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201  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: March 29, 2009, 06:52:37 AM
Finally the trailer comes out and the movie will be release October 19th. 
I cant wait to take my boys to see this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NOkQ4dYVaM
202  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: March 27, 2009, 05:12:46 AM
Bully Beatdown!

http://www.mtv.com/videos/bully-beatdown-ep-1-ryan-the-family-favorite/1606877/playlist.jhtml
203  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Music on: March 27, 2009, 04:53:49 AM
Haven't listened to these songs in a while..





204  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: The Physics of a stick strike on: March 25, 2009, 12:11:26 AM
Does this help?

205  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: March 20, 2009, 05:26:12 PM
Guro Crafty have you ever had the chance to witness while traveling \ teaching in Mexico?

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8kxox_big-mexican-punchup_sport
206  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: KALI TUDO (tm) Article on: March 17, 2009, 05:46:00 PM
 afro  Looking forward to the knowledge that comes from the footage.
207  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Rest in Peace on: March 16, 2009, 01:12:58 PM
GM Roland Dantes passed away this weekend.  I met him at a BBQ years ago.
He was handing out food and making sure everyone had enough to eat when it should have been the other way around.

Aloha GM Dantes, till we meet again.

Robert
208  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Music on: March 14, 2009, 03:17:31 AM
Adding this one to my workout mix:

209  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Internet and related technology on: March 06, 2009, 11:24:15 AM
Fcuk!!!  Another gaddammed technology to vampire life!!!  angry angry angry tongue cheesy

True.  The cool thing about it that during the power outage earlier this year, people were twittering what was going on in their area as well as what time power was restored to each part of the island.
210  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Internet and related technology on: March 06, 2009, 11:22:39 AM
huh huh huh

See reply #41 above for more info on Twiitter, Guro Crafty.

I have question about Twitter for anyone who uses it. Can you have the tweets forwarded to your phone as txt msgs? There are a few I'd like to follow but I don't sit at a computer all day. Since I have unltd msg, I thought it would be a good way to use twitter.

Yes, If you are a member you can set it up send you txt messages.
211  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Internet and related technology on: March 06, 2009, 04:29:02 AM
Yet another use for Twitter:

 Twitterfall: A New Twitter Tool for Journalists
Posted by Paul Bradshaw at 12:21 PM on Mar. 2, 2009
A new Twitter interface application, Twitterfall, has been around for a month now. If you're a journalist, this is a must-see -- for about 10 minutes. Then it becomes a must-use.

Yes, this is yet another Twitter interface. But: This is Twitter on crack ... on roller skates ... in a jumpsuit.

Here's what Twitterfall does:

    * Scanning. You can choose to watch everyone's tweets go by, or log in to watch only the tweets of those you follow. Thanks to Comet technology, Twitterfall has an especially fast search service. You can alter the speed from 0.3 tweets per second to a mind-scrambling 10 tweets per second.

    * Keyword tracking. You can see the most popular terms of the moment, and just follow tweets containing those keywords (including hashtags). Or you can enter your own search term (as on the Web-based Twitter service Monitter) to track tweets mentioning it. You can combine keywords, too.

    * Geo-filtering. You can enter a location to narrow down your display to tweets from that location that also mention keywords you choose (again as with Monitter). The words Mumbai and Chengdu come to mind.

    * Basic usability. Unlike Monitter, you can use Twitterfall to post tweets yourself, reply to tweets and mark tweets as favorites. Just hovering over a tweet pauses the whole thing. You can also follow a user with one click -- a feature some popular clients like Tweetdeck lack. You can filter by language and choose to exclude retweets. You can save favorite searches. And you can customize the appearance of the interface, including the font size.

This is quite simply the best-designed Twitter interface I've ever seen -- and I have seen a lot of them.

If they ever create a mobile version of it (and it does sort of work on an iPod Touch/iPhone) I'll probably explode.

The fact that it was made by two students in York, U.K. also pleases me no end. You've just saved me 30 minutes every week convincing newspaper editors where the value lies in using Twitter, so thank you.

212  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Internet and related technology on: March 06, 2009, 04:25:57 AM
Another use of Twitter and iPhone.  This is actually pretty cool, when the power went out on the island of Oahu many people still had use of their iPhone and so we twittered. Checkit out - http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23hipower

Anyway, we have added extra batteries to our emergency preparedness kit for the iPhone.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17939_109-10186631-2.html

Twitter and iPhone help find lost skier
by Caroline McCarthy

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In a bittersweet conclusion, a missing skier in the Swiss Alps was rescued with the help of Twitter and an iPhone, but it appears that his fellow skiing companion was found deceased after the two were separated from the rest of their group.

Tracking Twitter search for the term "verbier" (the region of the Alps where the two went missing) has brought much of the news together.

Blogger Robin Blandford of ByteSurgery.com rounded up some of the messages: one member of the ski trip Twittered that two members of the group were missing, and another posted a tweet requesting the cell phone numbers of the missing skiers to attempt to contact them. From what it looks like, the GPS coordinates of their iPhones were used to pinpoint their location, but when one of them was found alive, he had become separated from his companion.

The Swiss news source Le Nouvelliste reported on Tuesday that, unfortunately, the second skier had been found deceased.

Blandford updated his blog post to say that the two skiers worked for a start-up called Dolphin Music, and that a number of other tech entrepreneurs were in the same British ski group.

UPDATE at 8:53 a.m. PST: We have more information, and in English now, thanks to the U.K.-based Evening Standard. The two missing skiers were actually on snowboards, and have been identified as Jason Tavaria and Rob Williams, the 29-year-old co-founders of Dolphin Music.

Tavaria was found alive after he was located with GPS on his iPhone, but Williams was found dead, and according to the Evening Standard, had fallen about 66 feet and landed on rocks.

Blizzard conditions at Verbier had made the search and rescue process difficult.
213  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Twitter on: March 06, 2009, 04:18:26 AM
Anyone use twitter?

********************************************************************************************************************
What is twitter?
Twitter is a social networking and micro-blogging service that allows its users to send and read other users' updates (known as tweets), which are text-based posts of up to 140 characters in length. Updates are displayed on the user's profile page and delivered to other users who have signed up to receive them. Senders can restrict delivery to those in their circle of friends (delivery to everyone being the default). Users can send and receive updates via the Twitter website, SMS, RSS (receive only), or through applications such as Tweetie, Twitterrific, and Feedalizr. The service is free to use over the web, but using SMS may incur phone services provider fees.
********************************************************************************************************************

Twitter is huge, my GF has been using this for a while initially i thought it was .. well. Stupid but now Im a user. LOL. 

Many people use it even celebrities, news stations and the president.

A variety people use it to connect and share information.



