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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #50 on: April 10, 2009, 09:48:39 AM »

Regulators and lefty loons go after a woman who sold a Shepherd to VP Biden. . . .

By GRETCHEN METZ, Staff Writer

Click to enlarge
EAST COVENTRY — It was a proud moment for Linda Brown when then-Vice President-elect Joe Biden selected her kennel to purchase his new German shepherd puppy.

That was in mid-December.

For Brown, that proud moment was short-lived.

After the story about the puppy sale ran in the newspapers and on TV newscasts, three dog wardens from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture showed up on Brown's doorstep for a kennel inspection.

And they showed up again and again for four visits over four months.

She said she has also received death threats from animal activists against her and Biden, which were reported to the Secret Service and the FBI.

Bob Slama, special agent in charge of the Secret Service's Philadelphia field office, said the agency "cannot comment on an ongoing investigation."

J.J. Klaver, special agent at the Philadelphia field office of the FBI, said his agency is not investigating the matter at this time.

"I thought when Joe Biden bought a puppy from me, what an honor," Brown said. "Out of millions of breeders in the country, in the world, he picked me."

The glow dimmed almost immediately.

Following a story about Brown and Biden in the Daily Local News, readers posted 131 comments, some chiding Biden for having the Secret Service with him when he went puppy shopping and others complaining he did not get the dog from a shelter.

Brown was taken to task for selling pedigree dogs.

Brown said she has read the comments, even the one that said she was sued.

"I'd like to meet that person," Brown said, adding that she has not been sued.

Some people were outraged about the photograph of Biden holding a 5-week-old puppy, Brown said. But, the breeder points out, Biden only came to select a puppy on that visit, left it with its mother and returned three weeks later to take it home.

Brown was not only vilified in posted comments to newspapers but also on the Web site of People for the Ethical Treatment Animals, or PETA.

According to a Dec. 12 press release from the animal rights group, it aired its controversial TV commercials "Buy One, Get One Killed" in Biden's home state of Delaware after he bought his dog from Brown. The commercial blames euthanization of animals in shelters on people who purchase pets from breeders.

Brown also was cited for record-keeping problems and warned about maintenance and sanitation shortfalls by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

"I was cited for a piece of kibble on the floor and five strands of dog hair. They took a picture of that, they walked around, snapped pictures and don't tell you why," said Brown, who disputes all the items where she was written up.

Brown's case was heard by District Justice James DeAngelo in South Coventry on March 31. She was found "not guilty" for each citation, the judge's office confirmed Wednesday.

Chris Ryder, press secretary for the Department of Agriculture, said Brown was inspected in December because of a complaint. He said it was department policy not to release the name of the person who complained.

Brown's kennel, Wolf Den, was inspected twice a year by the agency and routinely had satisfactory reports until December 2008 when it had seven unsatisfactory inspection results out of 26, according to the inspection records on the agency's Web site.

Ryder said the inspectors returned as a matter of follow-up to determine if the unsatisfactory matters had been taken care of. He said more than one inspector was brought in because Brown runs a large kennel.

Before going to court, Brown had to hire a lawyer. So far her legal fees are $4,000, she said.

"Never, never, never again," Brown said about selling a dog to anyone with a high profile.

Brown said she gets her breeding stock from Germany. Each dog costs between $5,000 and $10,000.

"If I paid that much for them, don't you think I'd treat them pretty good?" Brown asks.

While the First Family was shopping for a Portuguese water dog, Brown said those breeders were getting in touch with her to find out what her experience had been like.

Brown has a few words for them.

"It's been horrific since December," she said.

http://www.dailylocal.com/articles/2009/04/09/news/srv0000005068031.txt
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #51 on: April 26, 2009, 08:26:06 PM »

http://www.youtube.com:80/watch?v=Re644qgnCtw&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esherdog%2Enet%2Fforums%2Ff7%2Fmongolians%2Dusing%2Deagles%2Dhunt%2Dwolves%2Dthats%2Dright%2Deagles%2D959782%2F&feature=player_embedded
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rachelg
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« Reply #52 on: May 21, 2009, 10:31:30 PM »

Last November, Australian couple Jan and Dave Griffith took their Australian cattle dog, Sophie Tucker, on a sailing trip off the coast of Queensland. The couple and their pet were having a wonderful time at sea until a storm struck one day. While the Griffiths worked to keep the boat on course, they turned away from Sophie. A moment later, she was gone. She had slipped overboard, and the couple feared that she had drowned.

“We were able to back-track to look for her, but because it was a grey day, we just couldn’t find her and we searched for well over an hour,” Jan Griffith told BBC News.

“We thought that once she had hit the water she would have been gone because the wake from the boat was so big.”

The Griffiths returned home in tears over the loss of their beloved pet. But four months later, they received some surprise news: Sophie had been found on a remote island, alive and well. She had swum five miles to shore after falling off the ship, and had survived since then by eating baby goats and other small animals.

The rangers who discovered her initially thought that Sophie was a wild dog, because she did not let people come near her. But when the Griffiths came to pick her up, Sophie immediately recognized her owners. After Jan Griffith called her name, “she started whimpering and banging the cage and when they let her out she just about flattened us,” she told the AAP news agency.

Her castaway adventure finally over, Sophie is doing well at home, relaxing by the pool and eating all the treats she wants. But Jan Griffith still can’t get over what her dog must have gone through to survive.

