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1  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: March 8-10, 2013 DBMA Training Camp on: February 22, 2013, 02:51:24 PM
Alas, I have ran in to a serious roadblock that has made it impossible for me to attend.  My disappointment is beyond words.  I wish everyone the best of luck and hope to train with you all in the future.

Regards
2  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Islam in Europe on: February 01, 2013, 06:36:52 PM
Europeans are going to wish they'd kept their guns about the time their Islamist populations reach about 30%........multi-culturalism is a great idea, until you get a significant minority population that doesn't share your view of a multi-cultural world, and finally gains the numbers to flex their muscle.  Then it becomes cold hard reality that, perhaps, a little xenophobia might be healthy thing......Kind of like a cultural immune system.
3  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: January 31, 2013, 03:04:55 PM
For another thread perhaps, what I intended with 'America's Inner City', but most of what is wrong in inner Chicago has nothing to do with gun laws either way.  Yes, guns laws have left the law abiding and the innocent unarmed and exacerbated the crisis, but the shootings - the willingness to kill and risk life in prison and to be killed yourself at the rate of over 500 per year(!) - has to do with a cultural problem caused by multi-generational government inference in the finances and structure of the family more than by anything else IMHO.

An adult male, who does not have the responsibility of helping raise and support his family, to get to bed early and set an alarm clock for work, will go do what?  Almost anything.  Gang, drug, street fight, armed robbery, turf war, murders, yes.  Start a white collar investment company that caters to all the thriving and growing small businesses in the neighborhood and marry his college sweatheart? Probably not, if those of you further away from these neighborhoods have seen the youtubes of the cultural climate their.

The murders are the symptom of the dysfunction, not the cause or the main problem. 

The 500+ per year murders in just one, out of control city are in a different category of crime IMO than the mental health related, mass, copycat shootings of strangers for final attention that started this current, anti-2nd amendment, ball rolling.
I would add twin problems of multgenerational government interference both on the welfare/assistance front, and on the backend, by generations of incarceration, crime and poverty, resulting from those communities being heavily targeted for enforcement of the nations drug laws.  Whether one believes in the objectives of the 'war on drugs' or not, one is forced to acknowledge that the unintended consequences is generations of inner-city youth left to be reared by single-mothers while their fathers, uncles, and brothers have been indoctrinated into a violent prison gang culture, cycling in and out of incarceration, and bringing that culture of violence to the next generation of males, who's only view of male role models are those same men who have been reared in violent prison culture.

If we're looking at one single factor that explains why the US has 3 times the homicide rate of the UK, for example, we must plant it squarely at the feet of unintended consequences for American drug control policies.......Likely 75% of all US homicides are directly or indirectly a result of the illegal drug trade.....Likely an even higher percentage of the homicides in Chicago, for example.
4  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: January 29, 2013, 01:57:45 PM
I have my eye on him, but there are still a number of things where I fear he may be reckless in how he makes his case.

Certainly plenty of room for that.
5  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: January 29, 2013, 01:39:25 PM
I think Rand Paul is going to be a serious contender for the 2016 run.......He brings with him a good chunk of his fathers libertarian support base, and yet he's also able to bring in more traditional GOP support.......He's currently going around building coalitions of the disparate groups who want to stop this administration for a myriad of reasons.  I think this guy could be the real deal.
6  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: March 8-10, 2013 DBMA Training Camp on: January 25, 2013, 03:52:41 PM
Got signed up for the NC Training and finally signed up for a DBMAA membership......very much looking forward to it...........Hope to this year get more involved instead of poking around on the periphery.
7  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Assassination of US citizens in US? on: January 24, 2013, 04:59:30 PM
Crafty, if you haven't seen this give it a glance......The HEAD of the FBI in a hearing of congress.......Answers the question of whether it had been addressed in recent hearings that he's not SURE if it's been addressed whether the government has the authority to assassinate US Citizens INSIDE the US.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaWyPsD5eEA
8  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: NY Gun Control FAIL on: January 18, 2013, 06:05:54 PM
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=news%2Flocal%2Fnew_york&id=8958116

Additions to be made to gun laws for law enforcement

Updated at 05:45 PM todayTags:new york city, albany, gun control, new york news, jim hoffer
Comment NowEmailPrintReport a typo  
Jim Hoffer
More: Bio, Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Stories by Jim Hoffer, News Team Eyewitness News
NEW YORK (WABC) -- It appears someone forgot to exempt police officers from the ban of ammunition clips with more than 7 bullets in New York State's new gun control law.


It's a big oversight that apparently happened in the haste by the Cuomo Administration to get a tough package of gun-control measures signed into law.

On Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the sweeping gun measure, the nation's toughest. It includes a ban on the possession of high-capacity magazines.


Related Content
More: Follow us @EyewitnessNYC
More: Get AlertsSpecifically, magazines with more than 7 rounds will be illegal under the new law.

The problem as the statute is currently written does NOT exempt law enforcement officers.

The NYPD, the State Police and virtually every law enforcement agency in the state carry 9-milli-meter guns, which have a 15-round capacity.

Unless an exemption is added by the time the law takes effect in March, police would technically be in violation of the new gun measure.

Within the last hour, the Patrolman's Benevolent Association President released a statement saying, "The PBA is actively working to enact changes to this law that will provide the appropriate exemptions from the law for active and retired law enforcement officers."

State Senator Eric Adams, a former NYPD Captain, told us he's going to push for an amendment next week to exempt police officers from the high-capacity magazine ban. In his words, "You can't give more ammo to the criminals"

A spokesman for the Governor's office called us to say, "We are still working out some details of the law and the exemption will be included."



I think it's very important that they don't exempt the police..........If you only need 7 rounds to defend yourself, that should be sufficient.  I saw that as a 15 year police veteran.  What's good for the goose......


As to gun registration, it's necessary to impose mandatory registration before confiscation can occur.  If you allow people the illusion that they can keep their guns if they register them, they will register them.  Then you can come back and confiscate what is registered.  If you simply demand they turn them in, the non-complicance rate will be extraordinarily high and currently the government has no idea where all those guns are.

Imagine the logistics involved for the NYPD to find 7 rnd. mags for their duty weapons and collecting all the non-standard mags. They're in crisis at 1PP over this, I'll bet.

Absolutely........Considering GLOCK doesn't make 7 round magazines that i'm aware of.

And to go and amend the law makes them look like hypocrites.
9  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: NY Gun Control FAIL on: January 18, 2013, 02:13:37 PM
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=news%2Flocal%2Fnew_york&id=8958116

Additions to be made to gun laws for law enforcement

Updated at 05:45 PM todayTags:new york city, albany, gun control, new york news, jim hoffer
Comment NowEmailPrintReport a typo  
Jim Hoffer
More: Bio, Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Stories by Jim Hoffer, News Team Eyewitness News
NEW YORK (WABC) -- It appears someone forgot to exempt police officers from the ban of ammunition clips with more than 7 bullets in New York State's new gun control law.


It's a big oversight that apparently happened in the haste by the Cuomo Administration to get a tough package of gun-control measures signed into law.

On Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the sweeping gun measure, the nation's toughest. It includes a ban on the possession of high-capacity magazines.


Related Content
More: Follow us @EyewitnessNYC
More: Get AlertsSpecifically, magazines with more than 7 rounds will be illegal under the new law.

The problem as the statute is currently written does NOT exempt law enforcement officers.

The NYPD, the State Police and virtually every law enforcement agency in the state carry 9-milli-meter guns, which have a 15-round capacity.

Unless an exemption is added by the time the law takes effect in March, police would technically be in violation of the new gun measure.

