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101  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Sharyl Attkinson: Team was ordered to turn back , , ,by Baraq? on: May 17, 2016, 05:59:46 PM
http://www.breitbart.com/video/2016/01/13/sharyl-attkisson/
102  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Jim Webb endorses Trump! on: May 17, 2016, 05:56:40 PM
http://spartianlifestyle.com/2016/05/08/breaking-democrat-icon-jim-webb-endorses-donald-trump-over-hillary/
103  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US Foreign Policy on: May 17, 2016, 05:34:11 PM
Agreed, but I don't see how it comes to bite us in the ass if Baraq vetoes-- which he will.
104  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: May 17, 2016, 12:58:45 PM
Awesome.  Please put in the Rants thread as well.
105  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 17, 2016, 12:54:15 PM
See, I told you he strengthens some of Trump's weakest links!
106  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Jane Sanders for First Lady on: May 16, 2016, 04:38:48 PM
http://heatst.com/politics/breaking-burlington-college-closes-due-to-crushing-weight-of-debt-acquired-by-jane-sanders/
107  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 16, 2016, 04:30:38 PM
Speaking only politically, Kasich has a lot to offer in the way of strengthening up some of Trump's weakest links.
108  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Rambling Rumination: For Doctor Dog on: May 16, 2016, 03:06:23 PM
Rambling Rumination: Doctor Dog's Adventure continues
by Punong Guro Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
(c) 2016 DB Inc.

Woof All:

The 2016 Dog Brothers US Tribal Gathering of the Pack was held this past weekend on May 14-15.

Fighting were:

Original Dog Brother Dogzilla
Doctor Dog
Seeing Eye Dog
Smiling Dog
Beowulf
Fu Dog
Catch Dog
Crossover Dog
Pappy Dog
C-Shadow Dog
C-Fox Hound
C-Faithful Dog
C-Ferox Dog
C-Puni Dog
Dog Josh
Dog Greg
Dog Clint
Dog Lamont
Dog Joseph
Dog Mario
Dog George
Dog Matt
Dog Holger
Dog Rouwen
Cat Christine
Steve

Timekeeper and Scribe of the Tribe: Poi Dog

and yours truly as Ringmaster.

It is not our way to score things or to rank things, but I must say that this particular Tribal was simply outstanding from beginning to end. The physicality, the technical skill displayed under extreme adrenal conditions, the "Friends at the end of the day" credo, the variety of weapons, the creativity-- all were of the highest order.

Some random observations:

1) Size disparity: Again and again smaller fighters fought fearlessly and well against much larger fighters and with a number of fighters between 250 and 300 pounds, "larger" means large! It was common to see weight disparities of 60-100 pounds!

2) Kicking: Many of us have been taught that kicking in a weapons fight is foolish. Not on this field! Many fighters regularly integrate kicking, including head kicks, side kicks, spinning back kicks, teeps, front kicks as well as leg kicks into their games. Several of the lighter fighters were particularly skillful in this regard and were able to balance the scales against heavier opponents with their kicks. Some of the larger fighters surprised in this regard as well, for example Samoan C-Puni scored strong side kicks several times.

3) In the old days, we simply used knife as a way to warm up with the "knives" being rattan dowels or plastic trainers-- with exception of the occasional power thruster (e.g. Top Dog!)-- not a scary thing. Today most of the fighters use aluminum trainers. Getting thrust or hacked with an aluminum trainers, especially one the size of a Bowie knife is no joke with broken hands, arms, or ribs being a real possibility. With the greater danger these fights become more realistic and quite interesting in their own right with interesting match ups between ice pick and hammer grips being quite common; and one fighter exploring hammer with reverse edge.

4) The variety of weapons brought to bear continues to grow. With no public in attendance at a Tribal it becomes psychologically easier for fighters to experiment. In addition to the usual single stick, there was plenty of double stick, stick & knife, sword and knife, stick & buckler, sword & buckler, and even one staff & buckler!

5) With several people rather dinged up from Day One, Day Two had far more sword fights. A word here on the sword fights: Obviously if swung with intention a piece of aluminum the size of a sword can do too much e.g. break major bones badly or lastingly reduce IQ. Thus these fights require an intuitive understanding of both fighters equally staying relaxed and dialing back on the speed and power-- much trust in one's opponent to not accelerate is required and the Tribals are a good place for this. If/when someone gets excited and goes to hard these weapons can cause major breaks (ask Gong Fu Dog, who was on the wrong end of this a few years back.)

6) I think it safe to say there has been more exploration of the buckler in the Europe Dog Brothers than here in the US (though the NoHo Clan has been doing some good work in this regard) with many Euros going into the manuals from centuries ago. It was interesting for Poi Dog and me to scan for the differences due to this influence between the Germans and the Americans.
Noteworthy in this regard was C-Faithful Dog who came cherry to the experience but showed excellent intuitive understanding and movment.

7) The calm and composure shown by all was impressive. Particularly noteworthy for me was Beowulf who would calmly transition from taking most of the pictures you see on DBMA FB (and soon to be seen on our photo gallery) to some of the most hellacious fights of the weekend without batting an eye. Very Akita-like!

Cool As a teacher I confess to being more than a little proud of the good use my students put to the ideas, tactics, and concepts that we have worked. "Its DBMA-- if you see it taught, you see it fought!"

9) The culmination of the weekend came with Doctor Dog deciding to take up the "Beasting" tradition started by the Euros in celebration of this being his last time on the field. In a mighty display he fought seven fighters seriatim without rest!!!

