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Author Topic: Puerto Rico  (Read 472 times)
ccp
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« on: June 07, 2017, 04:22:33 PM »

Now that the economy has collapsed they are expected to vote for statehood.
They have voted in the past and state hood has always lost .   Dems must be drooling at the thought:

http://thehill.com/latino/336667-puerto-rico-goes-to-the-polls-for-statehood
« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 10:07:52 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2017, 10:08:04 PM »

This is a big deal!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2017, 10:32:29 AM »

http://thehill.com/latino/340568-puerto-rico-faces-off-with-bondholders-over-statehood
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 02:59:41 PM »

Not a State, Not a Nation?
 

People gather water from a stream in Puerto Rico, where an estimated 40 percent of the population has no access to drinking water. Erika P. Rodriguez for The New York Times

Is Puerto Rico suffering because Americans don’t see it as part of our nation?

Last week, Amanda wrote about the difference between being a legal citizen of a country, and part of a nation. A country is a legal entity with territory and a government, and citizenship is a matter of law and paperwork. It’s pretty straightforward.

But the nation is different. That word refers to a people bound together by common characteristics, like language, culture or political values. Typically, we presume that all citizens of a country are also part of the nation. But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, some groups are left out. And that can lead to serious crises.

That column focused on Myanmar, where members of the Rohingya minority, long excluded from the nation, are now fleeing from army violence that the United Nations has called a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

But we’ve had that distinction on our minds this week as we look at a crisis much closer to home.

Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, leaving the island without electricity and, destroying the ports and other infrastructure. The governor estimates that 40 percent of residents have no access to potable water. Food supplies are dwindling. People are dying in hospitals that have no power.

And yet the response from the federal government has been tepid. With some exceptions, lawmakers in Washington seemed much more focused on trying once again to pass healthcare reform than on the unfolding humanitarian crisis.

The Trump Administration initially declined to lift the Jones Act, a shipping rule that would have made sending aid more expensive, even though he had waived it for Texas ports after Hurricane Harvey. (They eventually reversed course yesterday, waiving the rule.) And the president’s tweets about the crisis were read by some as blaming the people of Puerto Rico for their vulnerability to the disaster.

And although the crisis did receive media coverage, it was rarely the main story of the day.

It's not that Americans don't care about Puerto Rico. But many seem to experience its devastation as they would a far-off crisis in, say, Bangladesh, or for that matter Myanmar. Puerto Rico’s disaster is rarely treated as a catastrophe befalling millions of fellow Americans, which Puerto Ricans are. Could that be because they are seen as part of the country but not of the nation?

Nearly half of Americans don’t know that Puerto Ricans are United States citizens, according to a poll that our colleagues at the Upshot published this week. And while it’s easy to see that misperception as a failure of civic education, it’s also a sign that many Americans do not believe that Puerto Ricans are part of the community of people for which the federal government is responsible.

Puerto Ricans, to many Americans, are not “us” — they are “them.”

On Monday, Gov. Ricardo A. Rosselló of Puerto Rico made clear that he sees that perception as posing a tremendous danger to his people, now desperate for aid.

“Puerto Rico, which is part of the United States, can turn into a humanitarian crisis,” he said. “To avoid that, recognize that we Puerto Ricans are American citizens.  When we speak of a catastrophe, everyone must be treated equally.”

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2017, 06:54:32 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XorC8WWchGk
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2017, 07:09:06 AM »

https://www.rawstory.com/2017/10/i-dont-see-people-dying-foxs-geraldo-rivera-scoffs-in-the-face-of-san-juan-mayor-to-back-up-trump/

http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/30/exclusive-fellow-puerto-rico-mayor-rips-san-juan-mayor-shes-not-participating-in-any-meetings/?utm_source=site-share
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 07:12:24 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
ccp
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2017, 08:26:06 AM »

https://pjmedia.com/video/puerto-rican-female-cop-says-local-government-is-preventing-supplies-from-getting-to-people/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2017, 06:45:47 PM »

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/01/puerto-rican-ceo-sends-engineers-to-help-fema-efforts-calls-local-pols-inept.html
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ccp
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2017, 06:46:13 AM »

"  Cruz is a member of the opposition party, Partido Popular Democrático (PPD). The PPD does not advocate for Puerto Rican statehood, but a sort of middle ground between full independence and statehood. Her party supports full sovereign powers for Puerto Rico, but close ties to the U.S.  "

In other words she want the benefits of being citizens but to not have to pay any price for it:

https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/10/02/san-juan-mayor-puerto-rican-statehood-like-a-slave-becoming-a-slave-owner/

Why else does PR keep voting against independence and statehood all these years?

« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 10:20:37 AM by ccp » Logged
DougMacG
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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2017, 08:45:53 AM »

PR voted for statehood last time but with lousy turnout.

Of course we should pay for disaster relief.  Isn't that what their federal income taxes go to pay for?

"Most residents do not have to pay the federal personal income tax."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxation_in_Puerto_Rico

To be fair, most mainland residents don't pay either.

"As American citizens, they are eligible for all welfare entitlement programs."
The following programs are provided by the U.S. Federal government in Puerto Rico:
Head Start Program
Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico (Programa de Asistencia Nutricional)
Section 8 (housing)
Community Development Block Grant
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welfare_in_Puerto_Rico

Minimum wage in Puerto Rico
 Employers not covered by the FLSA will be subject to a minimum wage that is at least 70 percent of the federal minimum wage or the applicable mandatory decree rate, whichever is higher. The Secretary of Labor and Human Resources may authorize a rate based on a lower percentage for any employer who can show that implementation of the 70 percent rate would substantially curtail employment in that business. Puerto Rico also has minimum wage rates that vary according to the industry.
----------------------------

One side sees them as a reliable voter group.  But imagine these are two companies in merger acquisition talks.  What does each side offer the other?

