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201  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Wesbury: Labor participation rate on: April 04, 2016, 01:34:10 PM
Don't Short the Participation Rate! To view this article, Click Here
Brian S. Wesbury, Chief Economist
Robert Stein, Deputy Chief Economist
Date: 4/4/2016

Last Friday was an interesting day. For years now, the US has consistently added jobs and the unemployment rate has steadily fallen. But, the Pouting Pundits of Pessimism keep arguing that a falling unemployment rate is only because of weak growth in the labor force.  So, on Friday, when the employment data for March were released, showing growth in the labor force and a rising unemployment rate (from 4.9% to 5.0%) guess what the pundits focused on? You got it, now it’s the unemployment rate that matters.

In spite of these Nattering Nabobs, the job market keeps getting better. The March payroll increase of 215,000 makes it 66 consecutive months of positive job growth. And now, both measures of job growth – the payroll report and the household data, which captures small-business start-ups – are up 234,000 per month in the past year. Not super strong, but certainly not weak.

But what’s changed the most lately is a pick-up in the growth of the labor force. The total number of people in the labor force is up 2.2 million in the past year, the largest increase since 2007-08. The labor force is now growing faster than population and the labor force participation rate bottomed at 62.4% back in September – the lowest level since the late 1970s – and in March made it back to 63.0%.

That’s still low by historical standards. Nonetheless, it shows that economic growth is finally overcoming the loss of workers due to baby boomers retiring and more generous government handouts to those who don’t work.

Faster wage growth is part of the reason. Average hourly earnings – workers’ cash earnings excluding tips and irregular bonuses/commissions – are up 2.3% in the past year. In the first three months of 2016, those earnings rose 2.7% at an annual rate. And with gas prices holding overall inflation down, those earnings go further.

Even more important, the acceleration in wages is happening while there’s a lull in the expansion of the welfare state. The welfare state has grown substantially in the past several years. The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, expanded Medicaid and created large subsidies to buy health insurance. As a result, people have less incentive to work. The same goes for letting disability benefits become, in effect, a “waiting station” for middle-age workers before they can get Social Security retirement benefits.

Even without retiring Boomers, a bigger welfare state should mean slower growth in the labor force and lower labor force participation, exactly what’s happened. But, for the next few years, as wages grow faster, the bargain available to those who work will likely get better faster than welfare benefits.
And that means a rebound in labor force growth.

It also means stabilization for the unemployment rate. The jobless rate ticked up to 5.0% in March and is now barely lower than the 5.1% back in September, six months ago. We would suggest that the US is now at “full employment,” or is even above full employment.

Earlier in the economic recovery, some analysts were complaining that slow growth in the labor force was causing the unemployment rate to drop quickly even though job growth was not that fast. Now we have the opposite: faster growth in the labor force, paired with faster job growth, meaning the jobless rate barely moves.

At present, we think the unemployment rate will likely stay right around 5.0% or slightly lower this year, with continued robust gains in both jobs and the labor force. However, we could eventually see further declines in the jobless rate in 2017 due to the delayed effects of loose monetary policy this year. But that would come with a negative – higher inflation.

What we’d really like to see is a shift in policy next year, one that both trims the welfare state and cuts tax rates. In that situation, jobs and the labor force would grow even faster and the Federal Reserve would have more room to raise rates back toward normal, even if the unemployment rate went up a little.
202  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Uighur hijackers beaten to death on: April 04, 2016, 12:36:48 PM
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2012/07/03/overpowered-passengers-beat-two-hijackers-to-death-on-chinese-flight/
203  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Geller: Integration is not the answer on: April 04, 2016, 12:35:10 PM
http://pamelageller.com/2016/04/integration-is-not-the-answer-to-muslim-terrorism.html/
204  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in America and pre-emptive dhimmitude on: April 04, 2016, 12:09:28 PM
There's an old joke mocking the French for perennially surrendering under pressure. But, once again, it was the Muslim sympathizers in the White House who were caught surrendering to political correctness. And the French were the bold ones.

A transcript on the White House website shows French President Francois Hollande, who was sitting across a table from Barack Obama, remarking, "But we're also well aware that the roots of terrorism, Islamist terrorism, is in Syria and in Iraq." But that's not what you'll hear in the video version. According to the Media Research Center, "The White House website has censored a video of ... Hollande saying that 'Islamist terrorism' is at the 'roots of terrorism.' The White House briefly pulled video of a press event on terrorism with Pres. Obama, and when it reappeared on the WhiteHouse.gov website and YouTube, the audio of Hollande's translator goes silent, beginning with the words 'Islamist terrorism,' then begins again at the end of his sentence."

Hot Air's Allahpundit makes this critical observation: "t's [Obama's] prerogative to choose his own words. It's not his prerogative to choose someone else's words, particularly when that someone is a foreign head of state whose country is dealing with a more severe jihadist threat right now than the United States is."

But here's the other thing, he says: "You know what the worst part is? Hollande didn't say 'Islamic terrorism,' which is the supposedly objectionable term. He said 'Islamist terrorism.' 'Islamist' was ... a term that came into use precisely because it gave the speaker an efficient way to distinguish between 'moderate Muslims' and the more jihad-minded. 'Islamic' describes all things Muslim; 'Islamist' describes a supremacist view in which Islam is the highest authority of the state."

But even that was too much for Obama's minion editors. It seems any iteration of the word "Islam" in the context of terrorism is altogether banned. You can't exercise a strong foreign policy when you're in denial about what defines your enemy.
205  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Hillbillary Clintons long, sordid, and often criminal history on: April 04, 2016, 11:56:31 AM
Very good post.  Please put on the abortion thread as well.
206  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Stratfor: Detecting Bombmaking on: April 03, 2016, 08:11:08 PM

Awareness Can Short-Circuit a Bomb Attack
Security Weekly
March 31, 2016 | 08:00 GMT Print
Text Size
Some missed opportunities to avert the bombing attacks that struck the Zaventem airport in Brussels included chemical odors outside the bombmakers' apartment and suspicious behavior on the part of the suicide attackers. (YORICK JANSENS/AFP/Getty Images)

By Scott Stewart

Bombs used in the March 22 attacks in Brussels displayed a degree of tradecraft not before shown by the Islamic State outside its core areas of operation. The bombings at the Zaventem airport and at a metro station in Brussels killed 35 and wounded more than 300, making them the deadliest jihadist bombing attack in the West in more than a decade.