This is a guest post by Straight to the Bar's Scott Bird. Strength, Nutrition and Conditioning on Twitter.

Just joined twitter and wondering what to do, who to follow? Here are just a few strength athletes, nutritionists and serious fitness enthusiasts to add to your list. To follow any of them, simply open the link in a new tab and click the 'follow' button near the top of the page. If you'd like to add someone that we've missed (whether it's you, or just someone you enjoy reading), leave a note in the comments. The more the merrier. NB : if you're looking for somewhere to start, (and to find out more about the people on this list), why not tune in to the weekly twitterchats on Straight to the Bar. Each Wednesday, a top strength athlete or coach will be available online for an hour of serious questioning. Great chance to chat about strength training.
Grip training

    * Jedd 'Napalm' Johnson, Napalm's Corner, twitter.com/JeddJohnson
    * Bill Long, Body by Long, twitter.com/bodybylong
    * Steve McGranahan, World's Strongest Redneck, twitter.com/wsredneck
    * Jim 'Smitty' Smith, Diesel Crew, twitter.com/JimSmithCSCS

Strongman

    * Mike 'The Machine' Bruce, The Machine, twitter.com/MikeMachine
    * Joe Hashey, Synergy Athletics, twitter.com/jhashey
    * Elliott Hulse, Hulse Strength, twitter.com/ElliottHulse
    * Ryan Pitts, Strongergrip, twitter.com/strongergrip
    * Zach Even-Esh, Underground Strength Show, twitter.com/ZEvenEsh

Powerlifting

    * Critical Bench, Critical Bench, twitter.com/criticalbench
    * Ashley Roberts, Hardcore Strength Coach, twitter.com/ashleyroberts
    * Dave Tate, EliteFTS, twitter.com/UnderTheBar

Conditioning

    * Matt Furey, Matt Furey Uncensored, twitter.com/MatthewFurey
    * Fight Geek, Fight Geek, twitter.com/thefightgeek
    * Josh Henkin, Sandbag Fitness Systems, twitter.com/JoshHenkin
    * Adam Steer, Better is Better, twitter.com/coachsteer
    * Pamela MacElree, Pamela MacElree, twitter.com/PamelaMacElree

Diet and Nutrition

    * Craig Ballantyne, Turbulence Training, twitter.com/craigballantyne
    * Rocco Castellano, Ask Rocco, twitter.com/askrocco
    * Rob Cooper, Former Fat Guy, twitter.com/formerfatguy
    * Girlwith Noname, Girlwith Noname, twitter.com/girlwithnoname
    * Mike Rousell, Naked Nutrition Network, twitter.com/mikeroussell
    * Melanie Thomassian, Dietriffic, twitter.com/dietriffic

Sports

    * Kraig Becker, The Adventure Blog, twitter.com/kungfujedi
    * Steve Blethyn, Steve Blethyn, twitter.com/sblethyn
    * Ryan Magin, Ryan Magin, twitter.com/RyanMagin

Bodybuilding

    * Steve Shaw, Muscle and Brawn, twitter.com/MuscleandBrawn
    * Steve, Project Swole, twitter.com/projectswole

General Fitness

    * Renee, Skwigg.com, twitter.com/skwigg
    * Denis Kanygin, Workout IQ, twitter.com/workoutiq
    * Vic Magary, Gym Junkies, twitter.com/GymJunkies
    * Mike Stehle, New Jersey CrossFit, twitter.com/njkettlebells
    * Kelly Swindell, Fitness Chick, twitter.com/fitnesschick
    * Charlie Wall, Purple Fitness, twitter.com/purplefitness

Scott Bird is the editor of strength-training site Straight to the Bar, and all-around fitness enthusiast. When he's not in the kitchen stuffing his face, he can generally be found engaging in cruel and unusual punishment in the backyard.




http://www.thefightgeek.org/2009/03/strength-nutrition-conditioning-on-twitter.html
214  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Team Dog Brothers MMA? on: February 26, 2009, 08:11:44 PM
Interesting article, I also posted this in the MMA thread.  I believe that DBMA has high standards for its members and with TUF showing de-evolution I think the DBMA TV Show would be great for for taking a higher road with its fighters.

http://sherdog.com/news/articles/mayeda-examines-mmas-role-in-society-16313

Wednesday, February 25, 2009
by Danny Acosta

16313
Fights inside and outside the cage and ring fall under the mixed martial arts umbrella. For David Mayeda, MMA has become as much about responsibility as excitement.

The “human cockfighting” phrase still reverberates, despite support from mainstream advertisers like Nike, Bud Light and Microsoft. Mayeda, who earned his PhD in American Studies from the University of Hawaii, set out to explore MMA’s place in society in 2005 after coming to know the sport through “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series.

“I knew, even though I was seduced by mixed martial arts as a fan, it potentially could have differing effects on society in terms of violence,” said Mayeda, who has placed his academic focus on violence prevention geared toward youth.

“Fighting for Acceptance: Mixed Martial Artists and Violence in American Society” was published in February 2008. Mayeda took his theses from print to film when he directed, co-produced and narrated the documentary “MMA 808: Inside Hawaii’s Fight Game,” which was later derived from his book.

“I’m going to stick to my assertion that because MMA is the closest thing to the complete sport of fighting, it holds -- the sport as a whole holds -- a broader social responsibility,” he said. “That overlap between MMA and street school or domestic violence is the most striking concern for me socially. I’d like to see the MMA community take a broader responsibility in distancing the sport from those types of violence and sending out the right social messages to prevent those types of violence.”

MMA enthusiasts charge Mayeda with taking the sport backward by acknowledging its warts. Detractors, on the other hand, view him as an apologist.

The Hawaiian recognizes reluctance to be honest about the sport because of the obstacles it has had to overcome to become accepted in the mainstream. If the UFC applies its marketing muscle to social issues, it can make a visible impact, according to Mayeda. He was pleased with UFC Fight Night 16 “Fight for the Troops” in December and hopes the show serves as the first step in significant social involvement.

Balance between violence and the “feel good” story seems paramount, and the former high school football player points to the NFL as a potential model for the UFC. That organization -- the most popular and powerful professional sports entity in America -- also walks arm-in-arm with violence.

“They have really strong charitable organizations that they promote during their commercials during their games,” Mayeda said.

Responsibility does not rest solely with the UFC. If an MMA promotion can profit from a community, it can give back to it, as well. Mayeda offered one startling example of MMA doing its best to curb violence. In Kailua, Hawaii, more than a year ago, a man beat his ex-girlfriend to death with the butt of his gun. MMA Hawaii executives who run MMA Hawaii Magazine and mmahawaii.com recognized the perpetrator as one of the spectators at an event they sponsored.

