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1  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Media, Ministry of Truth Issues on: November 30, 2016, 09:46:09 PM
Wrong thread.

This belongs Legal Issues, Homeland Security and Freedom, Intel, Legal Issues, or the Sovereignty thread.

My bad... I searched them both and since they both came up here, that's where I put it. I'll delete it.
2  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin, LGBT, "discrimination", & discrimination. on: November 30, 2016, 06:20:26 PM
As someone that has experienced a healthy amount of racism (and continue to do so), I'm going to say, people that are racist have every right to their legitimate view (and it is), whather others like it or not, because that goes hand in hand with freedom.

The fact that only some racists are ostracized is racism in and of itself, and ostracizing someone else, simply because you don't agree with them, isn't freedom.

I'm not saying I don't ostracize people. I do.... I ostracize anyone on the Left and think they should at a minimum, be forced into exile. Nothing to do with their color.

I'll add, if I didn't feel like appreciating someone for their color, that would also be my right, in MY country, and anyone opposed can go to hell. I'm in my country. I don't need your approval.

Now apply that to anyone in THEIR country, and we get the basis of individual and cultural values that may not agree with someone else, BUT those people are in their county and entitled to rule it, with ideas that others may find ignorant.

People leave that portion of the discussion out all of the time because it isn't politically correct and because it's a fact.
3  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Cuba on: November 27, 2016, 01:20:27 AM
I feel terrible... for the Obamas.... they lost a close, personal, family friend today... well... not terrible.... Just pointing out the Obamas' loss.


I wonder if the flag will fly at half mast.
4  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left on: November 27, 2016, 01:18:34 AM
Taking tips in snarkiness from a pro....

When Osama was killed, I smoked a Cuban Monte Cristo.... for the first time in my life.

U think I'm going to enjoy another one tomorrow.
5  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Trump on taxes - still not fair on: November 25, 2016, 04:46:15 PM
After all said and done I may not get one cent off my taxes next year while those making hundreds of thousands will save tens of thousands:

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/middle-class-trump-plan-mean-tax-increase-153628510--finance.html

Being that a number of these "single parents" are women who provoked the divorce, and bent the man over for child support and no 50/50 custody, and not ever letting the man have child tax credits, my heart is breaking.

I love how the liberal media finds the ONE case of a single mother who decides to share custody and tax credits with her ex, and cites that as a reference.

"Kelly Rodriguez, 47, who lives in Tampa, Florida, voted for Trump and is a single mother who claims two of her four children as dependents. (Her ex-husband claims the other two.)"

Sorry CCP.... and for you, I really am.... as for the single mother, child support protitutes, I could care less. The whole of America has let them screw over men for a couple of decades now (per US Department of Health and Human Services' own numbers - IIRC, something like 173 billion due in child support arrears, than has grown by 200 percent since 1970.... $1.50 federal tax dollars paid to every state, for every $1. the state collects....  more than 80% of child support is paid by men and women provoke most of the divorces and are granted primary custody in 11 of very 12 cases, while the guy gets to pay her lawyer, and goes to jail if he doesn't work, while the exact opposite happens to the woman). Well done America... you've created a growing class of men that no longer care.

Single families are going to take a hit? Men have been taking a hit for year, WHILE providing the cash for everyone else. I feel so bad.
6  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Mexico-US matters - News and General Attitude on: November 24, 2016, 05:35:50 PM
The news this morning stated that 21,000 illegals are going to the States per month, with it expected to spike at 30,000 in December and January.

Those are just the ones that register with the support groups for migrants. It doesn't count the others that go with no support.


Today... I had several court sessions, and even the magistrate here, expressed an interest in at least getting a visa for the States before "Hump," assumes power.

To be fair, a Mexican diputado "politician" that lived her entire life in the States, before coming back to Mexico, stated publicly, that the States do indeed have the right to enforce their laws, and she went as far as to call illegals "nacos," or crude, low class people. She is taking flack for it.

Mexicans do not like Trump at all, but even some are starting to admit the hypocrisy of law enforcement between countries. It still doesn't mean illegal immigration is slowing down as the Left and many Mexicans would have someone believe.

Even Colombians and Central Americans have an opinion on it, saying that now they will have to seek an illegal life in Mexico, instead of the States, which struck me as odd regarding two things:

1.) Why not force your own country to get better instead of leaving it and depending on people you don't even like?

2.) Mexico has averted any real illegal immigration problems by allowing free passage to anyone attempting to go to the States, and in fact, profits from it heavily, so much so that one of the national economic advisers was on the news, talking about the importance of remittances from the US in regard to the Mexican economy.

Today at court, we were working out several land disputes (135 of them actually). Many of the owners didn't even show up, because they were in the States. Others had sent power of attorney from the States, to assert their land claims here. Literally every family here has someone in the States, it is that prevalent.

Just to get a sense of scale and attitude.
7  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: WSJ: Mexico's options in a Trump trade war on: November 22, 2016, 09:08:12 AM
Mexico's Options in a Trump Trade War
The country could impose retaliatory duties and look for new trade partners.
By Mary Anastasia O’Grady
Nov. 20, 2016 5:22 p.m. ET


If the sharp selloff of the Mexican peso after the Nov. 8 election of Donald Trump were set to music it might sound like a funeral dirge, the dearly departed being the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The peso has fallen to an all-time low of more than 20 to the dollar, and on Thursday the Bank of Mexico raised its benchmark interest rate to stem the bleeding.

I arrived in Mexico, January 11th of 2011, in the heart of the country. There is about a 2 peso difference in value between internal Mexico and the border concerning the ability of the peso to purchase US dollars. Here, in central Mexico, in January of 2011, the peso was trading at 12.42 pesos per dollar. Even before Trump was elected, and it was (wrongly) assumed that Clinton would win (by many), the peso was still trading at 18.36 pesos per dollar internally. At the border, it was already at 20 pesos per dollar. After Trumps election, it dropped to 21 pesos internally (3 pesos).

Mexico investors are worried that Mr. Trump might actually believe—as he argued in his campaign—that U.S. productivity growth and job creation depend on renegotiating NAFTA to discourage U.S. investments south of the border. But Mexico won't easily yield to a new deal that limits its access to U.S. markets in order to make it less attractive as a destination for capital.

Mexico has several investors; Canada, Germany, Japan, South Korea, Italy, and the US, are just some examples. In short, Mexico doesn't depend on NAFTA.

If Mr. Trump counters with tariff hikes in violation of NAFTA, Mexico is likely to respond with its own duty increases. It did this with $2.4 billion in retaliatory tariffs on important U.S. export products in 2009 when the U.S. failed to live up to its NAFTA obligation in trucking. There is even the possibility that Mr. Trump will carry out his threat to tear up the agreement. There are no winners in any of these narratives.

Mexico wouldn't necessarily lose if NAFTA was torn up. In many cases, US companies are paid millions of dollars per company (annually, during the start up years), just for bringing their existing manufacturing here. I have seen it myself. I have also seen the US companies fail to live up to governmental obligation in providing a certain amount of jobs, even though the company received the money promised by the Mexican government.

In the 23 years since NAFTA was launched, Mexico has cultivated a middle-class, a more-vibrant democracy and a diversified economy far less dependent than it once was on oil. The country now sends 80% of its exports to the U.S. A trade war would be an economic disaster and open the door to political instability.

Many of these "exports" originate from the States themselves, and take a $60,000 USD job, and pay someone that was previously farming chilis here in Mexico and pay them 4000 pesos a month to do it. Even myself. who was paid $43,000 pesos a month to manage machining and engineering operations, pails in comparison to the 8000 dollars a month I was making before I moved to Mexico, fulltime. If there are winners, the winners aren't the American nor Mexican people, but the business owners and investors. The losers are the people in both countries, who either lose jobs in the States, or pay huge amounts of taxes in Mexico, for underpaid, promised jobs, with high turnover rates to keep wages low, and the companies receiving millions of USD, per business, in Mexican tax dollars.

