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G M
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« Reply #100 on: October 09, 2012, 07:24:37 PM »

http://www.captainsjournal.com/2012/10/08/goodbye-to-the-army-and-marines-political-correctness-has-taken-over/

Goodbye To The Army And Marines: Political Correctness Has Taken Over
BY Herschel Smith
20 hours, 41 minutes ago
 
As precursors to my analysis, take note of the following inconsistencies and contradictions.  First, Dr. Steve Metz, Professor at the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in response to Sharia is coming, left this comment: “Should we worry about the creeping influence of the Boy Scout laws? More people follow that in the United States than sharia.” Note well.  Steve is comparing Boy Scout law with Sharia law.  This Boy Scout law – compared to this sharia law.

On the other hand, because of political correctness, in the Spring of this year, US Army Lieutenant Colonel Matthew Dooley was condemned by the Joints Chiefs of Staff (JCS) and relieved of teaching duties at Joint Forces Staff College for teaching a course judged to be offensive to Islam.  The course he taught, Perspectives on Islam and Islamic Radicalism, was an elective course that Lt. Col. Dooley’s superiors judged as presenting Islam in a negative way. His superiors were persuaded to come to this conclusion after receiving an October 2011 letter in which 57 Muslim organizations claimed to be offended by the course.  The fact that Lt. Col. Dooley is a highly decorated combat veteran with  nearly 20 years of service under his belt apparently held little or no sway with the JCS.  As a matter of fact, JCS Chairman General Martin Dempsey “personally attacked” Lt. Col. Dooley on C-Span on May 10, 2012, during a Pentagon News Conference.

Next, take note of the fact that females are now matriculating at infantry officer training at Quantico.  This is certainly in line with Andrew Exum’s counsel concerning his own branch of the service: “I see no compelling reason why women should not be allowed to attend Ranger School. As far as I am concerned, if a woman really wants to run around a sawdust pit at two in the morning screaming “Ranger!” while periodically stopping to low-crawl for 50 meters, we have a constitutional — nay God-given — responsibility to allow her to do so.”

But now consider what Former Spook observes concerning women in combat MOS.

Almost 20 years ago, columnist Fred Reed published results of an Army study, comparing fitness levels among male and female soldiers. The data reaffirms that most women simply lack the upper body strength and endurance required by an Army infantryman, a Marine rifleman, or most special forces MOS’s.

The average female Army recruit is 4.8 inches shorter, 31.7 pounds lighter, has 37.4 fewer pounds of muscle, and 5.7 more pounds of fat than the average male recruit. She has only 55 percent of the upper-body strength and 72 percent of the lower-body strength… An Army study of 124 men and 186 women done in 1988 found that women are more than twice as likely to suffer leg injuries and nearly five times as likely to suffer fractures as men.

The Commission heard an abundance of expert testimony about the physical differences between men and women that can be summarized as follows:

Women’s aerobic capacity is significantly lower, meaning they cannot carry as much as far as fast as men, and they are more susceptible to fatigue.

In terms of physical capability, the upper five percent of women are at the level of the male median. The average 20-to-30 year-old woman has the same aerobic capacity as a 50 year-old man.

Finally, take note of the undercurrents in the suicide prevention department of the DoD.  We can trust our men with the most lethal weapons known to mankind, but the desire now is to give commanding officers authority over personally owned weapons.  As one commenter has noted, the concept of “at risk” is subjective, which is the same reason that such medical assessments cannot ever be allowed to preclude the right to own firearms in the civilian community.

My son routinely hauled 120 pound(+) kit off the line as a fleet Marine, including his time in Fallujah, Iraq, between body armor (including SAPI plates), backpack, weapon, SAW drums plus ammunition, hydration system, and so on and so forth.  Recall this picture from the assault into Helmand in the summer of 2009?



This Marine is carrying his kit plus a mortar plate.  He is probably crossing the line at greater than 150 pounds.

My son trained as a fleet Marine before the age of political correctness.  Strong, male Marines – not reserve Marines, but hard core regular duty infantry Marines – would need to take several shots of whiskey and 1000 mg of Ibuprofen to kill the pain prior to their twenty miles humps with full kit on 100 degree F (+) days at Camp Lejeune.  Negligent discharges brought a season in the so-called “room of pain.”  Laying back on the humps brought time in the room of pain.  Failing to qualify well on the range brought time in the room of pain.

Fun time involved laying down to sleep in the swamp overnight at Camp Lejeune (as ordered) and having to strip naked the next morning so that your buddies could burn the leeches off with cigarettes.  Or, how about that extended time at Fort A.P. Hill when the NCOs gradually removed everything the Marines had, from tent, to sleeping bag, to food, to winter clothing.  Then, it was time to sleep one winter night on that outing, and there was no way to stay alive unless Marines huddled, hugged, laid down together, shivered and threw leaves over themselves for the night.

You get the picture.  But my son left the U.S. Marine Corps because, in his own words, “the Corps is changing.”  He couldn’t train his boot Marines the same way he was trained.  He wasn’t allowed.  He had initially intended to extend so that he could go to Afghanistan with his boot Marines because he felt responsible for them.  But he believed that a lot of good men would perish in Afghanistan, and that he couldn’t make a difference in that.  So he left, along with all of the other Marines who had experience from Iraq.

If you have some sort of androgynous, genderless vision for the armed forces – if you believe that Navy Corpsmen should be able to treat the field diseases of both men and women and understand what mud and parasites in the various different cracks and crevasses and holes of men and women do, if you believe that men and women are on equal footing pertaining to physical abilities, if you believe that machines like the ridiculous Army future combat systems robotics and the silly machines like the big dog can ever replace mules and the backs of infantry Marines, if you believe that men and women will be able to interact socially as a cohesive fighting unit without the behavior that attends the opposite sexes – I think you’re weird and creepy.  Not that we can’t be friends, but just that you’re weird and creepy, at least to me.  Machines cannot replace strong men, and even the Russians found out in Afghanistan that women had a higher number of lower extremity injuries than men, causing severe under-manning of forces.  Exum believes that we have a constitutional and God-given duty to allow women in Ranger school.  I’m a constitutional aficionado with seminary training, and I don’t think Exum can prove either of those assertions.

As for Steve Metz, he isn’t stupid, he has just let his political and religious bigotry cloud his scholarship, leading to the stupid things he said about Sharia law.  But it’s okay to have Steve Metz saying those things as long as we don’t let contrary positions be taught.  We wouldn’t want to offend anyone, would we?

As for the personal possession of guns by Soldiers and Marines, how about this proposition.  We remove the ridiculous rules of engagement under which they operate and give them a coherent strategy, and see how our fighting men respond.  If not well, then I would be willing to spend some extra dollars to help assess PTSD.  But I’m betting I won’t have to spend a dime of that money.

As for the Army, I kind of expect this sort of thing.  But the Marines were supposed to be different.  They’re not, and political correctness proves it.  It’s a sad thing to watch the diminishing of the U.S. Marine Corps, once the greatest fighting and strike force on earth, to political hackery.  I hold the Commandant of the Marine Corps responsible, at least in part.  I also hold responsible a public who allows this kind of thing without pulling the plug on the absurdity of the use of our armed forces for every social engineering experiment that appeals to the self-professed intellectual elites.  And finally, it’s a shame that I have to mention the Commandant of the Marine Corps and the nations “intellectual elite” in the same breath.  How very sad is all of this?

