities.org/resources/federal-budget-101/budget-briefs/federal-discretionary-and-mandatory-spending/, about 60% of the discretionary budget is military.  Therefore, we have to start there.  I would cut 10% of the military budget, but would focus on military pork projects.  The numbers and examples are dated, but I hope we can all agree with Cato here: http://www.cato.org/pubs/handbook/hb105-8.html

I would increase the Social Security tax by 5%.  I would also increase the age of retirement to 70, or perhaps even 72. 

I would have a welfare to work program.  Not only would it get people off of the govt. dole, it would increase the tax revenue.

I would cut non-military executive branch officials by 25%.  Smaller WH staff, EOP staff, and the like by either cutting the programs or eliminating them outright.

I would encourgage MOCs to limit their staffs, by matching the cuts I make in my staff.  I have even toyed with the idea of asking for a constitutional amendment mandating a shift to a unicameral legislature. 

Relatedly, govt. bureaucrats actually earn more than the private sector equivalents, on average.  I would cut retirement benefits, and institute a pay freeze for all federal employees for the first three years of their employment. 

I would cut subsidies to farmers who don't grow food. 

Let the chorus of boos and the spittle begin to fly.  I am sure I have angered at least one of you. 
1867  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: June 04, 2011, 03:48:29 PM
GM, do you want unrealistic campaign promises or items that as president I can actually change as president?
1868  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / 17 pyramids found on: June 03, 2011, 09:04:39 PM
http://www.tecca.com/news/2011/05/25/17-egypt-pyramids-discovered-infrared-satellite/
1869  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 03, 2011, 08:16:54 PM
"...he got rather stiff and prickly..."

Not stiff and prick-y?  evil
1870  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism on: June 03, 2011, 08:14:41 PM
A beer summit could lead to excellent photo ops, and serve as a launching pad for the campaign!  Maybe we can even rent a big bus with ours names on it, drive it around, and say we are on vacation???

Bigdog: "I wish we could talk things out over some beers DougMacG.  I often feel like we take different approaches to addressing the same issues.  I think we should run on the same ticket some time."


I would be honored to have a beer summit with you, no preconditions.  In the meantime I would like to learn all I can about your approach to the issues.  When we get to the point of running on the same ticket, I'm hope the discussion will have moved beyond the liberal fascism thread. wink
1871  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: June 03, 2011, 08:11:55 PM
I have heard of college administrators finding evidence, such as self posted FaceBook pictures, of students drinking/smoking/smoking/stealing/etc. on campus (or elsewhere) and using those as evidence of transgression that can lead to disciplinary actions.  There is a whole new public culture in those under about 25, and it creeps older. 
1872  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / high protein delicacy on: June 03, 2011, 08:06:21 PM
http://recipe.cicadayear.com/
1873  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 02, 2011, 05:03:13 PM
I wish we could talk things out over some beers DougMacG.  I often feel like we take different approaches to addressing the same issues.  I think we should run on the same ticket some time.

Denmark, a Scandanavian country, is number 8. 
1874  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: June 02, 2011, 06:04:03 AM
"Here you are being the literalist, which is good in constitutional law, and sometimes you pull our leg a little, which is also good in the human spirit and sometimes I can follow you and sometimes it flies over my head.  In this case I don't believe and I don't believe that you believe that Stossel thinks the constitution authorizing federal government powers is 8 words long.  I took that as a figure of speech meaning that government has gone way beyond where it should have gone or where it was authorized to go."

Here I took him literally, as he was invoking the Framers when he made the argument.  I could be wrong, of course.  My overall point was that there are expansive powers, not just a list of powers, provided to Congress and the President in the Constitution.  I should note that I believe that these powers have been expanded too much.  I also believe that Congress has largely abdicated is role in the separations of power and checks and balances.   

"The most telling clause I re-discovered about how large and intrusive a federal government the framers envisioned IMO was where they wrote that the congress needs to convene at least once each year, on the first Monday of December, if they haven't already made other plans to get together.  How does that compare with what we do today?"

Agreed, although much of the "extra" activity is posturing, reelection activities, and Sunday morning talk shows (and potentially tweeting pics of your junk to college girls). 