Then it was time for the full Dog Brothers there to confer over the ascensions. As always, the thoughtful consideration and conversation did its magic and I feel good about the choices we made. They are:

Promoted to Dog:

Steve Sachs

Promoted to Candidate Dog Brothers/Cat Sister

Clint "C-To be determined" Taylor
Christine "C-Freyja Cat" Richter
Holger "C-Juggernaut Dog" Hoffmann
Rouwen "C-Silent Dog" Neumann
Josh "C-Lazy Eye Dog" Rogers
Lamont "C-Wile E. Dog" Glass
Joseph "C-Honey Badger Dog" DeBraux
Mario "C-Beast Hound" Ramirez
Promoted to Full Dog Brother.....
Matt "Fox Hound" Berry

Also, I took advantage of the occasion to promote Crossover Dog to DBMA Red Tag Instructor and Dog Steve Sachs to Instructor.

With his retirement, promoted to the next level, the for now nameless level, was Doctor Dog.

Here are some words I wrote back in 2003-- perhaps they be of relevance to my good friend Doctor Dog at this special moment in his Life:

Woof All:

At the core of the attraction that the FMA hold for me is that they produce men who "walk as warriors for all their days".

Of all the stories of Guro Inosanto, in one of many that have touched me deeply, he tells of watching old manongs hobble out to demonstrate their art. Amongst his many skills Guro I. is an extraordinary mimic (of accents as well as movement BTW) and as he mimics their movement one can see the effects of time. But then!-- they pick up their sticks and begin to move and it is as though they were young again: the movement live, dynamic and full of grace. And then they finish and become old men again, and hobble off.

The thought I apply to myself for my personal mission (and that of DBMA) of "walking as a warrior for all my days" is to train so that there is a place in myself that is forever young-- a place that I can access should I ever need to. If I remember my readings in NLP correctly, this may be called an anchor. In FMA perhaps this may be considered an anting-anting.

Regardless the name, it is the place that is forever young. If one has done little in youth, it seems reasonable to me to think that it will be of less value than if one has done more-- without having done "too much".. Perhaps some of the training that is derided by some today may be better seen as what those who "did more" in their youth use to keep the rust off their skills? Of course this interpretation implies that these methods may not suffice in the absence of seasoning experiences.

Just a rambling rumination.
Woof,
Crafty Dog

In my case on this day I went straight from the Sacred Ground of the Dog Brothers to the gym and deep in the altered space that a Gathering brings, I began to dance with my sticks, with them speaking to me of what I had learned from I had witnessed.

As the Toby Keith song goes, "I may not be as young as I once was, but I am as young once as I ever was."

My life upon it.

The Adventure continues!
Crafty Dog
GF
109  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Forever Young on: May 16, 2016, 02:41:03 PM
ttt
110  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / VDH: Elites support illegal immigration on: May 16, 2016, 12:43:01 PM
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/435274/immigration-elites-support-illegal-immigration-working-class-suffers?BpQgygT4QMu6uybp.01
111  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / VDH: The Education that failed-- who killed Homer? on: May 16, 2016, 12:41:00 PM
http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/The-new-learning-that-failed-3833?utm_source=The+New+Criterion+Subscribers&utm_campaign=48de07da31-Archives_Learning_and_Education_5_11_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f42f7adca5-48de07da31-104738973
112  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / More civil forfeiture abuse on: May 16, 2016, 12:26:32 PM
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/05/16/for-the-record-how-the-government-can-seize-your-money-without-charging-a-crime/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Firewire%20HORIZON%205-16-2016%20final&utm_term=Firewire
113  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Venezuela on: May 16, 2016, 11:31:24 AM
 shocked shocked shocked
114  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: US-China (& Japan, South China Sea-- Vietnam, Philippines, etc) on: May 16, 2016, 09:33:09 AM
Or it might realize it might be a good idea to start working to restrain the Norks and to start respecting international law in the South China Sea.

Thanks in great part to the Obama-Kerry-supported by Hillary Iran nuke deal, the era of nuclear non-proliferation is over.  Thanks too to Obama-Clinton, the US's ability to lead world wide Pax Americana to the benefit of all (most certainly including China) is over.

Throw in the Norks going nuke, and well , , , the facts have changed and thus too our strategy must change.

115  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 16, 2016, 09:29:23 AM
Well Pravda on the Hudson already has egg on its face for its hit piece on Donald-- the main woman in question says the piece mis-portrayed her and that she has no complaints about her time with the Donald.
116  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / You Tube called a criminal racket on: May 16, 2016, 08:49:22 AM
http://rainnews.com/grammy-winning-musician-and-congressional-witness-calls-youtube-a-criminal-racketeer/
117  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Narrative Space on: May 15, 2016, 07:02:25 PM
https://info.publicintelligence.net/SMA-NarrativeSpace.pdf
118  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Allende, Chile on: May 15, 2016, 01:00:53 AM
This piece seems oblivious to a key point-- that Allende won with a tiny plurality (35%) but nonetheless many interesting details in it:

http://blog.victimsofcommunism.org/communisms-experiment-with-democracy-allendes-chile/
119  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Slick Willie's willy. on: May 15, 2016, 12:58:15 AM
http://www.elderstatement.com/2016/05/by-fox-news-may-13-2016-former.html
120  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 15, 2016, 12:57:46 AM
I get your point but there are some things he can't go back on without destroying his bond with his base.

And, its' not like he doesn't have counter ammo on being a horn dog , , , http://www.elderstatement.com/2016/05/by-fox-news-may-13-2016-former.html
121  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 15, 2016, 12:24:53 AM
Trump:

a) Good on illegal immigration
b) good instincts on limiting immigration of groups likely to contain jihadis
c) promises to announce in advance list of potential SCOTUS picks
d) though protectionist, this has the good result of being against TPP which appears likely to sabotage US sovereignty
e) recognizes that dramatic upgrade of US military is necessary
f) recognizes that US tax code is profoundly destructive, instincts are in the right direction
g) willing to take on much of PC fascism
h) recognizes that nuke deal with Iran is a disaster and that stopping Iran from going nuke is a must
122  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / And, as predicted, the excrement storm begins on: May 14, 2016, 12:04:09 PM
Some of these have merit, some do not.  All hurt.