Within the last hour, the Patrolman's Benevolent Association President released a statement saying, "The PBA is actively working to enact changes to this law that will provide the appropriate exemptions from the law for active and retired law enforcement officers."

State Senator Eric Adams, a former NYPD Captain, told us he's going to push for an amendment next week to exempt police officers from the high-capacity magazine ban. In his words, "You can't give more ammo to the criminals"

A spokesman for the Governor's office called us to say, "We are still working out some details of the law and the exemption will be included."



I think it's very important that they don't exempt the police..........If you only need 7 rounds to defend yourself, that should be sufficient.  I saw that as a 15 year police veteran.  What's good for the goose......


As to gun registration, it's necessary to impose mandatory registration before confiscation can occur.  If you allow people the illusion that they can keep their guns if they register them, they will register them.  Then you can come back and confiscate what is registered.  If you simply demand they turn them in, the non-complicance rate will be extraordinarily high and currently the government has no idea where all those guns are.
10  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: History of Gun Control on: January 16, 2013, 04:36:12 PM
On a side note, it appears that the Chinese actually have an official training program for mass executions.......Note the standardized techniques used in the above executions.

"One man with a gun can control 100 without one." -Vladimir I. Lenin





11  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: January 15, 2013, 08:55:54 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8nF098HtY-s
12  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The death of the rule of law on: January 15, 2013, 07:57:12 PM
Half this country is increasingly populated by people who desire a benevolent messianic figure as government leader, ala Hugo Chavez.  Their notion of government is mother and father to provide for them craddle to grave.   That represents an irreconcilable difference with the other half of us with a diametric opposition to despotic figures, benevolent or otherwise.  At it's root is a fundamental disagreement over the very definition of the words 'right' and 'liberty'.....Positive and Negative Liberty....With the left viewing it through the lense of socialism, ones 'liberty' being some service or benefit OWED to them by the government.....One has a 'right to free healthcare', One has a 'right to social safety net', One has a 'right to protection from the government'.......With the rest of us viewing liberty as being FREE from government intervention, 'One has freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of property, freedom of association, right to bear arms'.........These two views are not compatible.

13  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: January 15, 2013, 01:25:26 PM
I would say that a significant MAJORITY of Americans support our gun rights and a significant minority would entertain notions of resistance.

I would say you're right......If even 1% of gun owners took significant action, that would be about 1 million men and women (by way of comparison there are only 800,000 police officers.......1.4 Million Active Duty military and 1.4 Million reserve).......To complicate the numbers further, many of those MOST likely to resist are among those 800,000 police officers AND 3 million active and reserve (among the most conservative members of society)........
'One in Three Americans Personally Own a Gun'

http://www.gallup.com/poll/150353/self-reported-gun-ownership-highest-1993.aspx

Further, that the majority of active duty military personnel are disproportionately from states MOST likely to be involved with any resistance of the federal government on the matter.
http://www.heritage.org/static/reportimages/E8F05D884C7E78E45A200DC953ED3854.gif
14  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Left is convinced Americans won't fight for Second Amendment Rights on: January 14, 2013, 01:26:29 AM
http://www.westernjournalism.com/the-left-is-convinced-americans-wont-fight-for-2nd-amendment-rights/

The Left Is Convinced Americans Won’t Fight For 2nd Amendment Rights

January 7, 2013 By Doug Book 85 Comments










inShare.13

 





Once cowed at the thought of provoking Second Amendment supporters, leftists will soon attempt to ban “assault weapons” (and much more) as legislation offered by Dianne Feinstein makes its way to the Senate floor. It seems that D.C. liberals have finally become convinced that American gun owners are too cowardly, too lazy or too dependent upon the generosity of Big Brother to fight for their Second Amendment rights.
 



During the past four years, the gun banning-Left have watched as American buyers broke sales records in the purchase of semi-automatic rifles.  Opting for these and other powerful, efficient weapons, it is estimated that some 100 million private citizens are now in possession of over 300 million firearms. And these numbers continue to grow with each passing month.
 
Yet it’s against this backdrop of America’s unprecedented determination to assert the fundamental permanence of Second  Amendment guarantees that Diane Feinstein, Michael Bloomberg, Barack Obama and others will choose to implement gun bans, demand the federal registration of firearms, and even legislate outright confiscation.
 
Maybe Democrats are confident that fallout from Sandy Hook will provide the floor votes necessary to  disarm the American people. But if the Left is willing to risk picking this fight with millions of American gun owners, it must also believe something far more important—that Americans who have spent years arming themselves against the ultimate expression of tyranny by their own government–the overthrow of the Second Amendment– will choose to not fight when the time finally comes.
 
For decades, the Left have watched Americans simply “lie down” before every imaginable outrage and legislative assault on our liberty. The Constitution has been prostituted by power-hungry, America-hating Marxists in Congress, on the federal bench and in the White House. Elected officials have laughed when asked to provide Constitutional authority for the passage of massively unpopular pieces of legislation. Tax dollars are insolently manipulated to purchase votes, grease the skids of questionable legislation, and add to the wealth of bureaucrats and elected officials. And through it all, Americans are robbed of more and more liberty as we do nothing but “vote ‘em in and cuss ‘em out” every two years.
 
Liberals have come to depend upon the willingness of Americans to subordinate their desire for liberty to the wishes and whims of the political ruling class. The cowardly are rewarded for relenting while those with the courage to question dictatorial authority and refuse to submit are accused of domestic terrorism. And all who press their own beliefs—or worse, those of the nations’ Founders– are met with ridicule or intimidation in what was at one time a nation of free, thinking individuals.
 



In short, the Left has come to expect cowardice or disinterested submission from a people trained for decades to accept as given that the good intentions of their elected betters are sufficient to fulfill the requirements of constitutional authority.  And it’s a safe bet neither Democrats nor RINO’s will expect anything different from the majority of Americans this time around as Feinstein and Company legislate last rites and a funeral for the Second Amendment.
 
We know what the Left believe. We’ll soon find out if they are right.
 
Photo credit: Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL) (Creative Commons)

I think they seriously underestimate the divide in this country, and the degree to which one half of this country resents them and outright despises what they perceive as the excesses and overreach of their political ideology in power.  I think they don't realize that a significant minority of Americans see the union as nearly irreparably broken already, and are already expecting that this is going to come to a head somehow in the very near future.  They live in a different circle, a different culture, that allows them to believe they are compeletely triumphant and that now they can remake America and the world in their image without any resistance whatsoever.   I suspect that the reality will not be quite that.
15  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Yeager shoots mouth off, loses CCW permit on: January 11, 2013, 09:40:38 PM
 Yeah, I remember watching that yesterday on Yeager's facebook page........You know that moment when you realize you're watching a car wreck happening and there's nothing you can do to stop it?  Yeah......It was one of those obvious moments of 'Oh my god, this isn't going to end well'.,........But if Yeager's goal was to become the lightening rod for this entire conflict, he succeeded in that in spades.......yikes!
16  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: January 10, 2013, 11:27:58 PM
I've seen some VERY heated responses to this today by people who lack confidence that we remain a nation of laws.

Though this is "just" a cartoon, it skates pretty close to the edge of the legal ice , , ,  http://www.daybydaycartoon.com/2013/01/10/

It's kind of a scary time.......For the first time in my life I am actually concerned that the rantings of folks like Alex Jones might come to pass in some fashion or another (despite the fact that I still think he's nuts).......Why would the VP invoke the notion of Executive Order on the subject unless they are trying to provoke some kind of response?  I seriously get the impression that they not only want to pass laws, they want to ensure that we know they are in charge and they can do whatever they want.  There is an arrogant swaggering quality to all of this.

