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1  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Two quality discussions on Tucker Carlson on Sweden on: Today at 02:20:49 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eABehuOGaks
2  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Education on: February 20, 2017, 05:14:51 PM
15 miles?
3  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / My constitutional law professor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg on: February 20, 2017, 05:13:25 PM
http://www.dcclothesline.com/2017/02/09/supreme-court-justice-ginsburg-favors-decriminalizing-pedophilia-and-child-sex-trafficking/
4  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: North and South Korea on: February 20, 2017, 04:26:29 PM
It most certainly seems to be a significant development.
5  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Mexico-US matters on: February 20, 2017, 04:25:35 PM
I might add that the third one passed on trying for the presidency and went back to being governor of BCN or BCS where he was reputed to have gotten quite wealthy while governor there previously-- presumably working in concert with local cartel(s).  (Working from memory here based on an article I read in Proceso the last time I was in Mexico.

Do I have this right DDF?
6  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Milo on: February 20, 2017, 11:50:12 AM
http://www.theblaze.com/news/2017/02/19/video-surfaces-of-milo-yiannopoulos-defending-pedophilia-acu-board-reportedly-not-consulted-on-cpac-invite/
7  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Coal, the Navajo, and President Trump on: February 20, 2017, 11:18:14 AM


http://enewspaper.latimes.com/desktop/latimes/default.aspx?pubid=50435180-e58e-48b5-8e0c-236bf740270e
8  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / China cuts off coal imports! on: February 20, 2017, 11:03:52 AM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/china-suspends-north-koreas-coal-imports-striking-at-regimes-financial-lifeline/2017/02/18/8390b0e6-f5df-11e6-a9b0-ecee7ce475fc_story.html?utm_term=.cefc8d0e23db&wpisrc=nl_evening&wpmm=1

Perhaps if this weren't WaPo more prominent mention might have been given to the possibility that the phone call with President Trump played a role here.
9  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Mexico-US matters on: February 20, 2017, 10:50:26 AM
And two dead Secretarias de Gobernacion (the #2 post in the country, and quite commonly the next president) from odd plane/helicopter crashes during the previous administration , , ,
10  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Ambassador Haley off to a rockin' start on: February 20, 2017, 10:48:38 AM
"Haley’s Comet" | Editorial of The New York Sun | February 16, 2017 | on Nikki Haley

A star is born is our reaction to the first press briefing by President Trump’s new ambassador at the United Nations. The ex-governor of South Carolina was ridiculed by the Left when the president first sent her nomination up to the Hill, owing to her alleged lack of foreign policy chops. She certainly rang the wake up gong for that crowd this morning, after emerging from her first Security Council monthly meeting devoted to the Middle East. Tough as nails but with a smile and a layer of Southern charm.

The ambassador had just come from the regular monthly Security Council on Middle East issues. She said it was her first such meeting, and “it was a bit strange.” The Security Council, she said, is supposed to discuss how to maintain international peace and security. But the meeting, she said, was not about Hezbollah’s illegal buildup of rockets in Lebanon, it was not about the money and weapons Iran provides to terrorists, it was not how we defeat ISIS, it was not how we hold Beshar al-Assad accountable for the slaughter of thousands of civilians.

“No,” she said, “instead the meeting focused on criticizing Israel, the one true democracy in the Middle East. I am new around here, but I understand that’s how the Council has operated month after month for decades. I am here to say the United States will not turn a blind eye to this anymore. I am here to underscore to the ironclad support of the United States for Israel. I am here to emphasize that the United States is determined to stand up to the U.N.’s anti-Israel bias.”

The ambassador made clear that the Trump administration will not support the kind of resolution from which the Obama administration’s ambassador — Samantha Power — shamefully abstained, though Mrs. Haley was too polite to name the humiliated Ms. Power. “The outrageously biased resolutions from the Security Council and the General Assembly only make peace harder to attain by discouraging one of the parties from going to the negotiating table.”

“Incredibly,” Mrs. Haley said, “the U.N. department of political affairs has an entire division devoted entirely to Palestinian affairs. Imagine that. There is no division devoted to illegal missile launches form North Korea. There is no division devoted to the world’s number one state sponsor of terror, Iran. The prejudiced approach to Israeli-Palestinian issues does the peace process no favors, and it bears no relationship to the reality of the world around us. The double standards are breathtaking.”

The ambassador warned that it is “the U.N.’s anti-Israel bias that is long overdue for change,” and said America will not hesitate to speak out in defense of its friend in Israel. All this was going on while the press was questioning President Trump on what he was going to do about anti-Semitism. If his ambassador to the world body is any example, the answer is plenty. She has the principles of a Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the grit of a John Bolton, and the star power of a Jeane Kirkpatrick, and in her first press briefing she certainly made her point.
11  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / NRO: Why was FBI investigating Flynn? on: February 20, 2017, 12:04:49 AM
A serious, detailed discussion of the law as pertains to the FBI's actions with regard to Flynn:

 
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/445045/general-michael-flynn-national-security-adviser-fbi-investigation-phone-call-russian-ambassador
12  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The "I" word on: February 19, 2017, 11:38:12 PM
http://www.politico.com/story/2017/02/trump-impeachment-democrats-235184
13  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Hacker claims to break into Clinton Foundation on: February 19, 2017, 11:34:58 PM
Caveat lector

http://www.proudcons.com/hacker-breaks-into-clinton-foundation-servers-finds-millions/
14  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / POTH: If personel is policy, then , , , on: February 19, 2017, 11:06:51 PM
MELBOURNE, Fla. — During President Trump’s transition to power, his team reached out to Elliott Abrams for help building a new administration. Mr. Abrams, a seasoned Republican foreign policy official, sent lists of possible candidates for national security jobs.