The Brussels attacks broke the recent trend of moving toward armed assaults from bombings. The Brussels cell was able to conduct such a large bombing operation because one of its key members, identified by Belgian authorities as Najim Laachraoui, possessed advanced bombmaking tradecraft acquired from Islamic State trainers while he was in Syria. Laachraoui is also thought to have constructed the bombs used in the November 2015 Paris attacks.

Strangely, Laachraoui has been identified as one of the suicide bombers who attacked the airport in Brussels. It is rare for an organization's bombmaker to participate in a suicide attack — they are simply too valuable to waste  — but it appears as if Laachraoui, under heavy police pressure, chose to go out intentionally rather than to risk being captured like his fellow conspirator, Saleh Abdesalam, who was arrested March 18. No matter Laachraoui's motive, it is good news that a well-trained bombmaker is out of the picture. However, the threat of jihadist bomb attacks against targets in Europe and elsewhere in the West did not die with Laachraoui, and authorities and citizens alike are left to wonder: How many other trained Islamic State bombmakers remain at large?

I've recently seen a reputable company write that if a terrorist plot gets to the bombmaking stage, it is too late to avert an attack. However, I strongly disagree with this claim. Even in the weapons acquisition or bombmaking stage of the terrorist attack cycle, terrorist operatives remain vulnerable, and plots can be thwarted if bombmaking activity is noticed and reported to authorities.

Indeed, unusual activity was noticed in the Brussels case, according to a March 26 story in The New York Times. The story noted that an overpowering chemical odor coming from Laachraoui's sixth floor apartment made the building's owner gag — and odd happenings at the apartment prompted another neighbor to call the police, but those reports were not investigated. The taxi driver who drove three of the attackers to the airport also noticed that his passengers acted strangely and refused to let him touch their suitcases, which reeked strongly of chemicals, but he did not take action until after the attacks.

These were all indications that very well could have resulted in the attacks being disrupted, but unfortunately, they did not. However, that does not mean that the next bombing cannot be thwarted by the telltale signs of bombmaking activity. Let's examine some of those indicators in more detail.
Beyond a Bleach Blonde

As al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula's Inspire magazine so famously stated, you can indeed "make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom." It truly is not difficult for a knowledgeable individual to mix up improvised explosives using a wide range of common household chemicals, including peroxide, acetone, chlorine and brake fluid.

It is important to recognize that when we say an explosive mixture or an explosive device is "improvised," that does not automatically mean the end product is going to be ineffective or amateurish. Like an improvised John Coltrane saxophone solo, some improvised explosive devices can be highly crafted, albeit deadly, works of art. That said, certain activities necessary to make bombs leave even proficient bombmakers open to detection by outside observers — and amateur bombmakers are even easier to spot if one knows what to look for.

To obscure bombmaking activity, explosive mixtures and device components are often manufactured in rented houses, apartments or hotel rooms. We have seen this in past cases, such as the December 1999 "millennium bomb" plot in which Ahmed Ressam and an accomplice set up a crude bombmaking factory in a hotel room in Vancouver, British Columbia. More recently, Najibullah Zazi was arrested in September 2009 and charged with attempting to manufacture the improvised explosive mixture triacetone triperoxide (TATP) in a Denver hotel room. In September 2010, a suspected lone assailant in Copenhagen accidentally detonated an explosive device he was constructing in a hotel.

Similar to clandestine methamphetamine labs, which are also frequently set up in rental properties or hotel rooms, makeshift bombmaking operations frequently use everyday volatile substances. Chemicals such as acetone, a common nail-polish remover, and peroxide, commonly used to bleach hair, can easily be found in stores. Fertilizers, the main component of the bombs used in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and the 1993 World Trade Center attack, are present in large volumes on farms or in farm-supply stores in rural communities. Hardware and paint stores sell acids and powdered metals.

However, the quantities of chemicals required to manufacture explosives far exceeds those required for most legitimate purposes. Because of this, hotel staff, landlords and neighbors can fairly easily notice signs that someone in their midst is operating a makeshift bombmaking laboratory. Obvious suspicions should be raised if, for example, a new tenant moves several bags of fertilizer into an apartment in the middle of a city, or if a person brings in gallons of acetone, peroxide or sulfuric or nitric acid. Furthermore, bombmakers use laboratory implements, such as beakers, scales, protective gloves and masks, not normally found in a hotel room or residence.

Additionally, although electronic devices like cellphones or wristwatches may not seem unusual in the context of a hotel room or apartment, signs that such devices have been disassembled or modified to have wires protruding should raise a red flag, as these altered devices are commonly used as initiators for improvised explosive devices.

Certain items that are less commonly used in household applications but that are frequently used in bombmaking include nitric or sulfuric acid; metal powders such as aluminum, magnesium and ferric oxide; and large quantities of sodium carbonate, commonly sold in 25-pound bags. Large containers of methyl alcohol, which can be used to stabilize nitroglycerine, are another indicator that a bombmaker may be present.

Fumes from chemical reactions are another sign of bombmaking activity. Depending on the size of the batch being concocted, the noxious fumes from an improvised explosive mixture can bleach walls and curtains and, as was the case for the July 2005 London attackers, even the bombmakers' hair. The fumes can even waft outside of the lab and be detected by neighbors, as they were in the Brussels case. Spatters from the mixing of ingredients such as nitric acid leave distinctive marks, which are another way for hotel staff or landlords to recognize that something is amiss. Additionally, rented properties used for bombmaking activity rarely look occupied. They frequently lack furniture and have makeshift window coverings instead of drapes. Properties where bomb laboratories are found also usually have no mail delivery, sit vacant for long periods and are occupied by people who come and go at odd hours and who are often seen carrying strange things — such as containers of chemicals or large quantities of ice, which is used to keep chemical reactions such as those used to synthesize TATP under control.

