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1  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Interrogation methods on: April 20, 2009, 11:07:37 AM
Here is the problem with this theory. Many jihadists have lived in our nations, gone to our schools, enjoyed humane treatment in our lands and still gone on to wage jihad, often with a western passport in their possession.

The same thing can be said of rapists, murders, and other criminals in jails.

Vince
2  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Communicating with the Muslim World on: December 03, 2008, 12:08:38 PM
The muslim masses will not condemn Mumbai, Bali, Beslan, 9/11, 7/7 or any other islamic terrorism because these are acts that stem from core islamic beliefs. It would be like jews condeming keeping kosher.

I would agree and disagree. I work with a number of people originally or ethically Pakistani, and all of them condemn these acts. One common theme is that they actually blame the Saudi's for spreading radicalism in Pakistan.  But they also agree that no "official" condemnation would happen, because it would give creedance that it is Islam that is to blame which I can understand. No one expects the Vatican to apologize for the IRA.

Vince
3  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: November 06, 2008, 09:30:09 AM
Was his being black helpful or hurtful to his candidacy?

IMHO he would not have even been noticed but for his being black, let alone being aided and abetted by a shameless and dishonest MSM.


There have been other black Presidential hopefuls, although BO was the first candidate that could be taken seriously. Initially yeah being black brought BO notoriety, but if he was like  Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton you still think he would have won? Hell no!

Vince
4  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: November 06, 2008, 06:29:45 AM
Quote from: G M on Today at 10:28:04 AM
...Our first "affirmative action" president will have people wistfully longing for W...

Do you really believe this !?! "Affirmative  actions", people voted for him BECAUSE he is black!!!! PLEASE!!!! rolleyes

I guess its that white liberal guilt which explains NY, NJ,CT,MA,ME what about the rest of the country?

Vince

**Would a "Barry O'Malley" with the same lack of qualifications be the president-elect right now?**




Don't t know, maybe , maybe not. Given then state of the economy, 2 wars, the state of the republican party and the less than stellar campaign McCain ran. Probably.

If O'Malley did run he would still be the 2nd "ethnic" president, JFK being the first.

Vince



5  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: November 05, 2008, 01:05:32 PM
Quote from: G M on Today at 10:28:04 AM
...Our first "affirmative action" president will have people wistfully longing for W...

Do you really believe this !?! "Affirmative  actions", people voted for him BECAUSE he is black!!!! PLEASE!!!! rolleyes

I guess its that white liberal guilt which explains NY, NJ,CT,MA,ME what about the rest of the country?

Vince
6  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: October 16, 2008, 11:30:56 AM
Is there any examples of International terrorism that was not done in the name of Islam ? I can only think of one Air India 1985, and even that you can conceivable argue was an internal affair Indian Sihk v. Indian Hindu).

anyways back to to election

Vince

Could you define "International Terrorism" please.

Acts of terrorism on foriegn soil to that of the the perpetrators. Basically acts of terrorism outside the conflict area.

For example:
To my knowledge the following well know terrorist groups have have never bombed in a land not in dispute in the name of there religion or cause:

Has ETA ( Basque separatist) ever commit acts of terrorism onside of Spain ?
Has Zapatist ever commit acts of terrorism outside of Mexico ?
Has IRA  ever commit acts of terrorism outside of UK ?
Has the LTTE (Tamil Tigers) ever commit acts of terrorism outside of Sri Langka ?

The only example I can think of is (other than Islamic) is the bombing of Air India 182 (Montreal-London-Deli)in 1985 by Sihk extremist in the name of a Sihk homeland in India. Other than that, all acts of international terrorism are done in the name of Islam.

Vince

Sorry Crafty this response should probable be in another thread.
7  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: October 15, 2008, 07:17:29 AM
Is there any examples of International terrorism that was not done in the name of Islam ? I can only think of one Air India 1985, and even that you can conceivable argue was an internal affair Indian Sihk v. Indian Hindu).

anyways back to to election

Vince
8  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Obama Phenomena on: October 10, 2008, 08:04:27 PM
The problem is the WSJ and the others who point these things out are probably preaching to the choir who already know and believe this.

The MSM either ignores this or puts it on page 35.
...




I disagree when watching CNN they discussed the above before and after the debate. Mind you it wasn;t as colorful as the WSJ article.
9  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: October 10, 2008, 07:54:46 PM
This reminds me of my macroeconomic professor once said "When it comes to politicians when times are bad everyone is a Keynesian and when times are good classical"
10  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: October 06, 2008, 10:48:46 AM
60 Minitues Sunday Oct 5

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4502673n
11  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics on: October 02, 2008, 11:53:19 AM
http://www.businessweek.com/investing/insights/blog/archives/2008/09/community_reinv.html


Community Reinvestment Act had nothing to do with subprime crisis
Posted by: Aaron Pressman on September 29

Fresh off the false and politicized attack on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, today we’re hearing the know-nothings blame the subprime crisis on the Community Reinvestment Act — a 30-year-old law that was actually weakened by the Bush administration just as the worst lending wave began. This is even more ridiculous than blaming Freddie and Fannie.