http://fortune.com/2016/03/08/trump-university-financial-elder-abuse-charges/?xid=for_fb_sh

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/us/politics/donald-trump-women.html?emc=edit_na_20160514&nlid=49641193&ref=cta&_r=0
123  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 13, 2016, 05:04:37 PM
The point is to put an end to such excrement, not make sure that "our side" gets to crap on American freedom too.
124  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Clinton Foundation raised $100M+ from ME?!? on: May 13, 2016, 03:03:54 PM
http://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/hillarys-latest-scandal-she-and-bill-siphoned-100-mil-from-persian-gulf-leaders/
125  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Trump the vengeful authoritarian on: May 13, 2016, 03:00:31 PM
http://www.vox.com/2016/5/13/11669850/donald-trump-threatens-amazon
126  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Donald Trump on: May 13, 2016, 02:47:24 PM
Yes.
127  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Denmark; nice little bar you got here. It would be a shame , , , on: May 13, 2016, 12:52:39 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3586942/Bar-owners-ordered-pay-protection-money-Sharia-patrols.html
128  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Morris: Trump should back Glass Stegall on: May 13, 2016, 12:08:12 PM
http://www.dickmorris.com/trump-should-back-glass-steagall-dick-morris-tv-lunch-alert/?utm_source=dmreports&utm_medium=dmreports&utm_campaign=dmreports
129  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Baltimore vote decertified on: May 13, 2016, 11:26:45 AM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/maryland-decertifies-baltimore-election-results-investigates-irregularities/2016/05/12/fca6e128-1861-11e6-9e16-2e5a123aac62_story.html
130  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / "Should" vs. "Is" on: May 13, 2016, 09:13:34 AM
Don’t Get “Should” Mixed Up with “Is”
Posted: 28 Apr 2016 04:00 AM PDT

The hardest truth to swallow is that the world isn’t really fair, and it isn’t a world you’d necessarily draw up from scratch. It’s not usually what you suppose it should be. None of what’s around us came about by grand design: From a spark many billion years ago, things evolved in a fairly undirected manner (as far as we can tell).

When the world doesn’t quite agree with our ideas, we often begin distorting our own cognition. We confuse should with is, and then complain or rationalize when reality shows we’ve gotten the wrong answer.

The history of Marxist political ideology is a pretty good example. It’s not unreasonable to think that the world should, in some cosmic sense, be a bit more egalitarian. We’re all born and we all die just the same — why should some among us enjoy the spoils while some among us wallow? Capitalism encourages that outcome to an extent, and it sometimes accidentally rewards behavior that is anti-social or simply not adding anything to the world. (A thousand derivatives traders and casino operators just cringed.)

The problem is that reality is way more complex than a simple fairness test would hope to show.

A really large-scale egalitarian society has never worked for a few interrelated reasons, chief among them that: groups don’t have power, people have power (raising the question, who specifically decides how to allocate society’s resources?); utopia doesn’t scale; market forces provide very effective carrots, sticks, and signals that directed egalitarianism lacks, among other reasons. Reaching for extreme levelness in outcomes has always been deeply problematic and always will be, because that’s how reality is constructed.

Inevitably when certain people who get into power run the experiment again, and it does not work as intended, its deepest acolytes return to first principles instead of acknowledging a flawed premise. Well, that wasn’t real Marxism. Yes the proposed system of economic distribution didn’t work, but that’s not our fault. It still should be this way. Things should be fairer. We just did it wrong. Let’s run it again!

Results like that show the brain performing some real acrobatics to keep its desired and cherished idea intact. The Greek statesman Demosthenes, living about 350 years before the birth of Christ, put it best by saying “What a man wishes, he also believes.” In other words, because we want it to be true, we make it so in our minds, evidence be damned.

We’re all subject to this bias from time to time.

In the financial world, many an investor has seen his investment go south only to complain about how unfair the damn world is, how things shouldn’t have gone that way — the CEO should have been more attentive, the creditors should have been more fair, competitors should have been more rational. It’s not supposed to go like this! Far from the investor’s mind is the thought that he simply misdiagnosed a complex situation with a range of outcomes, including bad ones. But reality is irreducibly complicated — it doesn’t ignore things just because you do. It isn’t supposed to be anything. It’s just hard.
This isn’t to be harsh. It’s just the way things are. It’s not about you. Nature just doesn’t care too much about your should.

This happens in relationships all the time. It’s almost an iron rule of life that marrying someone with the intent of changing them is not going to work. Who wants to be chiseled, molded, and nagged by their spouse? Who’s really been successful at that? Most of us seek acceptance, and when we don’t get it, we fight for our independence. That’s just human nature.

And yet how many divorces happen due to traits that were plainly present before the marriage began? Is a continuation of long-held traits the fault of the non-compliant spouse, or was there a willful misunderstanding from Day 1?

That’s not to say that a good spouse shouldn’t work to improve themselves. Of course they should. It is a recognition of the base rate that major improvements are not very common.

Think of the last major personality flaw you had that you actually shed for good. I’ll wait…

And so our lack of understanding human nature and of the complex reality leads us to bad results, frequently because we wish the world was another way. We think it ought to be another way, and we keep that conclusion even after the world shows us we’re wrong, leading to one mistake after another as we rationalize repeated errors with ought style thinking.

Start resolving to test yourself with the basic question: Do I believe this because I wish it was so, or because it actually is so? Have I acted in some way because I wish that action caused success, or because it actually does? If you can’t tell the difference, it’s likely to be wishful. And if you simply don’t know, then leave it at that: You don’t know. Resolve to find out the truth as best you can.