“She was a house dog and look what she’s done, she has swum over five nautical miles, she has managed to live off the land all on her own,” she told BBC News. “We wish she could talk, we truly do

http://gimundo.com/news/article/dog-lost-at-sea-four-months-discovered-on-deserted-island/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7986816.stm
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #53 on: July 30, 2009, 06:59:22 AM »



Is there a snake bite vaccine for dogs?

There is a vaccine against rattlesnakes for dogs. For more information, see http://www.redrockbiologics.com/
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Freki
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« Reply #54 on: July 30, 2009, 08:35:41 AM »

I have known 2 dogs bitten by rattlesnakes.  They both recovered with no ill effects.  They were both just nursed not doctored ( no antivenom was given). I am forming the opinion that rattlesnake venom does not effect dogs as it does people.  Of coarse this is just 2 examples and many other variables could explain the recovery, dry bite etc.  The effect could be like the fallow web spider in Australia, lethal to people but annoying to dogs.  I am not a vet just an observer.  You might visit The Texas A&M web site or call the University I have had many agricultural questions answered there with a phone call.  They would know about the vaccine.  I have heard it is harder to get into  Aggie Vet school than medical school.

Freki
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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #55 on: September 04, 2009, 09:43:24 AM »

Dogs descended from wolf pack on Yangtze river
Today's dogs are all descended from a pack of wolves tamed 16,000 years ago on the shores of the Yangtze river, according to new research.
 
Published: 10:28AM BST 02 Sep 2009

It was previously known that the birthplace of the dog was eastern Asia but historians were not able to be more precise than that.
However, now researchers have made a number of new discoveries about the history of man's best friend - including that the dog appeared about 16,000 years ago south of the Yangtze river in China.

It has also been discovered that even though the dog has a single geographical origin it descends from a "large number of animals - at least several hundred tamed wolves, probable even more"...

Peter Savolainen, a biology researcher at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm and who led the study with a team of Chinese researches, said: "For the first time in world history it is possible to provide a detailed picture of the dog, with its birthplace, point in time, and how many wolves were tamed.

"This is a considerably more specific date and birthplace than had previously been put forward.

"Our earlier findings from 2002 have not been fully accepted, but with our new data there will be greater acceptance.

"The picture provides much more detail."

Researchers, writing in Molecular Biology and Evolution, also said that the time for the emergence of the dog conforms well with when the population in that part of the world went from being hunters and gatherers to being farmers, which was 10,000 to 12,000 years ago.

Mr Savolainen added: "The fact that there were so many wolves indicates that this was an important, major part of the culture.

"The findings provide several exciting theories.

"For example, the original dogs, unlike their later descendents in Europe, which were used as herders and guard dogs, probably ended their lives in the stomachs of humans."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/6125898/Dogs-descended-from-wolf-pack-on-Yangtze-river.html
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rachelg
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« Reply #56 on: November 03, 2009, 09:25:20 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/01/weekinreview/01kershaw.html?_r=1&em=&pagewanted=print

November 1, 2009
Good Dog, Smart Dog
By SARAH KERSHAW

Life as a Labradoodle may sound free and easy, but if you’re Jet, who lives in New Jersey, there is a lot of work to be done.

He is both a seizure alert dog and a psychiatric service dog whose owner has epilepsy, severe anxiety, depression, various phobias and hypoglycemia. Jet has been trained to anticipate seizures, panic attacks and plunging blood sugar and will alert his owner to these things by staring intently at her until she does something about the problem. He will drop a toy in her lap to snap her out of a dissociative state. If she has a seizure, he will position himself so that his body is under her head to cushion a fall.

Jet seems like a genius, but is he really so smart? In fact, is any of it in his brain, or is it mostly in his sniff?

The matter of what exactly goes on in the mind of a dog is a tricky one, and until recently much of the research on canine intelligence has been met with large doses of skepticism. But over the last several years a growing body of evidence, culled from small scientific studies of dogs’ abilities to do things like detect cancer or seizures, solve complex problems (complex for a dog, anyway), and learn language suggests that they may know more than we thought they did.

Their apparent ability to tune in to the needs of psychiatric patients, turning on lights for trauma victims afraid of the dark, reminding their owners to take medication and interrupting behaviors like suicide attempts and self-mutilation, for example, has lately attracted the attention of researchers.

In September, the Army announced that it would spend $300,000 to study the impact of pairing psychiatric service dogs like Jet with soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with post-traumatic stress disorder. Both the House and Senate have recently passed bills that would finance the training and placement of these dogs with veterans.

Hungarian researchers reported in a study last year that a guide dog for a blind and epileptic person became anxious before its master suffered a seizure and was taught to bark and lick the owner’s face and upper arm when it detected an onset, three to five minutes before the seizure. It is still somewhat mysterious how exactly dogs detect seizures, whether it’s by picking up on behavioral changes or smelling something awry, but several small studies have shown that a powerful sense of smell can detect lung and other types of cancer, as the dogs sniff out odors emitted by the disease.

Beyond these perceptual abilities, in which trainers can use the dogs’ natural instincts, some research has examined dogs’ actual cognitive ability, and found not just good doggie, but smart doggie.

“I believe that so much research has come out lately suggesting that we may have underestimated certain aspects of the mental ability of dogs that even the most hardened cynic has to think twice before rejecting the possibilities,” said Stanley Coren, a psychology professor at the University of British Columbia and an author of several books on dogs.

Dr. Coren’s work on intelligence, along with other research suggesting that the canine brain processes information something like the way people do, has drawn criticism. And there is good reason. For most of the last century the specter of a horse named Clever Hans hung over anyone who tried to prove that dogs were acting in thoughtful ways — not merely mimicking or manipulating people into believing that they in fact grasped human concepts.

