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1951  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Vegetarians in MMA on: February 19, 2011, 08:38:01 AM
http://sports.yahoo.com/mma/news?slug=dm-mmavegetarians021711
1952  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Education on: February 10, 2011, 04:49:03 AM


This is a trailer of a forthcoming documentary of the rise of homeschooling.  It looks like it may be interesting.
1953  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: February 09, 2011, 08:49:31 PM
Are you saying that the MSM might have an agenda, BD?   wink

I've never said otherwise, 
1954  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: February 09, 2011, 01:53:57 PM
This is just political drivel by POTB.  Can't trust anything coming from this source.   grin

That comment out the way, my statement above is true, but not necessarily due to politics.  It has to do with the author's inability (or lack of willingness?) to read the Gallup Poll.  As with any good poll, the Gallup provides information with the results it publishes.  In this case, if one is willing to read the "fine print" one learns that "For results based on the total sample of national adults, one can say with 95% confidence that the maximum margin of sampling error is ±4 percentage points."  In other words, according to the poll, statistically speaking there has been no change (68-4= 64, the results of the previous polls). 

This information is something that college students are aware by the end of introductory course on political science and/or statistics.  Shame on the author. 

1955  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: February 09, 2011, 07:51:51 AM
If the Reps are not both shrewd and careful while being aggressive, they are going to get outplayed.

Yep.  And the Republicans also need to hope that in the primary season they don't do the political equivilant of eating their young.  The winner of the nomination might have too much dirt associated with him (or her) to beat President Obama. 
1956  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Will today's GOP embrace Reagan's real legacy? on: February 09, 2011, 05:26:34 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/forum/2011-02-08-column08_ST_N.htm
1957  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Federal judicial vacancies reaching crisis point on: February 08, 2011, 09:47:56 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/07/AR2011020706032.html?hpid=topnews
1958  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: February 08, 2011, 09:46:12 AM
DougMacG: I think you misunderstood Tribe's intention in regard to Scalia and Kennedy.  As you are no doubt aware, there is much made about the "political decisions" of the Court, and the view of a few justices in particular.  I think what Tribe is trying to do, at least in part, is to take a pure legal view of the merits, and note that the justices in question have voted in a particular way in prior cases.  This would suggest, Tribe asserts, that the justices will follow precedent rather than follow the politics that they are often accused of.  (I would think that, on its face, this is something you would agree with.)

What may be less apparent from the article is the ongoing battle between legal scholars and political scientist who study Supreme Court decion making.  Legal scholars opine, not surprisingly, that the law matters, and that the value of stare decisis helps to understand why cases are decided in a particular fashion.  Some political scientists, with Jeffrey Segal and Harold Spaeth being the most cited examples, believe that we can predict how a Supreme Court justice will vote based on personal preferences.  I suspect that much of Tribe's article was aimed at political scientists. 
1959  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Lawrence Tribe on the constitutionality of "Obamacare" on: February 08, 2011, 05:34:24 AM
This is an interesting discussion of the legality of the health care law, two Supreme Court justices, and the role of Congress to regulate interstate commerce.   

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/08/opinion/08tribe.html?_r=2&hp=&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1297162948-Ry0HQx71YHQsncxJVfxlvw
1960  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Guns in Illinois???!!! on: February 07, 2011, 01:55:44 PM
http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/illinois/article_5e279c3c-3856-54b6-bea8-87de914a45fa.html
1961  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Sports fans and political change on: February 07, 2011, 01:50:52 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/dave_zirin/01/31/egypt.soccer/index.html
1962  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Declaration of Independence on: February 07, 2011, 05:56:08 AM


This was one of my favorite parts of the Super Bowl. 
1963  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / President Obama and O'Reilly on: February 07, 2011, 05:54:13 AM


I thought that both President Obama and Bill O'Reilly did a great job. 
1964  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: February 06, 2011, 10:34:46 AM

"This stance is just plain silly.  Interstate commerce clause?  Airline traffic certainly pertains.  FAA?  I have no problem with him, or anyone for that matter, questioning national government involvement in regulation.  But he should pick his fights with more care. "

Yup. If there is anything today that is clearly interstate commerce, aircraft would fall into that definition.