Photo courtesy of MMAHawaii.com

Kala Kolohe Hose
and the HSCADV.
In response, MMA Hawaii initiated partnerships with the Hawaii State Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Mothers Against Drunk Driving. MMA Hawaii Magazine also enlisted Icon Sport middleweight champion Kala Hose and had him pose with his daughter under the caption: “You love your daughter. You want to give her the world. Start by treating her mother with respect. Real fighters keep it in the ring.” Mayeda thinks responsible fighters should speak out against domestic violence, drunken driving, substance abuse and other social ailments more often.

Even with island MMA in recovery after the extended absence of Rumble on the Rock and Icon Sport -- Mayeda believes MMA was more popular in 2001 than it is now -- ads like the one involving Hose do more than educate fans; they educate lawmakers, too. It frustrates Mayeda that similar campaigns are not already fixtures in the sport.

“I think those icons need to be pushed, not just as athletes but as humanitarians, as well,” he said. “I think that can do a lot to change the culture of mixed martial arts.”

Mayeda thinks MMA has the power to use its popularity to bring about positive change. He and Antonio McKee -- a former International Fight League standout who also works with children in his community -- agree that youth violence prevention programs involving MMA appeal to at-risk kids because it provides a release through which they can draw on their physical abilities. However, advancing the culture of MMA has many obstacles, and one -- “The Ultimate Fighter” -- stands out above all the rest.

Each installment of the Spike TV reality series brings promising talent to the UFC. What happens along the way perturbs Mayeda. The fights may not be official, but UFC President Dana White’s presence -- along with prominent fighters serving as coaches -- makes the show a representation of the UFC, in particular, and MMA, in general. It has a heavy influence on first impressions.

“They already have the [male] 20- and 30-something demographic kind of hooked,” Mayeda said. “So I don’t know that ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ is bringing new fans from that demographic. They need to be reaching out to an older demographic, men and women.”

Mayeda sees it as a tug-of-war between long-term investment and a shortsighted play for ratings and cash. He points again to the NFL, which puts together family-friendly events despite the inherent violence associated with football. MMA role models abound, according to Mayeda.

“[Rosi Sexton has] a 2-year-old child and [is an] 8-1 mixed martial artist with a PhD,” he said.

Mayeda now watches traditional MMA programming as he continues his advocacy for a sport still struggling to find its identity. The more he speaks out, the more criticism he receives. His is a thankless job. Mayeda no longer watches “The Ultimate Fighter,” even though it brought him to MMA. He suggests Junie Allen Browning’s antics on the most recent season countered the UFC’s efforts to keep negative images -- like the infamous Noah Thomas-Marlon Sims street fight on season five -- under wraps. Mixed signals are being sent.

“It’s hard to reconcile that inconsistency,” Mayeda said. “It’s like ‘Jackass’ the movie for the series. They’re really helping to create that ambiance. I just don’t understand anymore. They should have learned from TUF 1. They’re not evolving. They’re devolving.”

Mayeda wants MMA to borrow from traditional martial arts. Teach it for discipline, self defense and self-esteem building. Teach younger students more grappling than striking. Build family relationships and educational goals.

“Those are the things that martial arts schools are known for doing,” he said. “If MMA schools can capture that identity and really pursue those goals, it’ll have a much easier time gaining acceptance across the country.”
215  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 26, 2009, 08:05:08 PM
http://sherdog.com/news/articles/mayeda-examines-mmas-role-in-society-16313

Wednesday, February 25, 2009
by Danny Acosta

16313
Fights inside and outside the cage and ring fall under the mixed martial arts umbrella. For David Mayeda, MMA has become as much about responsibility as excitement.

The “human cockfighting” phrase still reverberates, despite support from mainstream advertisers like Nike, Bud Light and Microsoft. Mayeda, who earned his PhD in American Studies from the University of Hawaii, set out to explore MMA’s place in society in 2005 after coming to know the sport through “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series.

“I knew, even though I was seduced by mixed martial arts as a fan, it potentially could have differing effects on society in terms of violence,” said Mayeda, who has placed his academic focus on violence prevention geared toward youth.

“Fighting for Acceptance: Mixed Martial Artists and Violence in American Society” was published in February 2008. Mayeda took his theses from print to film when he directed, co-produced and narrated the documentary “MMA 808: Inside Hawaii’s Fight Game,” which was later derived from his book.

“I’m going to stick to my assertion that because MMA is the closest thing to the complete sport of fighting, it holds -- the sport as a whole holds -- a broader social responsibility,” he said. “That overlap between MMA and street school or domestic violence is the most striking concern for me socially. I’d like to see the MMA community take a broader responsibility in distancing the sport from those types of violence and sending out the right social messages to prevent those types of violence.”

MMA enthusiasts charge Mayeda with taking the sport backward by acknowledging its warts. Detractors, on the other hand, view him as an apologist.

The Hawaiian recognizes reluctance to be honest about the sport because of the obstacles it has had to overcome to become accepted in the mainstream. If the UFC applies its marketing muscle to social issues, it can make a visible impact, according to Mayeda. He was pleased with UFC Fight Night 16 “Fight for the Troops” in December and hopes the show serves as the first step in significant social involvement.

Balance between violence and the “feel good” story seems paramount, and the former high school football player points to the NFL as a potential model for the UFC. That organization -- the most popular and powerful professional sports entity in America -- also walks arm-in-arm with violence.

“They have really strong charitable organizations that they promote during their commercials during their games,” Mayeda said.

Responsibility does not rest solely with the UFC. If an MMA promotion can profit from a community, it can give back to it, as well. Mayeda offered one startling example of MMA doing its best to curb violence. In Kailua, Hawaii, more than a year ago, a man beat his ex-girlfriend to death with the butt of his gun. MMA Hawaii executives who run MMA Hawaii Magazine and mmahawaii.com recognized the perpetrator as one of the spectators at an event they sponsored.

Photo courtesy of MMAHawaii.com

Kala Kolohe Hose
and the HSCADV.
In response, MMA Hawaii initiated partnerships with the Hawaii State Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Mothers Against Drunk Driving. MMA Hawaii Magazine also enlisted Icon Sport middleweight champion Kala Hose and had him pose with his daughter under the caption: “You love your daughter. You want to give her the world. Start by treating her mother with respect. Real fighters keep it in the ring.” Mayeda thinks responsible fighters should speak out against domestic violence, drunken driving, substance abuse and other social ailments more often.

Even with island MMA in recovery after the extended absence of Rumble on the Rock and Icon Sport -- Mayeda believes MMA was more popular in 2001 than it is now -- ads like the one involving Hose do more than educate fans; they educate lawmakers, too. It frustrates Mayeda that similar campaigns are not already fixtures in the sport.