One by one, the answer from the Trump team came back no. The reason was consistent: This one had said disparaging things about Mr. Trump during the campaign; that one had signed a letter opposing him. Finally, the White House asked Mr. Abrams himself to meet with the president about becoming deputy secretary of state, only to have the same thing happen — vetoed because of past criticism.

Mr. Abrams’s experience has become a case study in the challenges Mr. Trump still faces in filling top positions a month into his presidency. Mr. Trump remains fixated on the campaign as he applies a loyalty test to some prospective officials. For their part, many Republicans reacted to what happened to Mr. Abrams with dismay, leaving them increasingly leery about joining an administration that cannot get past the past.

As Mr. Trump brings candidates for national security adviser to meet with him in Florida this weekend, he presides over a government where the upper echelons remain sparsely populated. Six of the 15 statutory cabinet secretaries are still awaiting Senate confirmation as Democrats nearly uniformly oppose almost all of the president’s choices. Even some of the cabinet secretaries who are in place may feel they are home alone.


It is not just Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson who has no deputy secretary, much less Trump-appointed under secretaries or assistant secretaries. Neither do the heads of the Treasury Department, the Education Department or any of the other cabinet departments. Only three of 15 nominees have been named for deputy secretary positions. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has a deputy only because he kept the one left over from President Barack Obama’s administration.

That does not even begin to cover the rest of the more than 4,000 appointments that a president typically makes. In some cases, the Trump administration is even going in reverse. A senior political appointee at the housing department, who had already started the job, was fired this past week and marched out of the building when someone discovered his previous statements critical of Mr. Trump.

The president’s top Latin America official at the National Security Council was likewise fired after just weeks on the job for complaining about internal dysfunction at an off-the-record discussion at a Washington research organization, according to officials, who confirmed a Politico report. The State Department has laid off six top career officials in recent days, apparently out of questions about their loyalty to Mr. Trump.


“Many tough things were said about him and by him” before last year’s election, Mr. Abrams, who served as President Ronald Reagan’s assistant secretary of state and President George W. Bush’s deputy national security adviser, said in an interview. “I would have hoped he would have turned toward just hiring the most effective people to help him govern rather than looking back to what we said in that race.”

Mr. Trump has fallen behind the pace of his last three predecessors both in naming senior officials who require Senate confirmation and in securing their confirmations, according to data compiled by the nonpartisan Partnership for Public Service. Whereas Mr. Obama had nominated 40 senior officials by Feb. 11, 2009, Mr. Trump had named 34 of them as of Friday. Mr. Obama had 24 confirmed at that point, while Mr. Trump has 14.

The trouble assembling an administration reflects the deeper rift between Mr. Trump and the Washington establishment of both parties. A reality-show businessman with no government experience, Mr. Trump catapulted to power on a promise to break up the existing system. Even after he won the Republican nomination last year, he did little to win over those who had opposed him, while his “never Trump” critics within the party kept up a steady assault on his qualifications and temperament.

Mr. Trump faces other hurdles, too. With no cadre ready to go from past political service, he has been starting from scratch. His team has been slow to vet candidates, and in some cases his choices have had troubles with their business backgrounds or other matters. And Democrats have mounted a wall of resistance to his nominations, slowing the process down.

The White House did not respond to requests for comment, but Mr. Trump has disputed reports of troubles. “The White House is running so smoothly, so smoothly,” he told a rally of supporters in Melbourne, Fla., on Saturday. “And believe me, we inherited one big mess, that I can tell you.”

The ill will between Mr. Trump and much of the Republican establishment works both ways. Many Republicans who might have agreed to work for the president have been turned off by what they consider his sometimes erratic behavior and the competing power centers inside his White House. After firing his first national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, Mr. Trump found that his initial choice for a replacement, Robert S. Harward, a retired vice admiral, would not take the job.

“The problem is that with each successive episode, it raises the stakes for the next one,” said Peter D. Feaver, a Duke University professor who was a strategic planning adviser to Mr. Bush. “It’s going to be hard for the next outsider to accept the national security job and not request the ability to make personnel changes.”

Richard N. Haass, a former Republican official and now president of the Council on Foreign Relations, said Mr. Trump had “ruled out much of an entire generation of Republican public policy types” and alarmed others with his empowerment of Stephen K. Bannon, his chief strategist, to shape national security. Even some cabinet secretaries appear unable to pick their own staff.
Photo
Former Senator Judd Gregg, Republican of New Hampshire, said the roster of business veterans that Mr. Trump had enlisted for his cabinet was “the most positive thing about his administration so far.” Credit Cooper Neill for The New York Times

“This is unprecedented, it’s untraditional, it’s outside the mainstream,” said Mr. Haass, whose own name had been floated for a position. “And so it’s just that you’d be signing on for, at a minimum, tremendous uncertainty, and quite possibly for being associated with a set of policies you deeply disagree with.”

Stuart Holliday, an ambassador under Mr. Bush, said many Republicans would want to work for Mr. Tillerson or Mr. Mattis. “However, the Republican foreign policy bench is not that deep at senior levels,” he said, “especially if you factor in people who took themselves off the field.”

Former Senator Judd Gregg, Republican of New Hampshire, said the business veterans that Mr. Trump had enlisted for his cabinet were “the most positive thing about his administration so far.” But he added that the president’s disregard for advice could complicate his efforts to fill posts. “You get the feeling that he’s still flying by his own experiences,” he said, “and that’s got to concern anyone who cares about these issues.”


For Mr. Trump, the challenge is more pronounced because he and his advisers feel they cannot trust some of the senior career professionals still working at the White House or cabinet departments. Leaks about Mr. Flynn and Mr. Trump’s phone calls with foreign leaders have convinced White House officials that they face an opposition within.