The Community Reinvestment Act, passed in 1977, requires banks to lend in the low-income neighborhoods where they take deposits. Just the idea that a lending crisis created from 2004 to 2007 was caused by a 1977 law is silly. But it’s even more ridiculous when you consider that most subprime loans were made by firms that aren’t subject to the CRA. University of Michigan law professor Michael Barr testified back in February before the House Committee on Financial Services that 50% of subprime loans were made by mortgage service companies not subject comprehensive federal supervision and another 30% were made by affiliates of banks or thrifts which are not subject to routine supervision or examinations. As former Fed Governor Ned Gramlich said in an August, 2007, speech shortly before he passed away: “In the subprime market where we badly need supervision, a majority of loans are made with very little supervision. It is like a city with a murder law, but no cops on the beat.”

Not surprisingly given the higher degree of supervision, loans made under the CRA program were made in a more responsible way than other subprime loans. CRA loans carried lower rates than other subprime loans and were less likely to end up securitized into the mortgage-backed securities that have caused so many losses, according to a recent study by the law firm Traiger & Hinckley (PDF file here).

Finally, keep in mind that the Bush administration has been weakening CRA enforcement and the law’s reach since the day it took office. The CRA was at its strongest in the 1990s, under the Clinton administration, a period when subprime loans performed quite well. It was only after the Bush administration cut back on CRA enforcement that problems arose, a timing issue which should stop those blaming the law dead in their tracks. The Federal Reserve, too, did nothing but encourage the wild west of lending in recent years. It wasn’t until the middle of 2007 that the Fed decided it was time to crack down on abusive pratices in the subprime lending market. Oops.

Better targets for blame in government circles might be the 2000 law which ensured that credit default swaps would remain unregulated, the SEC’s puzzling 2004 decision to allow the largest brokerage firms to borrow upwards of 30 times their capital and that same agency’s failure to oversee those brokerage firms in subsequent years as many gorged on subprime debt. (Barry Ritholtz had an excellent and more comprehensive survey of how Washington contributed to the crisis in this week’s Barron’s.)

There’s plenty more good reading on the CRA and the subprime crisis out in the blogosphere. Ellen Seidman, who headed the Office of Thrift Supervision in the late 90s, has written several fact-filled posts about the CRA controversey, including one just last week. University of Oregon professor and economist Mark Thoma has also defended the CRA on his blog. I also learned something from a post back in April by Robert Gordon, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, which ends with this ditty:


    It’s telling that, amid all the recent recriminations, even lenders have not fingered CRA. That’s because CRA didn’t bring about the reckless lending at the heart of the crisis. Just as sub-prime lending was exploding, CRA was losing force and relevance. And the worst offenders, the independent mortgage companies, were never subject to CRA — or any federal regulator. Law didn’t make them lend. The profit motive did. And that is not political correctness. It is correctness.

12  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: McCain on: September 17, 2008, 09:30:08 AM
Prominent Clinton backer and DNC member to endorse McCain

From CNN Political Editor Mark Preston

Lynn Forester de Rothschild was a strong supporter of Clinton's White House bid.

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a prominent Hillary Clinton supporter and member of the Democratic National Committee’s Platform Committee, will endorse John McCain for president on Wednesday, her spokesman tells CNN.

The announcement will take place at a news conference on Capitol Hill, just blocks away from the DNC headquarters. Forester will “campaign and help him through the election,” the spokesman said of her plans to help the Republican presidential nominee.

Forester was a major donor for Clinton earning her the title as a Hillraiser for helping to raise at least $100,000 for the New York Democratic senator’s failed presidential bid.

In an interview with CNN this summer, Forester did not hide her distaste for eventual Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama.

“This is a hard decision for me personally because frankly I don't like him,” she said of Obama in an interview with CNN’s Joe Johns. “I feel like he is an elitist. I feel like he has not given me reason to trust him.”

Forester is the CEO of EL Rothschild, a holding company with businesses around the world. She is married to international banker Sir Evelyn de Rothschild. Forester is a member of the DNC’s Democrats Abroad chapter and splits her time living in London and New York.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

What I found particularly hilarious is a Rothschild calling ANYONE an elitist.


13  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: September 15, 2008, 11:37:19 AM
Vince:

What do YOU think explains his decsision to join this church/follow this pastor?  What do YOU think this says about him?

Crafty,

Sorry took so long to respond.  Work getting in the way!

For me to really get a feel for his decision to pick this particular church I think i would need to read his books. Not much for auto biographies (zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!).

From what I gather this is a fairly prominent church in Chicago with many community out reach programs, seems like a good reason to join any church. Is it Black centric, yeah, where they angry at white people, yeah, I also think at the times they good reason for both. (I think its debatable if this type of rhetoric is needed now and if so to what extent). Do I think this mean Obama hates white people, no.