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #101 on: November 16, 2012, 09:09:38 PM »

How Free Speech Died on Campus
A young activist describes how universities became the most authoritarian institutions in America.
By SOHRAB AHMARI
New York

At Yale University, you can be prevented from putting an F. Scott Fitzgerald quote on your T-shirt. At Tufts, you can be censured for quoting certain passages from the Quran. Welcome to the most authoritarian institution in America: the modern university—"a bizarre, parallel dimension," as Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, calls it.

Mr. Lukianoff, a 38-year-old Stanford Law grad, has spent the past decade fighting free-speech battles on college campuses. The latest was last week at Fordham University, where President Joseph McShane scolded College Republicans for the sin of inviting Ann Coulter to speak.

 
Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, on the battle for free speech on college campuses. Photo: Getty Images

"To say that I am disappointed with the judgment and maturity of the College Republicans . . . would be a tremendous understatement," Mr. McShane said in a Nov. 9 statement condemning the club's invitation to the caustic conservative pundit. He vowed to "hold out great contempt for anyone who would intentionally inflict pain on another human being because of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or creed."

To be clear, Mr. McShane didn't block Ms. Coulter's speech, but he said that her presence would serve as a "test" for Fordham. A day later, the students disinvited Ms. Coulter. Mr. McShane then praised them for having taken "responsibility for their decisions" and expressing "their regrets sincerely and eloquently."

Mr. Lukianoff says that the Fordham-Coulter affair took campus censorship to a new level: "This was the longest, strongest condemnation of a speaker that I've ever seen in which a university president also tried to claim that he was defending freedom of speech."

I caught up with Mr. Lukianoff at New York University in downtown Manhattan, where he was once targeted by the same speech restrictions that he has built a career exposing. Six years ago, a student group at the university invited him to participate in a panel discussion about the Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad that had sparked violent rioting by Muslims across the world.

When Muslim students protested the event, NYU threatened to close the panel to the public if the offending cartoons were displayed. The discussion went on—without the cartoons. Instead, the student hosts displayed a blank easel, registering their own protest.

"The people who believe that colleges and universities are places where we want less freedom of speech have won," Mr. Lukianoff says. "If anything, there should be even greater freedom of speech on college campuses. But now things have been turned around to give campus communities the expectation that if someone's feelings are hurt by something that is said, the university will protect that person. As soon as you allow something as vague as Big Brother protecting your feelings, anything and everything can be punished."

You might say Greg Lukianoff was born to fight college censorship. With his unruly red hair and a voice given to booming, he certainly looks and sounds the part. His ethnically Irish, British-born mother moved to America during the 1960s British-nanny fad, while his Russian father came from Yugoslavia to study at the University of Wisconsin. Russian history, Mr. Lukianoff says, "taught me about the worst things that can happen with good intentions."

Growing up in an immigrant neighborhood in Danbury, Conn., sharpened his views. When "you had so many people from so many different backgrounds, free speech made intuitive sense," Mr. Lukianoff recalls. "In every genuinely diverse community I've ever lived in, freedom of speech had to be the rule. . . . I find it deeply ironic that on college campuses diversity is used as an argument against unbridled freedom of speech."

After graduating from Stanford, where he specialized in First Amendment law, he joined the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, an organization co-founded in 1999 by civil-rights lawyer Harvey Silverglate and Alan Charles Kors, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania, to counter the growing but often hidden threats to free speech in academia. FIRE's tactics include waging publicity campaigns intended to embarrass college administrators into dropping speech-related disciplinary charges against individual students, or reversing speech-restricting policies. When that fails, FIRE often takes its cases to court, where it tends to prevail.

In his new book, "Unlearning Liberty," Mr. Lukianoff notes that baby-boom Americans who remember the student protests of the 1960s tend to assume that U.S. colleges are still some of the freest places on earth. But that idealized university no longer exists. It was wiped out in the 1990s by administrators, diversity hustlers and liability-management professionals, who were often abetted by professors committed to political agendas.

"What's disappointing and rightfully scorned," Mr. Lukianoff says, "is that in some cases the very professors who were benefiting from the free-speech movement turned around to advocate speech codes and speech zones in the 1980s and '90s."

Today, university bureaucrats suppress debate with anti-harassment policies that function as de facto speech codes. FIRE maintains a database of such policies on its website, and Mr. Lukianoff's book offers an eye-opening sampling. What they share is a view of "harassment" so broad and so removed from its legal definition that, Mr. Lukianoff says, "literally every student on campus is already guilty."

At Western Michigan University, it is considered harassment to hold a "condescending sex-based attitude." That just about sums up the line "I think of all Harvard men as sissies" (from F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1920 novel "This Side of Paradise"), a quote that was banned at Yale when students put it on a T-shirt. Tufts University in Boston proscribes the holding of "sexist attitudes," and a student newspaper there was found guilty of harassment in 2007 for printing violent passages from the Quran and facts about the status of women in Saudi Arabia during the school's "Islamic Awareness Week."

At California State University in Chico, it was prohibited until recently to engage in "continual use of generic masculine terms such as to refer to people of both sexes or references to both men and women as necessarily heterosexual." Luckily, there is no need to try to figure out what the school was talking about—the prohibition was removed earlier this year after FIRE named it as one of its two "Speech Codes of the Year" in 2011.

At Northeastern University, where I went to law school, it is a violation of the Internet-usage policy to transmit any message "which in the sole judgment" of administrators is "annoying."

Conservatives and libertarians are especially vulnerable to such charges of harassment. Even though Mr. Lukianoff's efforts might aid those censorship victims, he hardly counts himself as one of them: He says that he is a lifelong Democrat and a "passionate believer" in gay marriage and abortion rights. And free speech. "If you're going to get in trouble for an opinion on campus, it's more likely for a socially conservative opinion."

Consider the two students at Colorado College who were punished in 2008 for satirizing a gender-studies newsletter. The newsletter had included boisterous references to "male castration," "feminist porn" and other unprintable matters. The satire, published by the "Coalition of Some Dudes," tamely discussed "chainsaw etiquette" ("your chainsaw is not an indoor toy") and offered quotations from Teddy Roosevelt and menshealth.com. The college found the student satirists guilty of "the juxtaposition of weaponry and sexuality."

"Even when we win our cases," says Mr. Lukianoff, "the universities almost never apologize to the students they hurt or the faculty they drag through the mud." Brandeis University has yet to withdraw a 2007 finding of racial harassment against Prof. Paul Hindley for explaining the origins of "wetback" in a Latin-American Studies course. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis apologized to a janitor found guilty of harassment—for reading a book celebrating the defeat of the Ku Klux Klan in the presence of two black colleagues—but only after protests by FIRE and an op-ed in these pages by Dorothy Rabinowitz.

What motivates college administrators to act so viciously? "It's both self-interest and ideological commitment," Mr. Lukianoff says. On the ideological front, "it's almost like you flip a switch, and these administrators, who talk so much about treating every student with dignity and compassion, suddenly come to see one student as a caricature of societal evil."

Administrative self-interest is also at work. "There's been this huge expansion in the bureaucratic class at universities," Mr. Lukianoff explains. "They passed the number of people involved in instruction sometime around 2006. So you get this ever-renewing crop of administrators, and their jobs aren't instruction but to police student behavior. In the worst cases, they see it as their duty to intervene on students' deepest beliefs."

