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 31 
 on: February 16, 2018, 06:49:43 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
And it must be said and not without reason, that we also worry about empowering the nanny state to use this sort of stuff as part of their mission to disarm the American people.  Remember the campaign to draw equivalence in extremism between Islamo-fascism and the Tea Party?

 32 
 on: February 16, 2018, 06:46:53 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
Not to mention grifting operations like Trump University, bullying that little old lady in Atlantic City with eminent domain, and a reputation for stiffing contractors.

 33 
 on: February 16, 2018, 06:45:00 PM 
Started by Crafty Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
    U.S. President Donald Trump's administration will press for more aggressive action from Central American governments against criminal gangs, drug trafficking and illegal migration.
    Institutional inertia, competing priorities and the decentralized nature of criminal gangs are going to limit the White House's ability to come down hard on security threats from Central America.
    The administration will probably press Central American governments to pursue individual criminal groups more, but the way Washington deals with crime from Central America overall is unlikely to change.

As U.S. President Donald Trump's administration moves to take a harder line against crime in Central America, it will likely run into the same problems that have vexed many previous presidents. On the campaign trail, Trump emphasized domestic security and indicated that illegal immigrants and criminal gangs from Central America would get more attention from law enforcement. As president, he has already followed through on some of these campaign promises domestically. Now, the White House appears to be shifting its attention abroad. But as Washington turns up the heat on Central America, it is likely to find its goals thwarted by poverty, corruption and the amorphous nature of gangs.
Forecast Update

The United States has for decades focused on stemming violent crime and illicit migration from Central America. U.S. President Donald Trump's administration has made countering criminal activity from this region a central part of its foreign and domestic security policies, and it will press forward in the coming years to craft a more aggressive stance toward violent crime and illegal migration in the region.
See 2018 Annual Forecast
Spotlight on Central America

Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador — where many illegal migrants and criminal gang members in the United States are from — are in the spotlight as the Trump administration turns up the pressure. And the president has pointed to violent criminal gangs, particularly MS-13 (ethnically Salvadoran but born in Los Angeles--MARC not just ethnically, in citizenship too), in its drive to tighten immigration. Over the next few years, U.S. institutions such as the State Department, the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security will try to turn Trump's campaign rhetoric into actions that hit criminal groups or weaken the flow of drugs to the United States. Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez recently met with a U.S. State Department official in what was likely an attempt to find an actionable policy. And the United States can be expected to pressure the governments in Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City and San Salvador to target and arrest key criminals, as well as to enact more substantial programs to detect and slow migrants trying to cross into Mexico.

However, pressing for change and achieving it are two very different things. For decades, these Central American nations haven't been able to effectively move against these problems, which also vex the United States. The countries are poor, with small and extremely corrupt armies and police forces. The local institutions that the United States has to work with are limited and are not going to improve quickly. Training enough capable and trustworthy soldiers and police officers to challenge the cartels and gangs and to stem migrant flows will take years — and the Trump administration simply may not have enough time to fund these improvements.

Additionally, criminal activity in Central America is of relatively low importance for Washington compared with other pressing global problems, a fact that may delay further action. Criminal gangs are but one of many forms of violent crime within the United States, and illegal migration is far lower than it was a few decades ago. Furthermore, while drug trafficking to the United States is a public health issue, it isn't an existential crisis. A solution to the North Korean nuclear crisis is far more consequential for the United States than reining in MS-13, the 18th Street gang and similar criminals.

Decentralization is also likely to frustrate Washington's moves against threats south of the border, since there is no single group it can target to end the criminal threat from Central America. Gangs tend to be decentralized, so while authorities can round up their members, other factions will take their place. The same can be said of Mexican and Central American drug trafficking cartels, which have fragmented into smaller, more violent units as their leaders have been arrested or killed.
Turning to Mexico

While Washington faces formidable regional obstacles, not all of its goals are out of sight. Its successes will be small, and the United States will continue to rely primarily on Mexico to stem the flow of drugs and migrants northward. Mexico has an institutional capability that all Central American states lack, and that isn't going to change in the next few years. The administration can press for its Central American neighbors to take more aggressive action against criminal gangs, migration and drug traffickers — and that is likely where the U.S. push in Central America is going to go.

