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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #50 on: September 23, 2008, 01:07:07 AM »

A Jazz Artist Goes Back to His Roots Music
By JIM FUSILLIArticle
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For the renowned jazz bassist Charlie Haden, his new country album "Rambling Boy" (Decca) isn't a departure. It's a return to the music of his youth. Long before he played alongside Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, Carla Bley, Keith Jarrett, Pat Metheny and others, he was Cowboy Charlie, who first appeared at age 2 on his parents' country-music radio show "Uncle Carl Haden and the Haden Family." On the new disc, a clip from the show features 2-year-old Cowboy Charlie singing and yodeling, with gentle prodding from his dad.

For "Rambling Boy," which includes references obvious and obscure to his childhood influences, the 71-year-old Mr. Haden is united with another generation of the Haden Family: his triplets, Rachel, Petra and Tanya; son, Josh; and wife, Ruth Cameron. They're bolstered by an impressive collection of friends, including Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Mark Fain, Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs and Bryan Sutton -- surely the country equivalent of the jazz musicians with whom Mr. Haden usually keeps company.

 
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Charlie Haden
Rosanne Cash sings "The Wildwood Flower," a song popularized by Maybelle Carter, a frequent visitor to the Haden family home in Springfield, Mo., back in the 1940s. Dan Tyminski -- who provided the singing voice to George Clooney's character in the Coen Brothers' film "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" -- is onboard, as is pop's Elvis Costello and Bruce Hornsby. Mr. Metheny, with whom Mr. Haden collaborated in 1996 on the lovely "Beyond the Missouri Sky," plays guitar on, and helped arrange, many of the tunes on the new album.

"I thought originally it was going to be the kids with my dad," Petra Haden told me when we met in New York. "But it turned into one big party."

When I met with Charlie Haden later in the day, he told me he began thinking of recording a country album with his family about 20 years ago when they gathered in rural Missouri to celebrate his mother's 80th birthday.

"Ruth wanted everybody to be together," said Mr. Haden, whose four children were joined by his brothers and sisters. "At some point, we were sitting in mom's cabin and Ruth said, 'Why don't you sing something?' We hadn't sung in decades."

The kids joined in. "Josh and the girls were experimenting. They hadn't sung with me before," he recalled. "It really sounded great."

As well it might have. All the Hadens are musical. Tanya is a cellist and vocalist, Josh leads the band Spain, and Rachel played bass with Todd Rundgren and sang with Beck. Petra, who's played violin with the Foo Fighters, has recorded several wonderfully idiosyncratic vocal albums, including a version of the Who's "The Who Sell Out" in which she sings every sound. Her latest is "Hearts & Daggers" (FU:M) by Miss Murgatroid & Petra Haden, her two-person project with accordionist and singer Alicia Rose.

Though he kept busy -- fruitfully so -- with his jazz career, Mr. Haden seemed, after that party at his mother's cabin, to be creeping toward a return to the music of his youth. He sang a traditional country tune in public for the first time since childhood on "The Art of the Song," which he cut with his band Quartet West in 1999. Three years earlier, he and Mr. Metheny added a bit of country to "Beyond the Missouri Sky" with "The Precious Jewel," written by Roy Acuff; the traditional tune "He's Gone Away," which Mr. Haden's mother sang on the old radio program; and Josh Haden's composition "Spiritual."

“My dad knew so many people: Hank Williams, Jimmie Rodgers. I was privileged in my family. It was a normal thing for me to be with famous people.”
Charlie Haden

On the new album, Josh sings "Spiritual," and in what may be its most affecting track, Tanya delivers a fragile, heart-wrenching "He's Gone Away." Fans of "Beyond the Missouri Sky" will love the version of "The Fields of Athenry" on "Rambling Boy," in which Petra's voice gives way to a skittish, dazzling solo by Mr. Metheny.

Mr. Haden said he had to cajole at least one member of his family into participating. "I had to really talk Tanya into it," he told me. "She's really, really shy. She's not into the music scene like Rachel and Petra. She's a mother and a painter. But she doesn't picture herself a singer. I told them, 'I want each of you to do a song of your own.'" Tanya's married to actor Jack Black, who delivers a rousing reading of the traditional tune "Old Joe Clark" on the album. Ruth Cameron sings the Irish folk tune "Down by the Salley Gardens" with delicate grace.

The triplets' sweet harmonies are featured on "Voice From on High," "Single Girl, Married Girl" and "Seven Year Blues." "I hadn't sung with my sisters in so long," Petra said. "When we sang together, we were really locked in. It was really relaxed. Rather than having really strict rehearsals, we just watched my dad directing everybody. He had the vision. He said, 'I'm getting the best players' -- and here comes Bruce Hornsby and Pat Metheny, who's my favorite guitarist."

Petra remembers her father's stories about the country legends he met as a boy. "He would always refer to Mother Maybelle. She really meant something to him. He really has a deep connection to this music." As a tribute, guitarist Bryan Sutton plays Carter's introduction almost note for note on "The Wildwood Flower."

Mr. Haden said, "My dad knew so many people: Hank Williams, Jimmie Rodgers. I was privileged in my family. It was a normal thing for me to be with famous people." Which made it easier for him to infiltrate the highest level of modern jazz as a young bassist: "When I decided to play jazz, I made it a priority to meet the people I wanted to meet." He said he could see through the veneer of fame and celebrity to appreciate their true gifts.

"Rambling Boy" concludes with a tender reading of "Oh Shenandoah" sung by Mr. Haden, who was born in Shenandoah, Iowa. "It brought back all the time with my dad and mom and brothers and sisters, first in Shenandoah and then in Springfield. I talked to my sister Mary, and she said, 'Charlie, if only mom could've heard this.'

"And what a treat it was for me to be playing music behind my children," he added. "It was nice to be with both families again."

Mr. Fusilli is the Journal's rock and pop music critic. Email him at jfusilli@wsj.com.

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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #51 on: October 08, 2008, 12:03:23 AM »

I heard the interview with Charlie Haden on NPR a while ago, they played a song or two from the album and they had the girls sing live, it was great!!
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #52 on: October 10, 2008, 05:58:58 AM »

Nick Cave, Charlie Haden and Toots Thielemans - Hey Joe

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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #53 on: October 17, 2008, 04:16:58 AM »

Been listening to Matisyahu alot lately....

King without a Crown
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0oHAgfVgiw

Chop em down
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lO3ca5FshCY

Youth
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PVt4Yix02A
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #54 on: November 17, 2008, 10:57:02 AM »

Early S.F. Doors show breaks on through to CD
Joel Selvin, Chronicle Senior Pop Music Critic

Monday, November 17, 2008

 
Only a few tables of curious spectators showed up at the club each night, so the musicians pretty much played for themselves. In between two weekend engagements at the Avalon Ballroom, a little-known rock group from Los Angeles called the Doors played Tuesday through Friday at a 100-seat Marina district club called the Matrix. Even the musicians might have forgotten all about the gig if the club manager hadn't decided to tape the shows.

The Doors were making their second trip to the thriving San Francisco ballroom scene in March 1967. It was an unseasonably chilly end of winter before the Summer of Love and just three months after the little-noted release of the band's now-historic debut album.

"We were on the lip of great success and we didn't know it," drummer John Densmore says. "Neither did the audience, which was very cool."

"Light My Fire" wouldn't break the group on radio for another three months, so the Doors were playing that weekend second-billed to Country Joe and the Fish at the Avalon, and almost no one showed up at their midweek Matrix engagement.

Matrix co-owner Peter Abrams had only recently installed a tape recorder in the sound booth, but it would be his custom over the next five years to record every show at the club. His tapes have been made into albums before; his live recording of the Velvet Underground is one of the few records of that landmark band's stage show. The Doors' tapes have been passed around in the underground world of bootleg recordings for years, including a set of "horrible, horrible sounding" Italian CDs that Doors producer Bruce Botnick heard.

Botnick, who has engineered and produced virtually every Doors recording in the band's history, finally dusted off the tape copies in the band's vault, cleaned them up and put together a two-CD set, "Live at the Matrix," complete with a cover by '60s San Francisco poster artist Stanley Mouse, to be released Tuesday on Rhino Records. Botnick says he thinks the Matrix tapes contain "one of their best recorded performances."

"They were young, enthusiastic, out to have fun," he says. "They experimented a lot, changed arrangements around and played things they never did before."

"We looked at it as a paid rehearsal," says guitarist Robbie Krieger. "There were five to 10 people in the club. We did it for ourselves."

The Doors first came to San Francisco in January 1967 to open for the Young Rascals and Sopwith Camel at the Fillmore Auditorium. It was the same weekend that more than 25,000 hippies filled Golden Gate Park for the Human Be-In, and the Doors were there, too.

'Changing the world'
"We thought you guys were changing the world," Densmore says.

They stayed at the Swiss American Hotel on Broadway and ate po'boy sandwiches across the street at Mike's Pool Hall. "We were baby beatniks," organist Ray Manzarek says.

Along with the San Francisco rock bands of the day, such as Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead and Quicksilver Messenger Service, LSD evangelist Tim Leary urged the gathering of the tribes in the park to "turn on, tune in and drop out." There were also readings by the beat poets Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Michael McClure and Gary Snyder.

"Holy cow - these are the beat icons," says Manzarek. "(Jim) Morrison and I idolized the beats."

When the band appeared that night in the scheduled engagement at the Fillmore, the musicians sensed a certain reluctance by the crowd to embrace the band, introduced as a rock group from Los Angeles - "grumble, rumble, murmur, spatter of applause, sigh of disrespect," Manzarek remembers - but Morrison insisted the band plunge right ahead, opening with the 10-minute-plus opus "When the Music's Over," and winning the crowd right from the start. Promoter Bill Graham gave the band a $100 bonus.