In fact, having browsed some of the forums, the leftists are on there trying to provoke 'treason talk' with jibes of 'bring it on, I can't wait to see them drop JDAMS on your heads'........It's all taking on a rather 'Belfast' quality.
17  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: March 8-10, 2013 DBMA Training Camp on: January 09, 2013, 11:41:19 PM
Really excited about this.  Hoping to reserve my spot in a couple of weeks once the funds become available.
18  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Why haven't you heard about this? on: January 08, 2013, 05:40:32 PM

Good outcome, very, very bad tactics and mindset.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEDEi8ZZ--E
19  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: January 07, 2013, 10:15:29 PM
Nice post sgtmac.  Valid points for sure on the effects of the failed war on drugs.  Your final point though is what I think is the key to it all: "...the destruction of the black family is the root of the violence..."  

It is hard to establish cause and effect relationships.  My view is that destruction of the inner-city family, too often black, was accelerated by our welfare state that often required removal of the father in order to qualify for the 'assistance'.  Mothers had babies that guaranteed subsistence checks.  'Fathers' had idle time on their hands in place of the responsibility of supporting family.  Able bodied men didn't get the assistance that we pay a single woman with children.  The quickest and easiest appearing money in the neighborhood is in drugs, and illegal trafficking is enforced with violence.
EXACTLY!  Alienation/Resentment+Institutionalized Poverty+Promise of Black Market Profit+Draconican Response+Children raised without fathers=Multi-generational poverty and violence.

There are so many angles present that one could spend years studying the interlocking roots of the problem.......One thing is certain, however, the dynamics making comparing Canada, UK and Australia to the US apples and bananas........Because we don't have a violent crime problem, we have a very specialized problem that they don't remotely have within their demographic.  The UK is 92% European descent, comparable to the State of Wyoming, Vermont or New Hampshire, who have homicide rates of 1.4 per 100,000, 1.1 per 100,000 and 1.0 per 100,000, respectively, IDENTICAL to the UK's 1.4 per 100,000...........Comparing apples to apples we find the homicide rates are IDENTICAL, demographic to demographic, regardless whether it's unarmed UK or heavily armed (60% of the population armed) Wyoming........When people try to kill each other they succeed....Heavily armed folks are no more likely to try to kill each other because they are heavily armed than unarmed folks.........Attacking the tools do nothing to solve the reason why they are trying, and hence, don't solve the problem.
20  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: More twaddle from a Georgetown Law Prof on: January 03, 2013, 10:38:19 PM

Who Pays for the Right to Bear Arms?
By DAVID COLE
Pravda on the Hudson
Published: January 1, 2013

 .

IN the days following the Newtown massacre the nation’s newspapers were filled with heart-wrenching pictures of the innocent victims. The slaughter was unimaginably shocking. But the broader tragedy of gun violence is felt mostly not in leafy suburbs, but in America’s inner cities.

The right to bear arms typically invokes the romantic image of a cowboy toting a rifle on the plains. In modern-day America, though, the more realistic picture is that of a young black man gunned down in his prime in a dark alley. When we celebrate gun rights, we all too often ignore their disproportionate racial burdens. Any effort to address gun violence must focus on the inner city.

Last year Chicago had some 500 homicides, 87 percent of them gun-related. In the city’s public schools, 319 students were shot in the 2011-12 school year, 24 of them fatally. African-Americans are 33 percent of the Chicago population, but about 70 percent of the murder victims.

The same is true in other cities. In 2011, 80 percent of the 324 people killed in Philadelphia were killed by guns, and three-quarters of the victims were black.

Racial disparities in gun violence far outstrip those in almost any other area of life. Black unemployment is double that for whites, as is black infant mortality. But young black men die of gun homicide at a rate eight times that of young white men. Could it be that the laxity of the nation’s gun laws is tolerated because its deadly costs are borne by the segregated black and Latino populations of North Philadelphia and Chicago’s South Side?

The history of gun regulation is inextricably interwoven with race. Some of the nation’s most stringent gun laws emerged in the South after the Civil War, as Southern whites feared what newly freed slaves might do if armed. At the same time, Northerners saw the freed slaves’ right to bear arms as critical to protecting them from the Ku Klux Klan.

In the 1960s, Huey P. Newton and the Black Panther Party made the gun a central symbol of black power, claiming that “the gun is the only thing that will free us.” On May 2, 1967, taking advantage of California’s lax gun laws, several Panthers marched through the State Capitol in Sacramento carrying raised and loaded weapons, generating widespread news coverage.

The police could do nothing, as the Panthers broke no laws. But three months later, Gov. Ronald Reagan signed into law one of the strictest gun control laws in the country.

The urban riots of the late 1960s — combined with rising crime rates and a string of high-profile assassinations — spurred Congress to pass federal gun control laws, banning interstate commerce in guns except for federally licensed dealers and collectors; prohibiting sales to felons, the mentally ill, substance abusers and minors; and expanding licensing requirements.

These laws contain large loopholes, however, and are plainly inadequate to deal with the increased number and lethality of modern weapons. But as long as gun violence largely targets young black men in urban ghettos, the nation seems indifferent. At Newtown, the often all-too-invisible costs of the right to bear arms were made starkly visible — precisely because these weren’t the usual victims. The nation took note, and President Obama has promised reform, though he has not yet made a specific proposal.

Gun rights defenders argue that gun laws don’t reduce violence, noting that many cities with high gun violence already have strict gun laws. But this ignores the ease with which urban residents can evade local laws by obtaining guns from dealers outside their cities or states. Effective gun regulation requires a nationally coordinated response.

A cynic might propose resurrecting the Black Panthers to heighten white anxiety as the swiftest route to breaking the logjam on gun reform. I hope we are better than that. If the nation were to view the everyday tragedies that befall young black and Latino men in the inner cities with the same sympathy that it has shown for the Newtown victims, there would be a groundswell of support not just for gun law reform, but for much broader measures.

If we are to reduce the inequitable costs of gun rights, it’s not enough to tighten licensing requirements, expand background checks to private gun sales or ban assault weapons. In addition to such national measures, meaningful reform must include initiatives directed to where gun violence is worst: the inner cities. Aggressive interventions by police and social workers focused on gang gun violence, coupled with economic investment, better schools and more after-school and job training programs, are all necessary if we are to reduce the violence that gun rights entail.

To tweak the National Rifle Association’s refrain, “guns don’t kill people; indifference to poverty kills people.” We can’t in good conscience keep making young black men pay the cost of our right to bear arms.


David Cole is a professor of constitutional law and criminal justice at the Georgetown University Law Center.

IMHO David Cole is partially right.........And wrong when he invokes poverty as the reason for the high homicide rates in certain US populations.  Poverty alone does not create violence, and no reputable study has shown a legitimate correlation between poverty and violent crime.

The root of violence in African American communities is associated with poverty, but not caused by it.......the dirty secret is that US drug policies, not poverty, not guns, are the direct link to the extraordinarily high homicide rates in African American communities in particular and the US in general........Specifically the way in which the 'drug war' has been fought since the early 1960's.........

Drug laws and law enforcement targeted black drug dealers with often violent tactics that would never have been tolerated in white communities, incarcerating large numbers of poor blacks in numbers vastly disproportionate to white criminals, and the result was the institutionalization and indoctrination into violent prison culture of generations of black men.......Leaving generations of black families broken, and generations of black children without fathers.