Clever Hans was said to be able to count, make change and tell time by tapping his hoof, until investigators in the early 1900s learned that Hans was merely responding to his trainer’s body language, tapping when the trainer nodded his head. This provided an enduring example for those who believed thought was the exclusive domain of humans.

But in 2004, German researchers reported that a border collie named Rico could learn the name of an object in one try, had 200 objects in his repertoire and remembered them all a month later, all very human. Even skeptical animal behavior researchers found the Rico results impressive and sound. Is it possible that Rico turned the tide on the Clever Hans problem, even though there is debate about how we can reliably measure what dogs know?

By giving dogs language learning and other tests devised for infants and toddlers, Dr. Coren has come up with an intelligence ranking of 100 breeds, with border collies at No. 1. He says the most intelligent breeds (poodles, retrievers, Labradors and shepherds) can learn as many as 250 words, signs and signals, while the others can learn 165. The average dog is about as intellectually advanced as a 2- to 2-and-a-half-year-old child, he has concluded, with an ability to understand some abstract concepts. For example, the animal can get “the idea of being a dog” by differentiating photographs with dogs in them from photographs without dogs.

But Clive D. L. Wynne, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Florida who specializes in canine cognition and has himself said he met a border collie who knew 1,500 words, takes issue with efforts to compare human and canine brains.

He argues that it is dogs’ deep sensitivity to the humans around them, their obedience under rigorous training, and their desire to please that can explain most of these capabilities. They may be deft at reading human cues — and teachable — but that doesn’t mean they are thinking like people, he says. A dog’s entire world revolves around its primary owner, and it will respond to that person to get what it wants, usually food, treats or affection.

“I take the view that dogs have their own unique way of thinking,” Dr. Wynne said. “It’s a happy accident that doggie thinking and human thinking overlap enough that we can have these relationships with dogs, but we shouldn’t kid ourselves that dogs are viewing the world the way we do.”


Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #57 on: November 27, 2009, 09:00:37 AM »

Bay area, CA:
====================

http://www.hssv.org/adoption_pet-of-the-week.html

A friend of mine works at HSSV and sent this out. The dog's not 100% Akita, but she is apparently just completely awesome. So, I figured it couldn't hurt to send it your way on the off chance you guys would consider adopting her.
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rachelg
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« Reply #58 on: December 09, 2009, 05:13:22 PM »


http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/05/us/05religion.html?_r=1&pagewanted=printDecember 5, 2009
Religion Journal
Yes, Miky, There Are Rabbis in Montana
By ERIC A. STERN

HELENA, Mont. — In Montana, a rabbi is an unusual sight. So when a Hasidic one walked into the State Capitol last December, with his long beard, black hat and long black coat, a police officer grabbed his bomb-sniffing German shepherd and went to ask the exotic visitor a few questions.

Though there are few Jews in Montana today, there once were many. In the late 19th century, there were thriving Jewish populations in the mining towns, where Jews emigrated to work as butchers, clothiers, jewelers, tailors and the like.

The city of Butte had kosher markets, a Jewish mayor, a B’nai B’rith lodge and three synagogues. Helena, the capital city, had Temple Emanu-El, built in 1891 with a seating capacity of 500. The elegant original facade still stands, but the building was sold and converted to offices in the 1930s, when the congregation had dwindled to almost nothing, the Jewish population having mostly assimilated or moved on to bigger cities.

There is a Jewish cemetery in Helena, too, with tombstones dating to 1866. But more Jews are buried in Helena than currently live here.

And yet, in a minor revival, Montana now has three rabbis, two in Bozeman and one (appropriately) in Whitefish. They were all at the Capitol on the first night of Hannukah last year to light a menorah in the ornate Capitol rotunda, amid 100-year-old murals depicting Sacajawea meeting Lewis and Clark, the Indians beating Custer, and the railway being built. The security officer and the dog followed the rabbi into the rotunda, to size him up.

Hanukkah has a special significance in Montana these days. In Billings in 1993, vandals broke windows in homes that were displaying menorahs. In a response organized by local church leaders, more than 10,000 of the city’s residents and shopkeepers put make-shift menorahs in their own windows, to protect the city’s three dozen or so Jewish families. The vandalism stopped.

Lately, the only commotion about Hanukkah has been the annual haggling among the rabbis over who gets to light the menorah at the Capitol. (It has since been resolved — at this year’s lighting, on Dec. 16, they will each light a candle; in the future they will take turns going first.)

Last year, the rabbinic debate resumed as the hour of lighting neared and 20 or so Jewish Montanans filed into the Capitol.

One woman could be heard reporting, excitedly, that a supermarket in Great Falls would be carrying matzo next Passover; a guy from Missoula was telling everyone that he had just gotten a shipment of pastrami from Katz’s Deli in New York.

The menorah was lighted and Hebrew prayers chanted, while the officer watched from a distance with his dog. He figured he would let it all go down and then move in when the ceremony was done. The dog sat at attention, watching the ceremony with a peculiar expression on its face, a look of intense interest. When the ceremony was over, the officer approached the Hasidic rabbi.

“I’m Officer John Fosket of the Helena Police,” he said. “This is Miky, our security dog. Do you mind if I ask you a few questions?”