“You have a new administration that also has fewer people familiar with the processes and systems of government, including the importance of the vetting process,” said Max Stier, the chief executive of the Center for Presidential Transition at the Partnership for Public Service. “You can’t operate as they did in the campaign context, with a smaller than usual group — it doesn’t work.”

Indeed, Mr. Trump’s failure to vet candidates in advance has led to some stumbles. A White House scheduler was fired this past week because of an issue that surfaced in her background check, something that normally would have been completed weeks ago.

Another challenge has been Mr. Trump’s implementation of ethics rules that bar White House officials from lobbying for five years after they leave the government, prompting senior congressional officials and lobbyists to demur.

Mr. Trump has faulted the Democratic minority in the Senate for obstructing his choices. Democrats have voted almost as a bloc against many of his nominees, breaking with long tradition in which the opposition party largely went along with a president’s selections, except in specific cases of controversy. “The Democrats are making it very difficult,” Mr. Trump said at his news conference on Thursday. “This is pure delay tactics.”

Despite his own experience, one person still urging Republicans to take jobs in the administration is Mr. Abrams. “I have been encouraging everybody to go into the government if offered an appropriate position,” he said. “That was my view, and it’s still my view, because you have one president and one government at a time.
15  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / POTH: A Back Channel Plan for Ukraine and Russia, via Trump Associates on: February 19, 2017, 10:56:44 PM
A Back-Channel Plan for Ukraine and Russia, Courtesy of Trump Associates

By MEGAN TWOHEY and SCOTT SHANEFEB. 19, 2017

President Trump on his way to Charleston, S.C., on Friday. Although he has expressed hope that the United States and Russia can work together, it is unclear if the White House will take a privately submitted peace proposal for Ukraine seriously. Credit Al Drago/The New York Times

A week before Michael T. Flynn resigned as national security adviser, a sealed proposal was hand-delivered to his office, outlining a way for President Trump to lift sanctions against Russia.

Mr. Flynn is gone, having been caught lying about his own discussion of sanctions with the Russian ambassador. But the proposal, a peace plan for Ukraine and Russia, remains, along with those pushing it: Michael D. Cohen, the president’s personal lawyer, who delivered the document; Felix H. Sater, a business associate who helped Mr. Trump scout deals in Russia; and a Ukrainian lawmaker trying to rise in a political opposition movement shaped in part by Mr. Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort.

At a time when Mr. Trump’s ties to Russia, and the people connected to him, are under heightened scrutiny — with investigations by American intelligence agencies, the F.B.I. and Congress — some of his associates remain willing and eager to wade into Russia-related efforts behind the scenes.

Mr. Trump has confounded Democrats and Republicans alike with his repeated praise for the Russian president, Vladimir V. Putin, and his desire to forge an American-Russian alliance. While there is nothing illegal about such unofficial efforts, a proposal that seems to tip toward Russian interests may set off alarms.
Donald Trump’s Connections in Ukraine


Former Trump campaign manager with pro-Russian political ties in Ukraine now under investigation by the F.B.I.

The amateur diplomats say their goal is simply to help settle a grueling, three-year conflict that has cost 10,000 lives. “Who doesn’t want to help bring about peace?” Mr. Cohen asked.


But the proposal contains more than just a peace plan. Andrii V. Artemenko, the Ukrainian lawmaker, who sees himself as a Trump-style leader of a future Ukraine, claims to have evidence — “names of companies, wire transfers” — showing corruption by the Ukrainian president, Petro O. Poroshenko, that could help oust him. And Mr. Artemenko said he had received encouragement for his plans from top aides to Mr. Putin.

“A lot of people will call me a Russian agent, a U.S. agent, a C.I.A. agent,” Mr. Artemenko said. “But how can you find a good solution between our countries if we do not talk?”

Mr. Cohen and Mr. Sater said they had not spoken to Mr. Trump about the proposal, and have no experience in foreign policy. Mr. Cohen is one of several Trump associates under scrutiny in an F.B.I. counterintelligence examination of links with Russia, according to law enforcement officials; he has denied any illicit connections.

The two others involved in the effort have somewhat questionable pasts: Mr. Sater, 50, a Russian-American, pleaded guilty to a role in a stock manipulation scheme decades ago that involved the Mafia. Mr. Artemenko spent two and a half years in jail in Kiev in the early 2000s on embezzlement charges, later dropped, which he said had been politically motivated.


While it is unclear if the White House will take the proposal seriously, the diplomatic freelancing has infuriated Ukrainian officials. Ukraine’s ambassador to the United States, Valeriy Chaly, said Mr. Artemenko “is not entitled to present any alternative peace plans on behalf of Ukraine to any foreign government, including the U.S. administration.”

At a security conference in Munich on Friday, Mr. Poroshenko warned the West against “appeasement” of Russia, and some American experts say offering Russia any alternative to a two-year-old international agreement on Ukraine would be a mistake. The Trump administration has sent mixed signals about the conflict in Ukraine.

But given Mr. Trump’s praise for Mr. Putin, John Herbst, a former American ambassador to Ukraine, said he feared the new president might be too eager to mend relations with Russia at Ukraine’s expense — potentially with a plan like Mr. Artemenko’s.

It was late January when the three men associated with the proposed plan converged on the Loews Regency, a luxury hotel on Park Avenue in Manhattan where business deals are made in a lobby furnished with leather couches, over martinis at the restaurant bar and in private conference rooms on upper floors.

Mr. Cohen, 50, lives two blocks up the street, in Trump Park Avenue. A lawyer who joined the Trump Organization in 2007 as special counsel, he has worked on many deals, including a Trump-branded tower in the republic of Georgia and a short-lived mixed martial arts venture starring a Russian fighter. He is considered a loyal lieutenant whom Mr. Trump trusts to fix difficult problems.
Photo
Andrii V. Artemenko, a Ukrainian lawmaker, at the Women’s March in Washington last month. He said his peace proposal had received encouragement from top aides to Russia’s president, Vladimir V. Putin.