The components for the truck bomb used in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing were manufactured in a rented apartment in Jersey City. The process of cooking the nitroglycerine used in the booster charges and the urea nitrate used in the main explosive charge created strong chemical fumes that changed the wall paint color and corroded metal doorknobs and hinges. The bombmakers also spilled chemicals on the floor, the walls, their clothing and other places, leaving plenty of trace evidence for investigators to find after the attack.
More Clues to Spot Bombmakers

Given the caustic nature of the ingredients used to make homemade explosive mixtures and the volatile chemical reactions required to make things like nitroglycerin and TATP, creating the explosive can be one of the most dangerous aspects of planning a bombing attack. Indeed, Hamas militants refer to TATP as "the mother of Satan" because of its volatility and propensity to severely burn or kill bombmakers if they lose control of the chemical reaction required to synthesize it.

Because of this, it is important for medical personnel to pay attention to emergency room walk-ins with thermal or chemical burns who smell of chemicals and to report them to authorities in much the same way they do patients who appear to have been injured in meth lab accidents.

In January 1995, an apartment in Manila, Philippines, caught fire when the bombmaker in the 1993 World Trade Center attack, Abdel Basit (aka Ramzi Yousef), lost control of the reaction in a batch of TATP he was brewing for his planned attack against a number of U.S. airliners flying over the Pacific Ocean — an operation he had nicknamed Bojinka. Because of the fire, authorities were able to arrest two of Basit's co-conspirators and to unravel Bojinka and other plots against targets including Pope John Paul II and U.S. President Bill Clinton. Basit fled to Pakistan, where he was apprehended a short time later. This case serves to highlight the dangers presented by these labs to people in the vicinity — especially in a hotel or apartment building.

Another behavior that provides an opportunity to spot a bombmaker is testing. A professional bombmaker will try out improvised mixtures and components, like improvised blasting caps, to ensure that they are functioning properly and that the completed device will therefore be viable. Such testing may involve burning or detonating small quantities of the explosive mixture, or actually exploding the blasting cap or booster charge. The testing of small components may happen in a backyard, but the testing of larger quantities will often be done at a more remote place. In his diary, Norway bomber Anders Breivik noted how he had taken his bomb components to a remote location a good distance from the rented farmhouse where he built his bomb to test them. Therefore, any signs of explosions in remote places like parks and national forests should be immediately reported to authorities.

Obviously, not every container of nitric acid spotted or small explosion heard will be absolute confirmation of bombmaking activity, but reporting such incidents to the authorities will give them an opportunity to investigate. In an era when the threat of attack comes from increasingly diffuse sources, a good defense requires more eyes and ears than the authorities possess.
 
207  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Air France Stewardesses rebel against head scarves in Iran on: April 03, 2016, 08:07:26 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/02/air-france-stewardesses-mutiny-over-order-to-wear-headscarves/
208  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Trade Issues / Freedom to Trade on: April 03, 2016, 08:01:43 PM
pasting this here from the 3D thread on SCH for its trade implications:


Adding New Layers to 3-D Printing
Analysis
April 1, 2016 | 09:15 GMT Print
Text Size
Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, will become more prominent in several industries, including aerospace, over the next few years. (PAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images)
Forecast

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, and other advanced manufacturing technologies will shorten and simplify global supply chains in the coming decades.
    As they do, manufacturing will migrate back to former and current industrial nations.
    New technologies will simultaneously prevent developing countries from using low-level manufacturing to bolster economic growth.

Analysis

The world is in the early stages of another industrial revolution, one that could reverse some aspects of globalization. Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, as well as intelligent industrial robotics and other software-based manufacturing technologies, are reducing the advantage of low labor costs. Eventually, they will fundamentally change how goods are made by enabling manufacturing to move closer to consumer markets and eliminating the need to search for cheap labor or produce and assemble parts in different locations away from the assembly plant. These changes will decrease trade in intermediate goods and components and lessen the need for physical inventories, shortening and simplifying global supply chains in the long run.

Additive manufacturing is a broad term that applies to machines using various techniques, including lasers, heat or ultraviolet light, to build items made of any number of materials. Adding materials layer by layer allows for the production of new and more complex products that are lighter and use less material than those made with molds or other traditional manufacturing methods. Because computer software and digital data control the design, several different products or components can also be made on the same machine. Industries with high-value, low-volume products or parts, including the medical, aerospace and automotive industries, have already adopted this technology and will drive much of its initial development.

Needed Improvements

But to fully integrate additive manufacturing into mainstream commercial production, making actual components and products instead of prototypes, several hurdles still need to be overcome, especially for printing metal parts. Metal printing, unlike plastic printing, is expensive. Costs will need to fall before the technique can be used in manufacturing, especially since the printers currently account for between 40 percent and 60 percent of the total unit cost of sintering-based technologies. (Sintering means binding particles of a material into a solid mass through heat or pressure.) The expiration of key patents in 2014 will help lower the cost of machines that use laser sintering to fuse metal layers together; similar patent expirations in 2009 helped drive down the cost of fused deposition printers, an additive manufacturing technology used for modeling, prototyping and production. However, even if the metal printing machines become cheaper, they will still be slow — today such products take hours or days to print, depending on their size — and mainstream incorporation will remain elusive.

The quality of completed 3-D printed products must also improve enough to remove the need for additional finishing processes. Many additive manufacturing techniques do not meet traditional industry standards for accuracy or uniformity, and they often require additional processing before the part or product can be used for its intended purpose. Developing standards specific to additive manufacturing among all the industry players will be crucial to its wider success.

Of course, these advancements will partially depend on the materials used in the process, including metal, ceramic, plastic or any future materials. As the volume of metal printing increases, so, too, will the demand for a key component: metal powder. The powder must be uniform, free of defects and high quality, regardless of the metal used. Today's powders, even those of the highest quality, are not optimal for 3-D printing. Further investment into material science research and development will be needed to meet the demand for high-quality materials and to help eliminate post-printing modifications.