Thus it won't be so easy for Mr. Trump to bully the neighbors. National pride will play a role in stiffening the Mexican spine, and President Enrique Peña Nieto’s government is signaling that it intends to face any crisis by deepening structural reforms, getting its fiscal house in order and looking more aggressively for new trading partners. The unspoken message to Mr. Trump is that if he plays the protectionist game, Mexico is ready to raise the stakes.

Mexico is raising the stakes solely by just recently, creating a commission to create jobs and industry, to prepare for millions of deported Mexicans coming from the States in order to avert a crisis. It's about time.

Nafta’s demise would be bad for the U.S. too, although the U.S. stock market rally suggests that the fear of a trade war is overblown. Protectionist steel and textile tycoon Wilbur Ross is rumored to be in line for a job in the new administration. But Vice President-elect Mike Pence is a free trader from Indiana, which in 2015 exported $4.8 billion in goods to Mexico, its second-largest export market.

Again, the winners are only the business owners and investors. Company after company has left the US, leaving millions of Amercans jobless. Also, in Mexico, every time a new general manager is hired, all of the previous management staff, is run off, in order to give jobs to friends of the new manager, and the production staff also has the same issue.  Many people are fired before they can achieve seniority, to avoid paying them more, and even if they weren't a well paid machinist here in Mexico makes about 9000 pesos a month. I have seen people leave their jobs to move across the country for a 10 peso a day raise, only to come back, asking for their old job back.Also, Mexican labor law provides for the workers to have unions, which heavily prevents efficiency and production, and the US workers still can't compete.

From time to time Mr. Trump has had flashes of sanity on trade. In a joint press conference with Mr. Peña Nieto in Mexico in August, then-candidate Trump spoke of the need to “keep manufacturing wealth in our hemisphere.”

Keep manufacturing wealth in the pockets of Canadian owners of Mexican mines, US owners of US factories operated in Mexico, and the American and Mexican people can either lose their jobs or be paid 1/5 of what an American worker would make.

Some expect the Trump administration to find a way to largely leave NAFTA alone while it works on legitimate trade issues like China's practice of intellectual-property theft. Mexico seems to want to help in this face-saving endeavor and has wisely decided not to escalate the rhetoric. It doesn't need to: Americans have plenty to lose if NAFTA is destroyed.

The author this story has plenty to lose as well if TPP (next level NAFTA) is implemented, because the new person writing the story will come from India, work in a US office, on a guaranteed visa, and the house the author bought, will be foreclosed on, because there won't be enough workers around, to make a salary that will pay for the advertising revenue, or printed price of anything this author is conveying.

Many U.S. corporations are now heavily invested in supply chains that crisscross the continent to create globally competitive products. These support millions of U.S. manufacturing jobs. Saying goodbye to duty-free access to Mexico under NAFTA also would hit U.S. agricultural exports hard.

We came here and created an aerospace industry where one did not exist previously. We also decreased production run times here in Mexico, by up to 600% in some cases, primarily on large hydraulic actuators, for different models of Boeing aircraft, and not one cent made it to our pockets. It took American jobs though. You can bet on that. Also, the steel, is purchased from all over the world, including Gloria Steel Company in China, titanium from Russia and steel forgings from Austria. The US has already been sold out. I have to add, my engineers and I created a aftermarket machine interface, to allow for Marposs and Renishaw in machine measuring, with the help of an engineer from Mori-Seiki, in order to achieve in machine measurement and adjustment of work shift offsets. We were successful. I had also wanted to implement robotics, due to the unions here, even going as far as to quote 2000 series robots from Fanuc, but I finally chose not to, because if I did, there wouldn't be a workforce to generate wages to support a local economy. I learned my lesson after transferring the factory from the US to Mexico. In many things, we were successful. AS a whole, it failed American and Mexican peoples.

Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo told Reuters on Nov. 10 that his government is “ready to talk so we can explain the strategic importance of NAFTA for the region. Here we're not talking about . . . renegotiating it, we're simply talking about dialogue.”

He also said Mexico will look for new markets, adding to more than 40 existing free-trade agreements. It had hoped for expanded opportunities via the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, a 12-nation accord that includes the U.S. and much of Asia. But President Obama wasn't able to get TPP through Congress and Mr. Trump has promised to kill it. Mr. Guajardo said that Mexico will pursue the possibility of completing a smaller TPP with the countries that are expected to have ratified it by the end of 2016. He named Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Singapore, Vietnam and Malaysia. Australia would probably be eager to replace the U.S. as Mexico's chief food supplier.

Says the guy that lets Canada suck every cent of wealth out of the country's natural resources, shipping them abroad. Also, Mexico is second only to Vietnam in terms of minimum wages paid. It's like being second place in a race to "zero."

None of this would make up for the loss of U.S. market access under NAFTA, which means that increasing Mexican competitiveness is urgent. Mr. Peña Nieto got historic constitutional reforms in energy and telecommunications through his Congress in 2013. Opening these markets to competition will attract capital and improve the infrastructure for producers but implementation takes time.

I can't argue with this portion. Mexican production workers are severely inexperienced and undertrained. The management staff and engineers; however, are top notch, needing only experience, which they have been getting since the inception of NAFTA. Notably, there is only one that manufactures drones, in Jalisco. This will change soon, because people are becoming more experienced in top level manufacturing, and more importantly, design.

Unfortunately the government's debt burden has increased sharply in recent years and taxes have gone up, adding to disappointing economic performance. These are mistakes that Mexican policy makers cannot afford if Mr. Trump plays chicken with NAFTA.

That happens in what is essentially a socialist government. Also, NAFTA has had almost no effect on Mexican politics. They fought before NAFTA. They will fight after NAFTA.

Write to O’Grady@wsj.com.

[/quote]

EDIT: Every item stated here, is something that I have years of personal experience with, and also either oversaw directly or experienced myself. I didn't have to interview anyone as the author had to. NAFTA, and even worse, the TPP (which I read in its entirety), are bad for everyone with the exception of politicians and investors. Other than that, the people are the ones that lose, and the people implementing these policies, don't care, because they are insured their investment and tax dollars, until the people run out of money to pay them, which... in the end, they will, because the well will dry up. They're too short-sighted to see that, and if they're not, they think the impact will happen too late to affect them directly, having shielded themselves from it. I can't count how many investigations there have been, on both sides of the border, of politicians and investors, both, having been investigated for corruption or insider trading. That's a fact. NAFTA and TPP only serve the wealthy and powerful.

One last note, my engineers (each of whom has a degree - Calculus, the whole deal....not some chickensh.t liberal arts degree), make between 12,000 and 16,000 pesos a month, working for a world leader in Aerospace, and is a third tier supplier to Boeing themselves. It is important to add that, because many people in the States, think that having a degree will save their jobs.... it won't.

On a personal note, I am currently studying law and doing an internship for a lawyer, because that's where the only money for people that aren't rich, will be made. I could have said doctors, but even they have been sold out by everything the LEFT has to offer. I look at the world we live in, shake my head, and wonder what happened to it, and then I think of the laziness that most humans that have never done hard, manual work, are capable of and what their expectations are when thrust into comparison (I grew up working a corn and pig farm), and I have to look no further. Liberal Arts degree holders (or anyone for that matter), that have never done hard, physical labor.... they are fully the culprits of all of this. Even then though, there are ranch students ("San Marqueños" here and others, to be specific, that get subpar grades in school, protest, and think they're entitled to the world). Greed. I'm so grateful that I have to heat mine and Cynthia's bathwater by hand. It keeps things in perspective.
8  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Alt Right on: November 18, 2016, 12:55:31 AM
I would argue that the cultural understanding of our American Creed is to be found in greater degree in our various white populations and that we make a mistake by allowing progressive racialism to cause us to see things in racial terms.



I agree completely, and you're right. The problem is the demographics themselves of the US. It is 8to the fault of no one), a predominately White country, and the reason I targeted "white Liberals" is solely due to the fact that they make up the majority of the party, that views the founding principles of the country, and something that should be changed with the passage of time, and worst, actively works to discredit others that challenge their positions, as being racist, for being nothing other than born a certain shade of pale.

I take great issue with that, and they do it incessantly.