The result of that indoctrination in to prison gang culture?  The bringing of that culture back to the streets where it was adopted as violent streets gang culture by the children of those men.........A culture that has perpetuated along with the illegal blackmarket drug trade.
 
If we want to know what has made America the violent country it is today..........One thing and one thing only........75% of the homicide rate of this country is a direct or indirect consequence of the drug war.........And if we weren't warehousing record numbers of Americans since 1992 with mandatory minimum sentences we'd be seeing higher rates than we are now.  Without the 75% of the homicides attributed to the drug war, we'd have a homicide rate equal to Great Britains..........1.4 per 100,000..........A rate you see in the US among groups of similar socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds..........Britain is 92% European heritage..........So is the state of Wyoming, Vermont and New Hampshire, all have lax gun laws, all have populations 92% give or take European........All with homicide rates of 1.4 per 100,000 or less.

Poverty is a contributor..........But not the cause.  There are plenty of places in the US with high poverty rates and low homicide rates.  Brownsville, Tx is a prime example of a medium sized American city with 92% hispanic minority population, high poverty and a homicide rate actually BELOW the national average....Poverty doesn't drive homicide rates..........In a general sense, a marginalized population that perceives itself victimized by the larger population and viewing the official law enforcement/judicial system as illegitimate correlates to high homicide rates.

One can examine hispanic communities to really see the dichotomy of American society......In places like Brownsville, with long established community ties, violence is low........In places where newly transplanted Hispanic immigrants find themselves in conflict with the same black communities and gang culture that have resulted from the drug war, we see extraordinarily high homicide rates.  In areas along the US/Mexican border along major drug distribution routes, large influxes of drug money has driven extraordinarly high homicide and violence rates.

South Africa may be the best example of this........A larger marginalized minority (in their case a majority) population and a homicide rate over 10 TIMES the US rate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bp7KTVbJj3Y


Being indoctrinated in to violent prison gang culture and the destruction of the black family is the root of the violence far more than 'guns' or poverty.
21  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Swiss rampage on: January 03, 2013, 04:17:38 PM

Now the Swiss are going to be underfire on gun control.......
22  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Evil in Connecticut on: January 03, 2013, 02:21:01 PM
Bad things can happen and occassionally do happen in places that allow their citizens the private possession of arms.........Over the last 40 plus years the US has seen approximately 20 mass shootings a year with an average of 100 deaths.........Each tragic, but also statistical anomalies in a nation of 300+ Million people.

The bad things that can happen and occassionally do happen in places that allow their citizens the private possession of arms, however, are vastly eclipsed by the bad things that seem to happen in places where they are denied arms....

'in the 20th century, approximately 281,361,000 unarmed and helpless men, women and children (roughly the same as the number that might die in a nuclear war) were killed by state and quasi-state regimes and non-state groups.'

http://socialjusticereview.org/articles/the-genocide-in-rwanda-and-the-structural-limitations-of-the-secular-human-rights-movement

'At least 800,000 people are estimated to have been killed in the genocide [mostly with cheap $.50 chinese machetes] at a rate - over just 100 days - that was far faster than the Holocaust of the Jews in World War Two.'

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3572887.stm

The argument folks might make is that genocides do not happen as often as mass shootings........But if we take 800,000 as the death rate of an average genocide, one would realize that there would have to be 40,000 mass shootings to equal one Rwanda genocide, or at the rate of mass shootings in the US, 8,000 years worth of mass shootings at the rate they occur here.

And here's the rub.......An armed American society makes such an event very unlikely........Europeans feel secure that their civil governments will protect them.  But in Europe they are facing a massive demographic shift in the next several decades, France has already felt the first tinges of that in recent years, and that will only become worse as their Islamic population reaches critical mass.........'Those who beat their swords in to plowshares often find themselves toiling under the yoke of those who kept their swords.'

http://conservativepapers.com/news/2013/01/01/muslims-burn-about-1200-cars-on-new-years-eve-in-france/
23  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Al Sharpton: Next Up, Knife Control on: January 02, 2013, 05:45:26 PM
  'Cocaine is a helluva drug' -Al Sharpton (said to undercover agents during a sting)

I'm not worried about pocket knives, i'd be more worried about Al calling me an 'interloper' and sending one of his thugs in to burn my store down with me in it........Seems to be the way he does business.

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/celebrity/sharpton-and-rosemond-658234

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,58469,00.html
24  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Al Sharpton: Next Up, Knife Control on: January 02, 2013, 05:40:00 PM
  'Cocaine is a helluva drug' -Al Sharpton (said to undercover agents during a sting)

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/celebrity/sharpton-and-rosemond-658234

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,58469,00.html
25  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Knife Law on: January 02, 2013, 05:35:17 PM
This is from the NY Times (for which my nickname is Pravda On The Hudson: POTH) so caveat lector:
==============

PHOENIX — Arizona used to be a knife carrier’s nightmare, with a patchwork of local laws that forced those inclined to strap Buck knives or other sharp objects to their belts to tread carefully as they moved from Phoenix (no knives except pocketknives) to Tempe (no knives at all) to Tucson (no knives on library grounds).

D’Alton Holder, a longtime knife maker, said, “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference.”
But that changed earlier this year when Arizona made its Legislature the sole arbiter of knife regulations. And because of loose restrictions on weapons here, Arizona is now considered a knife carrier’s dream, a place where everything from a samurai sword to a switchblade can be carried without a quibble.

Arizona’s transformation, and the recent lifting of a ban on switchblades, stilettos, dirks and daggers in New Hampshire, has given new life to the knife rights lobby, the little-known cousin of the more politically potent gun rights movement. Its vision is a knife-friendly America, where blades are viewed not as ominous but as tools — the equivalent of sharp-edged screw drivers or hammers — that serve useful purposes and can save lives as well as take them.

Sure, knife fights and knife attacks are a concern. No knife-lover would ever deny that. In fact, Todd Rathner, the lobbyist for Knife Rights Inc., an advocacy group based in Arizona that is now in its third year, was mugged twice in New York City before moving to Tucson, once — “ironically,” he said — at knifepoint.

But the problem is with the knife wielder, not the knife itself, the knife lobby says, sounding very much like those who advocate for gun rights.

In fact, knife advocates contend that the Second Amendment applies to knives as well as guns. They focus their argument elsewhere, though, emphasizing that knives fill so many beneficial roles, from carving Thanksgiving turkeys to whittling, that they do not deserve the bad name they often get.

“People talk about how knives are dangerous, and then they go in the kitchen and they have 50 of them,” said D’Alton Holder, a veteran knife maker who lives in Wickenberg, Ariz. “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference. If you carry a machete that’s three feet long, it’s no more dangerous than any knife. You can do just as much damage with an inch-long blade, even a box cutter.”

As for the pocketknife he carries with him every day, Mr. Holder said: “I use it for everything — to clean my fingernails, to prune a tree or carve, even to eat dinner with. I never think about the knives that I carry or the knives that I make as weapons.”

Jennifer Coffey, the New Hampshire state representative who led the effort to overturn the state’s switchblade ban, is also an emergency medical technician who uses knives to extract people from vehicles after accidents. Even when switchblades were outlawed, there were exceptions for emergency workers and others who might use them on the job, but Ms. Coffey still considered the law outrageous.

“We had certain knives that were illegal, but I could walk down the street with a kitchen knife that I used to carve a turkey and that would be legal,” Ms. Coffey said. “I’d be more scared of a kitchen knife than a switchblade.”