And indeed, some improvements are already being made. The cost of metal printing is expected to decline as competition grows and technologies mature, and production speed will probably rise rapidly. Likely achievements in the computing are also important, since machines' software programing is equally vital to the entire production process.

However, 3-D printing will have the largest impact on global supply chains when printing multiple materials from the same machine becomes more affordable. Researchers at MIT recently announced the development of an inexpensive multicomponent printer that, though still in its early stages, shows promise. In time, their efforts could enable more parts of a product to be produced in a single location and reduce the number of separate components needed, simplifying supply chains and encouraging the technique's spread to many different sectors.

A Tipping Point

Despite the need for improvements, 3-D printing is already being incorporated into production in several industries. For example, hearing aid manufacturers in the medical industry have switched over to additive manufacturing methods, completely pushing out traditional manufacturers. (Hearing aids' small size makes them ideal for 3-D printing.) Moreover, other major companies, including GE, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Airbus and Google, are beginning to integrate the technology into their production processes as well. Sales of metal printers nearly doubled between 2013 and 2014. And the aerospace industry will continue to adopt the new techniques to make lighter, stronger structures required for its products.

Over the next two years, progress in 3-D printing technology will benefit the commercial sector. In 2016, GE will launch a new LEAP engine that uses 19 fuel nozzles produced by additive manufacturing. They are simpler and 25 percent lighter, reducing the number of separate parts in the nozzle from 18 to one. GE's success could certainly convince aerospace companies to jump on the 3-D printing bandwagon. Meanwhile, Carbon3D is gearing up to release its continuous liquid interface production method, which enables the printing of polymeric materials at speeds 25-100 times faster than the current rates, to the market this year. Developers of a new method known as high-speed sintering, which uses infrared lamp heating, are expected to release the technique in 2017, similarly increasing metal printer production rates by 10-100 times.

Still, the switch to additive manufacturing in the commercial sector will be gradual, much like it is for the transportation industry, because of the long lifetimes of traditional manufacturing equipment.

Changes in Trade

Additive manufacturing will not be the sole driver of the coming industrial transition that is poised to limit or even reverse globalization. However it, along with the Internet of Things (which at its heart simply connects devices to one another so they can communicate and become more efficient and effective), intelligent industrial robots, artificial intelligence and other technologies, will move manufacturing closer to the point of consumption, shortening and simplifying supply chains by reducing the need to import intermediate goods.

Developed nations, especially the United States, parts of Asia (Japan, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Singapore) and Northern Europe, will be the first to develop and adopt 3-D printing technologies. They will also be the ones to benefit most from the technologies, which will raise the productivity of highly-skilled workforces to the point that assembly, fabrication and processing using cheap labor no longer makes business sense. Put another way, 3-D printing could reverse outsourcing.

Additive manufacturing will change countries' domestic policies as well. For example, China is seeking to end its dependence on foreign technology to promote its own technology sector. Consequently, the incorporation of new 3-D printing methods there will be more rapid than might otherwise be expected. Different production specialties may also become more concentrated by region. Furthermore, U.S. government support and initiatives for additive manufacturing could even be used to benefit the rusting Steel Belt running from Pennsylvania to Michigan, the United States' former manufacturing heartland.

Developing countries may not fare so well as 3-D printing and other technologies diminish their opportunities for growth. As trade moves more toward finished products — many produced in or near consuming nations — there will be fewer chances for developing countries to promote economic development and diversification. As a result, low-end manufacturing's role as a catalyst for industrialization and growth in the developing world may weaken as the next industrial revolution unfolds.
209  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Stratfor: Adding New Layers to 3D Printing on: April 03, 2016, 08:00:25 PM

Adding New Layers to 3-D Printing
Analysis
April 1, 2016 | 09:15 GMT Print
Text Size
Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, will become more prominent in several industries, including aerospace, over the next few years. (PAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images)
Forecast

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, and other advanced manufacturing technologies will shorten and simplify global supply chains in the coming decades.
    As they do, manufacturing will migrate back to former and current industrial nations.
    New technologies will simultaneously prevent developing countries from using low-level manufacturing to bolster economic growth.

Analysis

The world is in the early stages of another industrial revolution, one that could reverse some aspects of globalization. Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, as well as intelligent industrial robotics and other software-based manufacturing technologies, are reducing the advantage of low labor costs. Eventually, they will fundamentally change how goods are made by enabling manufacturing to move closer to consumer markets and eliminating the need to search for cheap labor or produce and assemble parts in different locations away from the assembly plant. These changes will decrease trade in intermediate goods and components and lessen the need for physical inventories, shortening and simplifying global supply chains in the long run.

Additive manufacturing is a broad term that applies to machines using various techniques, including lasers, heat or ultraviolet light, to build items made of any number of materials. Adding materials layer by layer allows for the production of new and more complex products that are lighter and use less material than those made with molds or other traditional manufacturing methods. Because computer software and digital data control the design, several different products or components can also be made on the same machine. Industries with high-value, low-volume products or parts, including the medical, aerospace and automotive industries, have already adopted this technology and will drive much of its initial development.
Needed Improvements

But to fully integrate additive manufacturing into mainstream commercial production, making actual components and products instead of prototypes, several hurdles still need to be overcome, especially for printing metal parts. Metal printing, unlike plastic printing, is expensive. Costs will need to fall before the technique can be used in manufacturing, especially since the printers currently account for between 40 percent and 60 percent of the total unit cost of sintering-based technologies. (Sintering means binding particles of a material into a solid mass through heat or pressure.) The expiration of key patents in 2014 will help lower the cost of machines that use laser sintering to fuse metal layers together; similar patent expirations in 2009 helped drive down the cost of fused deposition printers, an additive manufacturing technology used for modeling, prototyping and production. However, even if the metal printing machines become cheaper, they will still be slow — today such products take hours or days to print, depending on their size — and mainstream incorporation will remain elusive.