Instead of beating our heads against the wall, we should spend more time trying to understand the world as it is, and live accordingly. Or, in the brilliant words of Joseph Tussman:

“What the pupil must learn, if he learns anything at all, is that the world will do most of the work for you, provided you cooperate with it by identifying how it really works and aligning with those realities. If we do not let the world teach us, it teaches us a lesson.”
131  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / BH Liddell Hart and the study of History on: May 13, 2016, 09:10:07 AM
Farnam Street: B.H. Liddell Hart and the Study of Truth and History
 

________________________________________
B.H. Liddell Hart and the Study of Truth and History
Posted: 04 May 2016 04:00 AM PDT

B.H. Liddell Hart (1895-1970) was many things, but above all, he was a military historian. He wrote tracts on Sherman, Scipio, Rommel, and on military strategy itself. His work influenced Neville Chamberlain and may have even (accidentally) influenced the German army’s blitzkrieg tactic in WWII.
What’s beautiful about Hart’s writing is his insight into human nature as seen through the lens of war. Hart’s experience both studying wars and participating in them — he was a British officer in World War I and present for both World War II and a large portion of the Cold War — gave him wide perspective on the ultimate human folly.

Hart summed up much of his wisdom in a short treatise called Why Don’t we Learn from History?, which he unfortunately left unfinished at his death. In the preface to the book, Hart’s son Adrian sums up his father’s approach to life:

He believed in the importance of the truth that man could, by rational process discover the truth about himself—and about life; that this discovery was without value unless it was expressed and unless its expression resulted in action as well as education. To this end he valued accuracy and lucidity. He valued, perhaps even more, the moral courage to pursue and propagate truths which might be unpopular or detrimental to one’s own or other people’s immediate interests. He recognized that this discovery could best be fostered under certain political and social conditions—which therefore became to him of paramount importance.

Why study history at all? Hart asks us this rhetorically, early on in the book, and replies with a simple answer: Because it teaches us what not to do. How to avoid being stupid:

What is the object of history? I would answer, quite simply—“truth.” It is a word and an idea that has gone out of fashion. But the results of discounting the possibility of reaching the truth are worse than those of cherishing it. The object might be more cautiously expressed thus: to find out what happened while trying to find out why it happened. In other words, to seek the causal relations between events. History has limitations as guiding signpost, however, for although it can show us the right direction, it does not give detailed information about the road conditions.

But its negative value as a warning sign is more definite. History can show us what to avoid, even if it does not teach us what to do—by showing the most common mistakes that mankind is apt to make and to repeat. A second object lies in the practical value of history. “Fools,” said Bismarck, “say they learn by experience. I prefer to profit by other people’s experience.”

The study of history offers that opportunity in the widest possible measure. It is universal experience—infinitely longer, wider, and more varied than any individual’s experience. How often do people claim superior wisdom on the score of their age and experience. The Chinese especially regard age with veneration, and hold that a man of eighty years or more must be wiser than others. But eighty is nothing for a student of history. There is no excuse for anyone who is not illiterate if he is less than three thousand years old in mind.
[…]

History is the record of man’s steps and slips. It shows us that the steps have been slow and slight; the slips, quick and abounding. It provides us with the opportunity to profit by the stumbles and tumbles of our forerunners. Awareness of our limitations should make us chary of condemning those who made mistakes, but we condemn ourselves if we fail to recognize mistakes.

There is a too common tendency to regard history as a specialist subject— that is the primary mistake. For, on the contrary, history is the essential corrective to all specialization. Viewed aright, it is the broadest of studies, embracing every aspect of life. It lays the foundation of education by showing how mankind repeats its errors and what those errors are.

Later, Hart expounds further on the value of truth, the value of finding out what’s actually going on as opposed to what one wishes was the case. Hart agrees with the idea that one should recognize reality especially when it makes one uncomfortable, as Darwin was able to do so effectively. If we forget or mask our mistakes, we are doomed to continue making them.

We learn from history that men have constantly echoed the remark ascribed to Pontius Pilate—“What is truth?” And often in circumstances that make us wonder why. It is repeatedly used as a smoke screen to mask a maneuver, personal or political, and to cover an evasion of the issue. It may be a justifiable question in the deepest sense. Yet the longer I watch current events, the more I have come to see how many of our troubles arise from the habit, on all sides, of suppressing or distorting what we know quite well is the truth, out of devotion to a cause, an ambition, or an institution—at bottom, this devotion being inspired by our own interest.
[…]
We learn from history that in every age and every clime the majority of people have resented what seems in retrospect to have been purely matter-of-fact comment on their institutions. We learn too that nothing has aided the persistence of falsehood, and the evils resulting from it, more than the unwillingness of good people to admit the truth when it was disturbing to their comfortable assurance. Always the tendency continues to be shocked by natural comment and to hold certain things too “sacred” to think about.

I can conceive of no finer ideal of a man’s life than to face life with clear eyes instead of stumbling through it like a blind man, an imbecile, or a drunkard—which, in a thinking sense, is the common preference. How rarely does one meet anyone whose first reaction to anything is to ask “Is it true?” Yet unless that is a man’s natural reaction it shows that truth is not uppermost in his mind, and, unless it is, true progress is unlikely.

Indeed, in the 125 short pages of the book, Hart demonstrates the above to be true, with his particular historical focus on accuracy, truth, and freedom, explaining the intertwined nature of the three. A society that squashes freedom of thought and opinion is one that typically distorts truth, and for that reason, Hart was a supporter of free democracy, with all of its problems in full force:

We learn from history that democracy has commonly put a premium on conventionality. By its nature, it prefers those who keep step with the slowest march of thought and frowns on those who may disturb the “conspiracy for mutual inefficiency.” Thereby, this system of government tends to result in the triumph of mediocrity—and entails the exclusion of first-rate ability, if this is combined with honesty. But the alternative to it, despotism, almost inevitably means the triumph of stupidity. And of the two evils, the former is the less. Hence it is better that ability should consent to its own sacrifice, and subordination to the regime of mediocrity, rather than assist in establishing a regime where, in the light of past experience, brute stupidity will be enthroned and ability may preserve its footing only at the price of dishonesty.