She said switchblade bans were passed in the 1950s because of the menacing use of the knives in movies like “West Side Story” and “Rebel Without a Cause.” Her legislation drew the support of an array of knife-related entities: Knife Rights, a young upstart in knife advocacy; the American Knife and Tool Institute, a group based in Wyoming that represents knife manufacturers, sellers and owners; and publications like Blade, Cutlery News Journal and Knife World.

The effort to lift the ban on switchblades in New Hampshire even won the support of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police.

==========



In Arizona, however, police groups were more circumspect about lifting all of the local knife laws. The Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police opposed the move, saying local jurisdictions ought to set their own knife restrictions. The Phoenix Law Enforcement Association remained neutral.

In much of the country, especially in urban areas, knives are still viewed as weapons in need of tight control.
District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. of Manhattan announced in June that his office had pressured retail stores that were selling illegal knives to remove them from their shelves, forfeit profits from the knives made over the last four years and help finance a campaign to educate people against illegal knives.

“What makes these knives so dangerous is the ease with which they can be concealed and brandished,” Mr. Vance said of the illegal switchblades and gravity knives, which require a wrist flip to open instead of a switchblade’s spring, that were bought by undercover agents.

Mr. Vance’s offensive drew the ire of the American Knife and Tool Institute, which issued an “action alert” and offered to assist New York retailers and individuals charged with knife violations with their legal defenses.

The knife lobby similarly rose up in 2009 when the federal Customs and Border Protection agency issued a proposal that would have reclassified many pocketknives and pocket tools as switchblades and thus made them illegal for import or sale across state lines under the 1958 federal Switchblade Act. In the end, Congress intervened and blocked the change.

A case now unfolding in Seattle shows how volatile knives continue to be. A police officer there fatally shot a man in August after, the officer said, he ordered the man several times to drop a knife that he was carrying. But the legitimacy of the shooting has been questioned by the Police Department, partly because the knife, which had a three-inch blade, was found in a closed position near the body of the dead man, who had been using it to carve a piece of wood.

Knife advocates are hoping that, just as Arizona’s immigration law has led to a national debate on that topic, its move to end knife restrictions will lead more states to take up the cause.

“Arizona is now the model when it comes to knives,” said Mr. Rathner, who was a National Rifle Association lobbyist before he switched to knives. “We’re now going to be moving to other states, probably in the Rocky Mountains and the Southeast. There’s probably half a dozen or more places that are ripe for this.”


  Wow......They haven't taken any guns yet, and they're already fantasizing about knife bans.......Hubris in spades.  The UK has moved on from banning knives to attempting to ban certain martial arts and martial 'artists' considered 'too dangerous' for it's citizens to possess knowledge of..........All this while the streets of Europe are becoming more dangerous as they flood their countries with alien cultures that are fundamentally antagonistic. 

Those who beat their swords into plowshares often find themselves toiling under the yokes of those who kept their swords.
26  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog Howie: Rest in Peace----RIP on: December 31, 2012, 01:55:56 PM
Wow.......That's very sad news.  I remember meeting Dog Howie at the Bloomberg, IL seminar a couple years back, seemed like a really genuine decent guy.  Puts things in perspective.
27  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: If go after guns better go after the freakin media on: December 31, 2012, 12:28:12 PM
I'll never forget doing a psychiatry rotation when we as medical students were invited to listen to an interview of a teenager with diagnosed boderline personality disorder.

It was quite chilling listening to him describing with glee in his eyes a scene from Rambo (I never could sit through the entire movie so I never verifed the scene) when Rambo holds his huge knife blade up to someone's throat and said, " I can kill you anytime I want".

This kid then stated, "I think THAT is the coolest thing I HAVE EVER SEEN!"

I don't want a  ban a guns but if it does happen, damnit, we need to censure Hollywood and tax the shit out of the entertainment hypocrits who deliver huge quantities of endless violence, sadistic, gore and thrive quite well doing so.
 Borderline?  Odd diagnosis for someone who sounds clearly Anti-Social.  Borderlines are usually self-destructive, usually female, hallmarked by drug abuse, promiscuity and instable interpersonal relationships jumping from idealization to devaluation......Their violence is usually self-directed OR turned directly toward the person closest to them.......Now if he was self-cutting after his boyfriend left him, i'd think it was BPD.  But that's just from the small description of his statement, that may be no indicative of his overall behavior.......But the statement is definitely not prototypical BPD.......That's best summed up with the classic 'I HATE YOU.....Don't leave me!'.

As far as Hollywood is concerned, it's hard to take the idea that violent media makes people violent when violent crime and homicide rates have been on the decline for over 25 years to the point that they are now nationwide below Pre-1960 levels.  Logic would dictate MORE violent media, MORE violent video games, would lead to MORE violent crime, if there is a causal link........but the opposite seems to be the trend.

That also goes for guns and gun laws.......With MORE guns, MORE guns being carried, MORE shall-issue CCW laws, MORE CCW holders.........Homicides have been on the decline in the US nationwide.........Even mass shootings have seen a slight decline over the last 40 years.

These mass shootings are likely tied to another psychiatric phenomenon, however, and that is Aspergers syndrome/Autism spectrum disorder..........Which seems to be a consistent diagnosis among the vast majority of these shooters, more than a coincidence, but given the statistical anamoly of these events, one should not throw them on to the multitudes of those with Aspergers who are violent to no one.  It does seem statistically significant, however.
28  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: December 31, 2012, 12:19:32 PM
Haven't seen you in these parts for quite some time SgtMac.  Welcome back.

Thanks, glad to be back.  Hope to see you out in Fayetteville in March.....God willing and the creek doesn't rise.
29  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (Gun rights stuff ) on: December 17, 2012, 09:42:47 PM
I truly fear the passions are present to drive the agenda that has long laid dormant waiting for the right tragedy to exploit.  The only strategy that gun owners can have is somehow shape the debate toward a compromise that will leave gun rights intact while providing the public the belief that something substantative has been done.  They were waiting for the right tragedy, and boy they found it.  I fear a new AWB with no sunset provision is on the horizon, how soon depends on whether Republicans will cave in the house.
30  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People on: October 22, 2010, 06:57:06 PM
What if I'm a doctor with a gun?  grin

Ironically enough, the late great Col. Jeff Cooper gave a lecture for a meeting of doctors a few years back that dissent in some ways from the ADA stance.   It's an excellent speech!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGYttXa0d1k&feature=player_embedded
31  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Tea Party, Glen Beck and related matters on: October 22, 2010, 06:53:46 PM
Beck's greatest sin seems to be that he has become an effective advocate against the modern left.......which is unforgiveable and a call for complete demonization from the MSM machine. 

The goal seems to be make Beck a poster child for the entire Tea Party movement.......utilizing the Alinksyesque stragegies for fixing individuals as representatives of a movement, polarizing and attack those individuals as surrogates for the movement.

Unfortunately for the left, folks like Beck have learned their lessons from the radical left, and are effectively utilizing some of those 'community organizing' lessons against the left......and have been quite effective at it.
32  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Guro Marc Denny Seminar Bloomington Illinois October 16th and 17th 2010 on: October 22, 2010, 04:21:33 PM
I would certainly like to thank Guro Crafty for the extraordinary material he presented to us.  Words escape me to define the quality and level of training and material I was exposed to.  You far exceeded my expectations.

And i'd also like to extend thanks to all the good, talented folks I had the opportunity to train with, to include, but not limited to, Terry, who I was very impressed with, and Dog Howie, who I had the opportunity to have a good conversation with while we were waiting for our Thai food (and waiting, and waiting! smiley), and Tobias, who I had already met, and who helped me considerably in understanding and working with the material......and thanks to everyone else I got a chance to meet.