I have no issue with the color anyone was born, because none of us chose, and for a large group of people that happen to be the same shade I am, attempting to discredit my concerns about their policies (not persons), by bringing my "white privilege" into it, and calling us "racists," and getting away with it because of their shade....

It's an issue. It is a weapon that they use constantly, so much so, that it can't even be argued at this point, and as the article stated, it will come to blows. The article did make one mistake though, it failed to include the "White Liberals" into it's own group, as it did with Latinos, Blacks, LGBT, etc.

To be clear, "White Liberals" isn't about their race so much, as it is about their tactics, numbers, and immediate proximity to other conservatives, the bulk of which being White, and the Left attacking them with impunity.

People don't have to agree me and I know some won't. It should be known though, there are a substantial number of people that do feel the way I do, and the numbers grow with every "you're a racist, bigot, etc." comment thrown out there.

There was someone that made an "Ape" comment, concerning Michelle Obama just two days ago. That person  (working in politics), was forced to resign.

Just today, another female, political worker in New York, was outside her office holding a sign that said "F.ck Whiteness." She appeared pale in complexion. Doubt she gets fired or resigns.

I'm not going to put up with this in MY country. Many people won't. Done being quiet about it. Just the way people on the ALT Right feel. (I don't like the name alt right by the way)... whatever.... not giving away my country to a bunch of safe space people. No way in hell.


Milo on 12 Steps to Destroy the Alt Right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNRGW1VtPJE
9  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Alt Right on: November 18, 2016, 12:24:06 AM
I identify as Alt-Right, I'm not racist, I have no problems with Jews, and I make no apologies for my politics.

If anything, I identify with conservatives of any color and loathe liberals, especially ones of my own color.

I like tradition, freedom, personal responsibility, military service, and to be self reliant, but having a big heart and a little government.

That basically explains the majority of who I have encountered.

We have been hiding in the shadows of the Republican party for years. A major point might be, what are the differences between the alt right and the tea party?

Edit: "The alt-right’s intellectuals would also argue that culture is inseparable from race." I don't necessarily agree with that. I do agree that Whites' voices are being stifled in their own country and that it needs to come to heel, that racism is allowed for in freedom, and that people should basically go about their day, minding their own business.
10  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / One Other Thing on: November 17, 2016, 10:20:09 PM
One of us here, was shot 11 times tonight.... while not at work.

I had an instructor from GAFE one time tell me, that as long as we're not sleeping in the truck, like a bunch of idiots, with our training and weapons, the bad guys have no chance, which barring an ambush, is absolutely true.

What the bad guys do then, is either ambush us, always with a ration of at least 3 to one, or more popularly, hit us when we're not working (here most people can't carry off duty), and work also has a heavy social impact on all of us....

We're very close when working, but we won't even tell each other whether we're married or not, where we live and we basically (almost without exception) have no contact ith each other outside of work, or any friends for that matter. That's what happens here when you can trust no one. It's hard. I won't lie.... it's scared me more times than I can count.



11  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Sad Day on: November 17, 2016, 10:02:55 PM
I've sent a letter. An important consideration regarding tactics... are the inherent value of "human rights." What is in writing and what is in practice, are often, two different things, but I hardly need to tell anyone here that.

The more brazen people become (walking up and executing officers qualifies), rules need to change, but at what cost?

On one hand, we're very effective here. OTOH, Mexico isn't swimming in freedom, still has bodies hacked in pieces laying in the streets, you can't even trust your own partners, because they might kill you for doing your job, there is a stunning amount of gun control, and in the last ten years, by some estimates, the body count here is higher than in Iraq and Afghanistan combined... so... what do we really know here? Some things, sure.... is it effective? At engaging heavily armed, combative enemies? Very much so. At fixing the problem as a whole? Not at all.

For once... and since I have been here, I really have no idea what the answer is. I do know... it isn't having good men murdered in their units. That's never the answer.


I think there will be a need for change, and someone with firsthand knowledge and experience from Mexico might make a lot of money teaching LEOs the new TTPs. Just putting that out there...


Indeed. Head on a swivel.

I feel particulalry bad, because I was just writing about this yesterday, and already, not even 24 hours later, another one.

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/national-international/Stanislaus-County-Sheriffs-Deputy-Killed-Outside-Modesto-401010385.html

I expect many more in the days to come. Things are going to get a lot more violent and law enforcement will pay for the chaos in blood.


https://pjmedia.com/trending/2016/11/13/marchers-chant-kill-the-police-during-anti-trump-protest/

The party of peace and love and tolerance!

With nothing but respect... US tactics and mentality might need to change.
12  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 17, 2016, 09:58:34 PM

DDF is right

I'm not correct CCP.... History is though. This only ever ends one of three ways. An interesting study would be what the average age of a country before undergoing a substantial change in either its geographic region, government, and/or demographics, especially in this era of transportation and instant news.

Polyethnic societies have never existed where sooner or later, one culture becomes dominate and either kills, subits, or sends into exile, the weaker cultures.

Any doubts, look no further than the Sioux and the pipeline. They have a treaty and the government is certainly inflicting its will over it. Same thing here in Mexico.

In fact, the Mexican Constitution makes me chuckle a bit.... the Spaniards that broke away from the Spanish crown, wrote themselves a constitution, helping themselves to the entire country, and then later in 1917, "recognized" the rights of the "indigenous" population of Mexico, but don't think for a second, that when there have been conflicts, they won't kill the indigenous if they have to. They already have and continue to do so.

The US is already getting there in terms of Whites. There are already two or more distinct groups, each with their own culture (culture is not the same as race), and their values couldn't be any more different. Again, Mexico is a great example of this, because even when the racial variable is removed (as with here and almost everyone being mestizos "mixed"), I have seen Mexican politicians so vitriolically angry, that spittle is literally flying from their mouths, in reference to other Mexicans. They are mad enough to kill over it, and indeed, they do..... race has nothing to do with it.... it's cultural differences.

The United States is arriving and almost due.
13  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Issues in the American Creed (Constitutional Law and related matters) on: November 15, 2016, 07:34:12 PM
CCP....couldn't agree more with your response.

Doug.... thanks for the list. I want to pick it apart and look for prior connections to Trump or sitting politicians.
14  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Boxer Moves to Eliminate the Electoral College on: November 15, 2016, 02:37:29 PM
http://www.latimes.com/politics/essential/la-pol-ca-essential-politics-updates-boxer-files-longshot-bill-to-scrap-the-1479234745-htmlstory.html
15  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / SEC Chair to Vacate Position on: November 14, 2016, 07:14:40 PM
Not my area of expertise, but this is probably important.

What will President Trump mean for stocks?

Mary Jo White announced plans on Monday to step down as chair of the powerful Securities and Exchange Commission before President-elect Donald Trump takes office.
White's term at the helm of the SEC hadn't been scheduled to expire until June 2019.
Trump has promised to roll back the sweeping regulation of Wall Street that White has spent nearly four years trying to install. In fact, implementing Dodd-Frank rules and other financial reforms had been one of the biggest challenges during White's tenure at the SEC.



White, 68, did not state a reason for her resignation, but said it was a "tremendous honor" to lead the SEC and she is "very proud" of the agency's rule making as well as its enforcement actions.

In her statement, White said it's "critical" that the SEC remain "truly independent," allowing the agency to carry out its duty to safeguard markets and protect investors.
White praised her agency's efforts to reform money market funds and make companies become more transparent. She also noted that the SEC has notched three straight years of record enforcement actions, including insider trading and corruption violations.

But the SEC chair has also drawn criticism from the likes of Senator Elizabeth Warren. Just last month Warren, a Democrat, called for President Obama to remove White from her job because she wasn't doing enough to prevent businesses from pouring cash into politics.

It's not clear who Trump would nominate to replace White, but her departure could allow the president-elect to tap someone more in line with his deregulatory tilt.
White's exit would also mean that Wall Street's top cop will become even more shorthanded, with just two of the SEC's five commissioner seats filled. Gridlock in Washington has prevented the Senate from confirming Obama's two nominees.
White arrived at the SEC in April 2013 after being nominated by Obama, and despite leaving before her term is up she will be one of the SEC's longest serving chairs.
White served as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York for nearly a decade until 2002. Her office successfully prosecuted the terrorists behind the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center.