“I think those icons need to be pushed, not just as athletes but as humanitarians, as well,” he said. “I think that can do a lot to change the culture of mixed martial arts.”

Mayeda thinks MMA has the power to use its popularity to bring about positive change. He and Antonio McKee -- a former International Fight League standout who also works with children in his community -- agree that youth violence prevention programs involving MMA appeal to at-risk kids because it provides a release through which they can draw on their physical abilities. However, advancing the culture of MMA has many obstacles, and one -- “The Ultimate Fighter” -- stands out above all the rest.

Each installment of the Spike TV reality series brings promising talent to the UFC. What happens along the way perturbs Mayeda. The fights may not be official, but UFC President Dana White’s presence -- along with prominent fighters serving as coaches -- makes the show a representation of the UFC, in particular, and MMA, in general. It has a heavy influence on first impressions.

“They already have the [male] 20- and 30-something demographic kind of hooked,” Mayeda said. “So I don’t know that ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ is bringing new fans from that demographic. They need to be reaching out to an older demographic, men and women.”

Mayeda sees it as a tug-of-war between long-term investment and a shortsighted play for ratings and cash. He points again to the NFL, which puts together family-friendly events despite the inherent violence associated with football. MMA role models abound, according to Mayeda.

“[Rosi Sexton has] a 2-year-old child and [is an] 8-1 mixed martial artist with a PhD,” he said.

Mayeda now watches traditional MMA programming as he continues his advocacy for a sport still struggling to find its identity. The more he speaks out, the more criticism he receives. His is a thankless job. Mayeda no longer watches “The Ultimate Fighter,” even though it brought him to MMA. He suggests Junie Allen Browning’s antics on the most recent season countered the UFC’s efforts to keep negative images -- like the infamous Noah Thomas-Marlon Sims street fight on season five -- under wraps. Mixed signals are being sent.

“It’s hard to reconcile that inconsistency,” Mayeda said. “It’s like ‘Jackass’ the movie for the series. They’re really helping to create that ambiance. I just don’t understand anymore. They should have learned from TUF 1. They’re not evolving. They’re devolving.”

Mayeda wants MMA to borrow from traditional martial arts. Teach it for discipline, self defense and self-esteem building. Teach younger students more grappling than striking. Build family relationships and educational goals.

“Those are the things that martial arts schools are known for doing,” he said. “If MMA schools can capture that identity and really pursue those goals, it’ll have a much easier time gaining acceptance across the country.”
216  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Grandfathers Speak Vol. 2: Sonny Umpad on: February 25, 2009, 03:45:25 PM
The pics of Maestro Sonny and me are from Dieter Knuetel (sp?) and Alfred Plath's big shindig several years ago in Dusseldorf Germany (A "20 masters under one roof for one weekend" sort of thing).    Great fun!  Given the nature of such an event, it was expenses only for us and Germany is a long trip from Los Angeles.  I can honestly say that seeing that Maestro Sonny would be there was the key factor in my decision to go.  I had heard rumors that intrigued me and made sure to schedule my day so that I could check him out.

He recognized me and was very kind and gracious.  A very gentle demeanor.  His "pendulum" training method is conceptually quite similar to our "metronome" and so we were able to achieve a base level of training rapport quite quickly.  He gracefully and effortlessly established some serious angles on me.  The amount of distance he could glide was quite amazing.  When we did knife he did standard grip reverse edge-- which I had never before experienced in the hands of someone who knew what he was doing.  shocked

I asked if he would teach me and he laughed and said he would rather exchange techniques.  I think I may have blushed a tad. cheesy
He gave me his address, but in one of the larger stupidities of my life I failed to follow up.  I was in LA and he was in Oakland and as the years went by it was always "I'll get to this next month". cry

I got word of his lung cancer from one of his students.  In such a moment one wants to be sure to not intrude or be the ghoul, and at the same time, it is a last opportunity.  I had his student ask if he would be interested in doing a Grandfathers 2 with us and was informed he was quite eager to begin.

Things were set up and Ron "Night Owl" Gabriel and I drove up.  As we entered his living room/training hall, I was moved to see that he had a picture of the two of us together in Dusseldorf.

It was a very special day as is students came to perform for him one last time.

Maestro Sonny's dignity and composure throughout the day moved me greatly-- off the top of my head I cannot think of a greater lesson than that.

The Adventure continues, , ,
Crafty Dog

That must have been hella cool Guro.   Sometimes when I feel like putting something off til tomorrow I am reminded by the blog that Tom Furman put up in titled "There is no tomorrow!"
http://physicalstrategies.blogspot.com/2007/01/there-is-no-tomorrow.html

Now excuse while I go do something that I have been putting off, LOL. 

Also wanted to say thanks for documenting one of the greats.

Also a shout out to Maija and Eddy of course for sharing some knowledge while we were visiting in LA.

Aloha.

217  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Grandfathers Speak Vol. 2: Sonny Umpad on: February 25, 2009, 03:41:23 PM
Speaking of The Grandfathers. I have read articles that Floro Villabrille could pull nails out of 2x4's making a sound similar to a gunshot, and also had the abilitiy to peel coconuts with his bare hands! Does anybody here thinks that possible, or can anyone confirm these feats.

I do not know the answer offhand but I believe there are a few people around Hawaii who may have a clue.  I was told that Floro Villabrille and Braulio Pedoy used to train together but it would always be in private. Oh to be a mongoose in the banana patch during those sessions.  grin
218  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Grandfathers Speak Vol. 2: Sonny Umpad on: February 24, 2009, 05:51:25 PM
Great pics! Is there a cool story to share behind it too? I know Guro Crafty said that he first met Sonny in Germany, Im assuming the pics are from then?
219  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin on: February 23, 2009, 11:35:02 PM
Quote
WTF is the flag of the republic of new Africa?

I dunno, I suppose that is what the flag stands for now that Obama is in office.
(Not that I believe that)
220  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Science, Culture, & Humanities / Re: Race, religion, ethnic origin on: February 22, 2009, 07:12:00 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/america-unmasked-the-images-the-reveal-the-ku-klux-klan-is-alive-and-kicking-in-2009-1625732.html

America unmasked: The images that reveal the Ku Klux Klan is alive and kicking in 2009

The USA has a new president but an old problem - and nothing typifies it like today’s Ku Klux Klan. The photographer Anthony Karen gained unprecedented access to the ‘Invisible Empire’

Words by Leonard Doyle

Saturday, 21 February 2009

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Klan members gather at a cross 'lighting' in Scottsboro, Alabama

Klan members gather at a cross 'lighting' in Scottsboro, Alabama

    * © Photos More pictures

These images show members of the Ku Klux Klan as they want to be seen, scary and secretive and waiting in the wings for Barack and his colour-blind vision for America to fail. Anthony Karen, a former Marine and self-taught photojournalist was granted access to the innermost sanctum of the Klan. He doesn’t tell us how he did it but he was considered trustworthy enough to be invited into their homes and allowed to photograph their most secretive ceremonies, such as the infamous cross burnings.