The security concerns the Trump administration is emphasizing are perennial, intractable issues that Washington's institutional bureaucracy cannot deal with conclusively. Their rather low importance, accompanied by institutional inertia, is going to limit the White House's ability to devote more time and resources to them.

In the end, the administration is probably going to respond to criminality from Central America with tactics reminiscent of measures that have already been tried. Mexico will shoulder most of the burden of helping the United States deal with security problems in its backyard. Though the administration will try to craft a response different from those of its predecessors, it will most likely resort to more of the same.

 34 
 on: February 16, 2018, 05:33:54 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by DougMacG
"If someone is a danger to self or others, there is usually a legal process in every state allowing for involuntary commitment for a  short term psych eval.

If there is a legit basis for commitment beyond that point, after due process, any such person is restricted by federal law from firearm possession. 18 USC 922 (g)"
------------------------------

From my observation, the process or criteria needs to be tougher, much tougher. I'm not saying I know how or that it would be easy.

I delivered a person to the emergency room of known and admitted risk who threatened to kill herself and daughter.  They applied their criteria, prescribed a narcotic and released her.  She killed someone else the next day. We saw the same doctor next day after the unnecessary fatality. She was convicted of negligent vehicular homicide, child endangerment.  Served almost no time, was in the psych and parole system.  Munchausen by proxy syndrome (harm your child) among problems noted.  Replay, nearly identical experience 4 years later, drove a Crown Vic into opposing traffic with daughter again in car.  No consequence.  If there is a process, it isn't being followed.  We prescribe and release.  Then are shocked when stuff like this happens.

 35 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:24:17 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by G M
Leftists are saying Trump blamed this on mental illness and maybe that is right. 
https://theslot.jezebel.com/trump-blames-school-shooting-on-mental-illness-while-pr-1823076101

I have a close relative with schizophrenia who wouldn't hurt anyone but perhaps shouldn't own guns and a close friend dealing with horrible bouts of panic and anxiety attacks apparently caused by prescriptions with lousy followup from psych-medical industry.  What to do with his guns, I don't know.  He would not harm others, but others who are going through mental disturbance might.  I wonder what we really have learned about the people who commit these crimes.  In addition to the obvious need to track radical Islamic terrorists better, maybe we need to put some kind of attention on people who have destructive urges for other reasons. 

Shooter of current news reportedly had psych prescriptions 12 months ago without medical followup.  I don't want to follow the ever-changing details of these events, but the larger principles are important.  Can we restrict rights without a conviction?  Without due process?  Can we give people of known risk due process and make reasonable restrictions?

Innocent until proven guilty - after the crime is completed - is not the way to stop mass killings.  You don't get to threaten the President; we have special laws for that.  How about the safety of the rest of us?

If someone is a danger to self or others, there is usually a legal process in every state allowing for involuntary commitment for a  short term psych eval.

If there is a legit basis for commitment beyond that point, after due process, any such person is restricted by federal law from firearm possession. 18 USC 922 (g)

 36 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:23:48 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by DougMacG
"Really decent people avoid political office. We have to decide among those who run. I didn't like Trump at all. He has turned out to be far better than I thought possible."

I agree, all true, same for me.  He is performing his duties as President in excellent fashion so far.  He is not a person you can point your children to and say I would like you to grow up and aspire to be like him.  If you are Melania's father and had all the information, you would tell her he is scum.  We are supporting a President that we wouldn't want as a spouse, friend or relative.  It sucks to have to settle and not just for moral reasons of principle but as a practical, political matter as well.  His defects lose him votes and gain him nothing.

Democrats have more skill and experience at looking the other way and more help at covering it up.

 37 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:18:12 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
YES.

Let's use this thread for discussion of these issues.

 38 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:15:56 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
AGREED.