She has also worked as a high-powered lawyer at the New York law firm Debevoise & Plimpton.

http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/14/investing/sec-mary-jo-white-resigns/index.html?sr=twCNN111416sec-mary-jo-white-resigns1048PMVODtopLink&linkId=31153062
16  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the Republicans on: November 14, 2016, 04:21:04 PM
Isn't he the moron who declared the real purpose of Gowdy's Benghazi committee was to "get Hillary" for political gain?

Yes.  http://www.politico.com/story/2015/10/hillary-clinton-benghazi-kevin-mccarthy-214325
Bad gaffe.

I know... but just going to say... I don't trust anyone that would wear a salmon colored tie.




And I don't know why a liberal Republican who is worse then most Rinos is speaking for the party anyway:

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/kevin-mccarthy-common-ground-secure-borders/2016/11/14/id/758744/

I have zero confidence in this guy..  His voting record is worse than many Democrats for goodness sakes:

https://www.conservativereview.com/members/kevin-mccarthy/liberty-card/

Because they're both one and the same. Term limits... has to happen.
17  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Sad Day on: November 14, 2016, 01:41:05 PM
Indeed. Head on a swivel.

I feel particulalry bad, because I was just writing about this yesterday, and already, not even 24 hours later, another one.

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/national-international/Stanislaus-County-Sheriffs-Deputy-Killed-Outside-Modesto-401010385.html

I expect many more in the days to come. Things are going to get a lot more violent and law enforcement will pay for the chaos in blood.


https://pjmedia.com/trending/2016/11/13/marchers-chant-kill-the-police-during-anti-trump-protest/

The party of peace and love and tolerance!

With nothing but respect... US tactics and mentality might need to change.
18  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: CAIR leader calls for overthrow of US government on: November 14, 2016, 01:38:28 PM

Moderate. I'm sure the MSM will get right on this as soon as Martha Raddatz stops sobbing uncontrollably.

I'm trying not to laugh.
19  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Trump Administration on: November 14, 2016, 01:35:54 PM
I have no problem with Preibus in this position.  Isn't it more managerial than policy?  And isn't Bannon getting a big policy slot?  RP has good relations with Paul Ryan, and IMHO there is plenty of common ground to be had with Ryan.  Congress is an equal branch of government, no need to pick an unnecessary fight with Ryan.


Excellent point and I think you're right.
20  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Trump Administration on: November 14, 2016, 12:41:17 AM
Those wondering why Trump would be seeming to "play ball" with the other side or elect Reince Priebus as chief of staff;

Trump isn't in office yet, so he may be playing nice as a strategy to avoid giving the media and leftist politicians anything to attack or prepare for.

Additionally, there is a lot that can be accomplished with the Executive Office, Supreme Court, House, and Senate all being Republican, so selecting Priebus may well have been done in order to get RINO support for matters requiring 60 votes.
21  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Sad Day on: November 13, 2016, 08:54:37 PM
Indeed. Head on a swivel.

I feel particulalry bad, because I was just writing about this yesterday, and already, not even 24 hours later, another one.

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/national-international/Stanislaus-County-Sheriffs-Deputy-Killed-Outside-Modesto-401010385.html

I expect many more in the days to come. Things are going to get a lot more violent and law enforcement will pay for the chaos in blood.
22  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: social justice wars , SJ warriors, gender warriors , victimhood on: November 13, 2016, 07:45:19 PM
CD,
I read Soros piece and I don't get it.  He frets about a coming crises - yet - he is doing everything he can to make it happen.  He pours gasoline on the fire !   How the hell are his activities helping?





Soros would benefit heavily from a global government. A fractured US would make it easier to defeat, taking away arms from Americans.

There are only really three nations in the world preventing that from happening.

Russia and China are both two powerful militarily speaking, but China and Russia could be coerced with trade.

The United States OTOH has an armed pòpulace, many of whom, do not like global government at all. They are the ones that would have to be fractured from within, in order to realize a world government.
23  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: who T should NOT pick for big roles on: November 13, 2016, 07:42:14 PM

I don't know if Trump¡s "backpeddling" on Obamacare or anything else is little more than "strategy" against the press and sitting politicians that he is using until January, but I'm already not like his pick of Priebus, who was very agressive against Trump early on.

Having said that, Clinton would be worse. Irt's all up in the air right now, especially until January.

If I was Trump, I would just shut up and not make anything public until then. People cannot attack what isn't out there, which ironically, was the genius in not outlining his policies during the campaign.
24  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Sad Day on: November 13, 2016, 04:17:36 PM
I feel particularly bad, because I was just writing about this yesterday, and already, not even 24 hours later, another one.

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/national-international/Stanislaus-County-Sheriffs-Deputy-Killed-Outside-Modesto-401010385.html
25  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Trump's Whitehouse Chief of Staff Pick - Reince Priebus on: November 13, 2016, 04:12:58 PM
https://www.conservativeoutfitters.com/blogs/news/announcement-donald-trump-picks-his-white-house-chief-of-staff
26  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The electoral process, vote fraud, SEIU/ACORN et al, etc. on: November 12, 2016, 09:32:19 PM
some how they keep finding votes in "Democratic Bastions" 4 days after the election.

very  very strange:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hillary-clinton-popular-vote-victory_us_5827a2c5e4b02d21bbc91bbc

Will votes in Mi Wis Oh and Pa suddenly appear ? too.

They probably called the states too early, not having counted the full 120% of the votes.
27  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Right vs Left on: November 12, 2016, 02:54:02 PM

The problem in the world today, isn't liberal or conservative.

It isn't even White, Black or Latino, due to the fact that even in primarily mono ethnic countries, these problems still persist.

It is the fact that doctors, lawyers, and politicians make more than farmers, construction workers, machinists, police and soldiers, and are respected more than the latter.

If anything, the latter should make more. Try living without them.

Most people want the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, and there's nothing wrong with that, their political views being nothing other than their personal belief on how to achieve that for themselves or others.

Given the hard, manual labor involved with farming, machining, or construction, the financial reward should be larger than having a warm office and manicures, in order to attract people to the industries that are necessary for survival.

People have grown soft, and want the world, for having studied, but never having worked on a farm.

That is the truth of it.
28  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Politics of Health Care on: November 12, 2016, 02:29:07 PM
"Mr. Trump said he favors keeping the prohibition against insurers denying coverage because of patients’ existing conditions, and a provision that allows parents to provide years of additional coverage for children on their insurance policies."

I agree with this.  I don't see any choice.  

I'm going with.... no one knows anything that will happen until Trump is actually in office. He didn't change his tune until after the election and after he met with BO.

Anything Trump does or says until he actually takes office can be taken as nothing more than strategy.

Trump still has the Left rioting, attempting to get the electoral college voting to support Clinton, Clinton and Soros still lurking around, the media STILL against him (though they say otherwise), some politicians acting like they like Trump (when they hated him just days previosuly), and BO still in office all the way until January.

Personally, I am buying nothing at face value until then.
29  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Left Wing Negotiation Tactics on: November 12, 2016, 02:02:08 PM
The best post election video you will ever see concerning negotiations between the right and left (or anyone for that matter).

https://www.facebook.com/viralthread/videos/598130190359668/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED
30  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Soros' Plan B? on: November 12, 2016, 01:08:52 PM

I read the Satanic Bible by Anton Lavey, just to see what was in it. In everything I have ever researched on the matter, purple is a color that one will see as commonly as they would see the color red.

Given the activities of Clinton when she is not at work, it does lead one to wonder why she chose THAT color. To my mind, it is the first day she wore that color combination.

I have seen her in white, blue, red, dark green, light green, but never purple.

It could be her and the "purple revolution." It could also be something darker.

31  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The tolerant and peaceful left 2nd post on: November 12, 2016, 01:01:53 PM

Though I heavily disagree with the sentiment expressed in the video, I am apprehensive to tell another parent how they should raise their children.

That's a slippery slope that is better left to the parents.