Three months later, the Doors returned to San Francisco for the Avalon Ballroom and the midweek Matrix engagement, checking into a Lombard Street motel.

Airplane led the way
The Matrix opened in August 1965, with the first public performance by the Jefferson Airplane - in many ways, the birth of the San Francisco scene. The band held an ownership interest in the enterprise - the surviving Doors semi-accurately remembered the club as belonging to Airplane vocalist Marty Balin - and the Airplane performed as house band during the brief, early days.

"Then the Fillmore opened and we got semi-famous," says Airplane founding member Paul Kantner, who helped paint the club.

All the San Francisco bands of the day played the former Fillmore Street pizza parlor. Artist Victor Moscoso did some of his most famous posters, highly prized by collectors, for the club. The Airplane played the band's last Matrix show in September 1966, the first night Grace Slick sang with the band. Her previous group, the Great Society, is largely remembered today through two live albums recorded by Abrams at the Matrix.

The current whereabouts of Abrams is not known to his former associates or the Doors, who tried to locate him for years. He is rumored to have sold copies of his Matrix tapes through classified ads in the back of Rolling Stone magazine during the '80s. Some 40 years ago, he gave the Doors four edited reels of the recordings - Botnick says he believes the tapes come from only two different nights - and the CD set was made from these first-generation dub copies.

A roar through the repertoire
On the earliest known live recording of the Doors, the band surges with power ("Robby was exceptionally good," says Botnick), roaring through the repertoire from the band's classic debut album with the certainty of a thousand previous performances at Sunset Strip niteries. Vocalist Morrison doesn't sound on the tapes like he thinks it's a paid rehearsal.

"The ante is upped anytime you have people there," drummer Densmore says, "even if it's only a couple. You can tell - Jim wants to say something, even to two people: 'I don't care - it will be like a pebble dropped in the water and make big circles.' "

The band played a lot of blues at the Matrix, including Allen Toussaint's "Get Out of My Life Woman" and Slim Harpo's "I'm a King Bee" that rarely turned up again in the repertoire. They did an instrumental version of "Summertime," a piece Botnick never heard the band play again. The group introduced new material that would eventually find its way to the second album - "People Are Strange," "Moonlight Drive" - while Morrison expanded and elaborated the ending of the already epic "The End" as recorded on the first album. The shadowy, echoey recording sounds like being in the dingy, rundown nightclub. The tiny room and handful of strangers in the crowd give off a palpable presence on the tape. All 10 people applaud madly.

Site's come full circle
In 2001, new owners reclaimed the bar's name - it now goes by MatrixFillmore - and some of its history. A enlargement of one of Moscoso's iridescent psychedelic posters dominates the entranceway of this sleek, upscale bar, operated by the ritzy PlumpJack restaurant firm. The entire front wall is glass now, and a modern fireplace burns away in the middle of the floor.

On a recent Wednesday night, a desultory DJ spun bluesy instrumentals from the stage in the corner to a crowd about the size the Doors drew in '67. Fewer than a dozen patrons nursed their drinks and made small talk. The dance floor was empty.

New owners have done over the floors and ceiling. The backstage where Jerry Garcia once smoked joints has been converted into an upholstered lounge. The place is not just empty of customers; something else is missing. It's squeaky clean, well-appointed, illuminated carefully. Despite the echo of the psychedelic posters on the drinks menu and the matchbooks, there isn't a trace of rock 'n' roll funk anywhere.

Outside a chilly wind whips though the foggy streets. At least the weather hasn't changed.

E-mail Joel Selvin at jselvin@sfchronicle.com.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/11/17/DD6Q13RA0V.DTL
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ccp
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« Reply #55 on: January 26, 2009, 05:57:56 PM »

Well I am looking forward to his new songs.  All of his previous hits lyrics were exactly like those stolen from our house some of whom my psychopathic sick mother-in-law handed to this narcissist's buddies.

These songs must be retreads from those they didn't use that disappeared from the house.  OVer my dead boday little rich getting any more.

I don't know where he gets his melodies from but I will say this guy couldn't write the lyrics to a song to save his life.

****John Rich keeps new marriage under wraps
      AP WASHINGTON – John Rich's latest song is about a relationship, but if you're looking for dish about his recent wedding or other details on his real-life love, you're out of luck.

Rich — who is half of the top country duo Big & Rich and host of CMT's "Gone Country" — got married last month to his longtime girlfriend, Joan Bush.

But unlike some other celebrities, he has no interest in sharing his big day, or much else about his marriage, with the public.

"I've never really understood artists that sold their wedding pictures or they sell pictures of their kids," he said in a recent interview. "To me, I'm just not that kinda guy. You gotta keep something for yourself, and my private life is my private life. Everything else the fans are completely welcome to, and I've let 'em in just about every corner of my life except that."

Rich's public profile is about to ramp up even more with the slated release of his upcoming solo album. The first single, "Another You," was recently released.

The 35-year-old said he probably would not have made the record had partner Big Kenny Alphin been healthy. Alphin has been sidelined due to an injury. He got hit by a drunk driver in 2001 and had to have a second surgery on his neck last year. That meant he couldn't tour for a while.

"I was faced with doing nothing for 18 months, which wasn't gonna happen, or put out new music," said Rich.

The "Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy" singer said he already had a number of songs written that probably never would have ended up on a Big & Rich album, because they were too personal. So those tunes will be part of his solo album due out in May, titled "Son of a Preacher Man."

Rich's dad is, in fact, a preacher, "the fire and brimstone kinda guy," Rich said. And that strong belief system is one thing Rich inherited. But Rich also calls himself "one of the most hard core honky-tonk guys in the business," which makes for an interesting combination.

"I live my life with a King James in one hand and a Crown and coke in the other," said Rich.

But he can still remember when he was John broke, not John Rich, and that's something that keeps him grounded.

"If you took everything that I've accumulated away from me, you'd still find me in a country bar somewhere, singing for tips with a guitar until two o'clock in the morning," he says.

Big & Rich plan a tour in the next few months.***

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #56 on: January 29, 2009, 11:26:30 AM »

By CORINNA DA FONSECA-WOLLHEIM
Oxford, N.J.

The pond outside Keith Jarrett's home in rural New Jersey is frozen over. Inside the jazz pianist's 18th-century farmhouse, life appears similarly suspended. An expectant silence reverberates against the walls of vinyl LPs, CD boxes spilling off sofas, towers of stereo equipment bristling with cables. Next door, in the converted barn that houses Mr. Jarrett's recording studio, a pair of Steinways and two harpsichords cower under black quilted covers.

In the weeks leading up to a solo improvised concert, Mr. Jarrett retreats into creative solitude to empty his mind. More than 30 years since his first fully improvised solo album, "Facing You," he continues to be the only pianist to offer evening-long concerts of music created out of nothing. He records every such concert, preferring a recording to any attempt to notate and transcribe his music. The recordings thus become the authoritative source for his "compositions." Tonight, he will play at Carnegie Hall, his first North American solo appearance in more than three years. How does he prepare for such a tightrope act?

Tune In
Listen to clips from Keith Jarrett's 2005 solo concert at Carnegie Hall:

Part 3Part 6More
A Jazz Night to Remember: The unique magic of Keith Jarrett's 'The Köln Concert' (10/11/08)Listen to a clip of Keith Jarrett's "The Köln Concert," Part 2c Mr. Jarrett, his closely cropped silver hair offset by an all-black outfit, frowns. "Imagine an archer preparing for a shot before the target shows up," he says. "He's just aiming at where he suspects there may possibly be a target." In the run-up to his 2005 solo concert at Carnegie Hall, he read fiction by New York writer Nick Tosches and thought about Charles Ives and Carl Ruggles, composers, as he puts it, "who did their thorny stuff, their spiky music which we can begin to call American classical music."

This time, there is little deliberate preparation beyond playing a lot of Bach to "keep his fingers going." But Mr. Jarrett, who is known for hectoring audiences who cough too much, looks forward to playing again for a New York crowd.

"When you're on stage you have a very strange knowledge of what the audience is. It isn't exactly a sound -- it's a hum, like the streets. New York is such a microcosm of the world, and so independent-minded, that I have a kind of trust with them. You can feel that they just want me on stage and then they don't know what's going to happen. It's more like playing for other 'me's' in the audience."

The format of Mr. Jarrett's solo concerts has changed since he returned to them after an illness-induced hiatus in the 1990s. While his improvisations often used to last as long as 40 minutes, Mr. Jarrett now allows each musical idea to find its shape -- even if the result is a three-minute miniature. Recent solo concerts have consisted of as many as 10 musically distinct pieces that range from lyrical blues to jaggedly dissonant knots of fast notes.

"Some of those languages come up just because my hands are in a certain place," he says. "One of the great things about paying money is that maybe you stay there a few minutes longer and you might get to see something being built in front of your eyes. If a person plays dissonance long enough it will sound like consonance. It's a language that was alien and then it's less and less alien as it continues to live. After a while, it's like saying, goddammit, it finally makes sense."

Whether the resulting music can still be called jazz is of little concern to Mr. Jarrett. "It has the tendency to be anything it wants to be. My music education and listening has been so broad that it doesn't sound categorizable to me either. Obviously it gets into jazz territory -- and then it gets out of it again." But while Mr. Jarrett can draw on a wide knowledge of Western music, and an impressive catalog of recording and performing the classical repertoire, he has no desire to return to "that nervous, jittery, get-into-emotion-on-bar-151" world.