When he talks about the Klan members he has encountered he tends not to dwell on the fate of their victims. Karen’s feat is that he takes us to places few photojournalists have been before, into the belly of the beast. The scenes he presents portray a kinder, gentler Klan. The mute photographs present an organisation that is far less threatening than the hate group of our popular imagination. Consciously or otherwise, his photographs hold our imagination in their grip while doing double duty as propaganda for the extremist right, much as Leni Riefenstahl’s work did for the Nazis.

Today the Klan is a mere shadow of what it used to be and there are at least 34 differently named Klan groups. “They are a fairly low-rent bunch of people, many of whom use their local organisations as a way of raising money for themselves,” says Mark Potok, director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama.
Related articles

    * More Americas News

Photographs of the Klan folk in their hooded regalia aren’t all that rare. The archives of America’s newspapers contain plenty of front-page photographs of lynchings throughout the past century. Three years ago, James Cameron, the last survivor of an attempted lynching died, thankfully of natural causes.

The older generation of Black Americans grew up hearing about Klan lynchings whispered over the dinner table but never mentioned outside the home. At the Klan’s height, around the turn of the 20th century, some 30 to 40 lynchings a year were being recorded. It is believed that there were in fact many more unrecorded deaths, especially in the cotton-growing south where the deaths of black field-hands were often not recorded.

Karen’s photographs show an entirely different side of the far right. He presents a 58-year-old, fifth-generation seamstress he calls “Ms Ruth” and he has photographed her running up an outfit for the “Exalted Cyclops” or head of a local KKK chapter. She gets paid about $140 for her trouble. Karen tells us that she uses the earnings to help care for her 40-year-old quadriplegic daughter, who was injured in a car accident 10 years ago.

Karen’s images of the Klan and its supporters regularly appear on the recruiting websites of the far right. Out of context, the images of hooded Klansmen and their families tell us little of the real story – the inexorable rise in the number of extremist organisations in America.

The number of hate-crime victims in the US is also rising and as America’s middle and working class gets thrown out of work, the hate groups behind the crimes are flourishing. As people lose their homes to foreclosure and, without the benefit of a safety net, find themselves slipping into poverty, there is already a search for scapegoats underway. Immigrants from central and South America have become particular targets as the grim economic times take hold.

Anyone who doubts the capacity of the modern KKK for violence need look no further than the recent case of 43-year-old Cynthia Lynch of Tulsa, Oklahoma. She had never been out of her home state before she travelled to Louisiana to be initiated into the Klan. She was met off the bus by two members of a group that calls itself the Sons of Dixie and taken to a campsite in the woods 60 miles north of New Orleans.

There, Lynch’s head was shaven and after 24 hours of Klan boot camp, including chanting and running with torches, she had had enough and asked to be taken to town. After an argument, the group’s “Grand Lordship”, Chuck Foster, is alleged to have shot her to death. He was charged with second-degree murder and is awaiting trial. Just as shocking is that the event happened in Bogalusa, a backwoods Louisiana town that was once known as the Klan capital of the US.

In the 1960s the Klan operated with impunity in Bogalusa and once held a public meeting to decide which black church to burn down next. Local Klan members were suspected of ambushing two black policemen in 1965, killing one and wounding the other. No one was ever tried for the crimes.

Despite all its notoriety the Klan has been a spent force for decades with nothing like the clout it once wielded. At its peak the KKK boasted four million members and controlled the governor’s mansions and legislatures of several states. Since the 1930s the KKK has been in a state of disorganisation and today it probably has 6,000 members. But the economic crisis is swelling their ranks and already, a month after the inauguration of the first black president, the tidal wave of interracial harmony that greeted Obama’s election is starting to recede.

“Things are certain to get worse,” says Potok. “The ingredients are all there: a dire economy that is certain to get worse; high levels of immigration; the white majority that is soon to turn into a minority and a black man in the White House.”

More than 400 hate-related incidents, from cross-burnings to effigies of President Obama hanging from nooses have been reported, according to law-enforcement authorities and Potok’s organisation, which files lawsuits against hate groups aimed at making them bankrupt.

Late last year, two suspected skinheads who had links to a violent Klan chapter in Kentucky were charged with plotting to kill 88 black students. They were then going to assassinate President Obama by blasting him from a speeding car while wearing white tuxedos and top hats. They were never going to succeed, given the huge security net around Obama, but the fact that they had planned such an outlandish attack may be a harbinger of things to come.

“There is a tremendous backlash to Obama’s election,” says Richard Barrett, the leader of the Nationalist Movement, another white supremacist group. “Many people look at the flag of the Republic of New Africa that was hoisted over the White House as an act of war.

www.powerhousebooks.com
221  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 06, 2009, 11:25:59 AM
Glenn Danzig  huh   Bad joke..

I like watching Mac Danzig fight, he started to irk me during the TUF show but now that he isnt trapped inside a house he seems to have lightened up.
222  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 06, 2009, 02:50:49 AM
Uh oh.... Just in from BJ's site ... will it happen?

BJ Penn accepts GSP and Greg Jackson’s challenge
# Posted by BJ PENN on February 5, 2009 at 10:29pm

For the past several days I have been reading statements made by St. Pierre and Greg Jackson about our fight on January 31. St. Pierre claims that he is “not a cheater” and that he and Greg Jackson will have “no problem with a rematch in the summer of 2009.” To the untrained eye the grease might not look like much, but every grappler knows the effect that it has. Being able to apply your submissions and sweeps or just being able to hold on to your opponent to defend yourself from being hit is absolutely critical! There is a reason why you are not allowed to put grease anywhere on your body except for the area around your eyes. Because of the grease applied to St.Pierre’s Body the Nevada State Athletic Commission’s executive director, Keith Kizer has stated that the Penn-St. Pierre fight “definitely wasn’t fair”. I hereby accept George St. Pierre and Greg Jackson’s challenge for a fight in the summer 2009. Lets call Dana now and set it up.

- BJ Penn
223  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Knife Law on: February 04, 2009, 02:51:58 PM
Whoa... I didn't see that? WTH?
224  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 04, 2009, 01:12:03 PM
Arvloski to box?

http://www.cagepotato.com/arlovski-signs-golden-boy-will-box-next-and-why-not

Following his knockout loss to Fedor Emelianenko at Affliction: Day of Reckoning, Andrei Arlovski has signed with Golden Boy Promotions and will begin his career as a boxer, reports FightHype.com. 