The F.B.I. is reviewing an unverified dossier, compiled by a former British intelligence agent and funded by Mr. Trump’s political opponents, that claims Mr. Cohen met with a Russian representative in Prague during the presidential campaign to discuss Russia’s hacking of Democratic targets. But the Russian official named in the report told The New York Times that he had never met Mr. Cohen. Mr. Cohen insists that he has never visited Prague and that the dossier’s assertions are fabrications. (Mr. Manafort is also under investigation by the F.B.I. for his connections to Russia and Ukraine.)

Mr. Cohen has a personal connection to Ukraine: He is married to a Ukrainian woman and once worked with relatives there to establish an ethanol business.

Mr. Artemenko, tall and burly, arrived at the Manhattan hotel between visits to Washington. (His wife, he said, met the first lady, Melania Trump, years ago during their modeling careers, but he did not try to meet Mr. Trump.) He had attended the inauguration and visited Congress, posting on Facebook his admiration for Mr. Trump and talking up his peace plan in meetings with American lawmakers.

He entered Parliament in 2014, the year that the former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych fled to Moscow amid protests over his economic alignment with Russia and corruption. Mr. Manafort, who had been instrumental in getting Mr. Yanukovych elected, helped shape a political bloc that sprang up to oppose the new president, Mr. Poroshenko, a wealthy businessman who has taken a far tougher stance toward Russia and accused Mr. Putin of wanting to absorb Ukraine into a new Russian Empire. Mr. Artemenko, 48, emerged from the opposition that Mr. Manafort nurtured. (The two men have never met, Mr. Artemenko said.)

Before entering politics, Mr. Artemenko had business ventures in the Middle East and real estate deals in the Miami area, and had worked as an agent representing top Ukrainian athletes. Some colleagues in Parliament describe him as corrupt, untrustworthy or simply insignificant, but he appears to have amassed considerable wealth.

He has fashioned himself in the image of Mr. Trump, presenting himself as Ukraine’s answer to a rising class of nationalist leaders in the West. He even traveled to Cleveland last summer for the Republican National Convention, seizing on the chance to meet with members of Mr. Trump’s campaign.

“It’s time for new leaders, new approaches to the governance of the country, new principles and new negotiators in international politics,” he wrote on Facebook on Jan. 27. “Our time has come!”

Mr. Artemenko said he saw in Mr. Trump an opportunity to advocate a plan for peace in Ukraine — and help advance his own political career. Essentially, his plan would require the withdrawal of all Russian forces from eastern Ukraine. Ukrainian voters would decide in a referendum whether Crimea, the Ukrainian territory seized by Russia in 2014, would be leased to Russia for a term of 50 or 100 years.

The Ukrainian ambassador, Mr. Chaly, rejected a lease of that kind. “It is a gross violation of the Constitution,” he said in written answers to questions from The Times. “Such ideas can be pitched or pushed through only by those openly or covertly representing Russian interests.”

The reaction suggested why Mr. Artemenko’s project also includes the dissemination of “kompromat,” or compromising material, purportedly showing that Mr. Poroshenko and his closest associates are corrupt. Only a new government, presumably one less hostile to Russia, might take up his plan.
Photo
President Petro O. Poroshenko of Ukraine in Kiev on Wednesday. Two days later in Munich, he warned the West against “appeasement” of Russia. Credit Gleb Garanich/Reuters

Mr. Sater, a longtime business associate of Mr. Trump’s with connections in Russia, was willing to help Mr. Artemenko’s proposal reach the White House.

Mr. Trump has sought to distance himself from Mr. Sater in recent years. If Mr. Sater “were sitting in the room right now,” Mr. Trump said in a 2013 deposition, “I really wouldn’t know what he looked like.”

But Mr. Sater worked on real estate development deals with the Trump Organization on and off for at least a decade, even after his role in the stock manipulation scheme came to light.

Mr. Sater, who was born in the Soviet Union and grew up in New York, served as an executive at a firm called Bayrock Group, two floors below the Trump Organization in Trump Tower, and was later a senior adviser to Mr. Trump.

He said he had been working on a plan for a Trump Tower in Moscow with a Russian real estate developer as recently as the fall of 2015, one that he said had come to a halt because of Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign. (Mr. Cohen said the Trump Organization had received a letter of intent for a project in Moscow from a Russian real estate developer at that time but determined that the project was not feasible.)

Mr. Artemenko said a mutual friend had put him in touch with Mr. Sater. Helping to advance the proposal, Mr. Sater said, made sense.

“I want to stop a war, number one,” he said. “Number two, I absolutely believe that the U.S. and Russia need to be allies, not enemies. If I could achieve both in one stroke, it would be a home run.”

After speaking with Mr. Sater and Mr. Artemenko in person, Mr. Cohen said he would deliver the plan to the White House.

Mr. Cohen said he did not know who in the Russian government had offered encouragement on it, as Mr. Artemenko claims, but he understood there was a promise of proof of corruption by the Ukrainian president.

“Fraud is never good, right?” Mr. Cohen said.

He said Mr. Sater had given him the written proposal in a sealed envelope. When Mr. Cohen met with Mr. Trump in the Oval Office in early February, he said, he left the proposal in Mr. Flynn’s office.

Mr. Cohen said he was waiting for a response when Mr. Flynn was forced from his post. Now Mr. Cohen, Mr. Sater and Mr. Artemenko are hoping a new national security adviser will take up their cause. On Friday the president wrote on Twitter that he had four new candidates for the job.
Correction: February 19, 2017

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article gave an incorrect middle initial for Paul Manafort. It is J., not D.
16  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Gen. James N. Mattis on: February 19, 2017, 04:08:58 PM
http://thehill.com/policy/defense/320171-mattis-on-rise-in-trump-administration
17  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Mexico-US matters on: February 19, 2017, 04:06:53 PM
or , , , desaparecido , , ,
18  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Novak: Democracy, Capitalism on: February 19, 2017, 10:39:03 AM

By Michael Novak
Feb. 17, 2017 6:46 p.m. ET
44 COMMENTS

(This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 27, 1994. Michael Novak died Friday at 83.)