As he sees it, moving from the interpretation-based world of classical music to the improvisational one of jazz requires a radical shift that can shake the foundations of self. When he performed a lot of Mozart in the '80s, he says, "I wasn't playing anything other than Mozart. I had to become another person." And, he adds, "to teach a classical musician to improvise is almost more impossible than to teach an accountant or a plumber to improvise."

View Full Image

Ken Fallin"I once had a conversation with Vladimir Ashkenazy. We were on a cruise with the English Chamber Orchestra and I gave him a tape with some of my improvisations. When he had listened to it, he said, 'How do you play all the right notes?' I said, 'No, you see they just become the right notes by virtue of their environment.' Then he said, 'I'd love to be able to improvise but I know I'd need so much time to get into the right headspace to do that.' Of course, he didn't use the word 'headspace.' But he knew he'd have to shut everything down. From where they are you can't get to the improvisation and have it be you, because you've been trained outside of yourself.

"If you're improvising and you finish a concert and you're changed forever, that's different from finishing any kind of classical concert, no matter how good. The reason you can't be physically, cellularly changed is it did not come through you. The music was already there."

Still, there are clues to Mr. Jarrett's classical ventures in almost every aspect of his art, from the musical idioms he employs to his near-obsessive concern with matters of touch, color and sonority. Many have written -- and complained -- about his physical relationship with his instrument, the tortured positions he gets into while playing, and the moans and groans that escape him. But Mr. Jarrett says that what some see as an almost sexual relationship with the piano is really one marked by struggle.

"I'm never trying to get it to sound just like a piano. I'm trying to find every possible way to make it either a voice or an instrument that is unlike a Western instrument. You know, it can't be a guitar but I wish it was; it can't be an orchestra but I wish it was. So the rebellion that I'm faced with immediately upon sitting down at a piano is that it is a piano. And I can turn cartwheels -- it's not going to make any difference. But what I can do is try to almost fool the instrument into becoming something else."

The irony is that the painful contortions and ecstatic moans that some critics find so distracting are the effect of his efforts to get out of the way of the music and to channel what he calls a "transformation of energy." And it is this intensity that he brings to each moment on stage that ultimately roots him in jazz.

"If I'm not a jazz player all the time, I've at least been cued in to what I do by jazz. Because people needed to survive, they were in the cotton fields and they sang because otherwise they would not be able to handle their lives at all. If you play music from that same position, then what you have at stake is your own survival. Which is really what I've been saying about solo improvisation for 30 years: It's dangerous as hell because if you fail you feel like committing suicide."

Ms. da Fonseca-Wollheim is a writer living in New York.
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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2009, 02:06:01 AM »

Posted this, just because.   grin

The sunscreen song!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5NAPZp2w-o
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Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
William
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« Reply #58 on: February 06, 2009, 07:43:47 AM »

Recently was I turned onto Pandora Internet Radio by a friend and I find I’m really enjoying listening and discovering new music. I like the way you can pick an artist and it will play them as well as pull up music that is structured in a similar format or range. It’s based on what they call the “Music Genome project”. It hadn’t occurred to me to Try out Brent Lewis since I already have a number of his discs loaded onto my iTunes. I’m going to try that next to see what it comes up with.


William

http://www.pandora.com/


The Music Genome Project®
On January 6, 2000 a group of musicians and music-loving technologists came together with the idea of creating the most comprehensive analysis of music ever.
Together we set out to capture the essence of music at the most fundamental level. We ended up assembling literally hundreds of musical attributes or "genes" into a very large Music Genome. Taken together these genes capture the unique and magical musical identity of a song - everything from melody, harmony and rhythm, to instrumentation, orchestration, arrangement, lyrics, and of course the rich world of singing and vocal harmony. It's not about what a band looks like, or what genre they supposedly belong to, or about who buys their records - it's about what each individual song sounds like.
Since we started back in 2000, we've carefully listened to the songs of tens of thousands of different artists - ranging from popular to obscure - and analyzed the musical qualities of each song one attribute at a time. This work continues each and every day as we endeavor to include all the great new stuff coming out of studios, clubs and garages around the world.
It has been quite an adventure, you could say a little crazy - but now that we've created this extraordinary collection of music analysis, we think we can help be your guide as you explore your favorite parts of the music universe.
We hope you enjoy the journey.
Tim Westergren
Founder
The Music Genome Project
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Mongrel Combative Systems
www.mongrelcombativearts.com
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #59 on: February 06, 2009, 07:49:24 AM »

I too listen to Pandora and like it a lot.
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ccp
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« Reply #60 on: February 14, 2009, 12:23:13 PM »

It really is amazing how these musicians who are on the receiving end of music that is stolen are so idolized and honered.

I heard a story from a law enforcement person how he was convinced it was obvious based on the evidence he saw that Wonder stole another man's music. It went to civil trial and of course the jury sided with the "lovable" Wonder.  You know the jury gets "star struck", probably get offers for backstage passes, think he is so wonderful and would never steal others' music ("hey he doesn't need it he is so rich"), or are simply bribed which is rampant in the music industry.  Katherine also states she recently heard him come out with a "jingle" that is right out of one of her songs though she said another also used it.

Anyway, musicians like many of our sports "heroes" are fasely idolized, have phoney facades.  They are often even thieves. AS the saying goes, there is no honor amongst thieves.  Nor with those who lie like the wind blows:

****Obama plans concert for Stevie Wonder
        AP – Stevie Wonder performs at the 40th NAACP Image Awards on Thursday, Feb. 12, 2009,in Los Angeles. (AP …
 Play Video Barack Obama Video:Obama's Valentine's Vacation ABC News  Play Video Barack Obama Video:AP Top Stories AP  Play Video Barack Obama Video:Obama: Stimulus passage is a 'major milestone' AP WASHINGTON – The White House is planning a concert this month to honor Stevie Wonder, whose music provided part of President Barack Obama's campaign soundtrack.

The White House says the president and first lady Michelle Obama will present Wonder a Library of Congress award on Feb. 25. The concert will be broadcast the next day on PBS as part of its "Performance at the White House" series.

The award-winning and chart-topping Wonder performed at the Democratic National Convention in Denver on the night Obama accepted his party's nomination. He also performed at a concert during the week of Obama's inauguration.

His song "Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours" became a theme song during the campaign. Obama also used "Higher Ground" during campaign stops.****

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nonkosherdog
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« Reply #61 on: February 14, 2009, 12:59:46 PM »

Frank Zappa.  Never got a chance to see him perform live  sad





Blue Man Group



opened my eyes & ears that music doesnt just come from conventional instruments, contrary to what my parents always said when I was banging away on the pots and tupperware ... I coulda been a star  cheesy
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #62 on: February 14, 2009, 06:54:58 PM »

Woof Nonkosherdog! Thanks for the memories cool
I got to see Frank Zappa in the late 70's at CLevelandS public Hall.....

One of my all tme Favorites and IMO one of if not the greatest guitar players ever.....(among many)
I still have a lot of his original albums in my collection.......
If memory serves me correctly a man that also sported a IQ 175...
Fun to watch the clips......I'am gonna have to visit you tube soon!
                                              TG
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« Reply #63 on: February 14, 2009, 07:26:34 PM »

I saw FZ lead the Mothers of Invention at the Fillmore East  cool  Probably around 1969.  To be candid, Zappa often irritated me a bit-- he had great chops, but usually was disrespectful of the music, he had a hard time just playing.   Exception:  the Hot Rats album.  Yes the humor was still there, but with great vocals by Capt. Beefheart, Zappa jammed and played his ass off.
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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #64 on: March 09, 2009, 03:54:19 PM »

I have a dirty secret: I hate the Beatles, viewing them as a lens through which an entire generations music was pulled. Talk about fights, say something mean about the two-dimensional swill the boys form Liverpool excreted and you'll find yourself flamed in no uncertain terms. As such I was happy to see this bit from Van Morrison:


Van Morrison: 'Beatles were peripheral'
Thursday, March 5 2009, 9:50am EST
By Mayer Nissim

Rex Features
Van Morrison has said that The Beatles's influence on the history of music is overstated.

According to The New Yorker, the Irish singer-songwriter made the comment when someone in the city described skiffle legend Lonnie Donegan as one of a number of "pre-Beatles rock and roll" artists.

He is quoted as saying: "That's a cliché. I don’t think 'pre-Beatles' means anything, because there was stuff before them.

"Over here, you have a different slant. You measure things in terms of the Beatles. We don't think music started there. Rolling Stone magazine does, because it's their mythology.

"The Beatles were peripheral. If you had more knowledge about music, it didn't really mean anything. To me, it was meaningless."

He added that he preferred the "real" Little Richard, Carl Perkins and Gene Vincent to the music of Elvis Presley.

Morrison is currently playing a worldwide tour of his 1968 album Astral Weeks, which includes two concerts at the Royal Albert Hall on April 18 and 19.

http://www.digitalspy.com/music/a148565/van-morrison-beatles-were-peripheral.html
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #65 on: March 14, 2009, 03:17:31 AM »

Adding this one to my workout mix:

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« Reply #66 on: March 14, 2009, 05:11:32 PM »

Sort of music related but very enjoyable

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJJo8CJpGWo
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #67 on: March 27, 2009, 04:53:49 AM »

Haven't listened to these songs in a while..