Hart’s clear-eyed view of the world as an examiner of human nature and the repetition of folly led him to conclude that even if authoritarianism and coercion were occasionally drivers of efficiency in the short-run, by the quick and determined decision-making of a dictator, that in the long-term this would always cause stagnation. Calling to mind Karl Popper, Hart recognizes that freedom of thought and the resulting spread of ideas is the real engine of human progress over time, and that should never be squashed:

Only second to the futility of pursuing ends reckless of the means is that of attempting progress by compulsion. History shows how often it leads to reaction. It also shows that the surer way is to generate and diffuse the idea of progress—providing a light to guide men, not a whip to drive them.

Influence on thought has been the most influential factor in history, though, being less obvious than the effects of action, it has received less attention— even from the writers of history. There is a general recognition that man’s capacity for thought has been responsible for all human progress, but not yet an adequate appreciation of the historical effect of contributions to thought in comparison with that of spectacular action. Seen with a sense of proportion, the smallest permanent enlargement of men’s thought is a greater achievement, and ambition, than the construction of something material that crumbles, the conquest of a kingdom that collapses, or the leadership of a movement that ends in a rebound.

Once the collective importance of each individual in helping or hindering progress is appreciated, the experience contained in history is seen to have a personal, not merely a political, significance. What can the individual learn from history—as a guide to living? Not what to do but what to strive for. And what to avoid in striving. The importance and intrinsic value of behaving decently. The importance of seeing clearly—not least of seeing himself clearly.
Hart’s final statement there calls to mind Richard Feynman: “The first principle is you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool.”
Finally, Hart admits that the path of studying history and studying truth is not an easy one. Truth is frequently cloaked, and it takes work to peel away the layers. But if we are to see things clearly, and we must do so if we’re to have a peaceful world, we must persevere in the hunt:

It is strange how people assume that no training is needed in the pursuit of truth. It is stranger still that this assumption is often manifest in the very man who talks of the difficulty of determining what is true. We should recognize that for this pursuit anyone requires at least as much care and training as a boxer for a fight or a runner for a marathon. He has to learn how to detach his thinking from every desire and interest, from every sympathy and antipathy—like ridding oneself of superfluous tissue, the “tissue” of untruth which all human beings tend to accumulate for their own comfort and protection. And he must keep fit, to become fitter. In other words, he must be true to the light he has seen.

Still Interested? Check out the short book in its entirety.
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132  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Militants give oil companies ultimatum on: May 13, 2016, 08:54:00 AM

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Nigeria: Militants Give Oil Companies Ultimatum
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The Niger Delta Avengers militant group issued a two-week ultimatum to oil companies operating in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta region, warning companies to shut down or risk attack, the Nigerian publication This Day reported May 12. The group has claimed responsibility for several attacks on oil pipelines and platforms, including an explosion that targeted a Chevron oil platform on May 4. Though the militant group has shown it can conduct assaults against individual installations, it has not yet demonstrated the ability to disrupt regional oil production on a larger scale.
133  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Mexico-US water issues on: May 13, 2016, 08:50:30 AM
Analysis

Editor's Note: This is the 15th installment of an occasional series on water scarcity issues around the world.

When determining borders, a river is often the clearest delineation between sovereign nations. But that clarity abruptly ends when countries must decide how to use the water that the river provides. Even managing rivers that do not determine borders, but rather travel through multiple countries, is precarious at best. The Rio Grande, which partly establishes the U.S.-Mexico border, is no exception. It has been and will continue to be vital to economic growth in the region, especially in Mexico, where the river and its tributaries are crucial to supporting new opportunities for manufacturing and energy.

But growing demands and environmental pressures will increase tension over water resources in the coming decades. Unlike the waters of the Colorado River, which originate entirely in the United States, the watershed of the Rio Grande is more evenly split between the United States and Mexico. Although Mexico depends on the water resources far more than the United States does, both nations are vulnerable to increasing water stress, making it difficult for them to meet anticipated water treaty obligations.
Exceptional Management

The Rio Grande is more than just the main river that runs along the Mexican border of Texas, emptying into the Gulf of Mexico. Its upper reaches stretch as far north as Colorado, though the majority of the basin area in the United States lies in New Mexico. Because of a combination of factors — such as high evaporation rates in the arid region, diversions for agricultural production in New Mexico and invasive plant species — a portion of the Rio Grande effectively dries up before being replenished at its confluence with the Rio Conchos. The Rio Conchos runs entirely through Mexico's territory, beginning in the mountains of Chihuahua and Durango and moving through the Chihuahuan Desert, and it accounts for roughly 14 percent of the Rio Grande's total watershed. On the U.S. side, one of the Rio Grande's primary tributaries, the Pecos River, runs through New Mexico before joining up again with the larger river farther south.

Yet the cooperation between the United States and Mexico over the river systems of the Colorado and the Rio Grande (or Rio Bravo, as it is known in Mexico) is in some ways exceptional by international standards. Treaties signed in the first half of the 20th century clearly dictate the volumes of flow guaranteed to each country, and those agreements have successfully forestalled many past disputes. Specifically, the river's use is governed in two separate sections, with Fort Quitman, Texas, acting as the dividing point for legislation and management.

It was not until the late 19th century that legal disputes over the use of the Rio Grande began. At the time, U.S. courts determined that the country had no legal obligation to deliver any water downstream. A 1906 case, however, determined that roughly 74 million cubic meters per year would be delivered to Mexico from the northwestern parts of the river but stipulated that the amount could be reduced in drought years. There were reductions in roughly a third of the years between 1939 and 2015. In fact, Mexico has not received the full allotment since 2012, and as little as 6 percent of the full amount was delivered in 2013.