Consider the University of Delaware, which in fall 2007 instituted an ideological orientation for freshmen. The "treatment," as the administrators called it, included personal interviews that probed students' private lives with such questions as: "When did you discover your sexual identity?" Students were taught in group sessions that the term racist "applies to all white people" while "people of color cannot be racists." Once FIRE spotlighted it, the university dismantled the program.

Yet in March 2012, Kathleen Kerr, the architect of the Delaware program, was elected vice president of the American College Personnel Association, the professional group of university administrators.

A 2010 survey by the American Association of Colleges and Universities found that of 24,000 college students, only 35.6% strongly agreed that "it is safe to hold unpopular views on campus." When the question was asked of 9,000 campus professionals—who are more familiar with the enforcement end of the censorship rules—only 18.8% strongly agreed.

Mr. Lukianoff thinks all of this should alarm students, parents and alumni enough to demand change: "If just a handful more students came in knowing what administrators are doing at orientation programs, with harassment codes, or free-speech zones—if students knew this was wrong—we could really change things."

The trouble is that students are usually intimidated into submission. "The startling majority of students don't bother. They're too concerned about their careers, too concerned about their grades, to bother fighting back," he says. Parents and alumni dismiss free-speech restrictions as something that only happens to conservatives, or that will never affect their own children.

"I make the point that this is happening, and even if it's happening to people you don't like, it's a fundamental violation of what the university means," says Mr. Lukianoff. "Free speech is about protecting minority rights. Free speech is about admitting you don't know everything. Free speech is about protecting oddballs. It means protecting dissenters."
It even means letting Ann Coulter speak.

Mr. Ahmari is an assistant books editor at the Journal.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #102 on: November 25, 2012, 11:38:51 AM »



http://www.theblaze.com/stories/uk-couple-loses-foster-children-for-supporting-conservative-party/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #103 on: January 08, 2013, 04:00:35 PM »

http://washingtonexaminer.com/suspension-revoked-for-montgomery-county-6-year-old-who-made-pretend-gunshot/article/2517618#.UOubvqzIm2c
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #104 on: January 19, 2013, 03:57:10 PM »



http://news.yahoo.com/pa-kindergartner-suspended-bubble-gun-remark-035057936.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #105 on: April 17, 2013, 08:34:16 AM »


Judith Grossman: A Mother, a Feminist, Aghast
Unsubstantiated accusations against my son by a former girlfriend landed him before a nightmarish college tribunal..
By JUDITH E. GROSSMAN

I am a feminist. I have marched at the barricades, subscribed to Ms. magazine, and knocked on many a door in support of progressive candidates committed to women's rights. Until a month ago, I would have expressed unqualified support for Title IX and for the Violence Against Women Act.

But that was before my son, a senior at a small liberal-arts college in New England, was charged—by an ex-girlfriend—with alleged acts of "nonconsensual sex" that supposedly occurred during the course of their relationship a few years earlier.

What followed was a nightmare—a fall through Alice's looking-glass into a world that I could not possibly have believed existed, least of all behind the ivy-covered walls thought to protect an ostensible dedication to enlightenment and intellectual betterment.

It began with a text of desperation. "CALL ME. URGENT. NOW."

That was how my son informed me that not only had charges been brought against him but that he was ordered to appear to answer these allegations in a matter of days. There was no preliminary inquiry on the part of anyone at the school into these accusations about behavior alleged to have taken place a few years earlier, no consideration of the possibility that jealousy or revenge might be motivating a spurned young ex-lover to lash out. Worst of all, my son would not be afforded a presumption of innocence.


In fact, Title IX, that so-called guarantor of equality between the sexes on college campuses, and as applied by a recent directive from the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, has obliterated the presumption of innocence that is so foundational to our traditions of justice. On today's college campuses, neither "beyond a reasonable doubt," nor even the lesser "by clear and convincing evidence" standard of proof is required to establish guilt of sexual misconduct.

These safeguards of due process have, by order of the federal government, been replaced by what is known as "a preponderance of the evidence." What this means, in plain English, is that all my son's accuser needed to establish before a campus tribunal is that the allegations were "more likely than not" to have occurred by a margin of proof that can be as slim as 50.1% to 49.9%.

How does this campus tribunal proceed to evaluate the accusations? Upon what evidence is it able to make a judgment?

The frightening answer is that like the proverbial 800-pound gorilla, the tribunal does pretty much whatever it wants, showing scant regard for fundamental fairness, due process of law, and the well-established rules and procedures that have evolved under the Constitution for citizens' protection. Who knew that American college students are required to surrender the Bill of Rights at the campus gates?

My son was given written notice of the charges against him, in the form of a letter from the campus Title IX officer. But instead of affording him the right to be fully informed, the separately listed allegations were a barrage of vague statements, rendering any defense virtually impossible. The letter lacked even the most basic information about the acts alleged to have happened years before. Nor were the allegations supported by any evidence other than the word of the ex-girlfriend.

The hearing itself was a two-hour ordeal of unabated grilling by the school's committee, during which, my son later reported, he was expressly denied his request to be represented by counsel or even to have an attorney outside the door of the room. The questioning, he said, ran far afield even from the vaguely stated allegations contained in the so-called notice. Questions from the distant past, even about unrelated matters, were flung at him with no opportunity for him to give thoughtful answers.

The many pages of written documentation that my son had put together—which were directly on point about his relationship with his accuser during the time period of his alleged wrongful conduct—were dismissed as somehow not relevant. What was relevant, however, according to the committee, was the unsworn testimony of "witnesses" deemed to have observable knowledge about the long-ago relationship between my son and his accuser.

That the recollections of these young people (made under intense peer pressure and with none of the safeguards consistent with fundamental fairness) were relevant—while records of the accuser's email and social media postings were not—made a mockery of the very term. While my son was instructed by the committee not to "discuss this matter" with any potential witnesses, these witnesses against him were not identified to him, nor was he allowed to confront or question either them or his accuser.

Thankfully, I happen to be an attorney and had the resources to provide the necessary professional assistance to my son. The charges against him were ultimately dismissed but not before he and our family had to suffer through this ordeal. I am of course relieved and most grateful for this outcome. Yet I am also keenly aware not only of how easily this all could have gone the other way—with life-altering consequences—but how all too often it does.

Across the country and with increasing frequency, innocent victims of impossible-to-substantiate charges are afforded scant rights to fundamental fairness and find themselves entrapped in a widening web of this latest surge in political correctness. Few have a lawyer for a mother, and many may not know about the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which assisted me in my research.

There are very real and horrifying instances of sexual misconduct and abuse on college campuses and elsewhere. That these offenses should be investigated and prosecuted where appropriate is not open to question. What does remain a question is how we can make the process fair for everyone.

I fear that in the current climate the goal of "women's rights," with the compliance of politically motivated government policy and the tacit complicity of college administrators, runs the risk of grounding our most cherished institutions in a veritable snake pit of injustice—not unlike the very injustices the movement itself has for so long sought to correct. Unbridled feminist orthodoxy is no more the answer than are attitudes and policies that victimize the victim.

Ms. Grossman, an attorney and mother, lives in New York City.
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ccp
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« Reply #106 on: April 17, 2013, 04:50:23 PM »

Ms Grossman, may I suggest you get rid of Ms mag and join this group:

http://falserapesociety.blogspot.com/2011/04/title-ix-sexual-assault-directive-has.html
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bigdog
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« Reply #107 on: April 17, 2013, 05:29:32 PM »

BoR doesn't really have a place in the college judicial board type of hearing.