Democracy, Winston Churchill once said, is a bad system of government, except when compared to all the others. Much the same might be said of capitalism. It is not a system much celebrated by the poets, the philosophers or the priests. From time to time, it has seemed romantic to the young; but not very often. Capitalism is a system that commends itself best to the middle aged, after they have gained some experience of the way history treats the plans of men.

My own field of inquiry is theology and philosophy. From the perspective of these fields, I would not want it to be thought that any system is the Kingdom of God on Earth. Capitalism isn’t. Democracy isn’t. The two combined are not. The best that can be said for them (and it is quite enough) is that, in combination, capitalism, democracy, and pluralism are more protective of the rights, opportunities, and conscience of ordinary citizens (all citizens) than any known alternative.

Better than the Third World economies, and better than the socialist economies, capitalism makes it possible for the vast majority of the poor to break out of the prison of poverty; to find opportunity; to discover full scope for their own personal economic initiative; and to rise into the middle class and higher.

Sound evidence for this proposition is found in the migration patterns of the poor of the world. From which countries do they emigrate, and to which countries do they go? Overwhelmingly they flee from socialist and Third World countries, and they line up at the doors of the capitalist countries.

A second way of bringing sound evidence to light is to ask virtually any audience, in almost any capitalist country, how many generations back in family history they have to go before they reach poverty. For the vast majority of us in the U.S. we need go back no farther than the generation of our parents or grandparents. In 1900, a very large plurality of Americans lived in poverty, barely above the level of subsistence. Most of our families today are described as affluent. Capitalist systems have raised up the poor in family memory.

The second great argument on behalf of capitalism is that it is a necessary condition for the success of democracy—a necessary, but not a sufficient, condition. The instances of Greece, Portugal, Spain, Chile (after Pinochet), South Korea and others allow us to predict that once a capitalist system has generated a sufficiently large and successful middle class, the pressures for turning toward democracy become very strong. This is because successful entrepreneurs speedily recognize that they are smarter and more able than the generals and the commissars. They begin demanding self-government.

As has been recognized since ancient times, the middle class is the seedbed of the republican spirit. Capitalism tends toward democracy as the free economy tends toward the free polity. In both cases, the rule of law is crucial. In both, limited government is crucial. In both, the protection of the rights of individuals and minorities is crucial. While capitalism and democracy do not necessarily go together, particularly in the world of theory, in the actual world of concrete historical events, both their moving dynamism and their instincts for survival lead them toward a mutual embrace.

On this basis, one can predict that as the entrepreneurial spirit grows in China, particularly in its southern provinces, we can expect to see an ever stronger tide in favor of democratic institutions begin to make itself felt. The free economy will unleash forces that propel China toward the free polity.

True, some dictators have chosen to permit capitalist systems even though such systems severely limit their own power over the economy. But there is an inherent defect in one-man rule that makes capitalism in such nations vulnerable. That defect is human mortality and the problem of succession. One of the great advantages of democracy is that it solves that problem of succession in a routine, regular and peaceful way. For the long-run health of capitalism, then, I venture the hypothesis that democracy, with its methods of peaceful succession, is also a necessary condition.

Another service to capitalism that democracy performs better than dictatorship draws upon its representational function. A free economy has a great many parts, and a parliament or representative congress tends to represent all these parts. Thus in a democracy every part of the economy has at least some active voice. This may make it more difficult for clear and simple decisions to be made. But the active representation of all economic parties does make less likely the harsh, unilateral decisions to which dictators are prone. Pinochet and other dictators have caused great harm to their economies by unconsidered, unilateral decisions, which a parliament might have prevented them from making.

People do not love democracy if it does not bring improvement in their economic conditions. They will not be satisfied with democracy if all it means is the opportunity to vote every two years. Typically, they do not ask for utopia but would like to see the possibility of solid economic progress for their families over the next three to four years. This is the psychological mechanism which makes capitalism, or at least a dynamic economy, indispensable to the success of democracy. Capitalism delivers the goods that democracy holds out as one of its promises.

Another service provided by capitalism to democracy is less well understood. The founders of the U.S. understood it very clearly, however, as one can see by a careful study of Federalist No. 10 and No. 53. Benjamin Franklin in London and Thomas Jefferson in Paris searched libraries to find out why previous republics had failed. Envy, it turns out, is the most destructive social passion—more so than hatred, which is at least visible and universally recognized as evil. Envy seldom operates under its own name; it chooses a lovelier name to hide behind, and it works like a deadly invisible gas. In previous republics, it has set class against class, sections of cities against other sections, leading family against leading family. For this reason, the early Americans stood against division (“divided we fall”) and sought ways to neutralize envy.

To accomplish this task, the Founders determined that a republic cannot be built upon the clerical (priestly) class; nor upon the aristocracy and military (whose interests in “honor” caused so many rivalries and contestations); but upon a far humbler and typically more despised class, those engaging in commerce. They opted for what they called “a commercial republic.” Why did they choose as their social foundation a class, and an activity, universally regarded by philosophers, religious leaders, and poets as lowly and ignoble?

They chose commerce for two reasons. First, when all the people in the republic, especially the able-bodied poor, see that their material conditions are actually improving from year to year, they are led to compare where they are today with where they would like to be tomorrow. They stop comparing themselves with their neighbors, because their personal goals are not the same as those of their neighbors. They seek their own goals, at their own pace, to their own satisfaction.