You may recall that Arlovski’s trainer, Freddie Roach, said he’d like to see Arlovski take on heavyweight boxing champ Nikolai Valuev if he was victorious against Fedor.  Of course, he wasn’t, so maybe Valuev won’t be Arlovski’s first opponent, which is probably just as well.  But whoever he does face in the boxing ring, at least he won’t be tempted to try another flying knee.

If you’re Arlovski this move makes perfect sense right now.  Having lost to Fedor, there’s no immediately obvious opponent for him outside the UFC ranks.  He’s already beaten Ben Rothwell and Roy Nelson, Josh Barnett has the next shot at Fedor (though it won’t happen until the summer, at the earliest), so why not put on some bigger gloves and find out whether Roach really knows a boxing diamond in the rough when he sees it?

The upside for MMA fans is we get to see someone from our world match his skills against a real boxer.  We’ve all heard about how superior their striking is for so long, wouldn’t it be nice to find out the old-fashioned way?  Not to mention, this could actually get people to care about boxing’s heavyweight division again, at least for a little while.
225  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 04, 2009, 11:27:31 AM
Quote
IF at any point DURING the match BJ thought that there was a problem, he could have made it clear to the ref.
He didn't.
This looks rather unprofessional.

I think BJ was too busy getting hit to notice or wonder what was going on and if I read everything right, it was a member of the NSAC who noticed it first. Ill go back and read but the fact that someone from the commission had to jump up during the fight and wipe GSP off seems unprofessional to me.  IT may have not changed the outcome and the better man won but let not ignore the fact that what the corner man did was wrong.

If you watch Dana's video blog he's already pissed at the end of the match and asks Rashad Evans about that the vaseline.

Im not here to say BJ would have won if it wasn't for the vaseline, it's just a shame that GSP victory may be tainted.

Even Matt Hughes stated GSP felt greasy
http://www.cagepotato.com/it-had-happen-matt-hughes-says-gsp-%E2%80%9Cfelt-greasy%E2%80%9D

But then again you have to take it with a grain of sale since Matt Hughes lost.  Im not sure when that article came out I cant find the date, and like the article says maybe it is a chance to dig at GSP since he lost.

The following article lists others with complaints about someone being greased up.

http://www.mmatorch.com/artman2/publish/Staff_Editorials_19/article_1931.shtml
226  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 03, 2009, 07:54:42 PM
Nevada State Athletic Commission Executive Director Keith Kizer today reported today that an improper application of Vaseline to St. Pierre's back by his cornermen has already merited a stern warning from the commission, and further actions may follow.

"There was no need for it," Kizer said of the incident in question. "It was disturbing. Where it goes from here, if anything, I don't know."

"The first round, one of the inspectors that was on the outside of the cage came over to me and said it looked to him that when the cornerman, who I think in that case was Phil Nurse, put the Vaseline on Georges' face then rubbed his shoulders -- which you see the guys rubbing the other guy's shoulders to help him out -- he didn't wipe off his hands between doing that. I said, 'Well, I'm going to watch very closely after this round.'"

"At the end of the second round I watched, and then another cornerman who I believe was Greg Jackson, he put the Vaseline on Georges' face, and then he put his hand on his back to do the breathing thing they always do. As soon as I saw that, it looked like there was still some Vaseline on his hand. Not a lot, but still some."

"Tony Liano and I immediately yelled at him, and I don't think he heard us because of the noise. So I actually went into the octagon, and I said, 'Take your hand off of his back. What are you doing?' We wiped it down. We made sure it was wiped down after the third round as well. This was after the second when I was in there. I was very upset. I don't know if they were doing it intentionally or not. Either way, they shouldn't have done it."

"I came out of the octagon and explained to the commissioner what I saw. I also motioned toward (UFC President) Dana (White) and (UFC co-owner) Lorenzo (Fertitta) so they'd know what I was doing in there. After the fight, actually both Mr. White and Mr. Fertitta both commented on how they're not sure whether those guys need to corner any other UFC (events) ever again. I leave that to them from a company standpoint. We'll deal with it from a commission standpoint."

"It wasn't necessary, it definitely wasn't fair to Mr. Penn. I don't think it was even fair to Mr. St. Pierre."

"His cornerman should have been more careful if it was an accident. If it was intentional, that's even worse. Just very, very disturbing."

"I found out this morning -- I talked with another inspector of mine -- he said that apparently B.J. Penn had complained to the inspector in his corner after either the first or second round that he though maybe Georges was a little slippery. I found that out this morning. At the same time he was complaining we were actually handling the situation in Georges' corner. It's just unfortunate."

"It wasn't like [St. Pierre's cornerman's] hand was covered in Vaseline, but he went directly from the face to the shoulders. By itself it's not a problem, but if there was still some Vaseline residue on, which there very well could have been, you've got to be more careful than that."

"Again, I don't know if that was a trick they were trying to play on us or not, but regardless, it's improper. We took the action we did after the second and third round."

"If they do file something, we'll obviously deal with it in due course. Whether or not the commission wants to do anything on their own initiative, other than what we've already done, obviously, in giving them a very, very stern warning, (I don't know)."

"Anytime you have disciplinary action, it could involve a suspension. It could involve a fine. It could involve a revocation. But it's a little premature to be talking about that."

"They can definitely file a complaint against the cornerman, but that's probably it. I don't know. We'll see. I don't see any basis to protest the decision, but you can definitely complain against the actions of the cornerman."

"My understanding is there's four ways you can overturn a decision. There's a scoring error. There's some sort of collusion; you know, someone paid off a judge, etc. The third is a positive drug test, and the fourth is the referee misinterpreted the rules. For example if you had the old boxing rule of three knockdowns in a round and after the third knockdown the referee says, 'Hey the fighter's fine. He can continue,' and he ends up winning the fight, you can overturn it then because the referee misinterpreted the rules. So I don't see any basis here."

"The example I give is Gaylord Perry of the (San Diego) Padres back in the day was known for putting Vaseline on the ball. The umpires did their best. Let's say it's the eighth inning and his team is up 10-0, he's throwing a shutout, and they find out on some pitch that he put Vaseline on the ball. They take action against him, but that wouldn't invalidate the rest of the game, although you could argue maybe he used it on every pitch and got this 10-run lead."

"But again, the Penns have the right to file whatever they're going to file, and we'd look into it and see if there is any basis for whatever they asked for."

"We wiped [St. Pierre] down very, very hard and even after the end of the third round, even though there was no touching of his back with Vaseline, we still wiped him down again after that round, too, just to be safe. You do the best you can to make it back to an even playing field and go from there."

