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Author Topic: Lameco at DBMA  (Read 3576 times)
Mike
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« on: July 27, 2003, 01:49:13 PM »

Hi @ll,

i had a special questions about the lameco techniques in the dbma. I never visit a gathering, but i watch the dog brothers since many years. Next year i plan to visit the gathering of the pack and will be happy to get some answers before.

Salty Dog and Crafty Dog trained a lot with Punong Guro Edgar Sulite and i know that everybody get showed techniques to fight against the other one. So here is my question:

How small or big is the part of lameco in the system of dog brothers martial arts? I often seen footworking like retirada illustrissimo and some of the laban laro sections.
Which standing did PG Edgar Sulite's analytical thinking in stickfighting have in the development of the Dog Brothers Martial Arts System?

Thanks in advanced, Mike from germany


Maraming Salamut Po Punong Guro for creating your system
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2003, 12:52:05 PM »

Woof Mike:

  I was introduced to PG Edgar by Guro Inosanto at Tuhon Gaje's Pekiti Tirsia Training Camp in Tennessee in 1989.  (The Dog Brothers were formed in 1988)  At Guro I's suggestion I began training with him, which I continued to do until his unexpected death.

 Although Lameco's role is DBMA is smaller than that of Inosanto Blend or PT, it is important.  

  Apart from various specifics, (e.g. the Ilustrisimo Cross Step, various stroking patterns) there are conceptual influences from Lameco's Laban Laro training, plus the lasting insights gleaned from his observations and suggestions on strategy and tactics.  He was a very astute observer and his suggestions were highly functional.

 I miss him.

Woof,
Guro Crafty
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Mike
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2003, 09:57:46 AM »

Thanks for answering me.

Best regards, Mike from Germany
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Anonymous
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2003, 11:57:16 AM »

is there any formal heir to the lameco system? did guro sulite have enough time to bring someone far enough along in his style to truly carrie it forward?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2011, 11:49:16 PM »


This article was reprinted from Masters of Arnis, Kali and Eskrima published by Bakbakan International. More information about the book can be obtained by sending an email to Mrs. Felisa Sulite at info@lamecoeskrima.com.

Thursday, September 29th, 1994
What Makes A Grandmaster?
By Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite (edited by Master Reynaldo S. Galang)

To be recognized as a Grandmaster or Master of combat arts in the Philippines, you must have made your reputation and show mental maturity and physical age. Grandmasters question the rankings of other grandmasters.

Masters and grandmasters are criticized and questioned regarding their skills and abilities. Who bestowed their title? Do they have enough skills for the titles they carry? How many years have they been practicing the art? How old is he? How many followers and students does this man have?

In other martial arts, the attainment of a certain level automatically designates the title Master or Grandmaster. In the Philippines, there are certain norms to be satisfied before one can be called and accepted as a Master or Grandmaster.

A master of the art must be a master of himself. He must be in control. His daily life epitomizes a man in control of his life, his destiny. A master of the art must know his art, its origins, its history, its philosophy. He must know the techniques, the interplay of techniques, and the reversals of techniques.

A master must know the basics, the intermediate forms and techniques, and the advance levels of the art. Mastery of the art does not only mean so many years in the art, but the amount of experience using the art, one's personal evolution within the art and personal dedication and contribution to the art.

A master of the art must know how to teach and impart knowledge from the art. He must be able to communicate, elaborate and present the art in such a way that each student learns on a personal basis. Each instruction is adapted to the learning process and ability of the student. A master must be a real maestro, a real teacher.

A master of the art must be of good character. He should epitomize the qualities of a leader, the majesty of a noble, and the courage and strength of a warrior.

A master of the art is called and acknowledged a Master by other masters, never by himself.


Punong Guro Edgar Sulite on FMA Terminology (from the DBMA Snaggletooth Variations DVD - http://dogbrothers.com/dbmaa/store/product_info.php?cPath=40&products_id=131)
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2013, 08:46:46 PM »

While teaching today, I found a particular Lameco disarm particularly applicable. 

I really like the Lameco disarms; most of them are simultaneous hits and disarms.

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