P.S. You've not addressed the vesting clause in Article II, in my mind an even more important issue that Congress. 

 

1875  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 02, 2011, 05:53:21 AM
DMG: Excellent posts.  I would note that Norway would be the 6th ranked state.  I'm not sure that undermines my argument, since I had been focusing on Norway as a point of comparison.

I'm not sure what you mean about not using models for the most important analysis. 

Perhaps I've not been clear, but my point was not that tax cuts can't/don't/won't lead to jobs.  It's that it doesn't necessarily lead to jobs.  There are other issues at hand. 

Are you contending that the tax cuts led directly to the recession?  If not, there is one pretty obvious issue.
1876  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 02, 2011, 05:42:30 AM
 cheesy cheesy cheesy
1877  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 09:28:43 PM
The same basic argument can be made about the unemployment rate in the US, where that statistic is based on people are looking for work.  Many give up before finding a job, so the unemployment rate in the US is not a real indication of the number people working.  Next argument, please. 
1878  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Warriors in action on: June 01, 2011, 09:02:39 PM
Shot in the face by a .45.  And it pissed him off.  Stones.  Big ones!  Thanks for sharing. 
1879  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 08:49:32 PM
http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2010_EN_Tables_reprint.pdf

Number 1.  Norway
Number 4.  U.S.

http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/indicators/66706.html
Savings of Norwegians is more than 16x that of Americans (might explain the disposable income)

GDP of Norway is about $12,000 more than for US http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/indicators/62006.html
GNI of Norway is higher http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/indicators/90406.html
Unemployment rate is lower http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/indicators/44006.html (So much for higher taxes leading to job cuts, you know, automatically)


When I built my own dataset, with nothing included but income factors, Luxenbourg is 1, Norway 2, Hong Kong is 3, Iceland is 9, Denmark 11, Finland is 14.  Can't find the US on the list.  Literally.

1880  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 07:53:02 PM
http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2007/08/cross-country-c.html

"Cross-Country Comparisons of Inequality in Market and Disposable Income: Policy Matters"
Stephen Gordon looks at the relationship between inequality and government policy:


Cross-country comparisons of inequality in market and disposable income: Policy matters, Worthwhile Canadian Initiative: This graph is taken from a recent Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) working paper (45-page pdf):


Click on graph to enlarge
The countries are arranged in ascending order of inequality in disposable income, and  the Nordic countries take four of the top five positions. What strikes me is the extent to which this is due to government policy: the Gini coefficient for market income in Canada is the same as Denmark's, and is quite a bit lower than in Sweden. Indeed, Sweden is closer to the US than it is to any of the other Nordic countries.

A recurrent theme in discussions of the Nordic model takes the form of "That's all very well, but those policies won't work here without [insert some feature of Nordic countries here]." Libertarian types who would otherwise approve of the free market dynamism of the Nordics assert that the Nordic model can only work in small, homogeneous countries. As a general argument, I'm not convinced - but I can see why it would be hard to export the Nordic model to the US.

At the other end of the spectrum - those who would otherwise approve of Nordic levels of spending on social programs - some (eg: this commenter) point to the role of trade unions. But it's hard to conclude from this chart that union density matters much when it comes to reducing inequality. For example, look at Germany (where unions play a crucial role in setting wages) and the US (where they are decidedly less important): both have identical levels of inequality of market income. The distribution of disposable income is lower in Germany because of its redistributive policies, not because unions are more powerful.

That's not to say that cross-country institutional/cultural idiosyncrasies aren't important; they are. But there's little reason to believe that these factors have to be  changed before the Nordic model can work
1881  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 06:37:36 PM
I think you should look at GDP (by population) of other countries, notably Scandavian countries (but a few others) with higher tax rates and more per capita wealth.

You know why?  Variables. 

We can see that additional taxes and regulation harm tax revenue and economic growth. "No society has ever taxed it's self into prosperity." We might debate smaller policies, but free markets work best.
1882  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: June 01, 2011, 06:31:32 PM
Now Doug, if you can find where I said that the federal government shall run all aspects of private housing, then we can discuss this.  I didn't see that mentioned in the Stossel piece either.  What was it that was said last week about apples meeting kumquats?HuhHuh

But make sure you tell me exactly and directly how the following powers  "end at keeping the peace, enforcing contracts, and property rights."