Miky, pronounced Mikey, is in a Diaspora of his own. He was born in an animal shelter in Holland and shipped as a puppy to Israel, where he was trained by the Israeli Defense Forces to sniff out explosives. Then one day, Miky got a plane ticket to America. Rather than spend the standard $20,000 on a bomb dog, the Helena Police Department had shopped around and discovered that it could import a surplus bomb dog from the Israeli forces for the price of the flight. So Miky came to his new home in Helena, to join the police force.

The problem, the officer explained, was that Miky had been trained entirely in Hebrew.

When Officer Fosket got Miky, he was handed a list of a dozen Hebrew commands and expressions, like “Hi’ sha’ er” (stay!), Ch’pess (search!), and “Kelev tov” (good doggy). He made flashcards and tried practicing with Miky. But poor Miky didn’t respond.

Officer Fosket (who is not Jewish) suspected he wasn’t pronouncing the words properly. He tried a Hebrew instructional audio-book from the local library, but no luck. The dog didn’t always understand what he was being ordered to do. Or maybe Miky was just using his owner’s bad pronunciation as an excuse to ignore him. Either way, the policeman needed a rabbi.

And now he had found one. They worked through a few pronunciations, and the rabbi, Chaim Bruk, is now on call to work with Miky and his owner as needed. Officer Fosket has since learned to pronounce the tricky Israeli “ch” sound, and Miky has become a new star on the police force. The two were even brought in by the Secret Service to work a recent presidential visit.

So all is well in the Jewish community here because the Hasidic rabbi is helping the Montana cop speak Hebrew to his dog. It is good news all around. The officer keeps the Capitol safe, and the Hebrew pooch is feeling more at home hearing his native tongue.

But the big winner is the rabbi, a recent arrival from Brooklyn who is working hard (against tough odds) to bring his Lubavitch movement to Montana. He has been scouring the state for anyone who can speak Hebrew, and is elated to have found a German shepherd he can talk to.

Eric A. Stern lives in Helena, Mont., and is senior counselor to Gov. Brian Schweitzer. The Beliefs column by Peter Steinfels will return on Dec. 19.
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ccp
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« Reply #59 on: January 07, 2010, 02:13:35 PM »

True story:
Both my wife Katherine and one of our three dogs have diabetes and are on insulin.

Yesterday my dog Buckwheat started shaking and having a hypoglycemic reaction.
Katherine fed her these dried chicken chips from the pet store and the dog soon seemed better.

Than Katherine started getting shakey and having a low blood sugar reaction.
Buckwheat ran and came back with a chicken chip and dropped it in Katherine's lap.

I love dogs.
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Rarick
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« Reply #60 on: January 07, 2010, 02:24:35 PM »

One of the dogs I grew up with would remind us to take off our muddy boots after doing chores by blocking the door and patting the scrusher with a paw.  Dad frequently di the same thing, pointing at our boots while standing in the door and tapping the scrusher with his boot.

They can be pretty smart sometimes.
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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #61 on: January 19, 2010, 12:34:44 PM »

By Ellen Gibson
Tuesday, January 19, 2010; HE06

Dog genes that code for such signature pet traits as the furrowed skin of the Shar-Pei have been identified in a study that shows how centuries of breeding gave rise to 400 kinds of domestic dogs.

Researchers analyzed the genes of 275 dogs in 10 breeds to see how breeding practices have altered their DNA, the hereditary template in their cells. The results, reported last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that some conspicuous physical traits, or phenotypes, such as height and coat color, can be traced to particular genes of beagles, border collies, dachshunds and poodles, among other breeds.

"When you have a Chihuahua that's nine inches tall and a Great Dane that is seven feet tall, that can be traced back to IGF1," the gene that influences dog size, said Joshua Akey, a geneticist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was the paper's lead author.

Understanding how breeding leads to artificial selection of some doggy DNA can clarify the way genes give rise to appearance and behavior in other species, the researchers said. Such knowledge "holds considerable promise for providing unique insights into the genetic basis of heritable variation in humans," they wrote.

Dogs are "a great system for understanding how genetic variation influences how individuals in a population act differently, look different and have different susceptibilities to disease," Akey said in a telephone interview.

Domesticated dogs have been bred for more than 14,000 years, the report said. The strict form of selective breeding used today to turn out desired characteristics in the animals is a more recent phenomenon.

"Most dog breeds were formed in the last 500 to 1,000 years, a relatively short time frame in terms of evolution," Akey said.

Today there are more than 400 genetically distinct breeds of domestic dog, yet "relatively little progress has been made on systematically identifying which regions of the canine genome have been influenced by selective breeding during the natural history of the dog," the study said.

To pursue this, the researchers analyzed the full set of genes, called the genome, of 10 breeds of domesticated dogs to locate the most-differentiated regions of their genes. Of the 10, the most genetically distinct breeds were the German shepherd, Shar-Pei, beagle and greyhound.

The researchers were able to zero in on one specific gene, called HAS2, which causes deep wrinkling in the skin of the Shar-Pei. The breed is characterized by a sandy coat, furrowed skin and a wide muzzle, according to the American Kennel Club, the nation's largest purebred dog registry. The HAS2 finding was confirmed in two follow-up analyses.

This gene is of particular interest, Akey said, because HAS2 mutations in humans can lead to a skin condition called cutaneous mucinosis. This rare disease affects mostly young people and involves skin lesions and inflammation, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Previous analyses of canine genomics had linked four genes to physical traits including coat color and texture, leg length and size. The researchers in this study were able to confirm all four earlier findings, including variations in the genes IGF1 and FGF5 that account for the differences in dogs' size and limb length, respectively.