I am wondering where the boy's father is though. That house looked to be of moderate wealth. Is she another child support and welfare collector?

Children need their mothers and fathers. Lots of things to pick apart here.
32  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: We the Well-armed People (gun and knife rights stuff ) on: November 12, 2016, 11:08:49 AM
I LOVE the idea of being able to legally carry here in Los Angeles.

OTOH, as a matter of intellectual integrity, I'm seeing a couple of issues:

a) States Rights:  Under the Tenth Amendment, don't the individual states have sovereignty in matters pertaining to the "police power"?

b) Laboratory of Democracy:  Is not a key ingredient of federalism that we have a laboratory of democracy, which allows us to try different approaches and compare the results?  Are not the various States different?  Why impose a one size fits all approach?




Exactly the problem with the States currently, in regard to everything from abortion, religion, weapons, or anything else that's been legislated, that is not clearly spelled out as a federal power.

The problem in that the Constitution, like anything, is left to interpretation. It shouldn't be that way. Law needs to be clear, and the Federal government, passing Commerce Code, or any of the any other things they use to justify their overreach, needs to be rescinded, and given back to the individual state.

The fact that the ATF even exists is ludicrous.
33  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 12, 2016, 11:03:43 AM
There was already one civil war, which wasn't over just slavery, but state sovereignty.

Granted, last night, I was debating on a Mexican website, regarding the actual number of people that had signed the petition to leave California. It was 15,000.

California's population was something like 38 or 39 million people, putting the percentage of people who support secession at roughly .038% or something like that.

Even still, a very small percentage of people can cause quite a stir, and with feelings running as high as they are (admittedly this happens after any election), but it does seem that the feelings are similar to those of the Watt's riots, the L.A. riots (which many of us here personally witnessed), Fergussen, Milwaukee.... now Portland, and just now.... they're getting ready to walk through the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, from Panorama City to the Federal Building (I'm assuming along Van Nuys Boulevard - a major thoroughfare), and it is impossible to deny that the attitude is spreading.

Police have been assassinated in increasing numbers this year in:

Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Puerto Rico if we want to include that. 52 officers died directly from engagement.
26 states and one territory. Of those, many were instances of two or more fallen officers, by a single gunman, of which, both sides of the law at times, having prior military (if not combat) experience.

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/08/14/us/police-officers-fatal-shooting-line-duty-nationwide/



If we include the numbers from 2015, 39 officers were engaged and fell as a result.

I use the word "engagement" because though under current law, it is obviously murder (if not sedition), that doesn't account for the mindset that many people who engage police officers have. To many, justifiably, reasonably (from any possible perspective) or not, there are people who see roughly 1/2 of the country as their enemy, so to them, they are often "engaging" police, whom they consider to be their enemies. The distinction is an important one.

With any killing of an officer, there is a huge amount of people decrying the fact, and calling for the death of the offender, which is understandable. What they fail to consider, is that the law that was supposed to protect all of us, failed to do so, and that the offender, in every single case where the act was not spontaneous, and even in some of the cases were the act was not premeditated, all of them acted, knowing they would almost certainly die, and still did so. Why?

To be clear, I'm not supporting the murderers at all. In fact, I may be the only one here who knows both loss of freedom, and winning the ability to serve. I had to leave the country to realize that, but I strongly support law and order, have personally faced many people who have no issues with killing us, and I strongly support every human on the planet being armed. There are good reasons for that.

It is important that we understand the subject matter correctly, and I say that based on my experience here in Mexico, and the chaos that what we confront down here has caused, as well as the fear, and the psychological changes that occur to everyone, when brutality becomes acceptable by everyone, in a way that has never occurred in the States before now, and it matters to me personally, because someday, my wife and I will be coming back.

In the last three years, there have been a total of 152 officers killed by gunfire.

In New Jersey, Melvin Vincent Santiago was directly engaged upon arrival, and had not even cleared his vehicle.

In New York, Detectives Rafael L. Ramos and Wenjian Liu, had not cleared their vehicle.

In California, there have been two instances of multiple officers falling in just over two years.

If we add the instances of Iowa, Louisiana, and Texas, where multiple officers have given their lives, there is a disturbing pattern emerging.

[source https://www.odmp.org/search?name=&agency=&state=&from=2014&to=2016&cause=Gunfire&filter=nok9 ]

In Mexico, it is routine, to see the military on the streets, I myself have had a 3 hour gunfight at my own home with my wife present, and all of us are trained in SWAT tactics as a matter of course and some of us have special forces training in addition to that, and not because we're better than anyone else, but because our survival depends upon it, because the people we fight here, know that there are laws, and they don't care about them.

We have much stricter gun laws than the US, much more experience in direct conflict than officers in US with the exception of returning vets, and we are still ambushed, and killed in much larger numbers than Law Enforcement in the US is. People simply don't know about it because of the language barrier, or they think we're all corrupt (we're not...far from it). In Jalisco, 15 of us were killed in one ambush, and all were armed with fully automatic machine guns, level IIIA vests and ceramic plates. They all died.


I think the point I am making is clear. There are no laws that will protect any of us from a growing number of people, who have decided that we are the enemy, and that our value system and our culture is not aligned with theirs. They cannot be reasoned with and are fueled by ideology that they have no practical experience with; therefore, cannot be disproved, and sooner or later, it will come to a head. At what cost?

GC likes to say that the knees are a release valve for the hips. I've always loved that saying.

If state constitutions were left to themselves, to be run democratically, conservatively, or even independently as with state like Vermont, this wouldn't be such an issue. The problem is that the United States Supreme Court does legislate from the bench, they do override state law with federal law, and they do not allow states to decide for themselves, which thrusts everyone into a winner take all endeavor, and as a result, mentalities change, people die over it, and insecurity ensues, that harms everything, even the economy, which in turn creates a cyclical problem that is difficult to eradicate. When jobs are lost (as with so many inner cities), people turn to illegal activities, to survive (as with here), and the issue continues.

The above can only be fixed with the following:

The people that are idealists (violent or not), need to have the opportunity to prove or disprove their own theories, so that they can discern for themselves whether or not they are mistaken.

Farming, manufacturing and construction workers should have the social respect that a lawyer, doctor, or politician demands, and the pay should reflect that, because if not, you wind up with a massive influx of people that want to just be lawyers, doctors and politicians, but no one to produce the goods that we depend on for survival, and is anything, the former should be paid more, given the hard labor involved, driving much needed workers into those groups, because otherwise, there is a CLEAR direction people will take, given the lazy nature of so many, especially with this generation and an increasing amount of humans living in metropolitan areas.


Even the US military, in a video allegedly from the Pentagon, has already begun preparing for massive internal conflict, and are said admit, that the problem of large scale urban warfare in the United States may well be impossible to control, and with complete respect for every law enforcement officer that has ever served, and even with "militarizing the police," if the military has stated they cannot control it, neither can the police. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rb9ZV_eFd3I

Whether the video comes from the Pentagon or not, the point remains the same. What is happening in the middle east, could easily happen in the US, one patch of dirt being equal to another patch of dirt and tactics being tactics. The only thing that has changed is the geographic location and the immediate impact it will have on us.

It is important to discuss options that will alleviate the social and political problems that face us. Indeed, the Declaration of Independence was nothing less than what we're discussing here, whether in favor of the idea of secession or not.

To many, the legality of secession has not been well defined. The Articles of Confederation contradicts itself in that states are allowed their sovereignty, but creates a "perpetual union."

per·pet·u·al - never ending, lasting forever, indefinitely long time.

As GM correctly quoted in another thread;

"When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them..."

The Founding Fathers themselves, were themselves guilty of what the British Crown considered to be "High Treason."

"High Treason

The most serious of all felonies was high treason, or treason against the King of England. Eighteenth-century laws describe the four basic types of high treason:

1. "When a man doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the king, of our lady his queen, or of their eldest son and heir" [1].