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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
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« Reply #68 on: March 28, 2009, 11:33:37 PM »

http://www.youtube.com:80/watch?v=B1sgmj7JvCA&feature=channel
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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #69 on: March 29, 2009, 05:42:45 PM »


Yes, but did he string his harmonica upside down?
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« Reply #70 on: March 29, 2009, 08:17:19 PM »

I saw Hendrix twice-- including the New Year's Eve concert at the Fillmore East that become the record/CD "Band of Gypsies".
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ccp
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« Reply #71 on: April 14, 2009, 05:20:15 PM »

Jessica Simpson country career *may be over* ; since my "mother" in law has not come back into the house they have not been able to steal song lyrics.  Simpson will be back if they can steal more.  Or else get them from somewhere else.
We are finally hearing fewer and fewer of Katherine's lyrics.  It is amazing how they can extend the life of the stolen material.  They make new videos of second and third tier songs from the albums released and present them as new.  Or they start coming out with greatest hit albums.  Or when the season is right (esp. with Alan Jackson) Christmas or Easter covers.
Many of the stars are taking breaks for all sorts of excuses , family , childrearing, death of a loved one, divorce.  They might change the type of music they sing or play because they can't get it from the original writer.  I love when they do that and claim 'yeah we are experimenting with our versatility" yadah yadah etc. 
John Rich on Hannity singing his supposed songs.  The last two we heard may actually have been his writing because they were not Katherines's.  And IMO they sucked.  Because he really can't write no matter what he claims.  What a joke.  This guy sits there and talks about America and freedom, love of country, individualism on Hannity and he got famous singing stolen songs and claiming he wrote them. 

 Concerts Jessica Simpson's country career hits sour note
AP, Apr 14, 2009 6:00 am PDT
 
Jessica Simpson's courtship with country music seems to have had a shorter shelf life than her marriage.After lackluster sales for her country debut, "Do You Know," Simpson and her Nashville record label have parted ways, leaving many wondering what's next for the 28-year-old entertainer.
"Right now it seems like she's taken a break from recording. There is nothing else on the books," said Ian Drew, senior music editor at Us Weekly magazine.
A spokeswoman for the one-time pop princess says Simpson remains part of the Sony Music Group on the Epic label, but is no longer working with the company's country division, Sony Music Nashville.

 
"She was on loan to Sony Nashville for her country album," said Lauren Auslander.As for her future in country music? "We don't know yet," she said.
"Do You Know" started strong but faded fast. The lead single, "Come on Over," a flirtatious, steel guitar-laced slice of country pop, peaked at No. 18 last summer and the album debuted at No. 1. But the second single, "Remember That," stalled at No. 42, and the third, "Pray Out Loud," failed to chart.
To date, the disc, Simpson's fifth studio release, has sold around 178,000 copies — a long way from her 3 million-selling 2003 disc, "In This Skin."
"Everywhere I saw her around the U.S. at different radio station events she was always well-received," said Lon Helton, editor and publisher of the industry trade publication "Country Aircheck." "For whatever reason, the music did not resonate."
Simpson came to country after her 2006 pop outing, "A Public Affair," fell flat. The Texas-born blonde touted the move as a return to her roots. She performed on the Grand Ole Opry, signed autographs at the Country Music Association's annual festival, and toured with country's multiplatinum trio Rascal Flatts.
But she got more publicity for her life outside of music, most of it far from positive. She was ridiculed when it seemed as if she had gained a few pounds, and the status of her romance with Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo was constantly scrutinized.
She was also criticized for a few erratic concert performances. At a February show in Michigan, Simpson apologized to fans after she forgot the lyrics to a song and asked her band to start over on another.
Some detractors viewed her country career as a calculated attempt to follow other pop stars who have found success on country radio.
"Working the country market is very different. You really have to work it at country. You have to spend your life on the road building an audience and she didn't really put the work in," Drew observed. "She walked the walk and talked the talk, but she didn't have the street cred that she needed to make it work."
But others say Simpson shouldn't bail too soon. She may just need more time to find an audience.
"It doesn't seem like she was even on the country music scene long enough to prove what she is capable of doing for this industry. She never got the chance," said Neely Yates, music director for country station 96.3 in Lubbock, Texas.
Helton wondered whether the singer was a victim of bad timing. Pop rockers Darius Rucker and Jewel were crossing over to country about the same time, which he called unusual in country music.
"What was the ability of the market to absorb and focus on more than one pop singer at a time coming over?" he asked.
The question now is whether Simpson will keep her record deal. After two disappointments, Epic may be ready to move on without her.
"She's never really sold a lot of records except for the album out at the height of 'Newlyweds,'" said Drew, referring to her popular reality TV show, "Newlyweds: Nick and Jessica," which chronicled her ill-fated marriage to Nick Lachey. "Other than that, she's never been able to sell much of anything."
But in a recent interview, Rascal Flatts' Gary Levox said Simpson is in a no-win situation with her critics: "She's in a spot where whatever she does, they pick her apart. They need to just leave her alone and just let her sing."
"She's a wonderfully gifted singer," added bandmate Jay DeMarcus. "All the other stuff overshadows what she's really about and it's unfortunate, because there's more to her there than just tabloid fodder."
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ccp
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« Reply #72 on: June 12, 2009, 05:52:17 PM »

I suspect the Beatles may have actually been one of the few groups that actually did write their songs as they claim:

"Turner said his research, including interviews with Vodden and Julian Lennon, confirm that she is the Lucy in the song. He said it was common for John Lennon to "snatch songs out of thin air" based on a simple phrase he heard on TV or an item he read in the newspapers"

That is how Katherine writes her songs.  Except not from the newspaper which she doesn't read.  She gets them from TV, thngs she hears, during conversation or spontaneous thoughts.

The songs then just come into her head.

Of course a lot of dirtball liars in the music "industry", if that is what you call a criminal organization from top to bottom, claim this now.  After stealing hundreds of her lyrics the phrase "singer-songwriter" became ubiquitis as the assholes are all running around taking credit for coming up with lyrics - that they didn't write.

****Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds' gravely ill
AP, Jun 12, 2009 9:23 am PDT
 
They were childhood chums. Then they drifted apart, lost touch completely, and only renewed their friendship decades later, when illness struck.Not so unusual, really.
Except she is Lucy Vodden — the girl who was the inspiration for the Beatles' 1967 psychedelic classic "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" — and he is Julian Lennon, the musician son of John Lennon.
They are linked together by something that happened more than 40 years ago when Julian brought home a drawing from school and told his father, "That's Lucy in the sky with diamonds."
Just the sort of cute phrase lots of 3- or 4-year-olds produce — but not many have a father like John Lennon, who used it as a springboard for a legendary song that became a centerpiece on the landmark album "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band."
"Julian got in touch with me out of the blue, when he heard how ill I was, and he said he wanted to do something for me," said the 46-year-old Vodden, who has lupus, a chronic disease where the immune system attacks the body's own tissue.
Lennon, who lives in France, sent his old friend flowers and vouchers she could use to buy plants at a local gardening center, since working in her garden is one of the few activities she is still occasionally well enough to enjoy. More importantly, he has offered her friendship and a connection to more carefree days. They communicate mostly by text message.
"I wasn't sure at first how to approach her. I wanted at least to get a note to her," Julian Lennon told The Associated Press. "Then I heard she had a great love of gardening, and I thought I'd help with something she's passionate about, and I love gardening too. I wanted to do something to put a smile on her face."
Vodden admits she enjoys her association with the song, but doesn't particularly care for it. Perhaps that's not surprising. It was thought by many at the time, including BBC executives who banned the song, that the classic was a paean to LSD because of the initials in the title. Plus, she and Julian were 4 years old in 1967, the "Summer of Love" when "Sgt. Pepper" was released to worldwide acclaim. She missed the psychedelic era to which the song is indelibly linked.
"I don't relate to the song, to that type of song," said Vodden, described as "the girl with kaleidoscope eyes" in the lyrics. "As a teenager, I made the mistake of telling a couple of friends at school that I was the Lucy in the song and they said, 'No, it's not you, my parents said it's about drugs.' And I didn't know what LSD was at the time, so I just kept it quiet, to myself."
There's no doubt the fanciful lyrics and swirling musical effects draw heavily on the LSD experiences that were shaping Lennon's artistic output at the time — although many of the musical flourishes were provided by producer George Martin, who was not a drug user.
"The imagery in the song is partly a reflection of John's drug experiences, and partly his love of `Alice in Wonderland,'" said Steve Turner, author of "A Hard Day's Write," a book that details the origins of every Beatles song. "At the time it came out, it seemed overtly psychedelic, it sounded like some kind of trip. It was completely new at the time. To me it is very evocative of the period."
Turner said his research, including interviews with Vodden and Julian Lennon, confirm that she is the Lucy in the song. He said it was common for John Lennon to "snatch songs out of thin air" based on a simple phrase he heard on TV or an item he read in the newspapers. In this case, Turner said, it was the phrase from Julian that triggered John's imagination.
Veteran music critic Fred Schruers said Julian Lennon's reaching out to help Vodden as she fights the disease is particularly moving because of the childlike nature of the song.
"It's enormously evocative but with a tinge of poignancy," he said. "It's the lost childhood Julian had with that little Lucy and the lost innocence we had with the psychedelic era, an innocence we really cherished until it was snatched away."
Vodden was diagnosed with lupus about five years ago after suffering other serious health problems. She has been struggling extreme fatigue, joint pain, and other ailments.
"She's not given up, she's a fighter, and she has her family backing her, that's a good thing," said Angie Davidson, campaign director for St. Thomas' Lupus Trust, which funds research. "We need more people like her, more Lucys."
Davidson, who also has the disease, said it affects each person differently, typically causing exhaustion and depression. When the disease kills, she said, it does so by attacking the body's internal organs.
It has become difficult for Vodden to go out — most of her trips are to the hospital — but recently she and her husband went to a bookstore and heard the song playing over the store's music system. When they went to another shop, the song was on there as well.
"That made me giggle," she said.****
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #73 on: June 19, 2009, 09:54:13 AM »

Caught this musician on Carson Daly show, nice music to chill with:

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« Reply #74 on: June 27, 2009, 08:57:58 AM »

Well John Rich has "400" songs according to Gretchen Wilson, Dolly Parton claims three thousand, other claim hundreds, shania Twain was coming out with an album until her divorce supposedly put a stop to it.  Now Jackson had a "secret" stash of 100 songs.