Along the southeastern portion of the Rio Grande, downriver from Fort Quitman, the allotments are governed by the 1944 water treaty, which requires Mexico to receive two-thirds of the water from its tributaries and to deliver the remaining third to the United States. These deliveries are somewhat flexible because the amount (just over 430 million cubic meters per year) is tracked in five-year blocks, and one year's deficit can be accounted for in the next year if necessary. Even if a deficit spans the entire five-year block, as was the case for much of the 1990s as well as from 2010 to 2015, it can still be compensated for in the following five-year span. Mexico even made up its accumulated deficit of 325 million cubic meters within the first few months of 2016. Still, the uncertainty over consistent volumes of delivery sometimes leads to calls for political action, especially for consumers in Texas.

In addition to the two countries' shared surface water, Mexico and the United States share about 20 underground aquifers. Though these resources support the populations and economies of the border region, unlike surface water, no international treaty governs their use. Much like surface water, however, there is significant overexploitation and a decline in water quality. Consistent overuse ultimately threatens the viability of the aquifer systems.
Demand Factors

When these agreements were signed in the early 20th century, less was known about the hydrology of the region, and the Rio Grande's limited water resources were likely over-allocated based on above-average yearly flows. Furthermore, demand is growing, not shrinking. Agriculture is the primary consumer of the basin's water, but expanding populations that could reach nearly 20 million people by 2020, the rapid rise of manufacturing capacities in Mexico (following North American Free Trade Agreement) and energy production on both sides all play a role in increasing water stress in the region.

Mexican manufacturing capacity, especially in the automotive sector, may be slowing after having swelled between 2008 and 2014. But buoyed by the increasing number of nearby U.S. consumers, high-end manufacturing will soon determine Mexican economic growth, and water consumption by the sector will only rise.

Manufacturing growth has also propelled the rapid expansion of Mexico's electrical grid and, in turn, the demand for energy: Mexico continues to rehabilitate its energy sector to revive production levels. And while the full benefits of Mexico City's recent energy reforms have yet to be seen, the energy sector will likely increase its water consumption (including for hydraulic fracturing) at sites located in the Rio Grande Basin. Moreover, Mexico will not be the only country drawing from the Rio Grande or aquifers to support energy production. Agriculture is the primary consumer of water in Texas, but the Eagle Ford shale formation crosses the Mexican border, and production on the U.S. side has already increased water use in several river basins over the past decade, a pattern that will likely continue.

All of these factors contribute to current estimates that upper portions of the river will decrease by as much as a third by the end of this century, and lower portions will accumulate a deficit of more than 830 million cubic meters per year. The gap between supply and demand will grow, as will tension along the border. The treaties, signed decades ago, have been sufficient and their terms largely met until now. But overuse of water resources and environmental stress continue to rise, and basin conditions are poised to prevent amiable management of the water system in the long term. Efforts from both the private sector and governments will instead likely focus on implementing technological adaptations, including waterless hydraulic fracturing and water recycling, to mitigate water stress. Nevertheless, dwindling water supplies could hamper manufacturing growth and energy production in the basin, especially for Mexico. Moreover, Mexico's likely failure to meet delivery quotas will only ramp up tensions with the United States in the coming decades.

    Part 1: Yemen's Looming Water Crisis
    Part 2: U.S. Agriculture Wilts During California Drought
    Part 3: South Africa's Water Needs Will Be Costly
    Part 4: Indonesia's Disjointed Islands Make Water Scarcity a Problem
    Part 5: Mesopotamian Vitality Falls to Turkey
    Part 6: Water Use Reform Will Be Difficult for Fractured India
    Part 7: Sao Paulo Drought Could Benefit Brazil
    Part 8: Industrial Expansion Will Strain Mexico's Water Resources
    Part 9: China's Appetite Will Strain Australia's Water
    Part 10: Why Canada Cannot Export Its Water
    Part 11: The Sea Is a Relief for Spain's Water Problems
    Part 12: Central America: How a Drought Affects Migration
    Part 13: Algeria: A Desert Nation Fighting to Maintain Water Supplies
    Part 14: Southern Africa's Options Are Drying Up
134  DBMA Espanol / Espanol Discussion / Mexico-US Water Issues on: May 13, 2016, 08:49:29 AM
Analysis

Editor's Note: This is the 15th installment of an occasional series on water scarcity issues around the world.

When determining borders, a river is often the clearest delineation between sovereign nations. But that clarity abruptly ends when countries must decide how to use the water that the river provides. Even managing rivers that do not determine borders, but rather travel through multiple countries, is precarious at best. The Rio Grande, which partly establishes the U.S.-Mexico border, is no exception. It has been and will continue to be vital to economic growth in the region, especially in Mexico, where the river and its tributaries are crucial to supporting new opportunities for manufacturing and energy.

But growing demands and environmental pressures will increase tension over water resources in the coming decades. Unlike the waters of the Colorado River, which originate entirely in the United States, the watershed of the Rio Grande is more evenly split between the United States and Mexico. Although Mexico depends on the water resources far more than the United States does, both nations are vulnerable to increasing water stress, making it difficult for them to meet anticipated water treaty obligations.
Exceptional Management

The Rio Grande is more than just the main river that runs along the Mexican border of Texas, emptying into the Gulf of Mexico. Its upper reaches stretch as far north as Colorado, though the majority of the basin area in the United States lies in New Mexico. Because of a combination of factors — such as high evaporation rates in the arid region, diversions for agricultural production in New Mexico and invasive plant species — a portion of the Rio Grande effectively dries up before being replenished at its confluence with the Rio Conchos. The Rio Conchos runs entirely through Mexico's territory, beginning in the mountains of Chihuahua and Durango and moving through the Chihuahuan Desert, and it accounts for roughly 14 percent of the Rio Grande's total watershed. On the U.S. side, one of the Rio Grande's primary tributaries, the Pecos River, runs through New Mexico before joining up again with the larger river farther south.

Yet the cooperation between the United States and Mexico over the river systems of the Colorado and the Rio Grande (or Rio Bravo, as it is known in Mexico) is in some ways exceptional by international standards. Treaties signed in the first half of the 20th century clearly dictate the volumes of flow guaranteed to each country, and those agreements have successfully forestalled many past disputes. Specifically, the river's use is governed in two separate sections, with Fort Quitman, Texas, acting as the dividing point for legislation and management.