Indeed, in America, as de Tocqueville and others noted, there was a remarkable freedom from envy. On the whole, people rejoiced in the success of others, as signs of the coming prosperity of their village, city, and nation. Across America today, in public schools and colleges and universities, one still sees many portraits of public benefactors who were successful in commerce and industry. Democracy depends on a growing economy for its upward tide—for social mobility, opportunity, and the pursuit of personal accomplishment.

The other reason the Framers chose commerce and industry as the economic foundation for this nation is to defeat the second great threat to republican institutions, the tyranny of a majority. James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, in particular, understood the ravages of original sin in human affairs. They, therefore, strongly supported Montesquieu’s (and Aquinas’) notion of separated powers, plus the “principle of division” throughout every branch of society.

It is in the nature of commerce and industry that they focus the interests of citizens in many different directions: Some in finance, some in production, some in supply, some in wholesale, some in retail, some in transport, some in lumber, others in tobacco, or cotton, or vegetables, or whatever. In their structure and goals, industry differs from industry, firm from firm. In such ways, commerce and industry render highly unlikely any single, universal majority.

In summary, commerce and industry are a necessary condition for the success of republican government (”government of the people, by the people, and for the people”) because they (1) defeat envy, through open economic opportunity and economic growth; and (2) defeat the tyranny of a majority, through splitting up economic interests into many different foci.
19  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / WSJ approves Trump tweet on: February 19, 2017, 10:12:41 AM
 Donald Trump’s Twitter habits often get him into trouble, but the President has outputted no better tweet than this one Wednesday: “Venezuela should allow Leopoldo Lopez, a political prisoner & husband of @liliantintori (just met w/ @marcorubio) out of prison immediately.”

This was one Trump tweet that didn’t make the front pages, but it might make a difference for the people of Venezuela, who have suffered immensely under the faux democratic dictatorship of Nicolás Maduro.

Leopoldo López was the leader of the Venezuelan opposition party Popular Will until Mr. Maduro railroaded him into a 13-year prison sentence two years ago.

The media have reported on Venezuela’s descent into status as an economic basket case, including shortages of basic foodstuffs and medical supplies. The Maduro government’s survival strategy has been to tough out criticism and let the Venezuelan catastrophe fade from international view.

Taking no chances of anyone noticing, the Maduro government on Wednesday shut down CNN En Español, the nation’s last remaining source of independent news.

But President Trump noticed. That tweet demanding the release of Leopoldo López belies Mr. Trump’s reputation for being soft on authoritarian leaders. On Monday the Trump Treasury Department put Venezuelan Vice President Tareck El Aissami on its sanctions list for allegedly aiding drug traffickers.

What a contrast this is to the help and support Venezuelans got from Barack Obama and John Kerry. Which is to say, essentially none, notably on the issue of recalling the despised Maduro government in a popular referendum. Last year the government-controlled national election council slow-walked a decision to permit the referendum, which never happened. International pressure, led by the Obama government, would have helped. It never came.

Credit is due the Trump Presidency for picking up this badly dropped ball.
20  DBMA Espanol / Espanol Discussion / Re: Venezuela Politica on: February 19, 2017, 10:12:02 AM
 Donald Trump’s Twitter habits often get him into trouble, but the President has outputted no better tweet than this one Wednesday: “Venezuela should allow Leopoldo Lopez, a political prisoner & husband of @liliantintori (just met w/ @marcorubio) out of prison immediately.”

This was one Trump tweet that didn’t make the front pages, but it might make a difference for the people of Venezuela, who have suffered immensely under the faux democratic dictatorship of Nicolás Maduro.

Leopoldo López was the leader of the Venezuelan opposition party Popular Will until Mr. Maduro railroaded him into a 13-year prison sentence two years ago.

The media have reported on Venezuela’s descent into status as an economic basket case, including shortages of basic foodstuffs and medical supplies. The Maduro government’s survival strategy has been to tough out criticism and let the Venezuelan catastrophe fade from international view.

Taking no chances of anyone noticing, the Maduro government on Wednesday shut down CNN En Español, the nation’s last remaining source of independent news.

But President Trump noticed. That tweet demanding the release of Leopoldo López belies Mr. Trump’s reputation for being soft on authoritarian leaders. On Monday the Trump Treasury Department put Venezuelan Vice President Tareck El Aissami on its sanctions list for allegedly aiding drug traffickers.

What a contrast this is to the help and support Venezuelans got from Barack Obama and John Kerry. Which is to say, essentially none, notably on the issue of recalling the despised Maduro government in a popular referendum. Last year the government-controlled national election council slow-walked a decision to permit the referendum, which never happened. International pressure, led by the Obama government, would have helped. It never came.

Credit is due the Trump Presidency for picking up this badly dropped ball.
21  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Sen. Feinstein's husband (13 months old article) on: February 19, 2017, 10:07:40 AM
http://conservative50.com/dianne-feinsteins-husband-wins-near-billion-dollar-california-high-speed-rail-contract/#
22  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Muslim Woman: I feel safer in the US than in any Muslim country on: February 18, 2017, 10:15:02 PM
http://insider.foxnews.com/2017/02/10/asra-nomani-i-feel-safer-us-i-do-any-muslim-country
23  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Commentary: Our miserable 21st century on: February 18, 2017, 10:12:31 PM
https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/our-miserable-21st-century/
24  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Pitting Russia against Iran not likely on: February 18, 2017, 09:29:22 PM
Trump is not stupid to want to find a way to have Russia and US work together, but IMHO this idea is a bridge too far and is doomed to failure.