Akey and his team also identified 150 new gene locations, containing more than 1,600 genes, that have been altered by artificial selection. They plan further testing of these genes, he said. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

-- Bloomberg News

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/15/AR2010011503145.html
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Body-by-Guinness
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« Reply #62 on: January 26, 2010, 05:19:40 PM »

'Survival of the Cutest' Proves Darwin Right
ScienceDaily (Jan. 21, 2010) — Domestic dogs have followed their own evolutionary path, twisting Darwin's directive 'survival of the fittest' to their own needs -- and have proved him right in the process, according to a new study by biologists Chris Klingenberg, of The University of Manchester and Abby Drake, of the College of the Holy Cross in the US.

The study, published in The American Naturalist on January 20,  2010, compared the skull shapes of domestic dogs with those of different species across the order Carnivora, to which dogs belong along with cats, bears, weasels, civets and even seals and walruses.
It found that the skull shapes of domestic dogs varied as much as those of the whole order. It also showed that the extremes of diversity were farther apart in domestic dogs than in the rest of the order. This means, for instance, that a Collie has a skull shape that is more different from that of a Pekingese than the skull shape of the cat is from that of a walrus.
Dr Drake explains: "We usually think of evolution as a slow and gradual process, but the incredible amount of diversity in domestic dogs has originated through selective breeding in just the last few hundred years, and particularly after the modern purebred dog breeds were established in the last 150 years."
By contrast, the order Carnivora dates back at least 60 million years. The massive diversity in the shapes of the dogs' skulls emphatically proves that selection has a powerful role to play in evolution and the level of diversity that separates species and even families can be generated within a single species, in this case in dogs.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100120093525.htm
Much of the diversity of domestic dog skulls is outside the range of variation in the Carnivora, and thus represents skull shapes that are entirely novel.
Dr Klingenberg adds: "Domestic dogs are boldly going where no self respecting carnivore ever has gone before.
"Domestic dogs don't live in the wild so they don't have to run after things and kill them -- their food comes out of a tin and the toughest thing they'll ever have to chew is their owner's slippers. So they can get away with a lot of variation that would affect functions such as breathing and chewing and would therefore lead to their extinction.
"Natural selection has been relaxed and replaced with artificial selection for various shapes that breeders favour."
Domestic dogs are a model species for studying longer term natural selection. Darwin studied them, as well as pigeons and other domesticated species.
Drake and Klingenberg compared the amazing amount of diversity in dogs to the entire order Carnivora. They measured the positions of 50 recognizable points on the skulls of dogs and their 'cousins' from the rest of the order Carnivora, and analyzed shape variation with newly developed methods.
The team divided the dog breeds into categories according to function, such as hunting, herding, guarding and companion dogs. They found the companion (or pet) dogs were more variable than all the other categories put together.
According to Drake, "Dogs are bred for their looks not for doing a job so there is more scope for outlandish variations, which are then able to survive and reproduce."
Dr Klingenberg concludes: "I think this example of head shape is characteristic of many others and is showing it so clearly, showing what happens when you consistently and over time apply selection.
"This study illustrates the power of Darwinian selection with so much variation produced in such a short period of time. The evidence is very strong."
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #63 on: April 20, 2010, 03:48:50 PM »


http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=pkPNa4DBFHI
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2010, 03:02:45 PM »

Rottweiler destroyed for mauling owner may have been helping her
By Brie Zeltner, The Plain Dealer
May 18, 2010, 5:57PM

Courtesy Baker familyCarolyn Baker CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, Ohio -- A Rottweiler destroyed for mauling its 63-year-old owner in Cleveland Heights in February, may have been trying to help drag the woman to safety, after all.

Carolyn Baker collapsed in her driveway after a heart attack, Cuyahoga County Coroner Frank Miller said Tuesday. The ailing woman had gone outside in only a nightgown to bring her 140-pound dog, Zeus, into the house.

The death was caused by a natural collapse, Miller said. "The dog was trying to help her, really. There were very few actual dog bites, it was mostly [signs of] pawing," he said.

Baker's family had said they believed Zeus was a hero, and the wounds were part of the 9-year-old dog's devoted rescue attempts. The family did not return phone calls Tuesday.

Baker's underlying heart disease was the main cause of her death, Miller said. She had suffered a recent stroke and heart attack, according to her family.

Hypothermia also contributed to Baker's death, Miller said. She was outside for several hours before the dog barked enough to wake a neighbor. Zeus was confined at Pepperidge Kennels in Bedford after the incident.

Cleveland Heights Municipal Court ordered the dog be destroyed on April 2, deeming it vicious and dangerous to society.

That decision was based on testimony from police officers and a neighbor, the dog's behavior report from the kennel, and from an oral report from a pathologist, listing '"severe dog bites" as contributing to her death.

While Miller said the description was accurate, he also said that the injuries the dog caused looked a lot worse than they actually were.

"It's our theory that she went down for a natural reason and then the dog was kind of tugging on her and some bleeding occurred that by itself may not have been fatal," Miller said.

Dr. Krista Pekarski, who completed the autopsy and gave the report, was not available for comment.

Cpt. Ron Salcer said the dog was deemed vicious based on the severity of Baker's wounds and because the dog regurgitated part of the woman's bra about a week after it was impounded.

"[It] shows that he was very aggressive if he would bite and chew to the point that he would take off her brassiere and swallow it," Salcer said.

The Baker family was notified of the court hearing where Zeus' fate was decided, but did not attend, said police Chief Martin Lentz.

Baker, who had suffered two strokes in the past 15 years, could move only slowly and with difficulty, her son Rinaldo said at the time of her death.