"And I did tell the cornermen that if we ever see this again, that's it for them. I don't know the outcome of this specific incident, but we definitely gave them a warning that if we ever see that happen again that's probably the last time they'd be cornering in Nevada. As far as cornering in the UFC elsewhere, I'll leave that to the owners of the UFC."

"It's just an unfortunate incident. No fight needs it, especially a fight of this caliber."

"The fans can make their own conclusions on what they felt from their aspect. They saw what I saw for the most part based on some of the .gifs (small video clips) out there showing what happened.

"This may have tainted [St. Pierre's] victory in the eyes of many fans, and it's his cornerman's fault for that. It doesn't take away his victory, but it does take away from his victory in the eyes of many fans, I believe."

(source: mmajunkie.com)
227  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 03, 2009, 02:03:26 AM
NSAC Comments:

Monday, February 02, 2009
by Brian Knapp (bknapp@sherdog.com)

16028
The sweat had not yet dried when accusations began to fly against welterweight champion Georges St. Pierre after his lopsided victory against B.J. Penn in the UFC 94 main event on Saturday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

Not long after his win, St. Pierre and his corner, including trainer Greg Jackson, came under fire for allegedly using a “greasing” agent between rounds. Nevada State Athletic Commission Executive Director Keith Kizer on Monday confirmed improprieties had occurred in the champion’s corner after the first and second rounds.

“After the first round, one of my inspectors came to me and told me he thought he saw one of the cornermen -- I believe it was Phil Nurse … after putting Vaseline on [St. Pierre’s] face, he saw him rub his shoulders, and it appeared as though he might not have wiped off his hands,” Kizer said. “After the second round, we observed Mr. Jackson putting Vaseline on Mr. St. Pierre’s face and then putting his hand on his back.”

At that point, Kizer attempted to get Jackson’s attention from outside the cage.

“I don’t think he heard me because of all the noise in the arena, so I immediately walked into the Octagon myself -- I’ve probably done that two other times in my career -- and told him to take his hand off Mr. St. Pierre’s back,” he said. “We took a towel and wiped off his back. After the third round, we went in again and made sure his back and shoulders were wiped off to ensure a level playing field.”

Kizer informed Penn’s camp of the situation after the bout ended. Penn’s manager and brother, J.D., told Sherdog.com on Sunday that the Hawaiian’s camp planned to file a complaint with the NSAC, but, as of Monday afternoon, Kizer had not heard from Penn’s representatives. Penn has 10 days to file.

Nevertheless, Kizer admonished Jackson and Nurse after the match.

“I told them I was disappointed and that they may have tainted Mr. St. Pierre’s victory,” he said. “I told them if it happens again, it will probably be the last time they work a corner in Nevada. Basically, they said, ‘Look, we’re sorry. We’re not trying to do anything. It was an accident.’ Whether it was intentional or not, I don’t know. It was improper.”

According to St. Pierre’s trainer, Greg Jackson, the controversy surrounding the bout has been blown out of proportion. Jackson addressed the accusations on the Monday edition of the Savage Dog Show on the Sherdog Radio Network.

“The controversy came because people didn’t know what they were looking at,” he said. “Steve Friend, ‘The Witch Doctor,’ he works with a ton of these guys, and he has this energy stuff [he does]. In between rounds, Phil [Nurse] put Vaseline on Georges’ head; then he’s supposed to reach around and rub something or tap something … I don’t know how it exactly works. On the outside, it looks like, ‘Why is he rubbing his back?’ And you don’t know why. ‘Oh, he’s putting Vaseline on. That’s got to be it.’”

St. Pierre punished Penn for four rounds, as he took him down numerous times and passed his guard with unthinkable ease. By the end of the fourth -- after Penn had absorbed a lethal dose of ground-and-pound -- the Hawaiian’s corner motioned to the cage-side doctor to stop the fight.

“On B.J.’s side, you just got beat, and you got beat pretty well,” Jackson said. “You gotta have something to hold onto. There’s gotta be a reason I got beat. They have to hold onto something, and I think they’re holding onto this.”

Jackson -- who also trains UFC light heavyweight champion Rashad Evans -- vehemently denies any intentional wrongdoing took place in the corner in between rounds.

“We certainly don’t need to cheat to win,” he said. “If we were going to put Vaseline on his back, it wouldn’t be like a tapping little thing. We’d take some Vaseline and make it count, you know what I mean? We don’t do that. We don’t cheat.

“It’s really a non-issue to me because there are cameras everywhere; there are inspectors everywhere,” he continued. “I’m not the smartest guy, but I’m not a moron. I wouldn’t grease someone between rounds.”

One of the sport’s most visible and respected trainers, Jackson thinks St. Pierre’s performance may have worked against him in terms of giving the controversy legs. No one had ever defeated Penn so soundly before.

“When you’ve got a guy as good as Georges and people are looking, like, ‘How can this guy be so good?’ People are going to find controversy somewhere at some point,” Jackson said. “Georges was, like, ‘What are you talking about? That’s ridiculous. I worked really hard.’ It’s nice for us because we know we didn’t cheat. We know what happened that night. To me, it’s not really a big deal when you have the truth on your side.”

Not surprisingly, the Jackson’s Submission Fighting founder indicated the otherworldly St. Pierre would invite a third fight with Penn if there was doubt about the legitimacy of his victory.

“I’m sure he wouldn’t mind fighting B.J. a third time if they’re that concerned about it,” Jackson said. “I’m sure everybody would make a lot of money, and we’d certainly welcome that fight again.”

Jackson expects the furor surrounding their rematch to die down soon.

“There’s not a lot of validity to it,” Jackson said. “It wasn’t a close fight where people were like, ‘Oh, if it wasn’t for all the cheating they did …’ I think it will just blow over once people realize what the truth was.”

Kizer was uncertain as to whether or not the incidents impacted the match. The first time St. Pierre and Penn met, the outcome was far less one-sided, as the French Canadian took a split decision at UFC 58 in 2006.

“It’s hard to tell,” he said. “I don’t think it takes away the victory, but I think it takes away from the victory. You’ve got to be better than that.”
228  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 01, 2009, 06:28:58 AM
Hmmmmm ..... people reaching for straws or a legitamate concern:

B.J. Penn's Camp Files Formal Complaint Over Vaseline on St. Pierre's Back Between Rounds | www.cagepotato.com

" "I saw the commission jump up there and flipping out," said Dana White. They said one of the guys was rubbing Vaseline on Georges' back in between rounds. It was one and two, I think."

"The guys from the athletic commission went up there and started screaming at them. Knocked the Vaseline and kicked the Vaseline out of the Octagon."