To establish Post Offices and Post Roads
 To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization
To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts
To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;
To provide and maintain a Navy;
To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;
disciplining, the Militia
To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof

(From liberalism thread, BD post)
Stossel: "The Founders knew [where government should end and personal responsibility begins].  Government should end at keeping the peace, enforcing contracts, and property rights."  I wonder if Stossel has read Article I, section 8 and the vesting clause of Article II. 

Okay, I'll bite.  Where does it say the federal government shall run all aspects of private housing?  I've read it twice now and still can't find it.

The closest I could come is: "To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections..." with Fannie Mae being the militia and private contracts being the insurrection.  Am I close?
-----------
To borrow money on the credit of the United States;

To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;

To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures;

To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;

To establish Post Offices and Post Roads;

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against the Law of Nations;

To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;

To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;

To provide and maintain a Navy;

To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;

To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;

To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings; And

To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.
------------
"The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America...."
1883  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 06:20:01 PM
"That economists can't and don't predict recessions accurately is a fact."

But economists can predict with absolute certainty that tax cuts will produce X in increased revenue/jobs/etc.?  Of course not, but the willingness to believe that is undeterred.  There are models, with margins of error, standard deviations, error terms (not that those are included enough) and even the models that include a dozen or more variables can only predict a small portion of the outcome.   
1884  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 01, 2011, 06:12:12 PM
Of course it isn't compelling.  It is funny though.  And note that I said nothing about that.  I did note the CNN bit though, since this is the media issues thread. 

And I LOVE (please note the sarcasm) is inabilty to deny it is his junk.

More on "Weinergate." make sure you watch the whole thing.  More on CNN's propensity to opine!  

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-may-31-2011/distinguished-member-of-congress?xrs=share_copy

I'm not sure Stewart's "His d*ck is too small" defense is very compelling. It wouldn't be hard, I mean difficult for the FBI to determine if Weiner's account was hacked. Funny how he hasn't asked for an investigation but lawyered up instead. It's almost like he has something to hide.
1885  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: June 01, 2011, 11:14:31 AM
Stossel: "For the first time since the founding of the Republic, people are visibly mad.  They are pushing back against the growth of government."  This is only true if one counts the founding of the Republic as being around 2000, rather than the late 1700's.  The push back against the Alien and Sedition Acts, the nullification crisis, the Civil War, most of the elections in the early 1900's, and there goes the Reagan Revolution.  I guess conservatives can put his false impact to rest.  Reagan Democrats?  Never happened.  RR landslide in 1984.  Down the conservative wormhole, I guess.  


Art Laffer's version of facts (admittedly not taken from his discussion within the video): http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2010/06/art-laffer-make-up-your-own-facts-here/
Laffer on the housing market bubble: http://realestaterecord.blogspot.com/2008/03/art-laffer.html

People get elected or reelected all the time by criticising government.  Look at congressional elections for evidence.  On this Gary Johnson isn't all that special.  His willingness to use the veto is noteworthy, but it is also worth noting that as governor he had the use of the line item veto, which presidents do not have.  

Stossel: "The Founders knew [where government should end and personal responsibility begins].  Government should end at keeping the peace, enforcing contracts, and property rights."  I wonder if Stossel has read Article I, section 8 and the vesting clause of Article II.  

He sure talks a good game, though.
1886  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 01, 2011, 09:14:09 AM
"I have not known George Will to open his criticism with a blatantly false statement.  Seems to me he makes a painstakingly effort to quote his opponents accurately."

That is because George Will has a Ph.D. in political science.  You can trust those people.  And, believe it or not, I prefer the three I mentioned to Rodgers. 

1887  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 01, 2011, 09:11:22 AM
More on "Weinergate." make sure you watch the whole thing.  More on CNN's propensity to opine!  

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-may-31-2011/distinguished-member-of-congress?xrs=share_copy
1888  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media Issues on: June 01, 2011, 09:08:07 AM
It is also easy, since he works for CS Monitor to get confused about the news source.  You know, since he left CNN in 2005. 
http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/its-official-walter-rodgers-leaves-cnn_b6703
1889  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: From a corrspondant from the "keeping them honest CNN" on: June 01, 2011, 05:58:38 AM
Walter Rodgers is a columnist for the Christian Science Monitor.  He gets paid to write opinion pieces, and his work is not intended to be "objective" any more than George Will, Mona Charen, or Charles Krauthammer. 