2. "If a man do violate the king's companion, or the king's eldest daughter unmarried, or the wife of the king's eldest son and heir" [2]. This aspect pertains to carnal knowledge, forced or unforced, of a royal female. The intention of this law is to guard the royal blood from any suspicion of bastardy, whereby the succession to the crown might be rendered dubious [3]. It is important to note that in a monarchy, the transition of rule and the reign of the monarch must be unquestioned, less civil unrest result.

3. "If a man do levy war against our lord the king in his realm" [4].

4. "If a man be adherent to the king's enemies in his realm, giving to them aid and comfort in the realm, or elsewhere" [5]. This aspect of the treason law pertains to trading with enemy nations, as well as trading with pirates. Many English colonies, including the American colonies, trading openly with pirates because the merchants could avoid the high English tariffs.


The original colonists themselves were no less divided than the current situation in the States are. The Founding Fathers also intended to grant to themselves, the same power that the king granted to himself, so long as they were in charge, just by stating "perpetual union." Isn't that what they just left? And now, wish to thrust others under the same yoke?

There is a way for territories to join theStates, but no way defined for one to leave it. That, in conjunction with their use of the word perpetual, does mean, that they indeed intended for states to not be able to leave, because the idea to codify joining the union was clearly presented.

While some people say that Washington and other founding fathers walked away from power, which, in a way, they did, they also made sure to retain that power to the country itself, not allowing for others in coming generations or centuries, to have the ability to leave the Federal Crown, as they had done, short of warfare.

If a substantial number of people no longer feel represented by their government, if this causes too much conflict for the likes of every day Americans, isn't it worth discussing a suitable alternative that is peaceful in nature, in the interest of everyone, specifically to maintain, liberty, peace and prosperity?



34  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 11, 2016, 04:05:20 PM
 grin grin grin grin grin grin grin
35  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Trump Administration on: November 11, 2016, 04:00:06 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't Pence's own state the first one called for Trump? IIRC, I'm pretty sure it was.
36  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 11, 2016, 03:58:53 PM
Doug - "Soda sizes...."

Says it all.

I agree with you completely on this. In fact, it is the major argument I have used in favor of secession (and I have indeed been a major proponent of it), the argument invariably being Democratic socialist programs combined with lack of productivity inherent under socialist governments (I have personal experience with both Russia and Mexico, and it is DEFINITELY an issue) vs Conservative capitalism and free markets, that notably disregard social concerns.

In ten years, the social states will go the way of Venezuela, or have people begging to run to Red states, and anyone that isn't willing to work in Red states. will run to the Blue states, only to see them running out of money, and unable to fund their social programs without a capitalist engine, and attempt to return to Red states. Not at all different than relatively socialist Mexicans, fleeing to their richer neighbor in droves.

It is absolutely what will happen. We see it daily, but we just call the would be "states," "countries."

Oddly... I have yet to see a single liberal without a substantial amount of cash, running to Mexico. They all claim they like Canada better. I wonder why that is? It isn't just the fact that they are White and speak English.... little cultural lovers.... it's because Canada is by far, a richer country than Mexico is. We all know it.

If we could forego states receiving tax dollars from any other state or central government, we could implement the plan. I think it would make a wonderful experiment, and possibly help the "21 and need a diaper" generation determine what really works.
37  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Pence takes over transition from Christie on: November 11, 2016, 03:40:25 PM

With Christie's legal problems still looming, I'm surprised Trump hasn't distanced himself from Christie completely. There still may be fallout from this that could cause a Trump administration problems.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/11/06/bridgegate-christie-team/93403850/
38  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Nepotism/American Political Dynasties on: November 11, 2016, 03:33:06 PM
Reposted here from Corruption, Skullduggery and Treason at the behest of GC

Nepotism in American politics.

Families that have last names starting with the letter "A," represent 89 families with 275 people having served in politics, for almost 3 centuries.

When one removes the state distinction and inter-marital relationships, and differences in spelling that have occurred over the years, the number of families drops to 50, and dates back to 1717 AD on the American continent.

Surnames starting with the letter "B," account for 201 distinct surnames, with their members of there families, offering up 801 public servants, not counting the Breckenridge, Butler-Belmont, or Bush families, which are so large, that they have their own listings, dating back to 1686.

In the case of the Breckenridges, accounting for another 59 politicians throughout the centuries
the Butler-Belmont family dating back to 1759, with 17 members of their family serving throughout the years (not including the other Belmont family members already accounted for)

Bush family, which actually includes two family lines, Bush, and Bush-Davis-Walker, dating back to 1676, with 56 members of their family serving public office and as president twice.

The total number of people from the 201 families with surnames starting with "B" that have been politicians is at least 933 politicians.

Surnames with the letter "C," are represented 218 times or less.

Focusing on the Clintons, of whom, both Bill and Hillary have lineage tracing back to the original 13 colonies, and just between Bill, Hillary and Hillary's brother, have included one president, FOUR presidential candidacies, secretary of state, senator, attorney general, and failed senate and congressional candidacies as well.

If we include marital relationships of Bill, Hillary's brother, and Chelsea, it will include ties to Senator Barbara Boxer, Congressmen James A. Lockhart and US Representatives Edward Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky.


Since the number of surnames in the United States is accumulative, accounting for everyone that has ever come to the country, and numbering at least 150,000 - 1,350,000 means that a fraction of the families in the US are ever included, and that those who are, overly so.


Leaving the Wikipedia list for a moment, others too, have made the same observation as noted here:

"My infatuation with political dynasties began in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1957, when, as a bored private in a peacetime army, I wandered into a library and discovered the "Biographical Directory of the United States Congress." Who were these Bayards, Muhlenbergs and Frelinghuysens, I wondered, with five or six names apiece in the directory? I counted 700 families in which two or more members had served in Congress. I eventually explored these questions in a book, "America's Political Dynasties," published more than four decades ago." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/11/AR2009091101831.html

When one contemplates the numbers of households/families, in 2015 numbering 124,590,000, https://www.statista.com/statistics/183635/number-of-households-in-the-us/, distinct surnames numbering between 150,000 to 1,350,000 (the date is still being counted and will be released in 2020), and the American population numbering 318,900,000, the fact that it is even possible to discuss dynasties existing in American politics should render the possibility of it occurring, out of reach, but it isn't. It happens frequently, which is concerning, when the amount of corruption perceived to exist happens, and given the roots of the United States having fought and defeated a monarchy in the name of freedom; yet, clearly, nepotism exists, and exists to a point, that given the references above, is too large to number, which even includes people such as discredited Sheriff Lee Baca, who has three relatives who have served public office, one of whom has served as senator, and Lee Baca isn't even included on the list I counted, when it i still a public office.

Some interesting notes:

The Kennedys:

1.) Arrived to the United States in 1849 from Ireland. Have had 12 members of their immediate bloodline serve public office since arriving.

2.) Two of them married men who would serve as governor, and another married to the mayor of Boston.

3.) Sargent Shriver, who never served, was the Democratic VP Nominee in 1972

4.) The first Kennedy took office in 1884, 35 years after their arrival, meaning that in 132 years, 17 people from their line, have either run, held, or been married to people holding public office.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-kennedy-political-dynasty-family-tree-infographic-2012-1



John Kerry :

1.) Distant blood relative to the Bush family.

2.) A member of the Forbes family.

3.) Husband to Teresa Heinz, who's family also includes prominent politicians and wealth.

4.) Direct family lineage includes at least one chief justice and a senator.

5.) Kerry himself served as senator for almost 30 years, before becoming Secretary of State, and has served as Lt. governor and congressman since 1972 (almost 45 years).


I've been reading this all day, and it's starting to sound like a skull and bones party before even the beginning of the States, and also having cross referenced this with lists from Forbes wealthiest... smh


"In 1848, for example, more than 16 percent of congressional seats were filled by someone whose relative had previously held the position [source: Kieley]. Moreover, a 2006 study found that Congress members who serve more than one term have a 40 percent chance of someone in their family later ending up in Congress [source: Alexander]. "

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/politics/2010-08-03-1Adynasties03_CV_N.htm

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-politics-dynasties-idUSN0332238720070304
39  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 11, 2016, 03:29:11 PM
Noted and thank you.
40  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 11, 2016, 01:03:45 PM
A ratification by 3/4's of the States would be 37.5 states IF California was included in the ratifying.