Yet if anyone listened to the Coutnry Music Awards recently they would have noticed there were almost no songs that have not been out for well over a year.  Yet supposedly all these people are sitting there with songs on the books.  Jackson's people are now claiming that this guy, who was hundreds of millions in debt, was saving songs for his children.  Folks, as a victim witness in the sewer hole the music industry is, I can tell you this is bullcrap.  That would be like someone sitting on a winning lottery ticket, being in huge debt, and saying, "well I'll save it for my kids".  The reality is, no one in the music business could possilby have 100 songs that are "secret" and no one would sit on them for years and especially so if, they owed hundreds of millions of dollars.

Even if they wanted to, the scum bag leeches around them wouldn't let them.

Unless, of course these 100 songs were so crappy they thought they wouldn't sell or be good enough to put together an album.

The new music has finally dried up since Katherine finally realized it was her own mother who was the last one still close enough to rip her off.  She has not been allowed back into our house for close to one and a half to two years now.

We still have evidence.  So even though the thieves (including several neighbors who moved in to stalk us and sit and wait to get into the house) put the "stars" on hold saying to them you can't do these songs yet. 

They have copies of everything Katherine wrote.  They just can't do it till they steal all the evidence.  They are that patient, that careful, that planning, and cunning, and scheming.

Since there last inside connection (my mother in law - who is pure evil - ruined her own daughters life for some cash) and Katherine has not left the house for *two years* they cannot get all the evidence.  They still hack into our computers, have listening devices in the house and monitor us (try finding them - I wouldn't even know what to look for) (Try hiring someone who does - everyone and I mean everyone can be bribed or threatened).

So this lastest news, MJ has one hundred "secret" songs which may or may not get released sounds to me like the latest scam.
If they can get the evidence from us - or perhaps someone else they are robbing - then the go ahead to release these songs will be given.  That is my take.  Or else he really did have 100 songs that were throw aways that they are trying to push as being good enough to release.
 


*******secret library of over a hundred songs recorded by Michael Jackson could be released following his death.

One of the singer's biographers, Ian Halperin, claimed that the unheard songs had been made for his children.

Mr Halperin, author of Unmasked, The Michael Jackson Story, said before his death: “He wants to leave them for his kids, a very personal legacy to them. I was told he will not let them come out now.”

Jackson leaves three children: Prince, 12, Paris Katherine, 11, and Prince Michael II aged seven.

 
Times Archive, 1972: The Jackson Five live at Wembley
Michael Jackson's twinkling feet scarcely seemed to touch the stage

Related Links
Web struggles to cope as Jackson news spreads
Michael Jackson: in his own words
The dysfunctional Jackson family
Multimedia
IN PICTURES: the passing of a legend
PICTURES: decline and fall
PICTURES: highlights of Michael Jackson's career
It is rumoured, given the parlous financial situation of his estate, that any such recordings will not be kept private for long. It is understood that Jackson may have gone to the grave under debts of about $400 million (£240 million) – though some believe the true figure may be much higher.

Sales of Michael Jackson’s music and memorabilia have already begun to soar. In America, the Thriller album is number one on iTunes, while his Number Ones album has now reached the top spot on the UK iTunes chart.

Online retailers Amazon say that Jackson’s albums had taken 14 of the top 20 places on the Amazon.co.uk sales chart. The Amazon chart was topped by his first solo album, Off The Wall, which features tracks such as "Don’t Stop ’Til You Get Enough" and "She’s Out Of My Life".

Already, Jackson’s death is beginning to producing a new industry. Outside the Los Angeles hospital where he was pronounced dead, a group of men appeared selling $10 T-shirts with a silhouette of Jackson and reading: “In loving memory of Michael Jackson.” Memorial T-shirts were also being sold at the Glastonbury music festival.

On eBay, bidding grew on a number of Jackson memorabilia items. Limited edition records, musical instruments used by the star and even a movie contract with his signature were being sold for thousands of pounds.

The Neverland ranch and Jackson’s final resting place, if made accessible to the public, could also become lucrative tourist attractions.

Graceland, the mansion owned by Elvis Presley and where he was buried, has become a much-visited landmark. Opening its doors to the paying members of the public is thought to have made the trust that operates Graceland in the region of $100 million.*****

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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #75 on: July 08, 2009, 01:09:14 AM »

The other side of Rick Wakeman from YES. cool

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4JRFFmlPCY
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« Reply #76 on: July 28, 2009, 04:23:28 PM »

Now we finally stopped them from stealing songs (I allege) she can't write her own - like she fasely claimed she ever did.
In any case she's got nothing left but cover songs:

Gretchen Wilson, Sony Music Nashville part waysThe Associated Press
Posted: 07/28/2009 02:33:15 PM MDT


NASHVILLE, Tenn.—"Redneck Woman" Gretchen Wilson and her longtime record label, Sony Music Nashville, have parted.
Sony announced the split Tuesday, describing it as a mutual decision.

Wilson shot to fame with her 2004 smash "Redneck Woman." Her debut album, "Here For the Party," sold 5 million copies.

Her next two albums for Sony—2005's "All Jacked Up" and 2007's "One of the Boys"—reached No. 1 but didn't sell nearly as well as her debut and produced only one Top 10 single between them.

Sony says in a statement that while Wilson will no longer record for the label as a solo artist, both parties look forward to working together on catalog projects.

Wilson was not immediately available for comment.


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ccp
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« Reply #77 on: July 28, 2009, 04:32:51 PM »

Clarkson has the lead name as writer of this song.  I allege she didn't write it.  My wife did.  Clarkson moved to the country scene because that WAS where the songs were.  Now they can't get songs she is going back to pop.
Despite her name on it she of course blames another writer whose name is on it.
I allege she is lying.  She didn't write the lyrics to the song, she can't wirte hit songs.
She is a bs artist.
That is my belief.  Now that we stopped them from stealing (for now) Katherine's lyrics by keeping her mother away you will see country songs drop off a cliff.  the country stations are keeping the radio/cable stations going by releasing new videos from songs that were not lead songs from previous albums from at least 6 months to even years ago.  Most people would not necessarily notice these are videos to songs that came out from older albums.  They make it look like they are brand new songs.
Where are all the songs from the dozens of writers out of Texas and Nashville???

****Kelly Clarkson says she isn't a rip-off artist despite having the same song as Beyonce
BY Nicole Carter
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Tuesday, July 28th 2009, 1:57 PM

 
Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty; Winter/Getty
 
Kelly Clarkson is doing everything she can to explain she isn't ripping off of Beyonce.

Related News
Articles
VH1 annoints new 'Divas,' but have they earned the title?
Beyonce video for 'Sweet Dreams' set to debut
Beyonce shows 'Fierce' and softer sides in tour kickoff at the Garden
Beyonce, nominated for 5 BET Awards, will perform on show
It's true: Kelly Clarkson's new single "Already Gone" sounds a lot like Beyonce's "Halo."

But Clarkson is doing everything she can to explain she isn't a rip-off artist.

After speculation that the "American Idol" winner had copied the R&B diva's power ballad, Clarkson claimed it's actually her co-writer Ryan Tedder- who consequently wrote Beyonce's tune- that's to blame.

"We wrote about six songs together, four or five of them made the album," Clarkson said on Canada's CBC radio earlier this week. "I"d never heard of a song called ‘Halo.' Her album came out when my album was already being printed."

And the 27-year-old doesn't hold back her feelings about getting, well, screwed.

"It sucks, but it"s one of those things I have no control over. I already made my album. At this point, the record company can do whatever they want with it," she added.

Clarkson has also said she "fought and fought" to prevent the song from ever going public.

The pop star knew what her fans would think.

"No-one"s gonna be sittin" at home, thinking ‘Man, Ryan Tedder gave Beyonce and Kelly the same track to write to." No, they"re just gonna be saying I ripped someone off."

Beyonce has yet to comment on the situation.****
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ccp
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« Reply #78 on: July 28, 2009, 04:39:57 PM »

Friedman talks like he has the inside scoop.  This guy has no clue.  The reason Clarkson went to country is that is where the songs were.  Now there are none left so she goes back to pop.
He claims she can't write yet she was let into the Grand Ole Opry.  She was one of the biggest stars while she did her songs that I allege the lyrics were Katherine's.  Friedman, the dupe doesn't even mention this.  He just says she learned her lesson and is running back home to grand daddy Clive.  Is this what Clive has told him from the "inside".

Friedman are you that stupid or are you part of the scam:

By Roger Friedman

Kelly Will Go Back to Pop for Next Album

Kelly Clarkson gets the picture, finally.

There was no bucking the system, and no going against Clive Davis. Sources tell me that Clarkson has agreed, through her wise new manager Narvel Blackstock, to make a pop album for release in 2008 with songs selected by Davis and his team.

Clarkson's acquiescence comes at the end of a long melodrama concerning her current, turgid album "My December," which features a lot of ragged self-penned songs by Clarkson about a relationship gone sour.

Davis didn't like the album, considering it was the follow up to Clarkson's multimillion selling "Breakaway." But he released it, and Clarkson responded by dissing him and then apologizing earlier this week.

In the meantime, "My December" is sort of free-floating away now, and will probably sell a respectable 850,000 copies in the U.S. and maybe the same worldwide.