The quality of completed 3-D printed products must also improve enough to remove the need for additional finishing processes. Many additive manufacturing techniques do not meet traditional industry standards for accuracy or uniformity, and they often require additional processing before the part or product can be used for its intended purpose. Developing standards specific to additive manufacturing among all the industry players will be crucial to its wider success.

Of course, these advancements will partially depend on the materials used in the process, including metal, ceramic, plastic or any future materials. As the volume of metal printing increases, so, too, will the demand for a key component: metal powder. The powder must be uniform, free of defects and high quality, regardless of the metal used. Today's powders, even those of the highest quality, are not optimal for 3-D printing. Further investment into material science research and development will be needed to meet the demand for high-quality materials and to help eliminate post-printing modifications.

And indeed, some improvements are already being made. The cost of metal printing is expected to decline as competition grows and technologies mature, and production speed will probably rise rapidly. Likely achievements in the computing are also important, since machines' software programing is equally vital to the entire production process.

However, 3-D printing will have the largest impact on global supply chains when printing multiple materials from the same machine becomes more affordable. Researchers at MIT recently announced the development of an inexpensive multicomponent printer that, though still in its early stages, shows promise. In time, their efforts could enable more parts of a product to be produced in a single location and reduce the number of separate components needed, simplifying supply chains and encouraging the technique's spread to many different sectors.

A Tipping Point

Despite the need for improvements, 3-D printing is already being incorporated into production in several industries. For example, hearing aid manufacturers in the medical industry have switched over to additive manufacturing methods, completely pushing out traditional manufacturers. (Hearing aids' small size makes them ideal for 3-D printing.) Moreover, other major companies, including GE, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Airbus and Google, are beginning to integrate the technology into their production processes as well. Sales of metal printers nearly doubled between 2013 and 2014. And the aerospace industry will continue to adopt the new techniques to make lighter, stronger structures required for its products.

Over the next two years, progress in 3-D printing technology will benefit the commercial sector. In 2016, GE will launch a new LEAP engine that uses 19 fuel nozzles produced by additive manufacturing. They are simpler and 25 percent lighter, reducing the number of separate parts in the nozzle from 18 to one. GE's success could certainly convince aerospace companies to jump on the 3-D printing bandwagon. Meanwhile, Carbon3D is gearing up to release its continuous liquid interface production method, which enables the printing of polymeric materials at speeds 25-100 times faster than the current rates, to the market this year. Developers of a new method known as high-speed sintering, which uses infrared lamp heating, are expected to release the technique in 2017, similarly increasing metal printer production rates by 10-100 times.

Still, the switch to additive manufacturing in the commercial sector will be gradual, much like it is for the transportation industry, because of the long lifetimes of traditional manufacturing equipment.

Changes in Trade

Additive manufacturing will not be the sole driver of the coming industrial transition that is poised to limit or even reverse globalization. However it, along with the Internet of Things (which at its heart simply connects devices to one another so they can communicate and become more efficient and effective), intelligent industrial robots, artificial intelligence and other technologies, will move manufacturing closer to the point of consumption, shortening and simplifying supply chains by reducing the need to import intermediate goods.

Developed nations, especially the United States, parts of Asia (Japan, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Singapore) and Northern Europe, will be the first to develop and adopt 3-D printing technologies. They will also be the ones to benefit most from the technologies, which will raise the productivity of highly-skilled workforces to the point that assembly, fabrication and processing using cheap labor no longer makes business sense. Put another way, 3-D printing could reverse outsourcing.

Additive manufacturing will change countries' domestic policies as well. For example, China is seeking to end its dependence on foreign technology to promote its own technology sector. Consequently, the incorporation of new 3-D printing methods there will be more rapid than might otherwise be expected. Different production specialties may also become more concentrated by region. Furthermore, U.S. government support and initiatives for additive manufacturing could even be used to benefit the rusting Steel Belt running from Pennsylvania to Michigan, the United States' former manufacturing heartland.

Developing countries may not fare so well as 3-D printing and other technologies diminish their opportunities for growth. As trade moves more toward finished products — many produced in or near consuming nations — there will be fewer chances for developing countries to promote economic development and diversification. As a result, low-end manufacturing's role as a catalyst for industrialization and growth in the developing world may weaken as the next industrial revolution unfolds.
210  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / This guy has some testicular fortitude! on: April 03, 2016, 07:42:36 PM
https://www.facebook.com/14310874716/videos/10154050833909717/

The openness of this conversation surprised me-- not only that it was said but that it was listened to. Perhaps it is not a coincidence that it was in Kuwait, which we saved from Saddam Hussein in the Gulf War.
211  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / FL Gov. Scott signs bill requiring charges before forfeiture on: April 03, 2016, 05:45:53 PM


http://reason.com/blog/2016/04/01/florida-governor-signs-bill-requiring-ac
212  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Radical Muslim Communities in the US? on: April 03, 2016, 04:20:47 PM
https://www.clarionproject.org/analysis/do-radicalized-islamic-communities-exit-us
213  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Save the Constitution! on: April 03, 2016, 08:58:19 AM
https://www.conservativereview.com/commentary/2016/04/we-must-not-destroy-the-constitution-to-save-it?utm_source=c-internal&utm_medium=Facebook&utm_campaign=save-the-constitution-4-1-2016
214  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Eight false memes about Iraq on: April 03, 2016, 08:42:56 AM
http://rightwingnews.com/column-2/debunking-8-anti-war-myths-about-the-conflict-in-iraq/
215  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / We will be seeing more of this: on: April 03, 2016, 08:37:01 AM
http://www.rawstory.com/2016/04/armed-hate-group-backs-out-of-texas-mosque-protest-when-faced-with-gun-toting-worshipers/#.VwBMzcvSC5Q.facebook
216  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / We will be seeing more of this: on: April 03, 2016, 08:36:31 AM
http://www.rawstory.com/2016/04/armed-hate-group-backs-out-of-texas-mosque-protest-when-faced-with-gun-toting-worshipers/#.VwBMzcvSC5Q.facebook
217  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Interpreting the Consitution on: April 03, 2016, 08:28:32 AM

By Juan Williams
April 1, 2016 6:41 p.m. ET
298 COMMENTS

As Republicans and Democrats wrangle over Judge Merrick Garland’s Supreme Court nomination to replace the late Antonin Scalia and whether or not to hold confirmation hearings, attention has been distracted from a fight of far more historical consequence.