Here is an article in a similar vein:

http://www.aei.org/publication/pitting-russia-against-iran-in-syria-get-over-it/?utm_source=paramount&utm_medium=email&utm_content=AEITODAY&utm_campaign=021717
25  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Math: Five Questions on: February 18, 2017, 06:20:33 PM

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/02/17/nyregion/math-camp-quiz.html?emc=edit_th_20170218&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=49641193

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/17/nyregion/new-york-math-camp.html
26  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / POTH: Mar-a-Lago on: February 18, 2017, 05:55:17 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/18/us/mar-a-lago-trump-ethics-winter-white-house.html?emc=edit_ta_20170218&nl=top-stories&nlid=49641193&ref=cta&_r=0
27  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Imginary News on: February 18, 2017, 05:52:00 PM
http://blog.dilbert.com/post/157358914491/imaginary-news
28  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Poll: Americans want Dems to work with Trump on: February 18, 2017, 01:16:07 PM
http://thehill.com/homenews/news/320229-poll-americans-want-democrats-to-work-with-trump
29  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / TE man convicted of plotting to attack NY Mosque on: February 18, 2017, 12:17:24 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tennessee-man-convicted-of-planning-to-attack-new-york-mosque/
30  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Shall Issue bill offered on: February 17, 2017, 11:15:53 PM
Snowball in hell's chance of passage though.


http://melendezforca.com/melendez-introduces-legislation-to-make-california-a-shall-issue-state/
31  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / SJW vs. the Dalai Lama on: February 17, 2017, 11:14:41 PM
http://heatst.com/culture-wars/uc-san-diego-students-protest-oppressive-dalai-lama-visit/
32  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Rambling Rumination: Odin's Eye on: February 17, 2017, 11:11:18 PM
ttt
33  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Judicial Watch: The Insider Threat on: February 17, 2017, 10:55:47 PM
Hillary Clinton, The “Insider Threat”

 You don’t have to take my word for it that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s sloppy email practices were an egregious breech of national security.  An expert in the Department of Defense thought so as well.

This week we released a U.S. Department of the Army OpSec (Operational Security) PowerPoint  presentation that depicts Clinton as an example of “insider threats. ” The presentation, produced as part of a lecture on cybersecurity, also includes General David Petraeus, terrorist Nidal Hassan, Bradley (Chelsea) Manning, Edward Snowden, and Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis.
 
We obtained the documents in response to a January 11, 2017, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia seeking the PowerPoint presentation on operational security delivered to soldiers at Fort Leonard Wood (Judicial Watch v. U.S. Department of Defense (No. 1:17-cv-00060)). We sued after the Department of Defense failed to respond to our August 22, 2016, FOIA request (the lawsuit is now over, since we got what we wanted).

The presentation warns against “Critical Information Compromises” involving material such as the “itineraries of … senior executive service (SES)” and “very important persons (VIPs),” any of which can result in “Attack, Kidnapping, Publicity.” It also cites “unsecure email” as an error that can lead to an enemy being able to “Kill, Counter, Clone.” Judicial Watch’s investigations into Clinton’s email practices while she was secretary of state repeatedly  produced examples of Clinton aide Huma Abedin sharing the schedule and travel plans of Clinton on an unsecure email system.
 
The operational security brief was reportedly leaked, and then posted on the Facebook page “U.S. Army W.T.F! moments.” Administrators of the Facebook page said a picture came from a service member stationed at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri.

Clinton and Petraeus are cited as examples of “Careless or disgruntled employees.” Former Secretary Clinton conducted official government business using a non-state.gov email account, which was hosted on a server in her home in Chappaqua, New York. JW’s extensive FOIA litigation pried loose Clinton email records, which proved she sent and received classified information on an unsecure server while serving as secretary of state.

Gen. Petraeus is a retired four-star general and the former director of the CIA who pled guilty in federal court to a charge of unauthorized removal of classified information. At the time, Petraeus was having an affair with his biographer to whom he provided classified information while serving as Director of the CIA.  (I see he is up for potential appointment to President Trump’s National Security Advisor post.  For obvious reasons, this would seem to be a big mistake.)

No wonder it took a lawsuit to extract this damning Pentagon analysis, which recognizes Hillary Clinton as an “insider threat” to national security. The Trump Justice Department should take note and proceed with an appropriate investigation.
34  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Caveat lector on: February 17, 2017, 06:29:41 PM
http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/02/reports-national-guard-fake-memo-ploy-smoke-leaker/
35  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / John Oliver: on: February 17, 2017, 02:26:20 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xecEV4dSAXE&sns=fb
36  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Glick: The Trump-Netanyahu alliance on: February 17, 2017, 02:21:16 PM
http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/The-Trump-Netanyahu-alliance-481846
37  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / PP: Seeing Russia from the White House on: February 17, 2017, 12:28:40 PM
https://patriotpost.us/articles/47526
38  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / WaPo: Trade Issues and Capital Flows on: February 17, 2017, 12:13:29 PM
Not impressed with this article but I post it because it does make an argument of some relevance:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2017/02/16/why-is-president-trump-attacking-foreign-investment-in-the-united-states/?utm_term=.1dbc4a4e02ea
39  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Immigration issues on: February 17, 2017, 11:45:33 AM
http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-daca-20170216-story.html?utm_source=Today%27s+Headlines&utm_campaign=7b1c773c1e-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_12_12&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b04355194f-7b1c773c1e-80108809
40  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / RT: China at tech parity with US or is passing us on: February 17, 2017, 01:15:45 AM
https://www.rt.com/news/377440-china-military-technology-parity/

Do note the source here-- Russia Today
41  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Flynn transcripts do not show wrong doing. on: February 17, 2017, 12:29:39 AM
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/15/515437291/intelligence-official-transcripts-of-flynns-calls-dont-show-criminal-wrongdoing?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social
42  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Saudi Arabia goes Islamophobe on: February 17, 2017, 12:19:03 AM
http://www.dailywire.com/news/13535/islamophobic-saudi-arabia-deports-40000-muslim-michael-qazvini?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=102516-podcast&utm_campaign=beingconservative
43  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Col. Mustard in the library: Sources and Methods on: February 17, 2017, 12:09:29 AM
https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/02/16/general-flynn-and-colonel-mustard-lets-piece-together-clues-about-the-leak/


General Flynn and Colonel Mustard: Let's Piece Together Clues About the Leak
By Charlie Martin February 16, 2017
chat 246 comments
Checkpoint Charlie sign from Wikipedia

The most recent big scandal is LTG Michael Flynn's resignation from the position of national security advisor -- and just as an aside, I've heard at least three media people claim he'd resigned as director of the NSA, and no, being NSA isn't the same as being DIRNSA. The Trump administration promptly complained about the leaks, to the mass amusement of the usual suspects.