As for staying, as Obama has said he has many ties to the church. A church is not just pastor but all the people who belonged.

I give you an example, a friend of my thinks that both Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI are too liberal and didn't particularly like them. I asked him if he considered them anti-popes, he said "no they are the real popes, they might lead the church but they are not the church".

Vince











 
14  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: September 11, 2008, 09:55:45 AM



**If Sarah Palin attended a church that taught "christian identity" theology (white supremacist ideology masquerading as christianity) I could not vote for her ever, for any reason. Barry-O chose to find a "black church" in Chicago. Obviously there were quite a few to choose from. He had to choose one that is formed around a racist theology, one that honored Louis Farrakhan. In fact, the only person to appear on the cover of the church's magazine cover as many times as Farrakhan was Barry-O. Does he hate the white people that raised him, or was it just a cynical move to enhance his "blackness" for running for the Illinois state legislature? Neither speak well of his character.**


Wright and  Christian Identity are hardly the opposite of the same coin. As for why he chose that church, again i think you are streching in saying he hates his white family because he joined a black church and as for joining to appear more black for legislature, come on now, he joined the church in the 80's he did run for state legislature until 97.

Vince
15  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The 2008 Presidential Race on: September 09, 2008, 12:16:14 AM
Barry-O has 20 years attending a racist, America-hating church and mostly voted "present" as a legislator. And this is experience we want for a president?

GM,

Sarah Palin went to a church that equates gibberish to speaking to God. Mitt Romney believes in holy text that were reveled from a hat,  and I go to church that protected child molesters. Look at any church/religion hard enough and you will find something 'f*cked up'. Obama has already addressed and has made his feelings clear, its time to move on.

I agree though that voting "present" as a legislator is relevant, what is also relevant is what were the votes for.

Vince
16  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Re: The Obama Phenomena on: August 28, 2008, 10:43:50 PM

After seeing the finished product. It reaffirms my belief that Michelle Malkin and hotair.com if full of crap.
17  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities / Politics & Religion / Non-millitary non-journalist point of view from Kabul on: July 25, 2006, 07:39:46 AM
Hi All,

I got this email from my cousin who is currently working for an NGO in Kabul. Found it interesting thought I would share. I removed her and her boyfriends name.


Dear Friends and Family,
 
Greetings from Kabul. To be honest it's getting a little scary. Aside from the occasional suicide bombing in Kabul, last week Karzai decided to reinstate the  Department for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice - which existed during the Taliban time. This department was responsible for ensuring that Afghans we're living as "good Muslims", and went to great lengths to ensure they lived accordingly. Well 2 days ago, some people from the Department (this isn't confirmed but it's what everyone is suspecting) went to one of the restaurants that were serving alcohol and beat up and arrested the owner, and destroyed all the alcohol in sight. now no restaurants are allowed to serve alcohol, even to non-Muslims. Needless to say people will be flocking to the liquor stores this weekend to stock up. i was going to go, but S***** said not to because you never know who is watching you. Yeah, it's a little scary right now. The department also issued letters to restaurants prohibiting men and women from sitting together in public. It doesn't matter if they are expatriates or not.  How is any of this progress?
 
Apparently Karzai did it to gain tribal support, especially in the south, which btw is a full on war. It's so crazy down there. NGOs have either pulled out or put their programs on hold. And what makes me really angry is that many of our donors are withdrawing funding from our programme areas and diverting aid funding to provinces like Helmand and Kandahar. Not to say that these provinces don't need aid, but how can you deliver aid when you're busy dodging bullets?! There is absolutely no security down there. It makes absolutely no sense to me. And what is going to happen to the provinces that were once receiving aid and aren't any more.
 
On top of that a lot of donor funding is going into "Good Governance" initiatives, which mostly consists of establishing democratic institutions at the village level. This would be fine, but what many donors don't understand is that you just can't fund governance activities. I mean, now you've got this democratically elected village body. You've given them basically literacy and numeracy skills, and maybe some training in village planning. But if we don't support this structure with additional funds for development projects then what are these institutions supposed to do? They don't have money to do anything let alone operate. And what this does is just breed discontent in the village that development money isn't helping relieve any of the poverty. It's so frustrating I tell you.
 
Anyway, I'm sorry I needed to vent.
 
Hope everyone is well.
 
-S
18  DBMA Martial Arts Forum / Martial Arts Topics / Florete in Pekiti on: October 15, 2003, 03:48:04 PM
I know there a few Pekiti guys on the board (including Crafty). I was wondering why PT calls the circular doubling attacks 'Florete'.  On the PTI website it describes it as petals.  In Kalis Ilustrisimo, florete refers to thrust atacks and in spanish florete is the equvilant of epee.  A can see the connection between how the Ilustrisimo use the term and the origin of the word but not in PT. Or is there no connection.


thanks,

Vince
aka Black Grass
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