It was not until the late 19th century that legal disputes over the use of the Rio Grande began. At the time, U.S. courts determined that the country had no legal obligation to deliver any water downstream. A 1906 case, however, determined that roughly 74 million cubic meters per year would be delivered to Mexico from the northwestern parts of the river but stipulated that the amount could be reduced in drought years. There were reductions in roughly a third of the years between 1939 and 2015. In fact, Mexico has not received the full allotment since 2012, and as little as 6 percent of the full amount was delivered in 2013.

Along the southeastern portion of the Rio Grande, downriver from Fort Quitman, the allotments are governed by the 1944 water treaty, which requires Mexico to receive two-thirds of the water from its tributaries and to deliver the remaining third to the United States. These deliveries are somewhat flexible because the amount (just over 430 million cubic meters per year) is tracked in five-year blocks, and one year's deficit can be accounted for in the next year if necessary. Even if a deficit spans the entire five-year block, as was the case for much of the 1990s as well as from 2010 to 2015, it can still be compensated for in the following five-year span. Mexico even made up its accumulated deficit of 325 million cubic meters within the first few months of 2016. Still, the uncertainty over consistent volumes of delivery sometimes leads to calls for political action, especially for consumers in Texas.

In addition to the two countries' shared surface water, Mexico and the United States share about 20 underground aquifers. Though these resources support the populations and economies of the border region, unlike surface water, no international treaty governs their use. Much like surface water, however, there is significant overexploitation and a decline in water quality. Consistent overuse ultimately threatens the viability of the aquifer systems.
Demand Factors

When these agreements were signed in the early 20th century, less was known about the hydrology of the region, and the Rio Grande's limited water resources were likely over-allocated based on above-average yearly flows. Furthermore, demand is growing, not shrinking. Agriculture is the primary consumer of the basin's water, but expanding populations that could reach nearly 20 million people by 2020, the rapid rise of manufacturing capacities in Mexico (following North American Free Trade Agreement) and energy production on both sides all play a role in increasing water stress in the region.

Mexican manufacturing capacity, especially in the automotive sector, may be slowing after having swelled between 2008 and 2014. But buoyed by the increasing number of nearby U.S. consumers, high-end manufacturing will soon determine Mexican economic growth, and water consumption by the sector will only rise.

Manufacturing growth has also propelled the rapid expansion of Mexico's electrical grid and, in turn, the demand for energy: Mexico continues to rehabilitate its energy sector to revive production levels. And while the full benefits of Mexico City's recent energy reforms have yet to be seen, the energy sector will likely increase its water consumption (including for hydraulic fracturing) at sites located in the Rio Grande Basin. Moreover, Mexico will not be the only country drawing from the Rio Grande or aquifers to support energy production. Agriculture is the primary consumer of water in Texas, but the Eagle Ford shale formation crosses the Mexican border, and production on the U.S. side has already increased water use in several river basins over the past decade, a pattern that will likely continue.

All of these factors contribute to current estimates that upper portions of the river will decrease by as much as a third by the end of this century, and lower portions will accumulate a deficit of more than 830 million cubic meters per year. The gap between supply and demand will grow, as will tension along the border. The treaties, signed decades ago, have been sufficient and their terms largely met until now. But overuse of water resources and environmental stress continue to rise, and basin conditions are poised to prevent amiable management of the water system in the long term. Efforts from both the private sector and governments will instead likely focus on implementing technological adaptations, including waterless hydraulic fracturing and water recycling, to mitigate water stress. Nevertheless, dwindling water supplies could hamper manufacturing growth and energy production in the basin, especially for Mexico. Moreover, Mexico's likely failure to meet delivery quotas will only ramp up tensions with the United States in the coming decades.

    Part 1: Yemen's Looming Water Crisis
    Part 2: U.S. Agriculture Wilts During California Drought
    Part 3: South Africa's Water Needs Will Be Costly
    Part 4: Indonesia's Disjointed Islands Make Water Scarcity a Problem
    Part 5: Mesopotamian Vitality Falls to Turkey
    Part 6: Water Use Reform Will Be Difficult for Fractured India
    Part 7: Sao Paulo Drought Could Benefit Brazil
    Part 8: Industrial Expansion Will Strain Mexico's Water Resources
    Part 9: China's Appetite Will Strain Australia's Water
    Part 10: Why Canada Cannot Export Its Water
    Part 11: The Sea Is a Relief for Spain's Water Problems
    Part 12: Central America: How a Drought Affects Migration
    Part 13: Algeria: A Desert Nation Fighting to Maintain Water Supplies
    Part 14: Southern Africa's Options Are Drying Up
135  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / 28 minutes by Caroline Glick on: May 13, 2016, 08:42:11 AM


https://vimeo.com/163437751
136  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / LA-SF overnight bus for $48 on: May 13, 2016, 08:17:23 AM
http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news/sleepbus-runs-overnight-between-sf-and-la-for-dollar48/ar-BBsOGmV
137  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Fighting Filipinos in WW2 on: May 13, 2016, 08:14:15 AM
https://m.warhistoryonline.com/featured/the-fighting-filipinos.html
138  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Wyoming farmer wins big against EPA on: May 13, 2016, 08:11:56 AM
http://www.tpnn.com/2016/05/10/wyoming-rancher-sticks-feds-wins-big-time-obama-epa/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=PostSideSharingButtons&utm_content=2016-05-11&utm_campaign=websitesharingbuttons
139  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Glick: The Fruits of Subversion on: May 13, 2016, 08:04:32 AM
http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Column-One-The-fruits-of-subversion-453875


140  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Sen.Ted Cruz reappears on policy as a Senator on: May 13, 2016, 08:01:12 AM
Ted Cruz: The Mullahs and Their Missiles

By TED CRUZMAY 13, 2016
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Credit Doug Chayka

Washington — ON Monday, the Iranian military’s deputy chief of staff announced that the Islamic Republic had successfully tested yet another ballistic missile — this time, a high-precision midrange weapon with a reported reach of 2,000 kilometers, or 1,250 miles, and with a degree of accuracy that he claimed to be “without any error.” If these statements are true, the entire Middle East, including Israel, is within the reach of the mullahs’ missiles.