Thanks guys, you're all top notch!
33  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 18, 2010, 07:15:01 PM

That video is a classic!  Just about every GSD or Malinois i've ever owned would attack water just like that.  One Malinois I had made it down right dangerous to have a water hose!  He'd tackle you trying to attack the water!
34  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 18, 2010, 12:27:45 PM
A good example of a dogs confident with biting people.  Notice no threat display barking, simply attack.  These are confident, tough dogs with high fight drive.  Dogs that are barking can be almost always be backed down by not retreating, and standing your ground.  They don't want a fight, it's a threat display.  A truly confident dog that wants to attack doesn't give a threat display.  Never turn your back on a dog.

http://blutube.policeone.com/Media/6230-Cop-hits-attacking-Rottweiler-with-TASER/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd5uvK8TfOA   

Notice the high tail position of the pitbull........very confident while biting a human.  He got wacked once with a club in the head, disengaged momentarily, but once he got over the initial effect of being hit, he went right back to the attack, tail still high even after being wacked.

Another kind of funny one that illustrates the point.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd3677if7PU



35  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 18, 2010, 12:18:25 PM
A word should be mentioned about dog behavior and possible aggression.  Dogs who are barking at you, but not otherwise restrained, are exhibiting a threat display, much like a rattlesnake.  If they were confident enough in the situation to bite they wouldn't be barking.  Truly tough dogs don't bark to get you to run away or back off, they simply attack.  There are few dogs out there like that, but they do exist, and if you ever are confronted by the bad side of one it's something you'll never forget. 

Tail positioning is an important part of reading dog behavior, as well.  Contrary to popular belief, tail up doesn't mean 'friendly'......the tail is more an indicator of confidence in the situation.  If a dog is comfortable it will go with a high tail.  If a dog is uncomfortable or agitated, the tail drops.  If a dog is truly in submissive fear the tail tucks between the legs.  Again, it doesn't necessarily mean the dogs are friendly when the tail is up. 

A dog can be retreating from a fight, and be completely comfortable with that, thus the term 'High tailing it out of here'.  A dog can also be quite comfortable tearing your arm off, and have a high tail the entire time, if it's a truly tough dog who's comfortable biting people.

Body positioning is also a good indicator.  Dogs read body language better than people.  A dominant dog faces other dogs and people head on.  A submissive dog has a more sideways posture.  Most folks have seen one dominant dog T up on another dog, who blades away.  They read this in people which is how they 'smell' fear.  They don't 'smell' it, they see it.
36  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 18, 2010, 12:09:42 PM
The discussion of establishing dominance and stories about it being done has made me think of a story and a question for those who own alpha dogs.

I do a good bit of bicycling.  Dogs bark at me all the time while I am riding.  Usually, I ignore them.  Sometimes, they chase.  If they stop at the edge of their 'turf', I ignore them.  If they chase continually and aggressively, I stop and deal with them.  The one time I did not stop it was the one time I have been bitten since I was about 14.  The dog I ignored while it chased and chased for a block was a little old lady's Yipping Rat Purse Chi-annoyah.  Unfortunately, I had to stop for a car at the intersection.  And it left me a couple of nice holes in my calf.  The lady runs up to me to explain her precious is harmless.  And I have to show her the bite marks.  Luckily, it had its shot tags.  I griped at the lady and then went home.  The lesson is one from Musashi:  Pay Attention, even unto trifles.

Now, the question for owners of dogs who like to be dominant and show it?  This one has come up for me from the other side.  I've had dogs come up and try to establish dominance.  I either ignore them as if they did not exist or turn and back them down. if they continue to try to push it.  I've come close but have never been bit while backing a dog down.  On a handful of occasions, I've been a hair's breadth from giving a dog a defensive cuff or leg check. The problems are not with the dogs but their owners.  I've been threatened by more than one owner with violence if I struck their dog.   And then I have to deal with a person as well as a dog.

So, for owners and trainers of those dominant dogs, has anyone considered how to react to their dog attempting to establish dominance one someone who is not willing to be dominated?  Telling the other human to wait for you to get the dog is like telling a lady to wait for the police if threatened or attacked.  It's the exact same logic.  To be clear, we're discussing something moving beyond wooofing phase and is moving into touch and attack.  

I'm just wondering what other's think?  With the exception of that Yipper that was partially my fault because I was arrogantly dismissive and careless of what looked to be a non-threat, I've rarely have any issues with a dog for more than 5 minutes.  Mostly, dogs of all levels will approach and make friends with me after a few minutes.  But I do remember times from my early twenties when that was not the case.  And being threated with violence and firearms from angry owners of dogs that try to control more than their own yard.  You can take the end of the statement about either the owner or the dog.  *grin*

Any thoughts?
 Actually, some of what you are describing isn’t entirely dominance.  When you’re on a bicycle dogs are operating in prey drive, not rank drive.  It’s rank drive that is the issue with dominance.  

Some dogs have tremendous prey drive, and will chase a moving object, barking and biting.  When dogs confront you barking when you’re near their property, they are exhibiting territorial aggression…….again, not dominance.

A dog that barks and growls when it feels threatened is exhibiting defensive aggression.  Defense, again, is a separate drive and motive.

A dog that is willing to fight and take on a stranger who is being aggressive is exhibiting fight drive, which is a bit of a combination of prey, defense, and overall confidence.

Dominance or rank drive is the desire to challenge other members of the pack for pack position.  Dominant dogs are difficult dogs for owners because they will often challenge the owners.

Dominance isn’t entirely desirable in protection dog, though it can be worked with.   A dog can be a very tough dog, with very good, strong drives, and still not be ‘dominant’.  Likewise a dog can be a little ankle biting wuss and be very dominant.  Of course if you have a TRULY confident strong dog who is also very dominant you have potential problems that require a strong handler.

The issue with all of the above is one of obedience training.  The stronger the drives, the more important the obedience training.   A dog that is properly obedience trained will not bite unless the alpha back member initiates it, or a situation in which it is clear that biting is allowed occurs.  The problem with dominant dogs is that they are harder to obedience train.
37  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Corrections and Prison on: September 16, 2010, 12:26:16 PM
I give props to corrections officers, it's a job I wouldn't want.  I like the ability to get in a patrol car and drive away after dealing with dirtbags.  To be locked up with hundreds of them for an entire shift every day is something that would seem claustrophobic on a number of different levels.  It's a difficult job those guys do.
38  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Door Work, Bouncing, Bodyguarding on: September 16, 2010, 12:18:14 PM
Sgt Mac:

I remember reading about that study at the time.

A variation of your tag line:

"Speak softly, and carry a big stick"  grin

Indeed!
39  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Door Work, Bouncing, Bodyguarding on: September 13, 2010, 01:10:50 PM
There was an interesting study done by the FBI several years back on LEO's killed in the line of duty, trying to identify character traits that were correlated with those deaths.  They showed some interesting things.

Victim officers tended to be veteran officers with an average of 5 years on the job
Victim officers tended to have a service orientation over enforcement orientation
Victim officers tended to rely on their ability to talk their way out of situations
Victim officers tended to use less force than fellow officers claim they would have in similar situations
Victim officers tended to use force later than fellow officers said they would have in similar situations

http://www.poam.net/main/train-educate/traits-that-gets-cops-killed.html
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2194/is_n7_v63/ai_15658025/

The ability to verbally deescalate is a crucial skill.......but the over reliance on it can be fatal. 