That said, I appreciate much of the author's points.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #108 on: April 17, 2013, 07:00:18 PM »

BoR certainly does not apply to a private school, but what is the analysis here?

"These safeguards of due process have, by order of the federal government, been replaced by what is known as "a preponderance of the evidence.""
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bigdog
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« Reply #109 on: April 17, 2013, 07:32:42 PM »

BoR certainly does not apply to a private school, but what is the analysis here?

"These safeguards of due process have, by order of the federal government, been replaced by what is known as "a preponderance of the evidence.""

But there is no due process constitutionally safeguarded at the college. The college is free to use  "a preponderance of the evidence." And, as I said, for the most part I agree with issues being presented.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #110 on: May 02, 2013, 04:36:05 PM »

http://dailycurrant.com/2013/05/02/bloomberg-refused-second-slice-of-pizza-at-local-restaurant/
Politics
Bloomberg Refused Second Slice of Pizza at Local Restaurant
May. 02, 2013
Tweet

doombergNew York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was denied a second slice of pizza today at an Italian eatery in Brooklyn.

The owners of Collegno's Pizzeria say they refused to serve him more than one piece to protest Bloomberg's proposed soda ban,which would limit the portions of soda sold in the city.

Bloomberg was having an informal working lunch with city comptroller John Liu at the time and was enraged by the embarrassing prohibition. The owners would not relent, however, and the pair were forced to decamp to another restaurant to finish their meal.

Witnesses say the situation unfolded when as the two were looking over budget documents, they realized they needed more food than originally ordered.

"Hey, could I get another pepperoni over here?" Bloomberg asked owner Antonio Benito.

"I'm sorry sir," he replied, "we can't do that. You've reached your personal slice limit."
Stop and Tisk

Mayor Bloomberg, not accustomed to being challenged, assumed that the owner was joking.

"OK, that's funny," he remarked, "because of the soda thing ... No come on. I'm not kidding. I haven't eaten all morning, just send over another pepperoni."

"I'm sorry sir. We're serious," Benito insisted. "We've decided that eating more than one piece isn't healthy for you, and so we're forbidding you from doing it."

"Look jackass," Bloomberg retorted, his anger boiling, "I fucking skipped breakfast this morning just so I could eat four slices of your pizza. Don't be a schmuck, just get back to the kitchen and bring out some fucking pizza, okay."

"I'm sorry sir, there's nothing I can do," the owner repeated. "Maybe you could go to several restaurants and get one slice at each. At least that way you're walking. You know, burning calories."

Witnesses say a fuming Bloomberg and a bemused Liu did indeed walk down the street to a rival pizzeria , ordered another slice and finished their meeting.

New York's so-called "soda ban" would have limited the size of sweetened beverages served in restaurants to 16 oz (0.5 liters). The plan, backed by Mayor Bloomberg, is currently being held up by a U.S. district court.

Bloomberg has been the mayor of New York City since 2002. Theretofore he was the CEO of Bloomberg LP, the world's leading financial data firm. His personal fortune is estimated at around $27 billion.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #111 on: May 02, 2013, 04:43:11 PM »

Second entry of the day:

Veracity unknown and it is odd that Senator Reid is called a "congressman" but too fun to pass up smiley

========================================



It just all depends on how you look at some things...

Judy Wallman, a professional genealogy researcher in southern California , was
doing some personal work on her own family tree. She discovered that
Congressman Harry Reid's great-great uncle, Remus Reid, was hanged for horse
stealing and train robbery in Montana in 1889. Both Judy and Harry Reid share
this common ancestor.
 The only known photograph of Remus shows him standing on the
gallows in Montana territory:

 
On the back of the picture Judy obtained during her research is this inscription:
'Remus Reid, horse thief, sent to Montana Territorial Prison 1885, escaped
1887, robbed the Montana Flyer six times. Caught by Pinkerton detectives,
convicted and hanged in 1889.'
So Judy recently e-mailed Congressman Harry Reid for information about their
great-great uncle.

Believe it or not, Harry Reid's staff sent back the following biographical sketch
for her genealogy research:
"Remus Reid was a famous cowboy in the Montana Territory. His business empire grew to include acquisition of valuable equestrian assets and intimate dealings with the Montana railroad. Beginning in 1883, he devoted several
years of his life to government service, finally taking leave to resume his dealings with the railroad. In 1887, he was a key player in a vital investigation run by the renowned Pinkerton Detective Agency. In 1889, Remus passed
away during an important civic function held in his honor when the platform
upon which he was standing collapsed."

NOW THAT's how it's done, Folks!
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DougMacG
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« Reply #112 on: May 02, 2013, 06:01:28 PM »

Sen. Reid was a congressman back when Paul Laxalt held that Senate seat.

Very funny writing!  I hope that line never gets into my obit:  He "passed away during an important civic function held in his honor when the platform upon which he was standing collapsed."
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 06:25:24 PM by DougMacG » Logged
DougMacG
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« Reply #113 on: May 02, 2013, 06:23:41 PM »

Bloomberg is fully deserving of this, but I have to think this one is a great spoof.

His taxi driver should give him a ride half way back, pull over, open the door, and tell him that walking the rest would better for him.
-------

The story reminds me of Scott Ott's writings on Scappleface:

Weeping First Lady Pushes Chicago to Ban Stolen Guns
April 11th, 2013 Scott Ott

First Lady calls on Chicago to ban stolen guns

First Lady Michelle Obama, in an intensely personal speech Wednesday, called for Chicago to ban stolen handguns, the most commonly-used murder weapon, in a city that tallied more than 500 murders last year.

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April 18th, 2013 Scott Ott

Obamacare to Cover Train Wrecks, White House Says
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April 1st, 2013,   Obama Declares April 1 ‘Fiscal Responsibility Day’

http://scrappleface.com/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #114 on: June 02, 2013, 08:00:10 AM »

http://now.msn.com/school-says-deaf-boys-name-sign-looks-too-much-like-a-gun
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« Reply #115 on: June 20, 2013, 09:14:27 PM »

Surely I am no fan of Anthony Weiner mainly because he is a liberal, but this gay infitada thing is getting really tiring.   Now some gays are going after Weiner  because he didn't express enough immediate moral outrage of the word "dyke" spoken by some stranger he was standing next to:

http://politicker.com/2013/06/state-legisaltors-slam-anthony-weiner-for-lack-of-moral-courage/
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« Reply #116 on: June 23, 2013, 12:43:17 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/06/22/bill-maher-defends-paula-deen-after-firing-do-we-always-have-to-make-people-go-away/
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« Reply #117 on: July 24, 2013, 04:21:00 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/07/24/fu-all-you-libtards-out-there-police-chief-records-explosive-and-vulgar-youtube-rants-should-he-lose-his-job/

I think he would have been better advised to stay out of uniform for this, and not shooting at an effigy of Nancy Pelosi would have been the better course of actions, but I admit to a certain immature pleasure at all of this , , ,
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G M
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« Reply #118 on: July 24, 2013, 04:29:12 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/07/24/fu-all-you-libtards-out-there-police-chief-records-explosive-and-vulgar-youtube-rants-should-he-lose-his-job/

I think he would have been better advised to stay out of uniform for this, and not shooting at an effigy of Nancy Pelosi would have been the better course of actions, but I admit to a certain immature pleasure at all of this , , ,