Holy $hi+!  Did we just agree on something GM???!!! cool cool cool grin
1965  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: February 06, 2011, 05:09:24 AM
"Sen. Obama, another non-compromiser, voted against raising the debt limit, against the surge, and against all Presidential picks to the Supreme Court, even against Roberts who won 78 votes in the Senate.  It didn't seem to hurt his career."

On the other hand, I don't recall Senator Obama, or Durbin, for that matter, calling out Lincoln (my best guess as to who would be Illinois' most influential statesman like Kentucky's Henry Clay).  

"Rand Paul was the '1 in a 96-1 vote to ban aiming pointing devices at airplanes (Different story: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2011/02/rand-paul-lone-dissenter-in-la.html).  'Paul told reporters after Thursday's vote that he believed the laser-pointer issue was one best handled by the states, not the federal government.'"

This stance is just plain silly.  Interstate commerce clause?  Airline traffic certainly pertains.  FAA?  I have no problem with him, or anyone for that matter, questioning national government involvement in regulation.  But he should pick his fights with more care.  



1966  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Rand Paul vs. Henry Clay on: February 05, 2011, 02:54:55 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/02/AR2011020204773.html
1967  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The new civility on: February 03, 2011, 01:25:08 PM

I have no words that aptly describe my frustration with those people at this moment.   
1968  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / GPS and picture posting on: February 02, 2011, 03:20:59 PM
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/video?id=7621105&syndicate=syndicate&section
1969  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Tea Party, Glen Beck and related matters on: February 02, 2011, 11:05:27 AM
Bigdog,

You posting this because you find it interesting or because you agree?

GM: Fair question.  Because it interested me.  I'll try to remember to clarify reasons for posting pieces.  Thanks for asking.  

Guro: I actually thought of putting it in the Media Matters thread.  I agree that it is not meaningful, except in the sense that it is being said.  
1970  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Beck and Father Coughlin on: February 02, 2011, 09:04:01 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/feb/02/far-right-glenn-beck
1971  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Mubarak supporters take to the streets on: February 02, 2011, 09:02:51 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110202/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt
1972  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Egypt shuts down the Internet on: January 29, 2011, 05:08:24 AM
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/The-day-part-of-the-Internet-apf-1092937415.html?x=0

 (AP) -- About a half-hour past midnight Friday morning in Egypt, the Internet went dead.

1973  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Tea Party, Glen Beck and related matters on: January 27, 2011, 12:13:22 PM
Indeed!

It was yesterday or the day before that Glenn was discussing something (I haven't seen the whole broadcast yet) about which I had not heard previously:  Working from memory here, apparently in September 2010 (i.e. during the height of the election compaign) a hard lefty with a huge trail of his leftness attempted to assassinate a Democratic governor with a knife-- only he mis-identified his target and instead stabbed the Dean of the university that had invited the governor to speak.

You never heard of that?  Me neither-- until GB.

IMHO GB is a remarkable man in search of Truth for the good of America.  The powers that be fear him-- and they should.

I had:

http://www.nbcactionnews.com/dpp/news/crime/report%3A-missouri-gov.-jay-nixon-was-intended-target-in-penn-valley-community-college-stabbing
1974  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / ILSC takes Rahm's appeal on: January 25, 2011, 07:04:32 PM
http://www.suntimes.com/3483600-417/emanuel-court-illinois-appellate-ballot.html


1975  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: January 25, 2011, 10:00:28 AM
Further evidence that the independent judiciary should remain as such.  And, even if Justices Scalia and Thomas "should" have recused themselves, it would hardly have been the most egregious examples of a justice sitting on a decision in a case where he had obvious ties. 
1976  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Rahm's ineligible on: January 24, 2011, 02:44:22 PM
Although this is a legal opinion, I place here because of the subject matter. 