Talk nice, think mean.
40  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 13, 2010, 12:37:14 PM
At 10 months (about 90 pounds) I was till taking my second Akita to the dog park.  One day an Irish Wolfhound (about 170, think large hairy Great Dane) that had bullied him when he was 6 months old (about 70 pounds) came in.  Naturally my boy remembered him and his body language told me he was going to settle accounts.  I gave him the stop command but he ignored me.  The fight was over very quickly.  He knocked the Irish Wolfhound across the entire park for about ten seconds with the IW just totally folding mentally.  Finally I caught up to him and grabbed him as the IW ran off.  I picked up up by the scruff of the neck and the loose skin at the base of the tail and carried him across the length of the park and out the gate.  We were clear between each other thereafter.

OTOH my first Akita, Zapata, the one in our logo, was a VERY dominant Akita.  Instead of trying me he dominated a couple of formidable men; one who had gotten on his excrement list by raising his voice to me and then on another occasion violating the dog's personal space (Z. pinned him to the wall by the testicles) and the other a bodybuilder on steroids.  I'm guessing Zapata took the smell of the testosterone to be a challenge so he rose up and put his paws on the guy's shoulders (he was about 5 foot 6 inch and very thick) rumbled in his face and humped him twice--not in a neurotic poodle way, but in a prison way so as to establish dominance.
  grin
41  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 13, 2010, 12:28:45 PM
Some dogs are naturally dominant, and will test authority.  In those circumstances it is necessary to establish alpha dominancy in a manner similar to the way wolves establish pack order.  They don't get the seat of power growing up as puppies (the couch, the chair, etc) they don't get to sleep in the alphas bed, etc.  

What i've seen is that folks reinforce dominance traits in dominance dogs as they are growing up, and then when the dog gets to the age of genetic maturity, and the natural hormones that compel such things kick in, they've already established in their own minds that the 'master' is weak-willed, and attempt to exploit that opening........if folks have created that problem, the only answer is to establish dominance negatively........which is what Alpha wolves do with those that challenge their authority in the pack structure........or lose their place in the pack structure.

My experience has been with working GSD's and Malinois, however.  

I remember reading an article somewhere criticising a lot of the wolf pack theory in dog training. Bottom line being that the dog is a very different creature to a wolf and that a lot of these theories about wolf pack dynamics were based on wolf packs cooped up in zoo's which is about as natural an environment as all the forum members here living in a single room.  shocked. I've no idea if the criticisms were accurate but it made sense to me that we should not base our interaction's with dogs on theories that revolve around a creature that most of us have never dealt with..i.e the wolf.


It's quite clear that dogs are pack animals.  A lot of those criticism are more about splitting hairs than any real issue.  Alot of it comes down to some ulterior motives on the part of folks making some of those arguments when it comes to dog training.

Humans have selected certain traits in dogs that make them more manageable for our purposes, but those traits aren't newly created traits, merely modified wolf traits.

The bottom line is that what works with dogs works, and no amount of debate over the reason why it works alters that.
42  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Door Work, Bouncing, Bodyguarding on: September 12, 2010, 03:44:05 PM
Not dissing the Security Guy, but I've read/heard that Doormen/Bouncers say if their soft skills have not deescalated the situation and that they have to resort to hard skills then they didn't perform their duties well. Or maybe it was something Dalton/Patrick Swayze said in Road House lol


SG, would you please post this on the DBMAA forum too?

Done.



Can't comment on bouncing work, but I can apply 14 years of LEO experience.  Verbal de-escalation works 98% of the time, if properly applied.  That still leaves 2% of the time that the universe has just determined that there WILL be a fight no matter how smoothed tongued you are.
43  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Dog (Canine) Training on: September 12, 2010, 03:29:10 PM
Some dogs are naturally dominant, and will test authority.  In those circumstances it is necessary to establish alpha dominancy in a manner similar to the way wolves establish pack order.  They don't get the seat of power growing up as puppies (the couch, the chair, etc) they don't get to sleep in the alphas bed, etc.  

What i've seen is that folks reinforce dominance traits in dominance dogs as they are growing up, and then when the dog gets to the age of genetic maturity, and the natural hormones that compel such things kick in, they've already established in their own minds that the 'master' is weak-willed, and attempt to exploit that opening........if folks have created that problem, the only answer is to establish dominance negatively........which is what Alpha wolves do with those that challenge their authority in the pack structure........or lose their place in the pack structure.

My experience has been with working GSD's and Malinois, however. 
44  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Law Enforcement issues on: August 15, 2010, 12:03:44 PM
In my departmental training and policies i've attempted to incorporate this concept of bi-lateralism in to our defensive tactics training.  With the Taser we now train officers to draw and deploy the Taser with their non-dominate hand, which we feel will not only reduce the likelihood of weapon confusion like what happened with the BART shooting, but will actually aid in transitioning up and down the force spectrum under pressure.  I found it humorously interesting to note in our last Taser inservice training how, when I put officers in a position of drawing their Tasers under stress and time constraint, they realized that the task was much more difficulty than they first realized.  They also increasingly realized how often a serious confrontation would end up being a Tactics issue that needed to be resolved with empty hand responses before a weapon could even be brought to bare.

DLO 1,2 and 3 were real eye openers to a lot of officers when they had a chance to watch them.  Thanks to Marc Denny and Gabe Suarez for everything you guys have been doing.  It's filtering out some top notch stuff.  I look forward to bringing a group to Bloomington, IL. in October.
45  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Guro Marc Denny Seminar Bloomington Illinois October 16th and 17th 2010 on: August 08, 2010, 11:49:34 PM
I have had a few people contact me in the last few days to advise that they missed the July 15th deadline for the early seminar price of $175.00 for the general public.

To be fair to all I have decided to extend the early deadline to September 1st.

Woof!

Terry


You are the man!  I'll definitely be getting my reservation in before September 1st.
46  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: States' Rights on: September 03, 2009, 11:54:37 AM
BTW I would like to note my approval of the BO Administration's decision to respect States' right to decriminalize pot.

Yeah, if he were to stop drug prohibition madness it'd change my opinion of him significantly.

He would give lip service to it, but ultimately doing so would actually serve the purpose of shrinking the power of the federal government, and that's one thing you can count on BO ever doing!
47  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The War on Drugs on: September 03, 2009, 11:45:12 AM
I've been a police officer for 12 years and i've finally come to the conclusion that the WODs is a failure, and ultimately misguided.  I still pursue drug offenders, because in the present situation drug and crime are inextricably tied together so that fighting drugs IS fighting crime (because of the illegal nature of drugs and what is required to get them).......but it doesn't have to be that way if we eliminate the profit of drugs via some measure of decriminalization.

It's a costlier and costlier endeavor to pursue the WOD, with no hope of winning.  There has to be another way.
48  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: July 27, 2009, 04:18:12 PM
- Pajamas Media - http://pajamasmedia.com -

The Gates Arrest: Sgt. Crowley’s Nightmare Is All Too Real
Posted By Jack Dunphy On July 25, 2009 @ 12:34 am In . Feature 01, Crime, Politics, Race Issues, US News | 106 Comments

I had a terrible nightmare last night: I dreamed I was driving along in my patrol car when I responded to a fairly routine radio call. Someone had reported a possible burglary, and when I went to the home to investigate I encountered not the burglar I was led to believe I would find but rather the home’s resident, an Ivy League professor who, while indignantly challenging my authority to inquire into the reported crime, couldn’t resist doing so without calling my intelligence into question, accusing me of racial bias, and even going so far as to insult my sainted mother. When the verbal provocations escalated further and crossed the line into illegal conduct, I slapped the handcuffs on the man and hauled him down to the station house. A frothing media maelstrom then ensued, with reporters clogging the streets outside my home and traipsing across the lawn and through the shrubbery with their cameras and their boom microphones and their incessant, impertinent questions. Finally, the president of the United States was on television telling the entire world how stupid I am.