But -- is that amusement justified? Or is this more interesting than the usual suspects believe? Let's give it a look.

There's a phrase that comes up over and over when talking about classification of intelligence information: "sources and methods." In fact, it comes up so often that it's become one of those buzzword cliches that runs past -- sourzeznmethdz -- without people really hearing or thinking about it. So, just for once, let's think about it.

Obviously, it breaks down into sources and methods: sources are where the information comes from, and methods are how we illicitly obtained the information. (Strictly it isn't always illicit, since we derive useful intelligence from newspapers, but it's also not interesting to know the CIA reads Russian newspapers.)
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Now, we have a big scandal that is based on leaked reports of phone calls between LTG Flynn and the Russian ambassador, which apparently came from intercepts of the phone calls. But let's look at this through the "sources and methods" lens for a minute: we have an overt leak that our intelligence services have intercepted communications of the Russian ambassador (a source) by "wire tapping" or something similar their phone calls (a method). What's more, the other party to the call was LTG Michael Flynn. Technically, Flynn in this case is a United States Person ("U.S. Person") under 50 USC 1801. Here's the definition:

    (i)“United States person” means a citizen of the United States, an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence (as defined in section 1101(a)(20) of title Cool, ... .

Here's a link to all of 50 US Code Subchapter I, which contains the whole section on FISA courts. I won't go through the whole thing, but the gist is that there must be a FISA Court order to allow an intercept of a U.S. Person's communications; if a U.S. Person's communications are intercepted by accident, by law the U.S. Person's communications must be "minimized" in such a way that information identifying the U.S. Person isn't stored or disseminated except under some special conditions.

It looks like that rule was, shall we say, applied less than diligently here with these leaks.

But let's go back to "sources and methods" -- what we have here is "communications intelligence," COMINT. This isn't super sensitive -- as a friend pointed out, it's not like it's a big secret the U.S. is listening to the Russians -- but it still meets the qualifications to be something like CONFIDENTIAL and special compartmented intelligence: CONFIDENTIAL//SI. (You can read more details, if you're interested, in my pieces on Hillary's Air Gap Problem, on how It's Not Classified because It's Marked; It's Marked because It's Classified, and on L'Affaire Snowden and Computer Security.)

But the point for now is simply that this stuff must be classified at least CONFIDENTIAL//SI, which puts it under the Espionage Act; revealing it without authorization is a violation of 18 USC 793 (and some other sections. Again, the link is to the containing chapter). This is the same chapter that would have been used to indict Hillary Clinton if she hadn't had friends in high places.

Finally, let's ask the question that should be on every critical thinker's mind at all times: Cui bono? Who benefits? Add to that: who could have been involved?

Probably not the Trump people (plus they wouldn't have known to have access to it). Not the Russians. Decisions involving this kind of material are made in the executive branch (CIA, FBI, NSA are all in the executive branch). What's more, very few people are going to have need to know on this stuff, even if it's only CONFIDENTIAL: we don't want to let the Russians know exactly what conversations we've actually intercepted.

The final piece of the puzzle here is that we know these calls were intercepted before the inauguration. Which means they were authorized during the Obama administration.
Sponsored

So now, like Colonel Mustard with a lead pipe in the library, pieces have come together: this has to have been authorized under the Obama administration, by someone pretty high up (or else they wouldn't have access to the compartmented information), and leaked by someone pretty high up, also, almost certainly, either a civil service permanent employee held over from the Obama administration or a political appointee very high in the intelligence community. One who was pretty confident they also have friends in high places.

Why? It seems it must have been to make trouble for the incoming Trump administration.

This is going to get a lot more interesting.
44  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Countering President Trump's hand shake arm drag on: February 17, 2017, 12:05:51 AM
https://www.jiujitsutimes.com/defend-donald-trumps-arm-drag-handshake/
45  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Things are getting medieval on the border , , , on: February 16, 2017, 08:58:41 PM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-38986804
46  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Wounded Warriors on: February 16, 2017, 04:11:51 PM
I took my money away from WWP a few years ago and now give it to the Green Beret Foundation.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2017/02/08/wounded-warrior-project-cleared-of-spending-lavishly-report-finds/?tid=ss_mail&utm_term=.1f65789615e0
47  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Grannis: the economy and inflation on: February 16, 2017, 03:01:51 PM
http://scottgrannis.blogspot.com/2017/02/reflections-on-economy-and-inflation.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FtMBeq+%28Calafia+Beach+Pundit%29
48  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cal State San Marcos snowflakes freak at photos of abortion on: February 16, 2017, 12:55:12 PM
http://www.capoliticalreview.com/capoliticalnewsandviews/cal-state-san-marcos-students-hysteria-when-confronted-with-reality-of-killing-babies/
49  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Vice President Mike Pence on: February 16, 2017, 12:04:58 PM
http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/319801-vice-president-pences-power-grows-in-trumps-white-house
50  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: President Trump on: February 16, 2017, 01:02:31 AM
http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/319800-gop-senators-unnerved-by-trump-russia-relationship
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