Oof! I don't think this was a well thought out idea. If he wasn't identified by his title/agency, that's a bit different. He better have some sort of civil service protection and a good legal defense plan.
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« Reply #119 on: August 02, 2013, 10:55:37 AM »

Seattle city officials: The terms 'citizen' and 'brown bag' are too offensive to say
Published by: Dan Calabrese

And don't you dare wish anyone a happy birthday.
A long time ago, I spent a couple of years working in local government. It wasn't a big city, and while the P.C. era was already underway (the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings occurred during this period), I don't recall the good folks at the Charter Township of Canton wasting much if any time on nonsense like this.
But boy do they dive into it in Seattle, as Fox News reports. The term "citizens" is too offensive because of all the non-citizens living in the city, paying taxes, blah blah blah. And as for brown bags, well, if you say that you might as well be segregating drinking fountains and lunch counters, Mr. Grand Wizard. Elliott Bronstein of the city's Office of Civil Rights explains to KIRO Radio:
"For a lot of particularly African-American community members, the phrase brown bag does bring up associations with the past when a brown bag was actually used, I understand, to determine if people's skin color was light enough to allow admission to an event or to come into a party that was being held in a private home," Bronstein said.
According to the memo, city employees should use the terms "lunch-and-learn" or "sack lunch" instead of "brown bag."
Oh, and Bronstein doesn't want you wishing anyone happy birthday either, because Jehovah's Witnesses don't celebrate birthdays, and you never know who might be within earshot so as to become offended.
I would love to know how much time and money cities spend on nonsense like this. It's not just that they pay the salaries of people like Bronstein, but typically policies like this are also reviewed by lawyers - either someone on the city attorney's staff or an outside firm that charges by the hour. You can never be sure the kind of time and resources the employees of any governmental unit might spend indulging their own little intellectual fetishes as opposed to serving the citizens, er, sorry, residents.
It's another pretty good argument for smaller government, though. A bare-bones operation doesn't have time for crap like this.
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« Reply #120 on: August 09, 2013, 11:05:04 PM »

http://www.guns.com/2013/08/08/nyc-dept-of-education-pushes-to-ban-50-forbidden-words-from-standardized-tests/
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« Reply #121 on: August 13, 2013, 12:51:40 PM »



http://www.dennisprager.com/columns.aspx?g=b31f3b6c-7beb-41a5-b15a-e0e1d0bd4812&url=nis-prager-n1662604
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« Reply #122 on: September 04, 2013, 02:21:12 PM »

http://www.cbc.ca/thisisthat/blog/2013/09/03/to-ensure-every-child-wins-ontario-athletic-association-removes-ball-from-soccer/index.html
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« Reply #123 on: September 04, 2013, 02:42:51 PM »


Ball-less captures it perfectly.
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« Reply #124 on: September 04, 2013, 05:16:37 PM »

I like to think I do have my moments  cheesy cheesy cheesy
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« Reply #125 on: September 04, 2013, 05:27:02 PM »

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9134122/China_dominates_NSA_backed_coding_contest_

China dominates NSA-backed coding contest

Chinese student, 18, wins, prompting call for earlier math and science education in U.S.

By Patrick Thibodeau

June 8, 2009 04:24 PM ET



Computerworld - Programmers from China and Russia have dominated an international competition on everything from writing algorithms to designing components.


Winner: Bin Jin, or 'crazyb0y.'
 
Whether the outcome of this competition is another sign that math and science education in the U.S. needs improvement may spur debate. But the fact remains: Of 70 finalists, 20 were from China, 10 from Russia and two from the U.S.

TopCoder Inc., which runs software competitions as part of its software development service, operates TopCoder Open, an annual contest.

 About 4,200 people participated in the U.S. National Security Agency-supported challenge. The NSA has been sponsoring the program for a number of years because of its interest in hiring people with advanced skills.

Participants in the contest, which was open to anyone -- from student to professional -- and finished with 120 competitors from around the world, went through a process of elimination that finished this month in Las Vegas.

China's showing in the finals was also helped by the sheer volume of its numbers, 894. India followed at 705, but none of its programmers were finalists. Russia had 380 participants; the United States, 234; Poland, 214; Egypt, 145; and Ukraine, 128, among others.

Of the total number of contestants, 93% were male, and 84% were aged between 18 and 24.

Rob Hughes, president and COO of TopCoder, said the strong finish by programmers from China, Russia, Eastern Europe and elsewhere is indicative of the importance those countries put on mathematics and science education.

"We do the same thing with athletics here that they do with mathematics and science there," Hughes said. He said the U.S. needs to make earlier inroads in middle schools and high school math and science education.

 That's a point Hughes is hardly alone on. President Barack Obama, as well as many of the major tech leaders including Bill Gates, have called for similar action.

Of the participants in the contest, more than 57% had bachelor's degrees, most in computer science, and of that 20% had earned a masters degree, and 6% a PhD.

But the winner of the algorithm competition was an 18-year-old student from China, Bin Jin, who went by the handle "crazyb0y". Chinese programmers have a history of doing very well in this contest.

Mike Lydon, TopCoder's CTO, said Jin's future in computer science is assured. "This gentleman can do whatever he wants," he said.

The participants are tested in design, development, architecture, among others, but one of the most popular is the algorithm coding contest.

To give some sense of difficulty, Lydon provided a description of a problem that the contestants were asked to solve:

"With the rise of services such as Facebook and MySpace, the analysis and understanding of such networks is a particularly active area of current computer science research. At an abstract level, these networks consist of nodes (people), connected by links (friendship).

 "In this problem, competitors were given the description of two such networks, but with the names of all the nodes removed from each. The networks were each scrambled up before given to the competitors. The task was to determine if the two networks could possibly be from the same group of people.

"The competitors were to unscramble and label the two networks so that if Alice was connected to Bob in one of the two networks, then Alice was also connected to Bob in the other network. This problem is known as the network isomorphism problem, and solving it for large networks is a major unsolved problem in the realm of theoretical computer science."

 Lydon said the overall problem is unsolved for larger networks, and what's considered a correct answer for this problem would not be considered large enough for the solution in this case to be groundbreaking.

Two people solved the problem.

**But, American students totally dominated in the self-esteem catagory!!!
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ccp
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« Reply #126 on: September 04, 2013, 09:26:03 PM »

We got Lebron James!

We also got the best gardeners in the world!

Take that China!
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« Reply #127 on: September 06, 2013, 08:17:33 AM »

Should this go under humor?  Watch for the Huma and Anthony divorce announcement shortly after the election.  I still say it was absolutely no coincidence that he tanked in NYC polls only after comparisons were being made to Hillary Bill.   The machine went to work and he is cast adrift.   He could get a job as host to one of those LA comedy clubs. 