http://www.state.il.us/court/Opinions/AppellateCourt/2011/1stDistrict/January/1110033.pdf
1977  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Intelligence on: January 24, 2011, 09:46:58 AM
Whether it "matters" or not, it appears mine was lacking!  Sorry about that, Guro!
1978  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Private Intel firm on: January 24, 2011, 04:47:54 AM
http://www.stltoday.com/news/national/article_59308dcd-3092-5280-92fb-898f569504e4.html

Ousted CIA agent runs his own private operation
With U.S. funding cut, he relies on donations to fund his 'operatives' in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

1979  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: January 22, 2011, 09:38:44 AM
I mostly agree with you Guro.  I read these articles about 4 hours after talking about the politics of recusal in class.  I am often struck at the sheer dumb luck of what I teach and what goes in politics.  At any rate, I found them interesting, but mostly due to timing. 
1980  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: January 21, 2011, 07:31:16 PM
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/sc-dc-0121-court-conflict-20110120,0,2463815.story

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/20/us/politics/20koch.html?_r=1
1981  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / The Truth Wears Off on: January 20, 2011, 12:18:07 PM
The Truth Wears Off
Is there something wrong with the scientific method?by Jonah Lehrer

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/12/13/101213fa_fact_lehrer#ixzz1BbJXgS5h
1982  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / From Russia With Envy on: January 20, 2011, 10:08:37 AM
http://www.postbulletin.com/news/stories/display.php?id=1441481

1983  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Obama mustn't neglect Mexico's drug war on: January 20, 2011, 06:07:35 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/forum/2011-01-19-column19_ST_N.htm

SAN DIEGO — Many Americans see Mexico as a dysfunctional family in the neighborhood. With the start of a new year, and a new Congress, President Obama needs to persuade the American people to see Mexico in a different light — as one of the most explosive countries in the region capable of creating a major foreign policy crisis for the U.S. There's no better time to start than with Obama's upcoming State of the Union address.


Thanks to Mexico's narco nightmare, our backyard is on fire. According to figures recently released by Mexican Attorney General Arturo Chavez, the number of deaths in drug-related violence since President Felipe Calderon took
office four years ago has surpassed 30,000.

You can chalk up a few of those killings to a notorious drug cartel hit man who has admitted to beheading his victims — even though he isn't old enough to shave. A few weeks
1984  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: January 19, 2011, 11:53:01 AM
George Romney and Barry Goldwater also had questions about their eligibilty arise during their quests to become president. 
1985  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Why Our Best Officers Are Leaving on: January 19, 2011, 08:32:42 AM
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/01/why-our-best-officers-are-leaving/8346/1/
1986  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: January 17, 2011, 02:01:58 PM
"Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner in early 2009 found himself dealing with the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression without his team of deputies in place. The attempted bombing of an American airliner on Christmas Day 2009 occurred when the Transportation Security Administration was without an administrator."

Correct me if I am wrong but wasn't that in great part because BO (Geithner) did not nominate anyone?

NOT DENYING THE LARGER ISSUE, but

a) the Dems strated it with their outrageious borking of Reagan's Judge Bork nomination (contrast the Reps subsequent  treatment of Ruth Bader Ginsberg;
b) BO has nominated some seriously radical people.


I don't think that a "he started it" is all that helpful.  That may be the case, and I do feel that Bork deserved a seat on the Bench, but there is more than that.  (Here's an opening) As the size of the government increases, which it has consistently across adminisitrations regardless of party, that then increases the number of political appointments that the president, with the Senate, is responsible for filling. 

And, whether you like it or not, the Senate has been responsible for preventing people from taking a place on the Supreme Court under necessary circumstances, as well (Fortas and the early Nixon defeats come to mind as examples).  I recognize that the Senate should not abdicate its advice and consent role, but I do think that a reform of the process could help the president, regardless of party. 