 39 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:14:43 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by Crafty_Dog
https://www.westernjournal.com/dick-morris-humas-influence-hillary-let-islamic-scholar-now-charged-with-rape-into-the-us/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=deepsix&utm_content=2018-02-16&utm_campaign=can

Dick Morris: Huma’s Influence? Hillary Let Islamic Scholar Now Charged with Rape into the US

By Dick Morris
February 16, 2018 at 12:34pm
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In 2010, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton reversed a decision by the Bush administration and allowed Tariq Ramadan, a world-famous Islamic scholar who donated to a terrorist front group, into the United States.

CNS reported that two weeks ago, Ramadan was arrested in Paris and charged with the rape of two Muslim women, one of whom had been disabled in a car accident, forcing her to use a crutch to walk.

Ramadan, something of a celebrity in the Muslim world, was a professor of contemporary Islamic studies at St. Anthony’s College in Oxford, U.K. His grandfather, Hassan al-Banna, was the founder of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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The ban imposed by the Bush administration was a cause célèbre in the Islamic world.

Question: Did Huma Abedin, Hillary’s closest adviser, play a role in Clinton’s unjustifiable decision to lift the ban on Ramadan’s ability to travel to the U.S.? Was Hillary trying to please Huma?

TRENDING: FBI Was Warned About the Florida School Shooter Last Year in Comments Section of a YouTube Video

Abedin had to have known all about Ramadan. Her connection with the Muslim Brotherhood runs deep.

Huma’s father founded the Institute for Muslim Minority Affairs, an institution established by the government of Saudi Arabia with the support of the Muslim World League. Former federal prosecutor Andrew C. McCarthy said the Muslim World League is “perhaps the most significant Muslim Brotherhood organization in the world.”

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Tariq Ramadan was barred as a security threat from entering the U.S. in 2006 by the State Department for “providing material support to a terrorist organization.” Specifically, he was found to have donated funds to a supposed charity that was really — and quite openly — a front for Hamas.

He was arrested in Paris for raping two Muslim women.


A Swiss newspaper also reported that Ramadan tried to seduce a 14-year-old student in his class and noted that three other female students have said that Ramadan seduced them.

Despite his record, Hillary reversed administration policy and lifted the ban on his travel to the U.S. Judicial Watch, the conservative watchdog group, says that Ramadan “openly supports the Palestinian terrorist group Hamas” and has done work for Iran.

The New York Times wrote that “the women’s accusations have put a dent in his (Ramadan’s) projected image as a pious family man.”

The decision to revoke the ban on Ramadan came in the form of an order personally signed by Secretary Clinton, saying that she was acting “as a matter of discretion.”

Ramadan has been a host on an Iranian television talk show “Islam and Life.”  He was employed by the Dutch city of Rotterdam as an adviser on “integration,” but was terminated because of his role on Iranian television.

That Hillary Clinton used her “discretion” to let him into the United States speaks volumes about her own lack of “discretion” and may give us a clue to Huma Abedin’s ability to get Hillary to do what she wanted.

 40 
 on: February 16, 2018, 04:11:16 PM 
Started by Crafty_Dog - Last post by DougMacG
Leftists are saying Trump blamed this on mental illness and maybe that is right. 
https://theslot.jezebel.com/trump-blames-school-shooting-on-mental-illness-while-pr-1823076101

I have a close relative with schizophrenia who wouldn't hurt anyone but perhaps shouldn't own guns and a close friend dealing with horrible bouts of panic and anxiety attacks apparently caused by prescriptions with lousy followup from psych-medical industry.  What to do with his guns, I don't know.  He would not harm others, but others who are going through mental disturbance might.  I wonder what we really have learned about the people who commit these crimes.  In addition to the obvious need to track radical Islamic terrorists better, maybe we need to put some kind of attention on people who have destructive urges for other reasons. 

Shooter of current news reportedly had psych prescriptions 12 months ago without medical followup.  I don't want to follow the ever-changing details of these events, but the larger principles are important.  Can we restrict rights without a conviction?  Without due process?  Can we give people of known risk due process and make reasonable restrictions?

Innocent until proven guilty - after the crime is completed - is not the way to stop mass killings.  You don't get to threaten the President; we have special laws for that.  How about the safety of the rest of us?

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