She did not usually bring the dog inside on her own and the family did not know she had left the house that night.

Baker's husband, Ricardo, found Carolyn Baker about 3 a.m. on Feb. 7. Depressions and blood in the snow marked a trail from the garage, where Zeus was being kept, to the back door, where she was found.
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« Reply #65 on: December 30, 2010, 01:42:57 PM »

By MICHAEL M. PHILLIPS
BATTLE GROUND, Wash.—Sue Foster knew what she needed to do when her border collie, Taff, was expelled from puppy school for herding the black Labs into a corner.

She rented some sheep.

Then she bought another border collie and rented some grazing land. Then she bought some sheep of her own. And a third border collie. Now, like the old lady who swallowed the fly, Ms. Foster keeps a llama to chase off the coyotes that threaten the lambs that go to market to finance the sheep that entertain her dogs.

Once upon a time, Americans got dogs for their sheep. Now they get sheep for their dogs. "I never dreamed it would go this far," says Ms. Foster, 56 years old.

Border collies, first bred along the frontier between England and Scotland, are compulsive herders, with instincts so intense they sometimes search for livestock behind the television when sheep appear on screen, says Geri Byrne, owner of the Border Collie Training Center, in Tulelake, Calif. Left unoccupied, they'll dig up the garden, chew up the doggie bed or persecute the cat.

Herding experts—yes, there is such a thing—say it's increasingly common for people who get border collies as pets to wind up renting or buying sheep just to keep their dogs busy. "It's something that's snowballing all the time," says Jack Knox, a Scottish-born shepherd who travels the U.S. giving herding clinics.

Each day, an average of 18 dogs visit Fido's Farm outside Olympia, Wash., their owners paying $15 per dog to practice on the farm's 200-head flock of sheep. Herding revenue at the farm is up 60% over the past five years, says owner Chris Soderstrom, who bought the farm in 2004.

"We get many people sent down here from the dog park in Seattle," says Ms. Soderstrom, 63 years old. "They need to get their dog a job." Newcomers get a 30-minute herding evaluation, to weed out biters and ovinophobes. One crucial test: Does the dog instinctively know it should circle around the sheep, not charge into the center of the flock?

Ms. Soderstrom runs the sheep-rental operation on the honor system. Owners sign in, noting how many dogs they brought. A map on the wall of a shed shows where flocks can be found that day—perhaps grazing in the clover field or the east lambing pasture.

Bob Hickman, a 69-year-old retired Army officer, is a regular at Fido's Farm. Mr. Hickman drove a Volvo station wagon and was living in Tacoma when he got his first border collie. Now he has four border collies, a house in the country and a 23-foot camper trailer he uses to transport his dogs to herding competitions.

"I try to come early to beat the crowd," he said during a recent visit to Fido's.

With that many dogs, his sheep-rental bills were getting so high that he cut a deal with Ms. Soderstrom to swap fence-building, deworming and other work for time with the flock.

Mr. Hickman trains his dogs at a variety of sheep-rental outfits. He doesn't want his dogs getting too accustomed to particular sheep. Sheep that spend too much time being herded become "dog-broke," nice for novices but boring for a more experienced dog and owner who want the challenge of wilder stock.

 When faced with the reality that herding is deep in their dogs' DNA, many owners of border collies wind up on a farm, renting -- or buying -- their dogs some sheep. WSJ's Michael M. Phillips reports.
.Mr. Hickman likens herding to his old hobby, golf. Both are addictive, he says. And he wouldn't just play the same course over and over. "You get very good at that course, but if you leave that course you might not be able to handle it," he says.

Border collies, usually svelte, black-and-white dogs with pointed muzzles, control sheep with a relentless stare.

Using whistles and voice commands—"come by" for a clockwise run and "away to me" for counterclockwise—Mr. Hickman typically sends Mojo, his best herder, on a long, fast sweep to the far side of the sheep. The dog then turns back and approaches the flock in a crouch, head down and tail low, dropping to her belly if the sheep get too frightened. Gradually, she pushes the sheep back to Mr. Hickman.

A well-trained dog such as Mojo can split a few sheep off from the flock, drive them through gates and corral them into pens. A novice will send them fleeing in all directions, or even grab a mouthful of wool. When the work is done, Mr. Hickman quietly releases Mojo with the traditional command: "That'll do."

At sheepdog trials, handlers compete for cash and glory. The dogs have simpler needs.

"You don't have to treat the dogs with food," says Ms. Foster, 56, an expatriate Briton. "Their reward is the sheep." When Dot, her youngest dog, misbehaves by running straight into the flock, Ms. Foster penalizes her by standing between dog and sheep.

"They're my sheep—not hers," Ms. Foster explains.

 
Border collie
.Ms. Foster and her friend Karen Combs, whom she met outside of a PetSmart store, now own 48 sheep between them. They pay $500 a year to rent seven acres of grazing land, selling a few lambs to help defray the cost of feed and rent.

Ms. Combs, 64, owns a border collie-Australian shepherd mix and five border collies, one of which, Tex, she says suffered a nervous breakdown at six months of age. He was being drilled on challenging maneuvers and simply shut down, refusing to leave his handler's side. "He lost his confidence," Ms. Combs says. It took months for him to recover his will to herd.

More common are physical injuries, from unseen holes or collisions with sheep. Lisa Piccioni, an Oregon veterinarian certified in animal chiropractic, travels to sheepdog trials and clinics, adjusting canine spines as she goes.