Clarkson gets points for trying out her chops as a songwriter, but demerits for not following anyone's advice, trying to take on the record industry's most astute executive maybe of all time and acting like a 25-year-old (which is, in fact, her age.)

The news about Clarkson's next move came Thursday during the annual UJA Federation lunch at which Davis was honored. Everyone in the biz was there — the room was so packed that there was little space between the tables for waiters to maneuver or for good schmoozing.
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ccp
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« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2009, 10:44:32 AM »

I owe Friedman an apology.
Katherine tells me I mixed up Kelly Clarkson with Carrie Underwood who was the one who was "inducted" into the Gran Ole Opry.
My correction noted.  As for Clarkson, Katherine believes her lyrics were oddly like words she wrote and disappeared from her possesion (the same is believed for Underwood).  Perhaps that was the whole modus oper. behind Clarkson's suddenly deciding to "write her own songs".  Someone simply got her the songs and a deal was made.  It is possible Davis knew they stunk and after they proved to be bombs then said more or less, "I told you so".

Many of the lyrics are not that great.  It appears that when the crooks run low on material they start using the less good lyrics.
It only takes one really good set of lyrics out of ten songs to get one over the top.
And one never knows.  Songs thought to not be likely to sell sometimes do.

 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #80 on: August 13, 2009, 07:25:54 PM »

http://www.boston.com/ae/music/artic...os ton_globe/

Modern music owes a lot to Les Paul Inventor and Guitar legend.
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ccp
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« Reply #81 on: August 19, 2009, 10:10:38 AM »

***But it turns out there is a whole underworld of techie criminals who hack into emails and servers to get hold of the sought-after new tracks.***

Yeah no kidding.  I've been saying this for years.  And it is far worse than this.  We are not only talking hacking into servers, we are talking listening devices, surveillance, bribery (up to the US copyright office), payoffs and more.

And it isn't just people lifting songs from the suppossed creators of this music.  For example Justin Timberlake has done songs exactly like those stolen from Katherine. 

I must also point out the 100 to 150 songs (depeding on which story you read) that went missing from Michael Jacikson's home after he died (see the reports of the missing hard drive all over the news reports) is also no accident.

I strongly doubt it is as simple as Lotaya Jackson "backing up the moving van" and taking away the hard drive though elements in the music industry would like us believe it is that simple.

The hard drive was stolen.  It might reappear but it will likely be switched (if not already).
I VERY STRONGLY SUSPECT that the parade of people recently announcing they are coming out with new albums in September (including Gretchen Wilson - it will be  more rock than country this time) are going to get buy some of the materials from this HD.
I am not clear that Jackson didn't get the material for a price from those that steal and supply the material to the singers.
Now that he is dead these same elements aren't about to let Lotaya have it all.
I suspect they took it back and are out around the music world selling them off.

Remember those songs could be worth multiple millions.  People who don't think there is organized crime doing business in this realm are totally niave - as I was years ago.

"called the cops"

What a laugh - those guys are way in over their heads.  Plus they earn little - get my drift.

*****SIMON COWELL has called in cops after LEONA LEWIS's new track was leaked on to the internet.

On the case ... Simon Cowell
The X Factor boss discovered his record company Syco's computers have been targeted by hackers on a mission to nick tracks.

Last month I told you how these leeches had got their grubby mitts on some unfinished tracks by last year's X Factor winner ALEXANDRA BURKE and had been touting them around as the finished article.

The truth is the songs were rough, unmastered recordings and may not even make it on to the album.

But this latest leak is the hotly-anticipated single from Leona Don't Let Me Down, a collaboration with JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE.

The track is seriously being considered as the first release from her second album but it has found its way on to the web - and is the final straw for Cowell.

I always assumed songs that went missing were hard copies pinched from the studio.

But it turns out there is a whole underworld of techie criminals who hack into emails and servers to get hold of the sought-after new tracks.

It sounds like something out of Spooks.

These guys compete to be the first to get hold of a new song because there is huge kudos in it - and a shed load of cash to be made.

Dodgy file-sharing websites pay hackers top dollar for stolen tracks as they try to attract more downloaders to the site so they can rake in more money from advertisers.

The hackers put a bit of digital code - a geeky version of a graffiti tag - on to the tracks to prove they got there first when the track spreads like wildfire on the web.


A spokesman for Syco - part of Sony BMG - said: "Syco are working alongside the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, the British Phonographic Industry, the police and investigators in this and they are making fast progress.

"We will certainly look to bring charges against those who are responsible. We cannot give any more details at this stage for operational reasons."

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I hope the police manage to bang the criminals up.

They ruin it for everyone.

It is always better to hear the finished version than a stolen demo.****
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Freki
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« Reply #82 on: September 18, 2009, 10:25:34 PM »

This appeals to me and I thought the Dog Brothers might like it too

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPBt8UztXoQ
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bedens
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« Reply #83 on: September 25, 2009, 12:08:03 PM »

Wow, awesome find, Freki... Very nice!
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ccp
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« Reply #84 on: October 13, 2009, 10:50:19 AM »

Remember this from my post of June 27, 2009:

"So this lastest news, MJ has one hundred "secret" songs which may or may not get released sounds to me like the latest scam.
If they can get the evidence from us - or perhaps someone else they are robbing - then the go ahead to release these songs will be given.  That is my take.  Or else he really did have 100 songs that were throw aways that they are trying to push as being good enough to release."

The truth is Anka probably wrote the whole thing but had to share credit with Jackson.
 
Now fast forward to this:

****Anka gets credit for co-writing Jackson single
AP, Oct 13, 2009 2:28 am PDT
 
With a familiar high-pitched voice counting off one-two-three-four, a new Michael Jackson single debuted online Monday, prompting a hasty response from the singer's estate after Paul Anka revealed he was the song's co-writer."This Is It" is featured on the soundtrack to the upcoming documentary featuring the late superstar, but its genesis was actually in 1983 when it was written for a duets album Anka was recording.
The song was titled "I Never Heard," and Jackson and Anka are credited as co-authors on an early 1990s version recorded by the singer Sa-Fire.
Anka said Jackson's estate moved quickly to give him credit, promising Anka 50 percent of the song's profits.
"They did the right thing," Anka said. "I don't think that anybody tried to do the wrong thing. It was an honest mistake."
The string-backed ballad was released on the singer's official Web site and sent to radio stations. It gives advance publicity to the documentary, culled from footage of Jackson rehearsing for the concerts that he never got a chance to do.
Representatives of Jackson's estate acknowledged Anka's work in a prepared statement. Until Anka stepped forward, the song's history was a mystery.
"The song was picked because the lyrics were appropriate because of the name Michael gave his tour," the statement read. "We are thrilled to present this song in Michael's voice for the first time, and that Michael's fans have responded in unprecedented numbers."
Anka, 68, initially contemplated legal action after being informed Monday by outlets such as the New York Times and TMZ of the similarities between "This Is It" and the Sa-Fire version. But later in the day, he said he was satisfied with how the situation was handled.
"There's nothing but honorable people here," said Anka, a former teen idol from the 1950s and '60s who sang "Put Your Head on My Shoulder" and wrote "She's A Lady", one of Tom Jones' biggest hits.
Sony Music Entertainment had said it wasn't sure when Jackson recorded the song but speculated it could have been around the time Jackson's "Off the Wall" album was done 30 years ago.
Close — Anka said it was recorded right around the time Jackson's "Thriller" album was becoming a smash hit.
"This Is It" was apparently found in a box of tapes with only Jackson's voice and a piano accompaniment.
Strings were added to the bare-bones recording, along with backing vocals from Jackson's brothers. Other touches included finger-click percussion that echoes Jackson's recording of "The Girl Is Mine."
The preparation of "This Is It" is eerily similar to how the surviving Beatles took outtakes from John Lennon following his murder and added their voices and instruments to craft the "Real Love" and "Free As a Bird" songs released as part of the "Anthology" project in 1996.
"This is it," Jackson sings to open the song. "Here I stand. I'm the light of the world. I feel grand."
Sony says it was a coincidence that his upcoming concert series was also titled "This Is It"; the company has no evidence that Jackson himself had planned to release the song.
Posthumous releases follow a long-standing pattern in popular music dating back to Elvis Presley's death in 1977.
Presley's records have continued selling since then, with new greatest hit compilations and live concert releases finding huge new audiences. His estate still receives tens of millions of dollars each year from CD sales and other enterprises, and in 2002 he even topped the UK charts with a remixed version of an older song.
The same was true, to a lesser extent, after the deaths of rock icons such as Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Janis Joplin. A number of Lennon solo albums were also released in the years following his shooting death in 1980.
Some artists have scored major hits after their deaths. For example, "Time in a Bottle" was the No. 1 hit in early 1974, months after Jim Croce died. Otis Redding's biggest hit, "The Dock of the Bay," was released after his death in a plane crash in December 1967. "Me and Bobby McGee" made the charts in 1971, a year after Joplin died.
It probably won't be the last time music fans hear something new from Jackson. Tommy Mottola, former chairman and CEO of Sony Music, told The Associated Press shortly after Jackson died in Los Angeles June 25 that there are "dozens and dozens of songs" that did not make the pop star's albums, along with more recently recorded material.
Questions about who owns the material and differing opinions among people who control Jackson's estate could complicate the release of these songs, said Rob Levine, executive editor of Billboard.
Making "This Is It" available online before putting CDs on sale might seem counterintuitive. But several artists do it — the Flaming Lips streamed their entire new album online — and Web sites such as myspacemusic.com offer streams of many songs.
Jackson's company is betting that interest generated from early release of the song will spur purchases of the album. More so than many artists, Jackson fans are more inclined to buy CDs than seek out digital copies of his music, Levine said.
"This is aimed at passionate Michael Jackson fans and people who want to participate in a historical event," he said. "In both cases, people are going to want something to hold in their hands."
The two-CD set offers previously released versions of Jackson hits coinciding with the order they are presented on the DVD. Besides "This Is It," the other new material is a spoken-word poem and demo versions of "She's Out of My Life," "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" and "Beat It."
Jackson, one of the most commercially successful artists of all time, is expected to sell millions of albums in the coming years. His death already brought some of his classic records back to the top of the charts.
His death at age 50 is still being investigated.
The Los Angeles County coroner has ruled Jackson's death was caused by acute intoxication by the anesthetic propofol, with other sedatives a contributing factor. The coroner found the powerful anesthetic was administered without any medical need and that recommended resuscitation equipment was missing.
___
Associated Press Writers David Bauder, Gregory Katz and Mesfin Fekadu contributed to this report.****
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DougMacG
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« Reply #85 on: October 13, 2009, 11:26:20 AM »