If not, it would require 36.75 states.

2/3's of states at a constitutional convention would be 33 states with California included, 32.34 states without California voting.

And 2/3's of Congress... so....

Congress has 535 voting members: 435 representatives and 100 Senators.

287.1 representatives of 435 and 66 senators would have to approve it, IF secession is indeed unconstitutional , and IF it were done by constitutional amendment.

That's what secession looks like in numbers, which brings me to my next point:

"Unconstitutional" - Is it?

"California would either have to forcibly and unconstitutionally withdraw from the nation, or get nearly everyone in the U.S. to agree that it’s a good idea."

When they already stated that:

"In 1869, though, the court did recognize that some division of the country could happen “through revolution, or through consent of the States.” But while the Constitution specifies exactly how a state can gain admission to the United States, it affords no mechanism by which to leave it."

If there is no mechanism described, and it is not expressly prohibited by the Constitution, how then, can it be unconstitutional?

Texas vs Brown, leads to Salmon P. Chase (cabinet member of Lincoln) and the Supreme Court, leads to Chase's claim that there was a "perpetual union" created by the Articles of Confederation.

It is important to note, that while the Supreme Court DOES interpret law, it does not legislate it or pull it out of think air, and for something to be illegal or prohibited, it must first be codified into law.

The people that think that the Civil War settled the issue, fail to take into account, that the issue was settled militarily, for the time being, but never written into law.

The 10th amendment denies any power to the federal government that is not specifically granted to it in writing.

The 14th Amendment DOES state, that "no state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

The Supreme Court, Congress, and the Senate, assume an absurd amount after the Civil War.

Obviously, the question still stands as to the constitutionality of secession, but it is not expressly prohibited anywhere.

Even so, should secession be legal, it still would almost certainly be accomplished only through brute force.


Articles of Confederation:


The "Perpetual Union" referred to in the Articles of Confederation is a "perpetual Union between the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia."

It immediately contradicts itself in that; "Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled."

Article VI states that "No two or more States shall enter into any treaty, confederation or alliance whatever between them," but fails to mention what agreement a state might make unto itself.

Article IX DOES state that "The United States in Congress assembled shall also be the last resort on appeal in all disputes and differences now subsisting or that hereafter may arise between two or more States concerning boundary, jurisdiction or any other causes whatever;" but does that include the other states that joined afterwards? AND did the Constitution nullify the Articles of Confederation by it's mere existence as the supreme law of the land?

In the Articles of Confederation, sovereignty was left to the individual states. Under the Constitution, the Constution itself was raised to be the supreme law of the land, meaning that anything not specifically codified in it, cannot be illegal, due to the lack of law prohibiting it.

The government itself claims that the Articles of Confederation were "replaced" by the Constitution here: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html

"The present United States Constitution replaced the Articles of Confederation on March 4, 1789," effectively nullifying anything the Articles of Confederation may have implied.

The Constitution itelf only references the word "confederation" twice and only once specifically to the Articles of Confederation in regard to debt:

"All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this
Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under
the Confederation."


41  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Let them go! Time for the national divorce on: November 11, 2016, 12:37:26 PM
I agree. Let them go. Sooner or later, the other shoe will drop, and it is clear, that there are those that favor socialism.

California too, is talking about it. (as mentioned in the article).


What I find odd, is that when conservatives were talking about it with Texas, many liberals were very much against it. Imagine that.

EDIT: I just called Lizzy Acker at the number listed at the bottom of the article with some questions and got her voicmail. I'll try her back.

http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/11/after_trump_victory_oregonians.html

Peaceful is better than violent. This is no longer one nation, so let the free states and those who wish to follow the socialist path part ways.

42  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Black Sharpies Matter! on: November 11, 2016, 12:08:28 PM

Oh man.....
43  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Nepotism/American Political Dynasties on: November 11, 2016, 12:03:30 PM
Nepotism in American politics.

Families that have last names starting with the letter "A," represent 89 families with 275 people having served in politics, for almost 3 centuries.

When one removes the state distinction and inter-marital relationships, and differences in spelling that have occurred over the years, the number of families drops to 50, and dates back to 1717 AD on the American continent.

Surnames starting with the letter "B," account for 201 distinct surnames, with their members of there families, offering up 801 public servants, not counting the Breckenridge, Butler-Belmont, or Bush families, which are so large, that they have their own listings, dating back to 1686.

In the case of the Breckenridges, accounting for another 59 politicians throughout the centuries
the Butler-Belmont family dating back to 1759, with 17 members of their family serving throughout the years (not including the other Belmont family members already accounted for)

Bush family, which actually includes two family lines, Bush, and Bush-Davis-Walker, dating back to 1676, with 56 members of their family serving public office and as president twice.

The total number of people from the 201 families with surnames starting with "B" that have been politicians is at least 933 politicians.

Surnames with the letter "C," are represented 218 times or less.

Focusing on the Clintons, of whom, both Bill and Hillary have lineage tracing back to the original 13 colonies, and just between Bill, Hillary and Hillary's brother, have included one president, FOUR presidential candidacies, secretary of state, senator, attorney general, and failed senate and congressional candidacies as well.

If we include marital relationships of Bill, Hillary's brother, and Chelsea, it will include ties to Senator Barbara Boxer, Congressmen James A. Lockhart and US Representatives Edward Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky.


Since the number of surnames in the United States is accumulative, accounting for everyone that has ever come to the country, and numbering at least 150,000 - 1,350,000 means that a fraction of the families in the US are ever included, and that those who are, overly so.


Leaving the Wikipedia list for a moment, others too, have made the same observation as noted here:

"My infatuation with political dynasties began in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1957, when, as a bored private in a peacetime army, I wandered into a library and discovered the "Biographical Directory of the United States Congress." Who were these Bayards, Muhlenbergs and Frelinghuysens, I wondered, with five or six names apiece in the directory? I counted 700 families in which two or more members had served in Congress. I eventually explored these questions in a book, "America's Political Dynasties," published more than four decades ago." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/11/AR2009091101831.html

When one contemplates the numbers of households/families, in 2015 numbering 124,590,000, https://www.statista.com/statistics/183635/number-of-households-in-the-us/, distinct surnames numbering between 150,000 to 1,350,000 (the date is still being counted and will be released in 2020), and the American population numbering 318,900,000, the fact that it is even possible to discuss dynasties existing in American politics should render the possibility of it occurring, out of reach, but it isn't. It happens frequently, which is concerning, when the amount of corruption perceived to exist happens, and given the roots of the United States having fought and defeated a monarchy in the name of freedom; yet, clearly, nepotism exists, and exists to a point, that given the references above, is too large to number, which even includes people such as discredited Sheriff Lee Baca, who has three relatives who have served public office, one of whom has served as senator, and Lee Baca isn't even included on the list I counted, when it i still a public office.

Some interesting notes:

The Kennedys:

1.) Arrived to the United States in 1849 from Ireland. Have had 12 members of their immediate bloodline serve public office since arriving.

2.) Two of them married men who would serve as governor, and another married to the mayor of Boston.

3.) Sargent Shriver, who never served, was the Democratic VP Nominee in 1972

4.) The first Kennedy took office in 1884, 35 years after their arrival, meaning that in 132 years, 17 people from their line, have either run, held, or been married to people holding public office.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-kennedy-political-dynasty-family-tree-infographic-2012-1



John Kerry :

1.) Distant blood relative to the Bush family.

2.) A member of the Forbes family.

3.) Husband to Teresa Heinz, who's family also includes prominent politicians and wealth.

4.) Direct family lineage includes at least one chief justice and a senator.

5.) Kerry himself served as senator for almost 30 years, before becoming Secretary of State, and has served as Lt. governor and congressman since 1972 (almost 45 years).