"They're going to blow through the pain and not stop for it," she says.

Border collies appear willing to herd until they drop. In fact, they never appear to grow bored of organizing sheep. If they do, for an extra $5 dogs at Fido's Farm can also herd ducks.

Write to Michael M. Phillips at michael.phillips@wsj.com

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« Reply #66 on: April 30, 2011, 12:45:23 PM »



http://vimeo.com/2556048
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« Reply #67 on: May 27, 2011, 01:12:26 PM »

http://dogsinthenews.com/stories/070301a.php
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bigdog
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« Reply #68 on: June 08, 2011, 08:41:25 AM »

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/05/04/war_dog

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/05/12/war_dog_ii
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DougMacG
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« Reply #69 on: June 08, 2011, 11:05:18 AM »

BD,  Great story.  Amazing dog trainers, not just dogs.  I've never been able to get the canine to wear the goggles much less jump from the plane.  smiley

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« Reply #70 on: June 08, 2011, 11:08:55 AM »

 cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool cool
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« Reply #71 on: June 12, 2011, 06:09:33 PM »

http://wolfpark.org/
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« Reply #72 on: June 24, 2011, 06:39:27 AM »

http://tithenai.tumblr.com/post/3215186237/two-churches-located-across-the-street-from-each-other
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« Reply #73 on: September 04, 2011, 01:30:52 PM »



http://www.wimp.com/sheeplight/

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« Reply #74 on: October 29, 2011, 09:12:30 PM »

By MARK DERR
 
Ross MacDonald

Chauvet Cave in southern France houses the oldest representational paintings ever discovered. Created some 32,000 years ago, the 400-plus images of large grazing animals and the predators who hunted them form a multi-chambered Paleolithic bestiary. Many scholars believe that these paintings mark the emergence of a recognizably modern human consciousness. We feel that we know their creators, even though they are from a time and place as alien as another planet.

 Dog historian Mark Derr discusses the story of how man's best friend came to be and how new scientific findings are changing our preconceived notions of the domesticated dog. He speaks with WSJ's Christina Tsuei.

What most intrigues many people about the cave, however, is not the artwork but a set of markings at once more human and more mysterious: the bare footprints of an 8- to 10-year-old torch-bearing boy left in the mud of a back chamber some 26,000 years ago—and, alongside one of them, the paw print of his traveling companion, variously identified as a wolf or a large dog.

Attributing that paw print to a dog or even to a socialized wolf has been controversial since it was first proposed a decade ago. It would push back by some 12,000 years the oldest dog on record. More than that: Along with a cascade of other new scientific findings, it could totally rewrite the story of man and dog and what they mean to each other.

For decades, the story told by science has been that today's dogs are the offspring of scavenger wolves who wandered into the villages established by early humans at the end of the last ice age, about 15,000 years ago. This view emphasizes simple biological drive—to feed on human garbage, the scavenging wolf had to behave in a docile fashion toward humans. And—being human—we responded in kind, seeking out dogs for their obsequiousness and unconditional devotion.

As the story goes, these tame wolves bred with other tame wolves and became juvenilized. Think of them as wolves-lite, diminished in strength, stamina and brains. They resembled young wolves, with piebald coats, floppy ears and shorter, weaker jaws. Pleading whiners, they drowned their human marks in slavish devotion and unconditional love. Along the way, they lost their ability to kill and consume their prey.

But it was never clear, in this old account, just how we got from the scavenging wolf to the remarkable spectrum of dogs who have existed over time, from fell beasts trained to terrorize and kill people to creatures so timid that they flee their own shadows. The standard explanation was that once the dump-diver became a dog, humans took charge of its evolution through selective breeding, choosing those with desired traits and culling those who came up short.

This account is now falling apart in the face of new genetic analyses and recently discovered fossils. The emerging story sees humans and proto-dogs evolving together: We chose them, to be sure, but they chose us too, and our shared characteristics may well account for our seemingly unshakable mutual intimacy.

Dogs and humans are social beings who depend on cooperation for their survival and have an uncanny ability to understand each other in order to work together. Both wolves and humans brought unique, complementary talents to a relationship that was based not on subservience and intimidation but on mutual respect.

It seems that wolves and humans met on the trail of the large grazing animals that they both hunted, and the most social members of both species gravitated toward each other. Several scholars have even suggested that humans learned to hunt from wolves. At the least, camps with wolf sentinels had a competitive advantage over those without. And people whose socialized wolves would carry packs had an even greater advantage, since they could transport more supplies. Wolves benefited as well by gaining some relief from pup rearing, protection for themselves and their offspring, and a steadier food supply.

The relationship between dogs and humans has been so mutually beneficial and enduring that some scholars have suggested that we—dog and human—influenced each other's evolution.

The Chauvet Cave "dogwolf"—the term I use for a doglike, or highly socialized, wolf who kept company with humans—is controversial, but it cannot easily be dismissed. Over the past three years, it has been grouped convincingly with a number of similar animals that have been identified in Belgium, the Czech Republic, Ukraine and the Altai Mountains in Southern Siberia, dating from 33,000 to 16,000 years ago.

Identification of these early dogs, combined with recent genetic evidence and a growing understanding of animals not as stimulus-response machines but as sentient beings, has broken the consensus model of dog domestication—leaving intact little more than the recognition of the grey wolf, Canis lupus, as progenitor of the dog. Everything else, it seems, is up for grabs.

According to the old view, the dog arose around 15,000 years ago in the Middle East. (Or in China, south of the Yangtze River, an alternate possible origin point added in the last decade in an attempt to reconcile archaeological evidence with emerging DNA evidence.)