White added that "some Vaseline on a guy's back didn't change the outcome of that fight, but you don't do it," and said the blame should fall on the cornerman responsible and not GSP.

"If a guy was intentionally putting Vaseline on a guy's back, he should never corner a mixed martial arts fight again."

As for what becomes of the complaint now, White said it's out of his hands.

"Who knows. That's up to the commission." "



Intentional?
229  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: February 01, 2009, 02:23:22 AM
I feel the same way.

Honestly I think BJ took some good shots, maybe never been hit that hard before and was demoralized by the 3rd round.
4th round started out a little better.  GSP had the perfect plan to negate BJ strengths.

Love the Machida fight, lateral movement in and out with the knees.

The spinning elbow was cool, I was wondering if it could work if someone grabbed your weapon.

Sorry.. not as technical as others. Looking forward to hearing others as well.

Missed some of the earlier fights got to Mike's late.
230  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Ripley's believe it or not. on: January 31, 2009, 04:54:22 AM
Sorry for some reason I thought this kinda fits the topic.

231  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Ripley's believe it or not. on: January 30, 2009, 03:09:33 PM
Wow, he took a pretty good combo there..
So do they just take it and hope that the opponent will go away or do the follow up with something?

Out of curiosity can they take a beating with a stick?? LOL.
232  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Ripley's believe it or not. on: January 30, 2009, 02:21:39 PM
I think that clip was from the Combat KI guys, I googled the term "Combat KI" and didnt bring up any sites of substance but I did find this clip.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/677164/martial_art_combat_ki/
233  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Movie Fights on: January 29, 2009, 04:48:33 PM
I picked up
Ip Man(Yip Man)
cool movie, i'm not sure on the accuracy of this biopic.
There's a nice fight scene in a dojo with Yip Man(Donnie Yen) vs 9-10 japanese soldiers.
Other than that the fight scenes are pretty limited. This movie was choreographed and directed by Sammo Hung.
I've always liked the straight blast, just it's use must be timed like anything. Vitors boxing blast is a variation.

I still want to get Throwdown that judo movie....but I hae to order it via the web.

I was in Kaimuki the other day, watched a little because it was on the TV.  It kind of reminded me of the Bruce Lee movie Fist of Fury \ Chinese Connection. I decided I could wait a little while longer..



to be fair to both movies, you must've only watched that scene where Donnie takes on 10 guys. the rest of the movie Ip Man is nothing like BL's FOF/CC.

True, I watched that scene, browsed the store a little bit and then watched a little more I was intent on getting it but decided to buy something for my sons instead but Ill get it, eventually.
234  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Movie Fights on: January 29, 2009, 03:29:18 AM
I picked up
Ip Man(Yip Man)
cool movie, i'm not sure on the accuracy of this biopic.
There's a nice fight scene in a dojo with Yip Man(Donnie Yen) vs 9-10 japanese soldiers.
Other than that the fight scenes are pretty limited. This movie was choreographed and directed by Sammo Hung.
I've always liked the straight blast, just it's use must be timed like anything. Vitors boxing blast is a variation.

I still want to get Throwdown that judo movie....but I hae to order it via the web.

I was in Kaimuki the other day, watched a little because it was on the TV.  It kind of reminded me of the Bruce Lee movie Fist of Fury \ Chinese Connection. I decided I could wait a little while longer..

235  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Looking for fighters for stickfighting TV series on: January 29, 2009, 03:24:29 AM
Oooh I still have time? Sweet.
I had given up because of computer issues, I didn't get the laptop I wanted so I beefed up my current machine.
Going to get some training in with DogZilla tomorrow.  Maybe I can get something on tape.
236  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: January 16, 2009, 11:42:42 AM
Not sure if this was already posted,

Legendary moro warrior Telesporo Subingsubing capture in this rare clip demonstrating his double stick, multiple attackers and some dumog. Shot in Hawaii circa 50's-60's? (Unverified)


237  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: September 20, 2009 Gathering on: January 16, 2009, 11:37:57 AM
I'm not exactly sure which one I will be able to attend but I definitely plan on attending a gathering, Im leaning towards the September gathering.
Looking forward to getting back out there.
238  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Daily Expression of Gratitude on: December 27, 2008, 10:28:02 AM
Grateful power is being restored.  grin
239  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Daily Expression of Gratitude on: December 27, 2008, 02:47:09 AM
Grateful that my little guys are safe with grandmas.
Grateful that my wife is at work with me during this island wide power outage
Grateful  I work at a NOC
Grateful for family and a wonderful christmas.
240  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Happy Holidays, whatever your version on: December 24, 2008, 04:12:31 PM
Mele Kalikimaka!  Maligayan Pasko! La Maunia Le Kilisimasi Ma Le Tausaga Fou! Frohe Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr! Feliz Navidad! Hmmm I think that covers our family and the Hawai'i Clan.

Alohaz.
241  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: VIDEO CLIPS OF INTEREST on: December 07, 2008, 03:03:22 AM
um yeah...

242  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Daily Expression of Gratitude on: December 05, 2008, 08:15:54 AM
Grateful I still have my job, so far several people including some big wigs have been laid off.
243  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Daily Expression of Gratitude on: November 27, 2008, 07:30:57 PM
Thankful that what seemed like a disaster turned into a blessing, allowing me to spend my our 1st thanksgiving together as a family.
244  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Looking for fighters for stickfighting TV series on: November 18, 2008, 07:20:53 PM
Thanks for the clarification Guro Crafty!

Better get started on my submission.
245  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Looking for fighters for stickfighting TV series on: November 15, 2008, 03:37:32 AM
Could we get a little more info about the time commitment? Just curious, would it be more than two weeks, a month, or more?

Thank you Guro,
Robert
246  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Looking for fighters for stickfighting TV series on: November 10, 2008, 03:48:06 PM
This sure seems exciting and challenging... contemplating, not that I think I will be chosen but I have other things to weigh out IF chosen.
247  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: MMA Thread on: November 05, 2008, 09:05:27 PM
Anyone catch the Uriah Faber vs Mike Brown fight?
I wasn't sure who would win but I didn't expect .... so sudden.
But hey.. that's MMA.
248  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Daily Expression of Gratitude on: October 28, 2008, 08:35:10 PM
Grateful for the opportunity to spend my days off with my 8 mo old at the park / beach and get a small workout done in the process too!  grin
249  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: Why did Elite XC Fail? on: October 26, 2008, 01:40:11 PM
I think the commission ruled that there was no wrong doing.
250  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Re: GM Narrie Babao on: October 23, 2008, 05:36:11 PM
There is a Narrie Babao on myspace, he participates in some of the FMA groups. I sent him a message to contact you.
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