In any case, Carlos' dagger:

http://gawker.com/5809909/anthony-weiners-cock-shot-emerges
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« Reply #128 on: September 13, 2013, 09:29:48 AM »

I hope this is true , , ,

http://www.fromthetrenchesworldreport.com/peta-crashes-biker-gathering-not-to-be-missed/27275
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« Reply #129 on: September 13, 2013, 10:37:00 AM »

Alas, it is not  http://www.snopes.com/politics/satire/leatherprotest.asp
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« Reply #130 on: September 30, 2013, 07:08:04 PM »

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/brendanoneill2/100238080/im-sorry-but-we-have-to-talk-about-the-barbarism-of-modern-islamist-terrorism/


I'm sorry, but we have to talk about the barbarism of modern Islamist terrorism




By Brendan O'Neill




The aftermath of an Islamist bomb directed at Pakistani Shiites (Photo: AFP/Getty)
 
In Western news-making and opinion-forming circles, there’s a palpable reluctance to talk about the most noteworthy thing about modern Islamist violence: its barbarism, its graphic lack of moral restraint. This goes beyond the BBC's yellow reluctance to deploy the T-word – terrorism – in relation to the bloody assault on the Westgate shopping mall in Kenya at the weekend. Across the commentating board, people are sheepish about pointing out the historically unique lunacy of Islamist violence and its utter detachment from any recognisable moral universe or human values. We have to talk about this barbarism; we have to appreciate how new and unusual it is, how different it is even from the terrorism of the 1970s or of the early twentieth century. We owe it to the victims of these assaults, and to the principle of honest and frank political debate, to face up to the unhinged, morally unanchored nature of Islamist violence in the 21st century.
 
Maybe it’s because we have become so inured to Islamist terrorism in the 12 years since 9/11 that even something like the blowing-up of 85 Christians outside a church in Pakistan no longer shocks us or even makes it on to many newspaper front pages. But consider what happened: two men strapped with explosives walked into a group of men, women and children who were queuing for food and blew up themselves and the innocents gathered around them. Who does that? How far must a person have drifted from any basic system of moral values to behave in such an unrestrained and wicked fashion? Yet the Guardian tells us it is “moral masturbation” to express outrage over this attack, and it would be better to give into a “sober recognition that there are many bad things we can’t as a matter of fact do much about”. This is a demand that we further acclimatise to the peculiar and perverse bloody Islamist attacks around the world, shrug our shoulders, put away our moral compasses, and say: “Ah well, this kind of thing happens.”
 
Or consider the attack on Westgate in Kenya, where both the old and the young, black and white, male and female were targeted. With no clear stated aims from the people who carried the attack out, and no logic to their strange and brutal behaviour, Westgate had more in common with those mass mall and school shootings that are occasionally carried out by disturbed people in the West than it did with the political violence of yesteryear. And yet still observers avoid using the T-word or the M-word (murder) to describe what happened there, and instead attach all sorts of made-up, see-through political theories to this rampage, giving what was effectively a terror tantrum executed by morally unrestrained Islamists the respectability of being a political protest of some breed.
 
Time and again, one reads about Islamist attacks that seem to defy not only the most basic of humanity’s moral strictures but also political and even guerrilla logic. Consider the hundreds of suicide attacks that have taken place in Iraq in recent years, a great number of them against ordinary Iraqis, often children. Western apologists for this wave of weird violence, which they call “resistance”, claim it is about fighting against the Western forces which were occupying Iraq in the wake of the 2003 invasion. If so, it’s the first “resistance” in history whose prime targets have been civilians rather than security forces, and which has failed to put forward any kind of political programme that its violence is allegedly designed to achieve. Even experts in counterinsurgency have found themselves perplexed by the numerous nameless suicide assaults on massive numbers of civilians in post-war Iraq, and the fact that these violent actors, unlike the vast majority of violent political actors in history, have “developed no alternative government or political wing and displayed no intention of amassing territory to govern”. One Iraqi attack has stuck in my mind for seven years. In 2006 a female suicide bomber blew herself up among families – including many mothers and their offspring – who were queuing up for kerosene. Can you imagine what happened? A terrible glimpse was offered by this line in a Washington Post report on 24 September 2006: “Two pre-teen girls embraced each other as they burned to death.”
 
What motivates this perversity? What are its origins? Unwilling, or perhaps unable, to face up to the newness of this unrestrained, aim-free, civilian-targeting violence, Western observers do all sorts of moral contortions in an effort to present such violence as run-of-the-mill or even possibly a justifiable response to Western militarism. Some say, “Well, America kills women and children too, in its drone attacks”, wilfully overlooking the fact such people are not the targets of America’s military interventions – and I say that as someone who has opposed every American venture overseas of the past 20 years. If you cannot see the difference between a drone strike that goes wrong and kills an entire family and a man who crashes his car into the middle of a group of children accepting sweets from a US soldier and them blows himself and them up – as happened in Iraq in 2005 – then there is something wrong with you. Other observers say that Islamists, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan, but also the individuals who attacked London and New York, are fighting against Western imperialism in Muslim lands. But that doesn’t add up. How does blowing up Iraqi children represent a strike against American militarism? How is detonating a bomb on the London Underground a stab at the Foreign Office? It is ridiculous, and more than a little immoral, to try to dress up nihilistic assaults designed merely to kill as many ordinary people as possible as some kind of principled political violence.
 
We have a tendency to overlook the newness of modern Islamic terrorism, how recent is this emergence of a totally suicidal violence that revels in causing as many causalities as possible. Yes, terrorism has existed throughout the modern era, but not like this. Consider the newness of suicide attacks, of terrorists who destroy themselves as well as their surroundings and fellow citizens. In the 1980s and 1990s, there were an average of one or two suicide attacks a year. Across the whole world. Since the early and mid-2000s there have been around 300 or 400 suicide attacks a year. In 2006 there were more suicide attacks around the world than had taken place in the entire 20 years previous. Terrorists’ focus on killing civilians – the more the better – is also new. If you look at the 20 bloodiest terrorist attacks in human history, measured by the number of causalities they caused, you’ll see something remarkable: 14 of them – 14 – took place in the 1990s and 2000s. So in terms of mass death and injury, those terrorist eras of the 1970s and 80s, and also earlier outbursts of anarchist terrorism, pale into insignificance when compared with the new, Islamist-leaning terrorism that has emerged in recent years.
 
What we have today, uniquely in human history, is a terrorism that seems myopically focused on killing as many people as possible and which has no clear political goals and no stated territorial aims. The question is, why? It is not moral masturbation to ask this question or to point out the peculiarity and perversity of modern Islamist violence. My penny’s worth is that this terrorism speaks to a profound crisis of politics and of morality. Where earlier terrorist groups were restrained both by their desire to appear as rational political actors with a clear goal in mind and by basic moral rules of human behaviour – meaning their violence was often bloody, yes, but rarely focused narrowly on committing mass murder – today’s Islamist terrorists appear to float free of normal political rules and moral compunctions. This is what is so infuriating about the BBC’s refusal to call these groups terrorists – because if anything, and historically speaking, even the term terrorist might be too good for them.
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« Reply #131 on: October 02, 2013, 10:30:42 AM »

With tongue in cheek I ask when is it ok for Blacks to hunt down Chinese people on the street and beat them mercilessly.   Where is the racial outrage?

http://nypost.com/2013/10/02/da-wont-charge-bike-assault-thug-in-suv-beating/
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« Reply #132 on: October 02, 2013, 10:35:28 AM »

With tongue in cheek I ask when is it ok for Blacks to hunt down Chinese people on the street and beat them mercilessly.   Where is the racial outrage?

http://nypost.com/2013/10/02/da-wont-charge-bike-assault-thug-in-suv-beating/

Most asians are too busy working hard to indulge in racial card playing. Besides, only whites can commit hate crimes.
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« Reply #133 on: October 06, 2013, 08:55:51 PM »

Obama said he is offended by the Redskins name.