Over the past half century, regardless of whether a liberal or a conservative resides in the White House, the critical issue facing any Supreme Court nominee is where he or she stands on the political contest of wills over how to read the Constitution.

In general the conservatives in this fight favor an “originalist” or “plain text” reading of the Constitution to limit the role of the courts to interpreting what the document and the Framers meant. Liberals regard the Constitution as a “living document” that lends itself to modern interpretations by judges, who may extend rights to groups not mentioned or considered in the Constitution or its amendments.

The first time I heard the originalist argument from conservatives was at a 1981 San Francisco conference organized by Edwin Meese, President Reagan’s then-White House counselor for policy and the future attorney general. While covering the Reagan White House, I saw Mr. Meese seek judges for the federal bench who abided by a strict reading of the Constitution, hoping to counter years of subjective interpretation—also known as legislating from the bench—by liberals such as justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall.

Beginning during Reagan’s time as California’s governor, Mr. Meese—a former prosecutor who served the governor in a variety of roles, including legal-affairs secretary and chief of staff—sought judges for state courts who stuck to the law as written by the legislator. That boiled down to selecting judges willing to apply strict sentencing guidelines to get tough with disruptive protests on college campuses, far-left radicals and criminals.

After becoming attorney general in early 1985, Mr. Meese told the American Bar Association in a July address that it was time for federal judges to get back to basics: “A Constitution that is viewed as only what the judges say it is—is no longer a Constitution in the true sense,” he said. “Those who framed the Constitution chose their words carefully, they debated at great length the minutest points . . . It is incumbent on the Court to determine what that meaning was.”

To that end Mr. Meese advised the president, after Chief Justice Warren Burger decided to retire in 1986, to elevate conservative Justice William Rehnquist to chief justice and to nominate Judge Scalia for the open seat on the court. When Lewis Powell retired the following year, Mr. Meese recommended as his replacement Judge Robert Bork, a staunch Constitutional originalist.

The elevation of Justice Rehnquist and appointment of Judge Scalia were confirmed, but Judge Bork’s nomination was famously defeated by a Democratic Senate in an episode remarkable for its vitriol. ( Anthony Kennedy was eventually confirmed instead.)

The Reagan administration was a judicial watershed in other ways: The careers of Justice Clarence Thomas and Chief Justice John Roberts trace to that period, and other federal judges appointed during the Reagan administration remain in place today, including Laurence Silberman, Edith Jones and Frank Easterbrook.

When Reagan nominated Judge Scalia for the Supreme Court, Mr. Meese told reporters that he was chosen for “his commitment to the interpretation of the law rather than being a lawmaker.”

For three decades Scalia championed the originalist approach to the Constitution. In his scathing dissent last year from the 5-4 decision legalizing same-sex marriage, Judge Scalia noted that the justices had discovered, in the 14th Amendment’s equal-protection provision, a constitutional right “overlooked by every person alive at the time of ratification, and almost everyone else in the time since.”

Scalia lost that fight but won others as he forced his colleagues to think hard about the Constitution and Bill of Rights in making their decisions. A major win came in 2008 with District of Columbia v. Heller upholding what he saw as the original intent of the Second Amendment to protect a citizen’s right to own a gun.

In today’s debate regarding Merrick Garland’s nomination to the court, much of the discussion concerns whether or not he is a “centrist.” But the real question, for both sides, is how he regards the Constitution. On that point it is clear from his record that Judge Garland is firmly in the “living document” camp. The push-pull over the Constitution and the Supreme Court is a battle without end, and in the current phase with the eight-person bench likely to divide 4-4 on important cases, the contrast between the court with Scalia on it and the court with Judge Garland or any other Democratic nominee couldn’t be greater.

Mr. Williams, a political analyst for Fox News and columnist for the Hill, is the author of “We the People: The Modern-Day Figures Who Have Reshaped and Affirmed the Founding Fathers’ Vision of America,” out April 5 from Crown.
218  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Righteous Kenyan on: April 03, 2016, 08:22:14 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/kenyan-muslim-man-who-died-protecting-christians-in-terror-attack-awarded-top-honour-a6964936.html
219  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Sen Feinstein's hubby wins CA rail contract on: April 03, 2016, 08:18:56 AM
http://www.capoliticalreview.com/blog/sen-diane-feinsteins-husband-wins-ca-rail-contract/
220  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / British commander on the IDF on: April 03, 2016, 02:28:31 AM
https://www.facebook.com/1780124725544063/videos/1781626642060538/
221  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Border Patrol Union endorses Trump. on: April 03, 2016, 12:23:04 AM
http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2016/04/01/leftists-organize-silence-border-patrol-agents-trump-endorsement/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social
222  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Progressive Fascism in Scotland on: April 02, 2016, 08:50:12 PM
http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/04/01/uk-police-say-they-will-pay-you-a-visit-unless-you-are-kind-on-twitter/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social
223  DBMA Espanol / Espanol Discussion / How to hack an election on: April 02, 2016, 08:26:44 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-how-to-hack-an-election/
224  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / How to hack an election on: April 02, 2016, 08:26:12 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-how-to-hack-an-election/
225  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Energy Politics & Science on: April 02, 2016, 07:55:52 PM
1)  Sometimes we need to know what the other side is saying.