Small tangent: I think that reform should focus primarilt on the executive branch positions.  I think the president should have more latitude as on appointments for those who will work for him than for those in a co-equal branch of government with lifetime appointments. 
1987  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Confirmation changes in the Senate? on: January 17, 2011, 06:41:38 AM
http://hosted2.ap.org/WTICAM/b7538a1b675b4d059de3e728edc01923/Article_2011-01-15-Presidential%20Appointments/id-22927b442e824facb162b13e5a8efff0

Presidential nominees stymied; Senate seeks change

JIM ABRAMS

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate, in its inaugural session, rejected George Washington's nominee to be a naval officer in Savannah because the two Georgia senators wanted their guy in the job. The way of naming and confirming the nation's top officials hasn't become much smarter in the years since.

It's become a lot more of a problem.

President George W. Bush had only about half his political appointees on the job at the time of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner in early 2009 found himself dealing with the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression without his team of deputies in place. The attempted bombing of an American airliner on Christmas Day 2009 occurred when the Transportation Security Administration was without an administrator.


Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Republican leader Mitch McConnell, in a rare moment of agreement, opened the new Congress this month by endorsing a bipartisan effort to find ways to improve an unwieldy, unproductive system.

It's a challenge because there are so many ways to bog down a nomination.

Reid noted that the slow-moving Senate is now responsible for confirming 1,215 executive branch nominees and the number keeps rising. Brookings Institution senior fellows E.J. Dionne Jr. and William Galston wrote in a study that the number of core policy positions the president must fill has risen from 295 when Ronald Reagan took office to 422 for Barack Obama.

Then there's the onerous screening process, even for lower-level appointees. It's meant that an administration can take months to send a nomination to the Senate for confirmation. Finally, there's the increasingly partisan Senate, where a single lawmaker has the power to bottle up a nomination for months or kill it, sometimes for reasons unrelated to the person in line for the job.

Like their Georgia counterparts of old, Louisiana's two senators stood in the way of nominations last fall to protest the freeze on offshore drilling after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The White House said there would be a one-week delay in making public the president's budget proposal this year, partly because Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., had blocked a vote on Obama's choice to be budget director, Jack Lew, for more than a month.

"Among the democracies, the United States has created — without intending to — what is almost certainly the most ungainly  process of filling a government with qualified people," Dionne and Galston wrote.

A Commission on Public Service headed by former Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker recommended in 2003 turning one-third of all Senate-confirmed political positions into career jobs. The Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit group that promotes service in the federal government, wants the Senate to commit to voting on the president's top 50 national and economic security officials immediately after inauguration and having the top 500-plus appointees in place by the summer recess.

Those studies dealt primarily with executive office nominees and not the equally vexing issue of judges. There are more than 90 judicial vacancies in U.S. district and appellate courts today. Chief Justice John Roberts complained in a year-end report that "each political party has found it easy to turn on a dime from decrying to defending the blocking of judicial nominations, depending on their changing political fortunes."

Reid, D-Nev., and McConnell, R-Ky., suggested that the chairman and the top Republican on the Senate Rules Committee — Sens. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. — lead a working group to study ways to streamline the confirmation process. But progress probably depends on Democratic-led efforts to change Senate rules to make it harder for single senators to hold up legislation and nominees and to reduce the number of filibusters.

At the end of the last session of Congress, 43 nominees, including judges, awaited a vote by the full Senate. That compared with seven at the end of Bush's first two years in office, Reid's office said. Seven have been on the waiting list since 2009.

One result is that many competent people are dissuaded from accepting positions in government, said Max Stier, president of Partnership for Public Service.

"It's the rare individual who is both qualified and willing to run the obstacle course that is required," he said. Stier said there are examples of people, even those without background problems, who had paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees to get through the screening process.

Presidents sometimes turn to recess appointments — putting people in the jobs temporarily when the Senate is not in session. Obama warned Republicans last February that he would resort to this strategy because of holds on nominations he said were "motivated by a desire to leverage projects for a senator's state or simply to frustrate progress. It is precisely these kinds of tactics that enrage the American people."