Then I woke up.

I am in a sense fortunate in that I work in an area where I’m as likely to encounter an extraterrestrial as an Ivy League professor, but like most police officers I can nonetheless sympathize with Cambridge Police Department sergeant James Crowley, for whom there will be no waking from the nightmare for some time to come. But, except for the notoriety and lofty position of the reported “burglar” (one of America’s preeminent black scholars, and all that), the scenario presented to Sgt. Crowley is fairly typical, one that every cop has experienced many times. A well-meaning neighbor has seen something she perceives as out of the ordinary and has asked the police to investigate. If more people were disposed to act this way, America’s crime rate would plummet overnight.

The first question to be asked about Sgt. Crowley’s initial response is, was it lawful and reasonable? Clearly it was both.  A cornerstone U.S. Supreme Court decision, [1] Terry v. Ohio, held that an officer may stop and detain a person he reasonably believes to be involved in criminal activity. Here, Sgt. Crowley answered a citizen’s report of a possible burglary. Such reports are granted a presumption of reliability under the law, so Sgt. Crowley was on solid ground in approaching the home and, upon seeing a man inside who matched the description provided by the witness, asking him for his identification. A police officer responding to such a report must, for his own safety, assume the report to be accurate until he can satisfy himself that it isn’t. The cop who blithely handles every call assuming it to be a false alarm will likely not survive to handle many of them. In fact, many police officers faced with the identical facts would likely have ordered Henry Gates out of the home at gunpoint.

Sgt. Crowley did not go so far as that (imagine the furor if he had), but he exercised a measure of caution by following Gates into the home as Gates retrieved his identification. Gates insists Crowley needed a warrant to enter the home but he is mistaken, as even the most liberal judge would find that Crowley was faced with sufficiently exigent circumstances, viz. a possible burglar who may have attempted to arm himself or flee, to justify a warrantless entry.

Mr. Gates, who [2] admits he asked his limo driver to force open a stuck door, is surely accustomed to a certain amount of bowing and scraping in the circles in which he travels, and it must have come as a shock when he was surprised by a cop who neither knew nor cared that he occupied such an exalted position. He apparently never stopped to consider that he and his driver may have been seen by someone who would misinterpret their actions and report them to the police. No, to Mr. Gates the first and only explanation for the sudden appearance of a white police officer at his doorstep was that the cops had come to hassle him because he’s black.

The next question is whether Mr. Gates’s language and behavior that Sgt. Crowley described in his police report fell within the proscribed conduct of the Massachusetts statute against disorderly conduct. This is where the two accounts diverge most dramatically. Mr. Gates [3] addressed the issue with CNN’s Soledad O’Brien, who, reading from the [4] police report, said, “[Sgt. Crowley] described you as behaving in a tumultuous manner.”

“Yeah,” Gates responded with a chuckle, “look at how tumultuous I am. I’m five foot seven, I weigh a hundred-fifty pounds.” He said this as though it’s inconceivable that someone of those proportions might behave in manner that could be characterized as “tumultuous,” an assertion that any police officer, and for that matter just about anyone not affiliated with an Ivy League university, knows is preposterous. That Gates’s behavior at the scene of his arrest might differ from that which he exhibited on a nationally televised interview was an issue that went unexplored.

But there is a way we might learn, as best we may, of what really occurred that day on Harvard Square. Mr. Gates says he’s considering a lawsuit against Sgt. Crowley and the Cambridge Police Department, during which, one presumes, we would hear testimony from all the various parties and witnesses. If Mr. Gates is to prevail in such an action he would have to prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that Sgt. Crowley fabricated the case against him, and did so in the knowledge that the incident had been witnessed by several other police officers, including a black sergeant from his own department and some officers from the Harvard campus police with whom he is presumably unacquainted. Also called to testify would be the woman who made the initial call to the police and some or all of the “at least seven other passers-by” referred to in the police report. And the arrest, which was undoubtedly vetted all the way up the police department’s chain of command, was nonetheless allowed to proceed despite the certain knowledge that Harvard Law School professor Charles Ogletree and a phalanx of briefcase-bearing shiny suits would soon descend on the police station and start tossing about their habeas corpus this and their mens rea that, and that they would spare no effort or expense in ferreting out any weaknesses the case may have.

Sure, professor, Sgt. Crowley made it all up. Arresting Mr. Gates may have been arguably imprudent, but it wasn’t illegal.

If I may presume to offer Sgt. Crowley a bit of advice, I would encourage him to invest in a small digital tape recorder such as the one I carry while on duty. I have done so for many years and it has often proved invaluable, as in the case when some of my colleagues and I were accused of all manner of heinous conduct by a young man we had arrested for carrying a gun. Among the allegations was that we had used the notorious “N-word,” which, though one can’t walk a block in some parts of Los Angeles without hearing the denizens use it a dozen times, is nonetheless held as a near-capital offense when spoken by a police officer.

The time came for my interview with the internal affairs investigators, for whom I played the tape. It revealed, among other inconsistencies in my accuser’s tale, that it was he and not we who had so liberally used the accursed word, and that he used it, in the span of about 45 seconds, as a noun, a verb, an adjective, an adverb, and as something of an all-purpose interjection, a linguistic feat I suspect I may never see equaled. I was cleared of the charge, but I still listen to that tape every now and then just for its entertainment value.

Sgt. Crowley, you can pick up one of those recorders for less than a hundred dollars. Don’t you wish you had bought one earlier?

Article printed from Pajamas Media: http://pajamasmedia.com

URL to article: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/sgt-james-crowleys-nightmare-is-all-too-real/

URLs in this post:
[1] Terry v. Ohio: http://supreme.justia.com/us/392/1/case.html
[2] admits: http://www.theroot.com/views/skip-gates-speaks
[3] addressed the issue: http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/living/2009/07/23/bia.henry.gates.cnn?iref=videosearch
[4] police report: http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/years/2009/0723092gates1.html


Indeed!
49  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Clinton prepares to jump from the SS Obamatanic on: July 27, 2009, 04:13:47 PM
Hillary will push a hawkish, pro-Israel stance until it blows up with Obama firing her or her resigning in protest, setting up her 2012 campaign.

I never expected Lady Macbeth to stop scheming just because Obama threw her a bone......OUT DAMN SPOT!
50  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Food testing? on: June 14, 2009, 06:01:28 PM
Is this some sort of joke?
Is this routine for presidents to have someone test the food for poison?

Do we have a king or a President?
 
"President Obama's French food tested by 'taster' 
 
Jun 7 10:12 AM US/Eastern
A US "taster" tested the food being dished up to President Barack Obama at a dinner in a French restaurant, a waiter said on Sunday.
"They have someone who tastes the dishes," said waiter Gabriel de Carvalho from the "La Fontaine de Mars" restaurant where Obama and his family turned up for dinner on Saturday night.

"It wasn't very pleasant for the cooks at first, but the person was very nice and was relaxed, so it all went well," he said on the Itele news channel.

Asked by AFP to comment, the restaurant confirmed the report.

Copyright AFP 2008, AFP stories and photos shall not be published, broadcast, rewritten for broadcast or publication or redistributed directly or indirectly in any medium"

Folks are surprised Papa Doc Barack thinks he's a king?
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