CCP, My daughter went to see Taylor Swift this past weekend sad  The question of who writes her songs is asked on Yahoo.  Then it is answered by young fans who vote on each other's answer and so it is now a resolved question sad

In my day... for one thing each band succeeded by creating something new and original. I doubt if Bob Dylan stole songs or poems.  Nobody ever said he sounds just like - fill in the blank. The lead singers of the Grateful Dead each had a lyricist and they gave and took shared credit on every song.  They played plenty of other people's material and even if they re-worked it musically or even if it was never previously famous they didn't claim they wrote the song.  Similar for bands like Yes, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Supertramp, Steely Dan, Jethro Tull, etc. They didn't come out with a new song to the reaction that it sounds remarkably like someone else.  More likely they could be accused of it sounding to much like own of their own previous works.

What I don't understand, if there are millions to be made why they can't, as Jackson had to here with Paul Anka, buy and pay for the help they receive.  Maybe the answer is in the fan comments on Taylor Swift.  They are so sure that she is singing directly to them from the heart, not reading a teleprompter.  Even then, couldn't they privately buy the right to take full credit?
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ccp
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« Reply #86 on: October 14, 2009, 07:53:34 PM »

Thanks for your thoughts.
I am not completely sure of the answer.
Taylor Swift of course is not running around taking songs.  There are organized thieves, PIs, and their freinds and relatives who have controlled the approach to us.

There have dozens and probably by now years after it started hundreds of people involved.
Yet it always seems coordinated and one person fails or is "outed" they seem to fade while other scams evolve.

Someone or someones are clearly behind the scene orchestrating this.  Unfortunately they succeeded at bribing one person after another  - tenants who lived in an efficiency we rented behind our house, an ex "friend" of mine (since age 12), Katherine's uncle, her mother, her brother, neighbors, mail carriers, co workers of mine, gardners, at least two police officers, lock smiths, Copyright official (others just looked away), almost certainly two different attorneys, and I could go on if I think about it.

As one person who moved to Florida where we were from Hoboken, NJ to set upa studio (the whole thing was certainly a scan) said to Katherine "everyone has their price".  "If someone want to get one's songs, they WILL get it".

Well I learned he wasn't kidding.  I learned how bribery can buy almost anyone.  You will see the experts in spying tell us on TV the best way to get information isn't torture.  Its simply to pay people off.

So in answer to your question the people who are behind robbing us are not interested in letting us get to the "stars" to sell songs.

They will stop us.  It doesn't help I work 60 plus hours a week, Katherine is legally blind and there is no one in her family she can trust.  As for my family they have their own lives and don't want to be involved or a few who don't believe the whole thing.

Taylor Swift is for all I know several people removed from Katherine.  Her father I understand is some producer and surely he has connections and for that reason and that reason alone she is where she is.  She is not terrible, but surely anyone can see she is not hugely talented as a singer, dancer, or musician in any way except that she along like many of them have either private deals with the people who got her the songs and come up with the melodies or have simply paid them to be able to claim them.

Perhaps she is allowed to claim she writes (I can only plead that from my place that she absolutely doesn't and almost certainly couldn't even if she tried) but those who stole and got her the material are getting the money for that.

Katherine was in Nashville in 1989.  She was right up there with these guys there.  She sat next to Willie Nelson.
They asked her to open for Alabama but I guess she got stage fright.  They knew she could right.  They even warned her to never show anyone her songs.  "why they will be stolen in a heartbeat!"

"Why don't even show your mamma your songs!"  She never thought this would apply to her own mother.

When she said she didn't have any melodies or songs their comments were to the effect, "don't worry we'll get you the songs".
She later told me she had no idea they meant steal them.

Well one crook she spoke to told her she'd be surprised at what they pay the people robbing us and stalking us.  It "isn't as much as you might think".   He then offered her $400  a song.  "Hey you gotta eat". 

Nice guy huh?

Another guy told her a "good crook sleeps with they girls he robs".

Another time we were followed to a hotel room and they were going to switch a Uhaul we rented.  Before we knew it one guy rents the room to one side of us and another the other side.  Katherine heard the one say to the other when she look out the window, "I told you this wouldn't work, the bitch is already looking out the window".

These are the kinds of people in the music "industry".
Don't think the "front" people, the Toby Keiths, the Shania Twains, the John Riches, the Brad Paisly's, the Dolly Partons, are any nicer people than these other behind the scenes low lives.  They are not.  Don't think their tours overseas doing shows for the troops means they really care about the troops or any of their fans for that matter.  It is all a show.  It is all sales.  It is all about the money.

I could forgive Taylor Swift as just a kid who would give anything to be a star just like the teens who would do anything to meet her, date her, be her friend, or be like her.

But when I see her get up there and lie like the best of the liars forget it. 
She is a  low life just like the rest.

She would stab you in the back as fast as  one can blink an eye.

Yet Katherine and I struggle on.
They will get the rest of her songs over our dead bodies.
And I mean it.  I ain't afraid to die.  I don't give a rats behind anymore.

And Katherine keeps wishing she never wrote.
I encouraged her for quite some time thinking everytime we wouldn't be robbed again only to find we keep getting scammed again.

Finally I pleaded with her to stop and I don't know why she llterally couldn't.  Emotional or what I don't know. It was like an addiction to her.  She could write and write and write.  And the people robbing us know it. 

Sony Nashville was organized all around her lyrics. 

So was Lyrics Streets.  Look at the names of the people behind these for example.  Were talking not onl millionaires but billionaires.







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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #87 on: October 25, 2009, 05:58:46 AM »

Ive been on a Retro Hard rock \ Metal kick.  Im sure these guys will conjure up some old sounds of rock.

Wolfmother - Woman


Wolfmother - Dimension
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SkinnyDevil
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« Reply #88 on: November 05, 2009, 10:57:40 AM »

Query: What's your favorite music to...

1) Workout to?

2) Fight to?
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ccp
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« Reply #89 on: November 09, 2009, 04:31:19 PM »

Katherine and I found out the criminals surveillancing us have been in our house more than once probably within the last few months.
Unless they used forced entry and covered it up they slipped in through a door and tip toed around stealing some Copyright documents, financial statements and ominously identification documents for Katherine.

Were not entirely sure the damage done but it is no coincidence this occured (we believe within last few weeks to month) before the Country Music Awards this Wednesday.

She or I are ALWAYS in the house so they somehow got in and snuck around while we were there.
They must have cameras and listening devices somewhere to be able to coordinate it without our knowing.
There are neighbors who have moved in to neighborhood after us in order to watch us exactly for this reason;  to stalk and wait for the perfect opportunity to get in the house steal evidence and then get the songs up to the singers so they can get them OUT THEIR - published!

This is how these criminals work and why it is so hard to catch them.  They never take chances, they are very patient and willing to wait for as long as it takes, and have everything planned out in advance, and everything is soft - they sneak around leaving no evidence.  No forced entry - just pick locks, get copies of keys through bribery or finding out which Home Depot I was in and simply getting a key from the same batch of locks (- they are all the same key), and similar tricks.

I believe they are getting in the house when I am not home. In retrospect I find they watch me closely wherever I happen to be at the time when the plan to get in the house.  This way they know I won't just happen to pull up and catch them.

I can't comment anymore.

We will be watching the CMAs closely for any new material.

Did anyone see Carrie Underwear say on the CMT or perhaps GAC station how she can't comment on her new songs,  "my handlers have not given me permission" to say yet?

In other words, the songs have not been *completely* stolen just yet so she has to keep her mouth shut.
When they think they are on the verge of succesfully stealing the lyrics and all the related evidence the singers many of whom claim they are the song writers start bragging about how they are working on new albums and about ready to release this or that.
If their plans fall through there is either total silence as to why the album or new hit single hasn't come out OR they make up excuses.
Such as taking time of for their children, spend more time with family, or some other BS excuse.

It is sickening to watch the total BS.

And I don't care how adorable Bill O'Reilly thinks Taylor not so swift is.  She is a lying dirtball.  She couldn't write a song to save her life.   All those stories about boyfriends are nonsense. And she is a mediocre singer.

 



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SkinnyDevil
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« Reply #90 on: November 10, 2009, 09:04:59 AM »

Not good workout music, but Sting is a brilliant & well-rounded musician, the likes of which we rarely see:



I hadn't seen this video before, but I love old Skinny Puppy. Better than "real ultimate power" for getting pumped (hahaha!!!):



Geez, Marc, I didn't know you'd seen Jimi live. I am forever jealous.....
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #91 on: November 12, 2009, 02:50:50 AM »

Query: What's your favorite music to...

1) Workout to?

2) Fight to?