Among his recess appointees: Donald Berwick, a Harvard professor now heading the agency that runs Medicare and Medicaid; James Cole, the No. 2 official at the Justice Department; Craig Becker, as a member of the National Labor Relations Board.

Obama also avoided a drawn-out fight with Senate Republicans on Elizabeth Warren, his choice to head the new Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, by naming her to oversee creation of the fledgling agency. That post doesn't require confirmation.




1988  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Taylor on the HOF on: January 15, 2011, 01:22:18 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1180701/index.htm

This is from SI, and Phil Taylor is discussing the most recent voting from the Baseball Hall of Fame.  I like this entire article, but the qutoes below are what stood out to me the most, and why I posted here:

Q | Doesn't that mean that some players with excellent stats will be kept out?

A | It does, and there's nothing wrong with that. The Gatekeeper believes the Hall of Fame has too many members as it is. In fact, don't get the Gatekeeper started, because he'll talk your ear off about how it's all part of the misguided tendency in sports to relax the standards of excellence. We don't just lock onto outdated milestones, like 500 home runs, we consider anyone who gets in the neighborhood, causing the bar to fall increasingly lower. The problem isn't limited to the Hall. Some people want to double the number of teams in the NCAA men's basketball tournament—or even worse, let everyone in. Loosening the definition of excellence is why we have expanded playoffs and expanded All-Star rosters. Does everything have to be devalued, diluted? The Gatekeeper wants a Hall that's harder to get into than his old high school jersey.

Q | Isn't it unfair to keep deserving players out when they don't meet subjective criteria?

A | Define deserving. The Gatekeeper believes that no one deserves enshrinement in Cooperstown. Induction is a privilege, and it's perfectly reasonable to put emotion into the analysis. Noted baseball thinker Bob Costas has said that the Hall should be limited to the immortals. The Gatekeeper couldn't agree more. How do we get such a Hall? By asking questions that can't be answered with a calculator. Did the player take your breath away? Is he someone to tell your grandchildren about? The Gatekeeper evaluates an artist by how a painting makes him feel, not by the number of brushstrokes per canvas.



1989  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: January 13, 2011, 08:47:35 PM
What I will write here likely will lead to backlash and consternation from at least some of you.

Williams sets up the article in a sort of straw man.  Asking the the question of whether the the father of the Constitution was constitutionally ignorant is silly.  And you and I both know it, and so does he.  However, as I often say, Madison was not the only person attending the convention, not the only person writing the Constitution, not the only person voting on the document in convention, and most certainly not the only person voting to ratify the document.  While I want to give Madison his due, it is important to note that even Madison is not solely, or even mostly (despite Williams' set up) responsible for the Constitution.  By the way, Constitution signer Rufus King was in the Senate at the time of Madison's veto.  I can't quickly find if he voted to support the bill, but pretending that he did, he would not be constitutionally ignorant.

Also, it is worth noting that the president, by design, is intended to check congressional power, and no where is this seen more than in the veto.  (Quick note: I like this.  I think the veto is incredibly important and worthwhile.)  Just because Madison SAID he vetoed for a particular reason does not mean that this is the real reason.  Perhaps the House had managed to upset him, and he vetoed for a personal or politcal reason. 

Another important innovation, by President Andrew Jackson, is the veto for strictly political reasons.  He, unlike his predecessors, did not feel the need to even try to justify some of his vetoes with a nod to the Constitution.  While I realize that Jackson postdates Madison, that cannot be said for the other two presidents that Williams uses to support his argument.  Pierce and Cleveland certainly may have felt that a veto was required by constitutional standards, or they could just have used constitutional language to support their politics.  I am not sure why either Pierce or Cleveland would be considered any more constitutionally literate than any other particular president.  Moreover,  it is worth noting that Cleveland hardly met a bill he didn't want to veto, and that over half of Pierce's were overridden: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0801767.html

Finally, the Constitution has changed.  Not always in a formal way, and I realize that that it the only way that many of you see it as legitimate.  However, states, in many instances, have asked the national government to step in many different instances, many of which involve "charity."  Moreover, whether Madison likes it or not, we have an interstate highway system, and railroads, and planes. A far higher percentage of the commerce of today is interstate.  If I drink a Coke, based out of Georgia at a McDonald's, based out of Illinois, out of a cup made in Huh, on my way to Maine, it is interstate commerce.  If I order a Dog Brothers DVD and it is shipped to my home, it is interstate. 