If both sides passed balanced budget amendments, we would have no use for each other.  There would be no spending increases to distribute.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2017, 06:12:21 PM »

http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/354312-puerto-rico-faces-looming-health-crisis?rnd=1507413104
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ccp
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« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2017, 12:57:44 PM »

https://townhall.com/columnists/larryelder/2017/10/05/trump-not-letting-media-turn-puerto-rico-into-his-katrina-n2390724
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ccp
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« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2017, 04:40:39 PM »

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/08/puerto-rican-ceo-who-blasted-local-government-over-maria-response-gets-serious-threats.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2017, 12:53:43 PM »

    Popular opinion in the overseas U.S. territory of Puerto Rico has trended toward statehood, with about 97 percent of voters backing that option in a June referendum.

    Admitting Puerto Rico into the Union would alter the composition of the U.S. Congress, and House and Senate members could resist adding extra legislators who could sway close votes.

    Aside from political representation, statehood does not hold many material benefits for Puerto Ricans, because they are already U.S. citizens and have the right to work and to travel freely in the United States.

The destruction wrought by Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico has renewed attention on the island's relationship with the United States. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the U.S. overseas territory was a key part of the United States' drive to secure the Caribbean against hostile foreign powers. But as European powers declined while the United States grew to become the globe's dominant force, the Caribbean's immediate importance to U.S. foreign policy waned. Still, the region remains indispensable to U.S. national security, mainly because of its proximity to the mainland. No foreign powers are capable of making meaningful inroads into the Caribbean, although Russian and Chinese influence in such places as Cuba and Venezuela will continue to concern the United States.

Taken From Spain

Dominance over the Caribbean is essential to the United States, but the country's direct political control of Puerto Rico is more a legacy of how the United States set about achieving this foreign policy imperative. The United States wrested control of the island from Spain during the Spanish-American War in 1898. (Compared with fighting in other Spanish possessions such as Cuba and the Philippines, Puerto Rico was a relatively minor part of the conflict.) And while Cuba and the Philippine islands came under U.S. control, only Puerto Rico, which was smaller and lacked the strong pro-independence movements of Cuba and the Philippines, remained directly administered by the United States.
 
Since the early 20th century, the issue of independence — or a change in the island's relationship with Washington — has arisen periodically. In 1917, Washington laid the groundwork for Puerto Rico's present relationship. It was made into a self-governing, unincorporated territory whose citizens have the rights of those on the mainland United States. However, the island has no political representation in Congress, and its citizens are not able to vote in U.S. presidential elections (although they do vote in presidential primaries). Its governors were appointed by the U.S. president until 1947, when Luis Munoz Marin, the first democratically elected governor, took office.
 
Beginning in the mid-1930s, an independence movement steadily grew in Puerto Rico, although it was never widespread enough to meaningfully threaten U.S. control. In 1950, the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, a pro-independence political movement, fomented a series of revolts that the United States put down by deploying the National Guard. Also that year, Puerto Rican separatists attempted to assassinate President Harry Truman. While separatists later injured five congressmen during an assault on the U.S. Capitol in 1954, the independence movement was seriously crippled after its main leader, Pedro Albizu Campos, was arrested during the 1950 revolts. From the 1960s through the 1980s, the United States continued to break up various cells advocating and carrying out violence in support of independence.

Congress Holds the Key

Because of Puerto Rico's status as a territory, the island's political future rests in the hands of the U.S. Congress. Puerto Rico's political scene is roughly divided between political figures who intend to uphold the status quo relationship with the United States and those who want to shift toward statehood. There is no serious movement toward independence. Since 1968, the island's status has been put to a vote five times in separate, nonbinding referendums. And the statehood option, which would make Puerto Rico the 51st state, has steadily gained ground. During the last referendum, held on June 11, 2017, that alternative won with 97 percent of the ballots — although turnout was less than 25 percent of registered voters.
 
Still, such referendums do not ensure that the island's status will change. Since Puerto Rico is a territory, any changes in its standing depend on the president and the legislature of the United States to execute them. And any referendums must be perceived as valid by U.S. authorities. But the main sticking point for U.S. authorities is political representation in Congress: Granting Puerto Rico two senators and several House representatives would prove controversial, as those seats could shift vote tallies in the legislative branch and benefit one party in federal elections. And those possibilities would reduce the will of Congress to even entertain a vote on statehood after a Puerto Rican referendum.
 
Meanwhile, despite recent referendums suggesting a shift toward statehood, there are no major economic or political drivers pushing Puerto Ricans themselves to a prompt resolution. While some parties and political figures have touted the benefits of statehood, Puerto Ricans have long been able to live, travel and work freely in the United States. Statehood would come with few material benefits for the average Puerto Rican, making it harder to drum up popular support to pressure Congress. Moreover, the recovery from Hurricane Maria will probably delay any attempts for a new vote, given that the island's authorities are overwhelmingly focused on rebuilding and need U.S. financial support to do so.
 
Thus, the storm, while a tragic humanitarian crisis, will have little impact on the future relationship between the United States and its island territory. With no serious push from Washington and no pressing motivations on the island, Puerto Rico is unlikely to seek statehood anytime soon.
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DougMacG
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« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2017, 03:31:50 PM »

I would add that per capita income in P.R. is one third of that in the rest of the US.  They would be our poorest state by far, meaning that a lot of our one size fits all laws like minimum wage don't fit them very well.

Whether they split or join, we should be bringing ideas to Puerto Rico that will raise up their prosperity - just as we should here.
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