Objective journoulism de jour: rolleyes angry

 By Walter Rodgers Walter Rodgers – Fri May 27, 10:16 am ET
“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it,” instructed the Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels, “people will eventually come to believe it.”

For 2-1/2 years, the big lie repeated about President Obama has been that he’s not a real leader. Responsible critics called him diffident, spineless, and rudderless. Irresponsible critics called him a socialist, a Muslim, and not an American. Now, even after his brilliant planning and direction of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, detractors are complaining that he didn’t have the guts to release photos of Mr. bin Laden’s corpse.

Outdated notions of leadershipSome of this maligning simply reflects the same savage partisan attacks leveled against every president (except Ronald Reagan) since Watergate. Some of it reflects darker bigotry toward Mr. Obama. But it also shows our outdated and wrongheaded notions of leadership.

American culture mistakenly prizes bravado and arrogance as sure signs of leadership. Public showmanship – like donning a flight suit in front of a “Mission Accomplished” banner – is easy. Quiet, cool, competence that gets results – like pulling together an international coalition to protect civilians in Libya in record time – is hard.

It’s a bias we learn as kids. Our history books lionize war heroes, yet are often silent about the diplomats who prevented conflict.

QUIZ: What's your political IQ?

AccomplishmentsLet’s recall the herculean tasks Obama has already accomplished:

He stabilized the worst economy since the Great Depression. Though unemployment remains stubborn, the stock market is basically back to where it was before the global economic meltdown. His stimulus bill kept America humming and saved hundreds of thousands of jobs, while his rescue of General Motors saved an industrial icon.

His administration kept thousands of over-extended Americans from losing their homes by laboring mightily to forestall foreclosures.

In spite of ferocious opposition, he passed long-overdue reforms of our health-care system that had eluded the reach of many past presidents.

He signed into law a bold package of regulations to boost consumer protection and restrain Wall Street’s greed.

He negotiated a historic nuclear-arms reduction treaty with Russia’s Dmitry Medvedev.

Forgetting these and other accomplishments, the public has regrettably bought into the corrosive and dishonest campaign to degrade Obama. Goebbels-style nihilism that rejects anything Obama does as odious remains a powerful narrative.

The good news is that Obama’s shrewd and calculated management of the hunt for bin Laden shows how hollow these critiques are.

For months, Obama discreetly oversaw the raid. He should be praised for concealing US intentions from the Pakistanis, who seemed willfully blind about bin Laden’s whereabouts.

Compare Obama’s stealth with his predecessor’s search for bin Laden. George W. Bush was embarrassingly gullible dealing with the Pakistanis. According to Bruce Riedel, a former CIA officer and senior adviser to four presidents on the Middle East, Bush 43 was too easily “dazzled” by Pakistan’s former president, Pervez Musharraf.

In 2002, Mr. Musharraf assured Washington that bin Laden was almost certainly dead. Later, Musharraf’s government hinted to the Bush administration that bin Laden was on a kidney dialysis machine, half dead in a cave in Afghanistan.

In his book “Deadly Embrace,” Mr. Riedel quotes former Afghan Foreign Minister Abdallah Abdallah saying, “Musharraf skillfully played the American administration, throwing ‘dust in Bush’s eyes.’ ”

Good tasteGood taste is another facet of leadership. Contrast the way the Bush administration orchestrated a public trial and execution of Saddam Hussein, turning it into a vulgar spectacle, with Obama’s shrewd refusal to publish photos of bin Laden’s body. His announcement of bin Laden’s death was restrained and sober, not at all celebratory – the right note to conclude a sensitive military operation. Obama’s later visit to ground zero was a fitting bookend to a sad chapter in United States history.

IN PICTURES: Obama in Britain

Obama’s hawkish critics chide him for allegedly “sitting on the sidelines” during recent uprisings in Yemen, Tunisia, Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, and Syria. Take it from someone who has reported from across the Middle East: Sitting out potential Arab civil wars isn’t abdication of leadership; it is wisdom.