Well I'm offended by the "giants" name.  I am not that tall so that has got to go.

I'm offended by the "Viking" name.  Vikings were rapists, murderers, thieves, and plunderers.

What about the New Orleans "saints' .  This offends me.  I am Jewish but I don't see any team named after "menches".

The "buccaneers?"   Weren't they pirates thieves, liars, con artists, and in general low lives?

The Houston Oilers really pisses me off.  Oil is destroying our planet.  Better name them the windmills.

And the "patriots?"   Why they were all slave holders!

I want them all changed.  I am one person who is offended!  What is going on here?  

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« Reply #134 on: October 07, 2013, 12:28:29 AM »

Obama said he is offended by the Redskins name.

Well I'm offended by the "giants" name.  I am not that tall so that has got to go.

I'm offended by the "Viking" name.  Vikings were rapists, murderers, thieves, and plunderers.

What about the New Orleans "saints' .  This offends me.  I am Jewish but I don't see any team named after "menches".

The "buccaneers?"   Weren't they pirates thieves, liars, con artists, and in general low lives?

The Houston Oilers really pisses me off.  Oil is destroying our planet.  Better name them the windmills.

And the "patriots?"   Why they were all slave holders!

I want them all changed.  I am one person who is offended!  What is going on here?  

Very funny!  My red-haired daughter gets quite red-skinned after sunshine exposure or exercise.  Maybe she is offended too.

One of the naming controversies related to one of America's great hockey colleges, formerly known as the North Dakota Fighting Sioux, 8-time NCAA champions.  They lost the mascot, but shouldn't they lose the school and state names too.  Sioux is native American and Dakota is not??  I suppose 'North' is judgmental too!  We are left with no names and I suppose no scores either.  Those can be most offensive.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #135 on: October 11, 2013, 09:02:57 AM »

'Let's Move!' Stamp Punted
"Let's Move!" Or not. According to the Postal Blog, the entire fleet of Just Move! stamps will be pulled. Here's the kicker: They're worried about the depiction of kids exercising recreational activities without proper protective gear. "With the Just Move! stamp issuance the U.S. Postal Service hoped to raise awareness about the importance of physical activity in achieving a healthy lifestyle," the report says. "However, according to Linns Stamp News, the USPS will be destroying the entire press run after receiving concerns from the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition over alleged 'unsafe' acts depicted on three of the stamps..." For Michelle Obama, it's one loss after another.
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« Reply #136 on: October 11, 2013, 07:01:17 PM »

Who was of Sioux heritage!

******Do You Know the History Behind the Name ‘Washington Redskins’?

Oct. 11, 2013 12:21pm Erica Ritz

Do you know the history of the Washington Redskins?  As the issue becomes increasingly contentious — with many claiming the name is racist or discriminatory and pushing for a change — Glenn Beck tackled the issue head-on Friday.

“Ninety percent of Native Americans feel that the name isn’t offensive and shouldn’t be changed,” Beck remarked, echoing a letter written by the Redskins owner Dan Snyder to fans. “Students at primarily Native American schools all across America wear the name with pride, and say now they’re afraid they might lose the name. At Kingston Oklahoma high school, which is 58 percent Native American, the name ‘Redskins’ has been worn by its students for 104 years.  In fact, ‘Redskins’ was a name first used by Native Americans.”

Glenn Beck Explains the History of the Washington Redskins
Photo via TheBlaze TV

“In 1932, the NFL team moved to the historic Fenway Park and were left under the leadership of George Preston Marshall. The very next year, Marshall changed the name to ‘Redskins.’ Why?” Beck continued. “Well that’s a good question for the president to ask … the name was changed to ‘Redskins’ to honor then-coach Lone Star Dietz, an American Sioux.  So the name actually pays tribute to a great people.”

Switching to a deeply sarcastic voice, imitating those who want the name changed, Beck remarked: “But the people it pays tribute to?  Oh, I guess they just don’t know any better. But Obama does. And Peter King does. And NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell does. But the majority of the Indians … don’t have a clue at all.  The speech police using political correctness again to take care of these helpless, hopeless people so they are never harmed again.  It’s for their own good…”

Beck said perhaps it’s not those who don’t want the name changed who are out of touch, but those “who have no connection to the Native American culture, people out there trying to draw attention to themselves.”*****
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« Reply #137 on: October 11, 2013, 10:17:37 PM »

http://politicalblindspot.com/boy-kills-himself-after-prank/

 cry cry cry
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« Reply #138 on: October 15, 2013, 12:13:56 PM »

http://chicksontheright.com/posts/item/24837-that-ll-teach-her
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« Reply #139 on: October 18, 2013, 11:09:36 AM »

Obama said he is offended by the Redskins name.

Well I'm offended by the "giants" name.  I am not that tall so that has got to go.

I'm offended by the "Viking" name.  Vikings were rapists, murderers, thieves, and plunderers.

What about the New Orleans "saints' .  This offends me.  I am Jewish but I don't see any team named after "menches".

The "buccaneers?"   Weren't they pirates thieves, liars, con artists, and in general low lives?

The Houston Oilers really pisses me off.  Oil is destroying our planet.  Better name them the windmills.

And the "patriots?"   Why they were all slave holders!

I want them all changed.  I am one person who is offended!  What is going on here?  



The esteemed Charles Krauthammer (http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/charles-krauthammer-redskins-and-reason/2013/10/17/cbb11eee-374f-11e3-ae46-e4248e75c8ea_print.html):

In re the (Washington) Redskins. Should the name be changed?

I don’t like being lectured by sportscasters about ethnic sensitivity. Or advised by the president of the United States about changing team names. Or blackmailed by tribal leaders playing the race card.

I don’t like the language police ensuring that no one anywhere gives offense to anyone about anything. And I fully credit the claim of Redskins owner Dan Snyder and many passionate fans that they intend no malice or prejudice and that “Redskins” has a proud 80-year history they wish to maintain.

The fact is, however, that words don’t stand still. They evolve.

Fifty years ago the preferred, most respectful term for African Americans was Negro. The word appears 15 times in Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech. Negro replaced a long list of insulting words in common use during decades of public and legal discrimination.

And then, for complicated historical reasons (having to do with the black power and “black is beautiful” movements), usage changed. The preferred term is now black or African American. With a rare few legacy exceptions, Negro carries an unmistakably patronizing and demeaning tone.

If you were detailing the racial composition of Congress, you wouldn’t say: “Well, to start with, there are 44 Negroes.” If you’d been asleep for 50 years, you might. But upon being informed how the word had changed in nuance, you would stop using it and choose another.

And here’s the key point: You would stop not because of the language police. Not because you might incur a Bob Costas harangue. Not because the president would wag a finger. But simply because the word was tainted, freighted with negative connotations with which you would not want to be associated.

Proof? You wouldn’t even use the word in private, where being harassed for political incorrectness is not an issue.

Similarly, regarding the further racial breakdown of Congress, you wouldn’t say: “And by my count, there are two redskins.” It’s inconceivable, because no matter how the word was used 80 years ago, it carries invidious connotations today.

I know there are surveys that say that most Native Americans aren’t bothered by the word. But that’s not the point. My objection is not rooted in pressure from various minorities or fear of public polls or public scolds.

When I was growing up, I thought “gyp” was simply a synonym for “cheat,” and used it accordingly. It was only when I was an adult that I learned that gyp was short for gypsy. At which point, I stopped using it.