For working out and "fighting" I prefer energetic, rhythmic

Stuff like:







I like metal but sometimes it doesnt give me boost \ vibe i need while working out, unless im on a stationary bike or need an energetic boost before working out.
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ccp
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« Reply #92 on: November 16, 2009, 06:22:03 PM »

I don't know if anyone is a country fan but if you watched the CMA awards you couldn't help but think the music mostly stunk.

No new songs that appeared to be Katherine's.
However there were some sung that originally appeared as recent as around two months ago that were like those networked off the computer or  a few left overs written on folders and taken out of the house.
Included are the first one of Taylor Swift's two songs as well as White Liar claimed to have been written by Lambert.
The Sugarland songs of course (Ms. stuffed nose).
Keith Urban's appeared to be written by someone else not Katherine - maybe really was his own.
Carrie underwood's song as usual sounded like a Katherine throw away.  Wasn't even "country" and was really more pop.
They had all kinds of excuses explaining how or why she is changing her style.  Don't buy the bullshit.  It is for no other reason than they can't steal something that is more suitably country and apparently can't write anything themselves or/and do not anyone else who can in their little club of scoundrels.

Brooks and Dunn who sang numerous songs just like Katherine's are all washed up and have announced their retirement but not before making fools of themselves singing a hard rock song with a ZZ top song (oh yea - that's real country).
 
Unless they can get Swift more songs she will go the way of the garbage can too.  See certainly isn't where she is because of talent.
Yea they will get her some more material to soak the teenie boppers as much as they can out of their parent's money but she proved again she can't sing well, dance well, or play guitar - unless strumming one cord is playing guitar.

They cleverly had all the country bumpkin "stars" come in with their daughters so they could all run down and surround the stage where Swift was doing her one cord strum and play up the teens gone wild for Taylor bit.

Sorry Doug.  I am glad your daughters had a good time with Swift and hope they are well.   No one can stop teenage crushes anymore that we can stop a hurricane.  I remember my older sister screaming and going nuts with my parents scratching their heads 45 yrs ago as the Beatles came out on Ed Sullivan.  Who didn't have romantic fantasies at that age?  I know I did. 

Unless they can steal more of Katherine's songs (or someone else with real talent) the country bumpkins are mostly washed up.
That said I don't underestimate their resolve or leverage in getting their way.

Like a boxer once said on cable - "you can't fight the mafia".
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #93 on: November 23, 2009, 04:49:27 PM »

@Freki 

Live performance clip:



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SkinnyDevil
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« Reply #94 on: November 25, 2009, 09:50:34 AM »

Great stuff!

Here's one for sparring - "Fight Song":



But after your session of unadulterated violence, you can cool down while indulging your sensitive side (hahaha!):

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #95 on: November 25, 2009, 10:28:40 AM »

Good to have you with us again SD.
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #96 on: November 25, 2009, 02:18:07 PM »

Ahhhh the sensitive side... forgot about that, lol.





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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #97 on: December 19, 2009, 04:49:46 AM »

not sure how to describe it, cool stuff. been listening to it over and over for some time now...




« Last Edit: December 19, 2009, 04:53:43 AM by Robertlk808 » Logged

"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
ccp
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« Reply #98 on: December 19, 2009, 02:38:52 PM »

I took a few computer courses at University of Central Florida aournd 1999.  After we realized Katherine was getting robbed we niavely looked for a computer expert who could dig up evidence on our hard drives.  I called the school and asked my professor if he does that and he said he was too busy but he would put me in touch with someone else.  After around 2 or 3 more people said the same thing I eventually got a call back from this guy, John Joseph Leeson.  He agreed to "help" us do searches and came to our house to copy our drives.  It was a set up from day one.  The people robbing us were, we later realized, listening to our phone calls and this guy was already approached, bribed, and bought and sold when he came to our house I think it was in around February of 2000 though I could be off on the dates.
He basically tampered with ur drives, some of which were probably switched altogether.  I made the mistake of giving him access to call our computers.  We had one or two desk tops and a few laptops.  He thus had all the codes and access information and them we were from that point on unable to stop them from networking in and swiping songs.  I was typing around thrity songs onto a laptop one time in the kitchen when suddenly they all disappeared off the memory.  Well they would then know if we made any copies by scanning printing or making discs or CDs.  Thus they knew what we had with regards to songs and everything they needed to do to steal any evidence we had.

Any songs we had that we might have had a copy they would thus know about and not let their singers do until they were sure we had nothing on them.  This piece of garbage who purports to be a forensic crime fighter actually did all he could to continure robbing us.  He even got flustered one day and blurted out, "what's my own ITP address doing on your computer".  Later we also found out his latino wife was some sort of a musician and singer.  For people who have not been through this kind of thing it feels like we were robbed, my wife was raped and our lives destroyed.  And this guy goes merrily on his way and gets lauded as some good guy crime fighter.  I wonder how many others he robbed while playing the role of a forensic computer hack.

And just by coincidence I find this article that was published (no coincedence at all) shortly after we made contact with this alleged thief and total dirtball.  I see he appears to have retired in 2007.  I believe he made hundreds of thousands for what he did to us:

Computer Forensics Teams Learn to Follow Digital Footprints
By DENNIS BLANK
Published: March 9, 2000
JOHN LEESON smiles as he straightens out a paper clip and inserts it in the back of a portable Zip disk drive of a personal computer that he has put into standby mode. The disk, which contains an unknown password that allows access to the computer's hard drive, pops out and Dr. Leeson inserts another disk. When prompted by an on-screen message, he chooses ''remove protection'' and enters a new password that will give him access to valuable information on the hard drive that had previously been blocked.

That is just part of a bag of tricks -- some easily available on the Internet -- that Dr. Leeson uses to teach his class of police officers and lawyers ways to retrieve information from computers.

Dr. Leeson, 55, an associate professor at the School of Computer Science at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, is a teacher and practitioner of what is known as computer forensics. In addition to teaching, he also helps the campus police department and the local sheriff's office with computer-related investigations.

''John is one of a couple of pioneers in this area,'' said Mark Politt, unit chief of the computer forensics laboratory at the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington. ''The need for computer forensics is growing exponentially, and we need more people trained in the basic fundamentals.

''The use of computers both as tools and storage devices for crimes is growing. Investigators need to build up teams because things have become so complex, one person doesn't have all the knowledge.''

There is a great demand for more law enforcement investigators trained in digital crime-solving techniques, said Carrie Whitcomb, director of the National Center for Forensics at the University of Central Florida, and the university is developing a graduate certificate program. Dr. Leeson's course, which is offered in the summer, is part of the program.

Digital evidence can come from many sources in addition to PC's, Dr. Leeson said. Investigators can also find evidence in Palm devices, fax machines, cell phones and other equipment that keeps or produces data or a record of users' activities.

''How do you catch a criminal?'' Dr. Leeson said. ''You try to follow the digital trail, just like the gumshoe would follow the trail of evidence.''

In a criminal case, if a computer can be seized by law enforcement authorities, then time is on the side of the investigators as they peel off the necessary information: e-mail and Web site records and hard drive data. If a computer cannot be confiscated, tracking a suspect becomes more difficult.

''Digital is like footprints in the sand,'' Dr. Leeson said, ''and it will disappear rather quickly over time because information is being overwritten constantly. If you overwrite in the digital world, it is virtually impossible to recover it.''

Standard detective work may be all that is necessary to recover things like Web site passwords. ''People leave information lying around,'' Dr. Leeson said. Often, a sticky note with a password might be in an obvious place, like on the PC monitor or underneath the keyboard. Pictures of a pet, grandparents or a friend, if they can be identified, may all be clues to a password.

A typical investigation might involve tracing the electronic path of someone suspected of downloading child pornography. If certain images are hidden or encrypted, Dr. Leeson said, ''it adds another layer to the hunt.'' If a suspect has used a ''very good encryption program, it goes from difficult to virtually impossible to unscramble,'' he said.

One of the hypothetical cases he discusses with his students is that of someone who receives a pipe bomb in the mail. In this case, an estranged wife is suspected. After the authorities get a search warrant, the hard disk on her computer reveals that she has been surfing the Internet and visiting sites that explain how to make the kind of bomb used in the crime. That kind of evidence, though circumstantial, can help link a person to a crime.

There are other, tougher cases, Dr. Leeson said, particularly those involving hackers who have used others' computer systems to do their damage. In those cases, he said, the investigator has to backtrack to determine how the hacker got into other people's computers.

Often that entry is through the Internet. ''The World Wide Web was not designed with security in mind but was designed to share research,'' Dr. Leeson said.

But the Web also has features that can aid a forensic computer scientist. Once a user is online, search engines are logging ''the fact that you are there and where you are coming from, and those log records can be used to track their way back,'' Dr. Leeson said. Cookies, tiny data files automatically placed by some sites on a computer's hard drive with a unique tracking number, are another way that a user's Web surfing habits are tracked.

''It is possible to falsify your tracks, and that makes the job of finding you much more difficult,'' he said.

Dr. Leeson acknowledges that some of what he taught in his first introductory graduate course on computer forensics may be old hat when he teaches the popular class again this summer. For one thing, Windows 2000 may pose some new security issues, while new state laws may have been enacted that will have an impact on the course.

''Any crime that you can conceive of,'' Dr. Leeson said, ''a computer can be an instrument of that crime.''

Photo: John Leeson of the University of Central Florida in Orlando teaches lawyers and the police to be digital detectives. (Linda Blank for The New York Times)

A version of this biography appeared in print on March 9, 2000, on page G8 of the New York edition.
 
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« Reply #99 on: December 25, 2009, 02:20:25 AM »

My nieces Cheesy

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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
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