And yet, when facing near-certain humanitarian disaster, Obama wisely and rapidly put together a broad NATO coalition to deal with the Libyan revolt while keeping American involvement to a minimum – no boots on the ground and no dead Americans.

It’s true that Obama hasn’t made tackling the debt a priority. But when Republicans controlled the White House and Congress for much of the past decade, US debt exploded. On that issue, the public will have to lead.

A friend, a center-right voter, told me recently, “The reason I voted for Obama is because he has no hatred in him.” In another era of divisive bitterness, Lincoln preached, “[w]ith malice toward none, with charity toward all.” It’s worth noting how closely Obama’s philosophy of leadership approaches that.

Walter Rodgers, a former senior international correspondent for CNN, writes a biweekly column.


1890  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cyber Jihad on: May 31, 2011, 06:53:18 AM

WASHINGTON—The Pentagon has concluded that computer sabotage coming from another country can constitute an act of war, a finding that for the first time opens the door for the U.S. to respond using traditional military force.

The Pentagon's first formal cyber strategy, unclassified portions of which are expected to become public next month, represents an early attempt to grapple with a changing world in which a hacker could pose as significant a threat to U.S. nuclear reactors, subways or pipelines as a hostile country's military.

In part, the Pentagon intends its plan as a warning to potential adversaries of the consequences of attacking the U.S. in this way. "If you shut down our power grid, maybe we will put a missile down one of your smokestacks," said a military official.

Recent attacks on the Pentagon's own systems—as well as the sabotaging of Iran's nuclear program via the Stuxnet computer worm—have given new urgency to U.S. efforts to develop a more formalized approach to cyber attacks. A key moment occurred in 2008, when at least one U.S. military computer system was penetrated. This weekend Lockheed Martin, a major military contractor, acknowledged that it had been the victim of an infiltration, while playing down its impact.

The report will also spark a debate over a range of sensitive issues the Pentagon left unaddressed, including whether the U.S. can ever be certain about an attack's origin, and how to define when computer sabotage is serious enough to constitute an act of war. These questions have already been a topic of dispute within the military.

One idea gaining momentum at the Pentagon is the notion of "equivalence." If a cyber attack produces the death, damage, destruction or high-level disruption that a traditional military attack would cause, then it would be a candidate for a "use of force" consideration, which could merit retaliation.



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2011/05/31/pentagon-cyber-attacks-count-acts-war/#ixzz1NviUtx6h
1891  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Independence Day Quiz on: May 31, 2011, 06:17:00 AM
http://games.toast.net/independence/

I got 29 of 30.  Makes me mad, because I violated a rule about changing answers.  Should have been 30.   angry angry
1892  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Libertarian Issues on: May 30, 2011, 07:58:17 PM
That is pretty college, GM!   cheesy shocked
1893  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: May 29, 2011, 11:35:37 PM
Ren McCormack will make it right. 

That does seem to be a pretty silly law/rule.
1894  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: May 29, 2011, 09:13:04 PM
I think you missed my point. 
1895  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Fascism, liberal fascism, progressivism, socialism: on: May 29, 2011, 08:12:34 PM
"Marxism is the opiate of academics".

That is actually true.  I had to smoke a bowl of "Marxism" before I got any of my degrees.  Too bad it was laced with research, data, and critical thinking.  
1896  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Rest in Peace on: May 29, 2011, 07:41:00 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110529/ap_on_re_us/us_memorial_day_cia_casualties
1897  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2012 Presidential on: May 29, 2011, 06:46:39 AM
"Huntsman's ace up the sleeve is his ability to appeal to centrist and independent voters."

That's much of an ace when he first has to appeal to Republicans to win the primary. 

1898  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Legal issues on: May 29, 2011, 06:43:27 AM
He is also the coauthor of a good book on the subject, with Melinda Gann Hall. 
1899  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Rest in Peace on: May 29, 2011, 06:41:34 AM
According to news outlets, he died in a hospital in New York.  No cause was annonced, although he was HIV positive and drug addicted. 
1900  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Gil Scott Heron on: May 28, 2011, 09:06:08 AM
A sad passing...

Pages: 1 ... 36 37 [38] 39 40 ... 44
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!