Things are different now, politically, environmentally, etc. 

1990  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / If MLK had tweeted from jail on: January 12, 2011, 06:20:37 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/forum/2011-01-05-column12_ST_N.htm
1991  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / "The Era of 'Owned by China'" on: January 12, 2011, 06:01:35 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/jan/12/era-of-owned-by-china 
1992  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: January 10, 2011, 01:46:24 PM
This here because it is interesting:

Happy mathematical new year: 2011 is the sum of 11 consecutive prime numbers

http://republicofmath.wordpress.com/2011/01/01/happy-mathematical-new-year-2011-is-the-sum-of-11-consecutive-prime-numbers/
1993  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: January 10, 2011, 01:41:11 PM
DougMacG: While I appreciate the First Amendment a great deal, I like the idea of the revocation of the tax exempt status.  I have no love for Fred Phelps, but I am looking forward to the USSC's opinion on the anti-protest legislation. 

(One small quibble: remember that the lack of protection by the First Amendment is FALSELY yelling fire in a crowded theater.  If I am watching a movie, and there is a fire, I for damn sure want to know!)

I have spent my lunch hour discussing this situation with two anti-gunners.  It did take them 2 minutes after I walked into the lunch room for the discussion to begin.  The backlash is quick. 
1994  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: January 10, 2011, 10:39:21 AM
Westboro Baptist Church To Picket Funerals Of Arizona Shooting Victims

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/09/westboro-baptist-church-arizona_n_806319.html
1995  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: January 07, 2011, 03:15:00 PM
Some information on pardons:

Time Magazine's (sorry) 10 most controverisal pardons: http://www.time.com/time/2007/presidential_pardons/10.html

A political scientist discusses the Office of the Pardon Attorney (pp 13-18): http://www1.law.nyu.edu/lawcourts/pubs/newsletter/spring08.pdf

A statistics of pardons, from Presidents Truman to Obama.  Pay special attention to Clinton's last day pardons of Marc Rich, Roger Clinton, and Susan McDougal, accessed from a link on the page. http://www.justice.gov/pardon/recipients.htm

Guidelines for seeking a pardon: http://www.justice.gov/pardon/pardon_instructions.htm

Limits on the president's power to pardon: approaching zero; constitutionally, only those who are impeached cannot be pardoned. 
1996  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: January 07, 2011, 02:55:32 PM
A surprisingly piece sensible from Pravda on the Hudson (POTH).  I had not thought of this point on my own:

"Never mind that attaching the epithet "slave" to the character Jim — who has run away in a bid for freedom — effectively labels him as property, as the very thing he is trying to escape."



That was the line that led me to share it here. 
1997  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politically (In)correct on: January 07, 2011, 06:56:32 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/07/books/07huck.html

A discussion of the edit of the Twain classic. 

Critic’s Notebook
Light Out, Huck, They Still Want to Sivilize You

1998  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Politics on: January 06, 2011, 04:51:49 PM
Well, as Speaker she campaigned for several D's in 2008, let them lambast her in 2010, controlled debate on the floor of the House, has major impact over committee assignments, and big time sway over the contributions of the DCCC. 
1999  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: January 06, 2011, 02:05:50 PM
http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01/04/opinion-will-the-new-congress-target-judges/

Opinion: Will the New Congress Target Judges?
2000  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Is China closer than thought to matching U.S. fighter jet prowess? on: January 06, 2011, 07:59:06 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/01/05/china.us.fighter.jets/index.html?hpt=T1
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