2) Let's be real-- it's not like there aren't some operators out there capable of cutting corners and fouling the water table.  This is a proper area for regulatory oversight IMHO.
226  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Blackball Trump on: April 02, 2016, 04:49:37 PM
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/433477/donald-trump-abortion-conservative-blackout?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Saturday%20Best%20of%204/2&utm_term=VDHM
227  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Fracking and keeping the water clean on: April 02, 2016, 02:16:12 PM
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/04/01/1508986/-Stanford-scientists-find-that-fracking-has-clear-impact-on-drinking-water-in-Wyoming?detail=facebook
228  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Who could have seen this coming? Bathroom gender bender on: April 02, 2016, 02:09:38 PM
http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2016/04/01/california-man-dressed-woman-busted-videoing-womens-bathroom/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social
229  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Islam in Paris on: April 02, 2016, 01:27:55 PM
https://www.facebook.com/1655553208052876/videos/1677976065810590/
230  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / At FBI request, State Depart review on hold on: April 02, 2016, 09:45:10 AM
https://www.yahoo.com/news/state-department-halts-review-clinton-emails-fbi-request-000207678.html
231  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Despite our cranial rectal interface things are getting worse on: April 01, 2016, 02:35:36 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2016/04/01/islamist-violence-threatens-judeo-christian-civilization.html

http://www.investigativeproject.org/5241/islamist-terror-growing-in-lethality

232  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / ISIS caliphate forming in Libya? on: April 01, 2016, 02:31:36 PM
http://www.investigativeproject.org/5261/isis-caliphate-in-libya-spreading-terror
233  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Concerning the charge that Kasich is receiving Soror money on: April 01, 2016, 02:21:46 PM
This WSJ editorial fails to note that the charge is made by a Super PAC, not by Cruz.  Shame, WSJ!

March 31, 2016 7:08 p.m. ET
301 COMMENTS

Ted Cruz keeps saying he wants to unite the Republican Party’s factions to defeat Donald Trump. But you wouldn’t know it from his campaign in Wisconsin, where his Super Pac is aiming its fire at John Kasich.

Exhibit A is the false ad that the Super Pac Trusted Leadership is running nonstop in Wisconsin that accuses Mr. Kasich of being funded by liberal baron George Soros. “Millionaires working side by side with George Soros are bankrolling [Kasich’s] super PAC,” the ad says as the text “Hundreds of thousands of dollars from George Soros” flashes on the screen.

This claim is as dishonest as Mr. Trump’s charge that the Texas Senator is owned by Goldman Sachs because his wife worked for the New York bank. Mr. Soros hasn’t donated a penny to the Kasich campaign. The alleged “millionaires” bankrolling the governor are Stanley Druckenmiller, who helped manage Mr. Soros’s Quantum Fund between 1988 and 2000, and former Soros Fund Management chief investment officer Scott Bessent, who left the fund last year.

According to the Federal Election Commission, Mr. Druckenmiller has contributed $450,000 to the Kasich Super Pac New Day for America. Mr. Bessent has chipped in $200,000. The implication of the ad is that both businessmen are liberal by their Soros association, as if all Americans should be accountable for their employer’s politics.

Messrs. Druckenmiller and Bessent have donated mainly to GOP candidates, reflecting their belief in free-market policies. Mr. Druckenmiller donated $103,375 to the Jeb Bush Super Pac Right to Rise USA and $123,000 to the National Republican Congressional Committee last year.

The Cruz ad is also counterproductive if he wants to win the nomination at the GOP convention—or the Presidency in November. The Real Clear Politics average shows Mr. Cruz running three points ahead of Mr. Trump and leading Mr. Kasich by 14 points in Wisconsin. Instead of whacking Mr. Kasich, the Texan should target Mr. Trump so the New Yorker finishes third. This would deny Mr. Trump more delegates and would hurt his narrative that his nomination is inevitable.

Mr. Cruz also needs Mr. Kasich to peel away delegates from Mr. Trump in the eastern primaries later this month where the Texan is often third in the polls. Mr. Cruz finished a distant fourth behind Marco Rubio and Mr. Kasich in Massachusetts and Vermont, and outside the Maine caucuses he hasn’t won more than 12% of the vote anywhere in the Northeast.

Mr. Cruz wants to force Mr. Kasich out of the race so the Texan is the only alternative to Mr. Trump. That’s also why he attacked Marco Rubio in Florida, where Mr. Cruz had no chance of winning. But he shouldn’t overestimate his appeal. Wisconsin Republicans may give him a victory to stop Mr. Trump, but millions are doing it while holding their nose. The best argument Mr. Trump still has, amid his many mistakes, is that Mr. Cruz is emerging as his main opponent.

Mr. Cruz isn’t likely to get enough delegates to win the nomination on the first ballot at the Cleveland convention, so he will need the help of many of the Republicans his campaign has done so much to alienate the last two years. His smear of John Kasich underscores the doubts that he’s too divisive to win in November.
234  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Naps are good on: April 01, 2016, 02:11:13 PM
http://www.littlethings.com/benefits-of-napping/
235  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Some insight amidst the drivel on: April 01, 2016, 01:26:20 PM
A Syndrome, Not an Ideology

After globalization's economic squeeze on the middle class, after the racism and xenophobia the squeeze brings out, and after the shift from the Political Era to the Economic Era, there is another factor that explains Trump ascendency: A certain psychosexual dynamic that's more complex than your grandfather's sexism. After all, as he'll tell you again and again, Donald loves women.

But the remarks! The denigration of Megyn Kelly! And the macho toleration for roughing up demonstrators! Once again, the important thing to focus on is not so much the man with the baton at the head of the parade, but all those who are so attracted by his outrageous incorrectness. And what we find when we look not at the drum major but at his followers is the emasculation of the middle-class American male.

Several factors add up and reinforce one another: Anxious about the economy and unemployment, threatened by immigrants, frustrated at the lack of efficacy on the part of the leadership in Washington, and fed up with feminism, the blue-collar American male is a ripe target for testosterone-soaked rhetoric. "Make America Potent Again!" and pass the political Viagra.

Yet again, this is not just about Donald Trump, and it's not just about America. I was struck by a Feb. 6 headline in The New York Times: "Wanted in China: More Male Teachers, to Make Boys Men." The article went on to explain that, "Worried that a shortage of male teachers has produced a generation of timid, self-centered and effeminate boys, Chinese educators are working to reinforce traditional gender roles and values in the classroom."