Not because I took a poll of Roma to find out if they were offended. If some mysterious disease had carried away every gypsy on the planet, and there were none left to offend, I still wouldn’t use it.

Why? Simple decency. I wouldn’t want to use a word that defines a people — living or dead, offended or not — in a most demeaning way. It’s a question not of who or how many had their feelings hurt, but of whether you want to associate yourself with a word that, for whatever historical reason having nothing to do with you, carries inherently derogatory connotations.

Years ago, the word “retarded” emerged as the enlightened substitute for such cruel terms as “feeble-minded” or “mongoloid.” Today, however, it is considered a form of denigration, having been replaced by the clumsy but now conventional “developmentally disabled.” There is no particular logic to this evolution. But it’s a social fact. Unless you’re looking to give gratuitous offense, you don’t call someone “retarded.”

Let’s recognize that there are many people of good will for whom “Washington Redskins” contains sentimental and historical attachment — and not an ounce of intended animus. So let’s turn down the temperature. What’s at issue is not high principle but adaptation to a change in linguistic nuance. A close call, though I personally would err on the side of not using the word if others are available.

How about Skins, a contraction already applied to the Washington football team? And that carries a sports connotation, as in skins vs. shirts in pickup basketball.

Choose whatever name you like. But let’s go easy on the other side. We’re not talking Brown v. Board of Education here. There’s no demand that Native Americans man the team’s offensive line. This is a matter of usage — and usage changes. If you shot a remake of 1934’s “The Gay Divorcee,” you’d have to change that title too.

Not because the lady changed but because the word did.

Hail Skins.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #140 on: October 18, 2013, 11:52:10 AM »


I caught this bit from CK on the BB Special Report.

Tis a rare event, but I disagree.

The team's name arose from HONORING a Native American coach.   The word itself arose from translation from Native American language(s).   Apparently the great majority of NA's have no objection, and many themselves use the term.

For me this is the PC progressive police on yet another pogrom and they can fcuk off.
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ccp
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« Reply #141 on: October 18, 2013, 08:37:04 PM »

CK suggests we get rid of the "red" portion of the "Redskins".   And then use the "skins" portion.  I am sure he contemplated but for whatever reason did not suggest the other half of the name:  "reds".
I think he is trying to hard to be  above it all.
 
On a more descriptive note we should rename Washington's team the "porkers", or the "lobbyists", or the "redistributionists", or the "elitists", or the "croneyists".

We could name them the Washington "Reds" to parallel the communist tendencies of the politburo types.  Then again we already have the Cincinnati Reds which because of the association with communistm really offends ME as do the Sacramento "Kings".  Didn't we have a Revolution to get rid of the King?

Maybe we could use a politically correct term.   How about the Washington "gays"?  How cool?

Or the Washington "undocumented"? 

I could go on pointing out the stupidity of it all.

CK used to be one of my favorite opinion writers.   Not lately.   Too much Washington DC in his thinking, methinks.
 

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #142 on: October 18, 2013, 10:02:39 PM »

The Fighting Irish of Notre Dame and the NAAAAP (take a minute and you'll get this one  cheesy ) are filing amicus briefs as we speak , , ,
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ccp
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« Reply #143 on: October 18, 2013, 10:33:38 PM »

NAAAAP

So if one is from Somalia, Nigeria, or say Cameroon but is not also American one cannot be a member?

One has to be both American And African?

Do white South Africans qualify?  My niece is a white South African and now an American.   I guess that is why it is still called the NAACP - to keep white people out!

So what do we call Nigerians?   Nigerian Africans?

Can I be called a New Jersey American?   (not that I want to admit I am from Jerzy)

I guess I am a Lithuanian, Ukrainian, Russian, Prussian American?

In the end we are all descended from apes from Kenya.  So we are all African Americans.

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #144 on: October 18, 2013, 11:28:36 PM »

My joke was this.  The "C" of NAACP stands for "Colored".  Why are people not OUTRAGED by the use of this racist term?  Clearly we must demand an end to this slur and that instead they use "African American" hence NAAAAP  cheesy cheesy cheesy
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ccp
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« Reply #145 on: October 19, 2013, 10:05:47 AM »

"Why are people not OUTRAGED by the use of this racist term?"

Good point.  Could you imagine the political correct crowd criticizing the NAACP?

Inadvertently I hit on another point about this.

The organization isn't about "African Americans".  It IS about Black people.   And more specifically American Blacks.

We don't hear the organization's people's outrage over Nigerians slaughtering each other in the streets.  It doesn't represent them.

Also what about Africans who are not Black.  What about Egyptians?  The Arab peoples of northern Africa?  What about my white niece?

The whole "African-American" thing is not helpful.  So is "Asian American". 

This had to have started someone with the political elite liberal university types.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #146 on: October 19, 2013, 10:22:51 AM »

In my life I have seen the transition from "colored" to "negro" to "black" and now "African American". 

I remember the transition from "negro" to "black" being explained as "Why are we called by a race and you by a color?"

This seemed, and seems, reasonable to me.  Thus for me, "black" is the term-- just as I am "white".  Enough! Done! and a hearty Foff to any who would seek to correct me.
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ccp
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« Reply #147 on: October 19, 2013, 10:47:53 AM »

"Enough! Done! and a hearty Foff to any who would seek to correct me."

I have many Black patients.   I guess they trust and like me.

I have to admit to being a little afraid at times of how to address them.   Some diseases are different with regards to prevalence or severity in Blacks vs Whites vs. Latino vs Asians.   It does sometimes matter where a person is from; born, raised, how long they have resided in the US. 

Hepatitis B, sarcoidosis, Helicobacter pylori, malaria, intestinal parasites, glaucoma, prostate and colon cancer, liver cancer, thalassemia, sickle cell, and others to name a few.

I was not sure to address them as African American or Black.   I have no problem addressing anyone the way they wish to be addressed.   I sometimes do not know which is preferred.   Once I recall using AA and the patient immediately kind of grinned as though she thought it just as silly.   A few times I recall pointing out a disease is more common in "Blacks" and the patient does display a bit of a change in facial expression.   I try to be as sensitive to this as I can.    I don't know how else to tell them the medical facts.  I go with the facts and present them as they are. 

Usually I use the term Black.   For example when I discuss the pros and cons of doing the PSA (prostate blood test) I would make the patient aware that prostate cancer deaths are more prevalent in Blacks.   Cause unknown but you need to know this.   

I would not use the term colored or Negro.  But do I use AA - which by the way in this case is not even accurate.  Or do I use Black?  I have chosen to use "black".   Thank goodness there has never been any response that suggested anyone was offended.   That is the last thing I would want to do.

In anthropology races were divided into Caucasoid, Negroid, and Mongoloid back in the 70's.  I do not know if it still that way when examining skeletons or not.
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bigdog
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« Reply #148 on: October 20, 2013, 04:25:04 PM »

http://reason.com/archives/2013/10/20/is-redskins-really-an-offensive-name-for
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #149 on: October 20, 2013, 08:37:30 PM »

Sound and well-reasoned, and, if I may, to the best of my understanding, a bit weak on the history.

My understanding is that

a) Red skin was originally a term used by Native Americans for themselves, just as they used White Skins for the Euros.
b) the term is "offensive" only to the professionally offended, and that the great majority of native americans (90%?) could not care less;
c) in the case of the football team, the name was chosen in homage in a Native American coach who died.
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