It was not revealed if this missile had its genocidal intent actually inscribed on it, as other missiles recently tested by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps have — with the inscription in Hebrew “Israel should be erased from the map.” But it hardly matters. The mullahs’ objectives are plain enough for anyone with eyes to see: The Iranian regime is continuing its determined march toward not only a nuclear weapon, but also the means to launch it, first against Israel and then against the United States.

This reality makes all the more inexplicable President Obama’s steadfast faith that, since the election of President Hassan Rouhani in 2013, Iran has been charting a “more moderate course” to the detriment of the old-time hard-liners, and that Mr. Rouhani and his administration would be reliable partners in negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program.

To give credit where credit is due, the regime in Tehran has been frank and open about its continued hostility toward America and Israel. In the months since the Obama administration and the other permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (the group commonly referred to as the “P5 + 1”) concluded the deal with Iran called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the Revolutionary Guards have tested at least four ballistic missiles. Flush with the $100 billion they claim to be getting in assets unfrozen under the deal, the mullahs have gone on a spending spree, finally purchasing, among other things, the Russian S-300 missile system, which is now being delivered to them.

Who can forget the searing images of American sailors on their knees with guns pointed at their heads by our “moderate” partners this past January? Just last week, in the course of receiving an official delegation from the Gaza-based militant movement Palestinian Islamic Jihad — which the State Department designated a terrorist group in 1997, for its efforts to destroy Israel — the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, reiterated that the prime directive of the Islamic Republic remains, as it has been since 1979, to wage war against the United States and Israel.

On Saturday, Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, that trusted counterpart to Secretary of State John Kerry, publicly affirmed to the Iranian Parliament that the same supreme leader who had just said doing harm to America and Israel was his key objective remains the ultimate arbiter of Iranian foreign policy. And as a final reminder of how the Islamic Republic conducts itself toward America, on Monday Amir Hekmati, a former United States Marine, sued the government of Iran for the brutal torture inflicted on him over the course of more than four years of arbitrary detention by Tehran.

Enough. The mullahs’ policy is, by their own admission, unchanged. It is the same one that inspired the so-called revolutionaries of 1979 to take 52 Americans as hostages for 444 days, and motivated murderous attacks on Israelis and Americans from Buenos Aires to Beirut to Baghdad over the subsequent decades. The only thing that is changing now is the potential scale of this violence, as they seek to replace truck bombs and roadside explosive devices with the most destructive weapons on the planet and the means to deliver them.
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The sensible thing to do now is to face this reality, however unpleasant it may be, and do what we can to bolster our defenses and those of our allies.

As a first step, I look forward to working with my congressional colleagues this week and in coming months to make sure that President Obama’s failure to sufficiently fund Israel’s missile defense programs in his latest budget request is reversed. Shockingly, even after admitting that the nuclear deal with Iran places Israel in greater danger and making assurances that support for the Jewish state would be increased, the president could not find a single dollar to put toward procurement for the David’s Sling or Arrow-3 missile defense systems, which are being jointly developed by the United States and Israel.

We have all been impressed by the success of Israel’s Iron Dome air defense system, which targets short-range rockets and was implemented with the generous assistance of American taxpayers. But as the recent Iranian medium-range missile test proves, rockets fired from Gaza are not the only threat Israel faces.

Providentially, David’s Sling, which guards against such ballistic missiles, is ready to go online this year; it will be followed by the Arrow-3 system to protect the Jewish state from longer-range weapons. Rather than starving these programs, Congress should seize this opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to Israel’s security and so to our own. That would send the leaders of the Islamic Republic an unmistakable signal that there are at least some in Washington who still take them at their word, and will act accordingly.
141  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Iran on: May 13, 2016, 01:26:06 AM
 shocked shocked shocked

I note that Trump's foreign policy speech sure sounded like he said we would war to stop Iran from going nuke , , ,
142  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces on: May 13, 2016, 01:23:57 AM
YES.
143  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Norway on: May 13, 2016, 12:18:30 AM
https://www.facebook.com/libtardmedia/videos/1687227271494623/
144  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / US missile shield goes live, irks Russia on: May 12, 2016, 11:33:26 PM
You may speak too soon , , ,

http://www.reuters.tv/8uF/2016/05/12/u-s-missile-shield-goes-live-infuriates-russia
145  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / JW: Proof Hillary knew of security risks on: May 12, 2016, 06:22:41 PM
https://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/judicial-watch-new-clinton-emails-reveal-clinton-knew-about-security-risk-of-private-blackberry-avoided-use-of-secure-phone/ 
146  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cuba to Panama to Mexico to America on: May 12, 2016, 01:33:20 PM
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/cuba/article75164957.html
147  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Hillary supporters like Trump's tax plan on: May 12, 2016, 12:30:52 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsxXty6vEBA
148  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Way forward for Republican party on: May 12, 2016, 12:23:03 PM
I agree with your assessment.  Newt's insider knowledge and skills with Congress could be particularly valuable for Trump, for whom these things are a great void.
149  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / New whistleblower arises on: May 12, 2016, 12:21:48 PM
https://www.conservativeoutfitters.com/blogs/news/102111937-air-force-whistleblower-we-could-have-saved-benghazi-victims
150  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / George Zimmerman on: May 12, 2016, 12:50:54 AM
http://thescoopblog.dallasnews.com/2016/05/george-zimmerman-to-sell-gun-used-to-kill-trayvon-martin-help-fund-anti-clinton-effort.html/
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