I've been reading this all day, and it's starting to sound like a skull and bones party before even the beginning of the States, and also having cross referenced this with lists from Forbes wealthiest... smh


"In 1848, for example, more than 16 percent of congressional seats were filled by someone whose relative had previously held the position [source: Kieley]. Moreover, a 2006 study found that Congress members who serve more than one term have a 40 percent chance of someone in their family later ending up in Congress [source: Alexander]. "

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/politics/2010-08-03-1Adynasties03_CV_N.htm

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-politics-dynasties-idUSN0332238720070304
44  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Way Forward for the American Creed on: November 11, 2016, 08:11:54 AM
Wow..... put that way, just wow.

Edit: I'll add Doug, that not only do I agree with GC and GM, but that it is nice to have someone a little more to the Left around. You point out things that hadn't occurred to me, the leftist politicians being angry for instance. Senate 60 vote rule.

I have often wondered, just exactly what it was, Obama told every Republican in all of those last minute, phone calls and private meetings, in order to get them to flip their vote for Obamacare. Did he threaten them with death? Who knows... but they certainly flipped.

It will be interesting to see Trump's strategy. Similar to what you have stated... this isn't a game show anymore. "You're fired," isn't going to cut it.

It is curious what Obama said to them though, in order to get that to pass. Hell, they hadn't even read it. I read it and it took me a week. What did he tell them?
45  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Oh my God - no , please no on: November 11, 2016, 08:09:14 AM

That is closer to the truth than many realize.

http://nypost.com/2016/11/10/chelsea-clinton-being-groomed-to-run-for-congress/

It really is like Friday the 13th.  Every time you think the scourge is killed of it keeps rising from the dead to terrorize the world.
Like the influenza epidemic that keeps coming back every year mutated but still at its core - the same.  Leaving dread, travesty, and death in its wake.  angry

I think the Clintons missed the memo on Americans not being fond of monarchies, much less monarchies that are hereditary in nature.

One of the things that stood out to me, is that Chelsea Clinton's "groomer," Rep. Nita Lowey, who herself has "served" for nearly 30 years, and will presumably "serve" even more.

A vast amount of Americans appreciate neither nepotism in politics, nor career politicians, even though the Gallup poll and others indicate otherwise. You'll forgive me if I don't trust polls at all, especially in this political climate and age of internet access.

If Trump does indeed find a way to institute term limits for Senate and Congress, Chelsea's running for Congress won't be a major issue.

OTOH, I have read somewhere, musings that Trump himself has considered position in government for his own son, even though his Ivanka Trump has said this against it:

 “Nothing epitomizes the excesses of America’s elite today more than the granting of prominent job titles to family members. This will end with the Trump family on the case,” Ivanka Trump told supporters at a campaign event in New York on Tuesday morning.

Even The Donald agreed:

“Corruption and nepotism are a big problem in american politics—very, very big! But if there’s someone who can root it out, it’s my children,” Donald Trump wrote in a tweet on Tuesday.

http://syruptrap.ca/2016/08/trump-children-vow-to-root-out-nepotism-in-american-politics/


Nepotism itself, I don't find to be a major issue, because who wouldn't know, trust and help out their own offspring? Most people would. It becomes an issue, when as stated in the article, the family becomes a "brand," particularly in politics.

The Clinton brand, The Bush brand, even now with Barack, and people pining for Michelle in 2020, people are already considering the Obama brand.

I was going to make this post longer with examples, but that should be saved for another thread. It does need to be mentioned though, George W. Bush's father was president, and his great-grandfather, a Senator. There is a distinct pattern with certain families in the US, and it isn't healthy. This makes clear two things:

1.) What amount of connections and currency are required, to become a politician, eliminating people not traditionally associated with the industry to join?

2.) How do qualified people that aren't involved with career politicians, achieve enough visibility to the American public in order to be able to run effectively, with a population over 300 million people?

Those are two important questions that need to be addressed for several reasons, chief of which, is political integrity and accountability for the nation as a whole.

46  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: 2016 Presidential on: November 11, 2016, 07:46:55 AM
As this thread presumably winds down, I would like to thank one and all for a fine job.  I like to think that perhaps our efforts here contributed in some small way to the outcome.

Well done gentlemen!

God bless America!

Indeed sir. You as well.
47  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: As Anti-Trump Violence Perpetrated By Hillary/Obama/Soros Minions Spreads Across on: November 10, 2016, 05:28:50 PM
http://ace.mu.nu/archives/366788.php

November 10, 2016
As Anti-Trump Violence Perpetrated By Hillary/Obama/Soros Minions Spreads Across America, Media Blesses It and Encourages It With Their Silence and Even Support

Question:

Is it true that "dark rhetoric" encourages violence?


I prefer her full quote from the page that the hyperlink above links to:

      
CNNDuring the massive anti-Donald Trump protests held in California the day after Election Day, one woman CNN spoke to called for violence and death as a means to enact political change.

“If we don’t fight, who is going to fight for us? People had to die for your freedom where we’re at today. We can’t just do rallies, we have to fight back,... There will be casualties on both sides. There will be, because people have to die to make a change in this world,” she continued. “Trump, enough with your racism. Stop splitting families. Don’t split my family.”

So basically, she's calling for the deaths of Americans, if her undocumented relatives are removed from the country.

Again, I'm saying that anchor babies, as sad as it is, NEED to be deported along with their parents. This woman was not by herself, and that is a Mexican flag in the video.

http://www.mediaite.com/tv/people-have-to-die-anti-trump-protester-calls-for-violence-on-cnn/
48  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Non Citizens Voting on: November 10, 2016, 01:39:55 PM

Even though I posted it, I'm not finding the 13℅ figure accurate or reliable, it could be higher.  But for whoever did vote illegally, they risked that Trump would win and these crimes would be investigated and prosecuted. Illegal voting should come with a lifetime ban on future citizenship and legal voting.   Maybe that will slow it down.


Several people from the Left and the media have insisted that voter fraud hardly even exists.

"While voter fraud is rare — one study found just 31 credible claims of fraud amid more than a 1 billion ballots cast since 2000 —  a few instances of voter fraud and voting irregularities have been found ahead of the election." http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-voting-irregularities-snap-story.html

https://votingwars.news21.com/voter-fraud-is-not-a-persistent-problem/

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2016/10/the_gop_created_the_rigged_vote_myth.html

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/11/08/politics/viral-video-shows-voter-fraud-take-a-closer-look/

(CNN pointing out that the man didn't explicitly claim that it was voter fraud, instead, "it was just weird how it happened)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/09/01/voter-fraud-is-not-a-persistent-problem/


But claim it IS a problem when it comes to Republicans:

https://news.vice.com/story/trump-supporters-keep-committing-voter-fraud

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/10/29/trump-supporter-charged-with-voting-twice-in-iowa/


So which is it?

The numbers stated here, along with Obama's remarks, show that it is at a minimum, a threat to the Republic.

Also not mentioned, but noteworthy, is the vote swapping application "#NeverTrump," allowing people to exchange votes from consistent states, to contested states. The political affiliation of the app's creator is clear.

http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/video/vote-swapping-app-helps-voters-trade-votes-swing-43379078

Interestingly, the idea was hatched by Maryland State Senator Jamie Raskin (D) in 2000, in a bid to help Ralph Nader without impacting Gore. The moment Conservatives started doing it, they were threatened by "Republican" state secretaries and attorney generals immediately per Raskin.


49  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of His Glibness on: November 10, 2016, 12:52:08 PM
Now they know exactly how many of us felt for 8 years of this guy.  God forbid anyone disagree with a lib:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/white-house-staff-obama_us_5824a8d1e4b01019814db520


Thinking about it, it doesn't strike anyone as odd, that Obama goes from being vitriolic towards Trump, to buddy-buddy in less than one week?

Edit: Michelle Obama deleted everything regarding Hillary Clinton from both her twitter and facebook accounts, about two weeks ago... something like that.

Her last facebook post is from February of 2013.

You're the wife of the man inhabiting the whitehouse, and you have nothing to post for almost four years? That's amazing.

We all know that Obama and Hillary exchanged emails on her private server.

Obama, while he can pardon Hillary (if she is charged and convicted before he leaves), cannot párdon himself... so he's in a pickle.
50  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Non Citizens Voting on: November 10, 2016, 11:42:26 AM
Thank you sir.

Very good work, DDF.
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