But "traditional gender roles and values" are not likely to return any time soon in China or the United States because gender roles are a function of evolutionary and psychological dynamics that take millennia to unfold. As my colleague, Ian Morris, has explained in this space, both the rise of patriarchy and its decline are not matters of fashion or individual choice. The gender equality of hunter-gatherers gave way to patriarchy with the advent of agricultural societies for a series of social, biological and technological reasons that Morris reviews.

Now, after about 12,000 years, our species is moving back toward gender equality, again for a series of social and technological reasons that have little to do with choice or fashion. As Morris puts it:

    "[T]he truly difficult part of this struggle was over long before anyone thought of promoting themselves as champions of a self-consciously feminist foreign policy. The real heroes of this story are the forces that are all too often miscast as villains: fossil fuels, which created an economy that allowed women to be independent, and globalization, which continues to spread the new economic order worldwide."

But if patriarchy really is in retreat, as I agree with Morris that it is, then Trump's parade is marching in the wrong direction. Trump has jumped in front of an angry gang of economically anxious, bigoted, misogynistic people who are united more by a syndrome than an ideology.

Linguist and political analyst George Lakoff has analyzed the syndrome. He has studied the language and the metaphors used in public discourse. He has written extensively about the correlations between conservative values and what he calls the Strict Father model of politics and child rearing, as opposed to the Nurturant Family model favored by progressives. The Strict Father model is hierarchical and authoritarian.

    "The basic idea is that authority is justified by morality (the strict father version), and that, in a well-ordered world, there should be (and traditionally has been) a moral hierarchy in which those who have traditionally dominated should dominate. The hierarchy is: God above Man, Man above Nature, The Disciplined (Strong) above the Undisciplined (Weak), The Rich above the Poor, Employers above Employees, Adults above Children, Western culture above other cultures, Our Country above other countries. The hierarchy extends to: Men above Women, Whites above Nonwhites, Christians above Non-Christians, Straights above Gays."

So you see, it is a syndrome more than an ideology. But it is a syndrome that appears to be on the wrong side of history. Trump's parade is marching backwards.
236  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Women captives of Boko Haram who have escaped on: April 01, 2016, 09:31:08 AM
http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/03/31/the-wives-of-boko-haram-fighters-nigeria-captives-escape/
237  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Gay in Saudi Arabia on: April 01, 2016, 09:04:23 AM
http://pamelageller.com/2016/03/saudi-government-to-execute-gay-people-who-show-their-sexuality-in-public-online.html/
238  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Belgium airport police say baggage handlers infiltrated by ISIS on: April 01, 2016, 08:59:55 AM
http://pamelageller.com/2016/03/isis-airport-workers.html/
239  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cruzin' with Ted for 28 minutes on: April 01, 2016, 12:46:30 AM
https://www.facebook.com/Cruztovictory2016/videos/222541641424380/?pnref=story
240  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Mason Law School being renamed Scalia School of Law on: April 01, 2016, 12:15:18 AM
http://www.wsj.com/articles/george-mason-university-to-rename-law-school-after-justice-antonin-scalia-1459452145
241  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Heh heh, no Third Party run for Drumpf on: March 31, 2016, 10:31:30 PM
https://www.conservativereview.com/commentary/2016/03/trump-independent-bid-all-but-impossible

Hat tip CCP
242  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / US finally getting excrement together? on: March 31, 2016, 10:29:02 PM
Good for Sec Def Carter!!!

http://www.businessinsider.com/ash-carter-south-china-sea-2016-3
243  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Indonesia to deploy F-16s to guard South China Sea on: March 31, 2016, 10:26:15 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-31/indonesia-to-deploy-f-16s-to-guard-its-south-china-sea-territory?cmpid=yhoo.headline
244  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / The eloquence of Trump protesters on: March 31, 2016, 09:38:41 AM
https://www.facebook.com/foxandfriends/videos/1045728428848086/
245  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Cruz goes after the Empress Dowager on Benghazi on Erin Burnett on: March 31, 2016, 08:36:00 AM
A bit out of date but shows Cruz's ability to handle disruptive questions and stay on point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81yahgUJBSw
246  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Europe at the edge of the abyss; German train introduces women only cars on: March 31, 2016, 08:11:53 AM
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/433364/europe-edge-abyss


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/german-train-operator-introduces-women-7640234
247  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Grannis on Trade on: March 31, 2016, 07:57:43 AM
http://scottgrannis.blogspot.com/2016/03/chinas-gift-to-us-cheap-goods.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FtMBeq+%28Calafia+Beach+Pundit%29
248  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Philippines considering a submarine on: March 31, 2016, 07:53:58 AM
China

China has moved from deploying weapons to a disputed South China Sea island to test-firing them, according to several reports. China recently tested a YJ-62 anti-ship cruise missile from Woody Island, claimed by both Vietnam and Taiwan. China also recently shipped surface-to-air missiles and an associated radar system to the island, as well as J-7 and J-11 fighter jets as part of what the U.S. has called the "militarization" of the South China Sea. Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook wouldn't confirm or deny the report, citing the sensitivity of intelligence issues.

Philippines

The Philippine military is considering whether to buy a submarine in its pursuit of a stronger military to hedge against the rise of China's territorial ambitions. President Benigno Aquino floated the prospect of a submarine force on Wednesday, citing the need to modernize the country's armed forces. The sub would be the first for the Philippines and likely an expensive purchase for the country's relatively small defense budget.
249  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Beck: Communism, the scourge spreads part-2 on: March 31, 2016, 07:26:08 AM
http://www.glennbeck.com/2016/03/29/communism-part-ii-the-scourge-spreads/
250  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Grannis on Trade on: March 31, 2016, 01:20:12 AM
http://scottgrannis.blogspot.com/2016/03/chinas-gift-to-us-cheap-goods.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FtMBeq+%28Calafia+Beach+Pundit%29
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