The first major challenge to the consensus came in 1997, when an international team of biologists published a paper in the journal Science placing the origin of the dog as early as 135,000 years ago. Their date was based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, which is passed on to offspring through females and is believed to change little from generation to generation; it allows scientists to calculate the time when populations or species separated genetically. This analysis suggested that wolves could have become dogs wherever in Eurasia they associated closely with early humans, and that even after the split was made, dogs and wolves continued to interbreed.

In short, because of their natural affinities, wherever and whenever wolves and humans met on the trail, some of them began to keep company. Often, when socialized wolves died, there were no others immediately available to replace them. But sometimes several socialized wolves would mate or a socialized female would mate with a "wild" wolf and then have her litter near the human camp. The pups would stay or go, according to their natures. This kind of arrangement could have continued for a considerable period. Any number of them could ultimately have produced dogwolves or dogs. Most of those lines would have vanished over time.

The DNA evidence remained controversial for years, even as most major studies placed the genetic separation of wolf and dog at earlier dates than those favored by archaeologists. Hard proof was slow to appear. The Chauvet Cave paw print once provided the only physical evidence for the existence of dogs before 15,000 years ago—and it was, at best, an indirect piece of support.

Then in 2008, Mietje Germonpré, a paleontologist at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Science and the leader of an international team of scientists, re-examined fossil material excavated from Goyet Cave in Belgium in the late 19th century and announced the identification of a 31,700-year-old dog, a large and powerful animal who ate reindeer, musk oxen and horses. The dogwolf from Goyet Cave was a creature of the Aurignacian culture that had produced the art in Chauvet Cave.

Last July, another international team identified the remains of a 33,000-year-old "incipient dog" from the Altai Mountains in southern Siberia. This month, Ms. Germonpré confirmed another find, this one in the Czech Republic, of the remains of a 26,000- to 27,000-year-old dog that had been buried with a bone in its mouth—perhaps to fuel it as it accompanied its human companion to the afterlife.

While the old consensus model held that the first dogs were small, these and other recently identified early dogs are large animals, often with shorter noses and broader faces than today's wolves. These early dogs appear in the camps of hunters of horses, reindeer, mammoths and other big game. From all appearances, they were pack animals, guards, hunters and companions. They are perhaps best viewed as the offspring of highly socialized wolves who had begun breeding in or near human camps.

Our view of domestication as a process has also begun to change, with recent research showing that, in dogs, alterations in only a small number of genes can have large effects in terms of size, shape and behavior. Far from being a product of the process of domestication, the mutations that separated early dogs from wolves may have arisen naturally in one or more small populations; the mutations were then perpetuated by humans through directed breeding. Geneticists have identified, for instance, a mutation in a single gene that appears to be responsible for smallness in dogs, and they have shown that the gene itself probably came from Middle Eastern wolves.

All of this suggests that it was common for highly socialized wolves and people to form alliances. It also leads logically to the conclusion that the first dogs were born on the move with bands of hunter-gatherers—not around semi-permanent pre-agricultural settlements. This may explain why it has proven so difficult to identify a time and place of domestication.

Taken together, these recent discoveries have led some scientists to conclude that the dog became an evolutionary inevitability as soon as humans met wolves. Highly social wolves and highly social humans started walking, playing and hunting together and never stopped. The dog is literally the wolf who stayed, who traded wolf society for human society.

Humans did wield a significant influence over dogs, of course, by using breeding to perpetuate mutations affecting their shape, size and physical abilities. Recent studies suggest that the dog has unique abilities among animals to follow human directions and that its capacity for understanding words can approach that of a two-year-old child. To various degrees, humans appear to have concentrated those and other characteristics and traits through selective breeding.

Since the advent of scientific breeding in the late 18th century, humans have altered the look and temperament of the dog more than they had over thousands of preceding years. A team of gene-sequencers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology estimated that the dog lost 4% of its genetic diversity during its initial separation from the wolf. Much greater losses have occurred as a result of modern breed formation, one result of which is the more than 400 inheritable diseases to which purebreds are uniquely vulnerable.

Recent genetic evidence has confirmed that certain basic types—pariah dogs, sight hounds, mastiffs, spitz-type dogs and small dogs—arose very early in the transformation of wolf to dog. These dogs adapted to their homelands and often had special talents as hunters, guards and eventually herders. These characteristics were often perpetuated over time.

Scientific breeders believed they could improve on nature by consolidating several similar types into one breed or isolating a few prize specimens from a larger population. In both cases, they relied on inbreeding to create and perpetuate the look and talents they wanted. With the advent of kennel clubs in the mid-19th century, the pace of breed creation picked up.

Breeders began to create dogs to fit the needs of the wealthy—from sporting dogs that could point and retrieve fowl, to little puppy-like lap dogs. The dog proved to be a wonderful animal for testing the skill of breeders, since it could be stretched in size from two to 200 pounds.

Purebred dogs were expensive commodities until after World War II, when they became symbols of arrival in the middle class. Increased demand led to increased breeding, often in puppy mills. The resulting dogs had health and behavior problems from bad breeding and the poor care of pregnant females and newborn puppies.

In some cases, the traits that breeders desire are inherited along with unwanted, debilitating conditions—such as when blindness and epilepsy accompany particular coat styles and eye colors. In many regards, the original, naturally occurring breeds were healthier and better at their appointed tasks than their purebred heirs.

But this is just the most recent chapter of a long tale. The tableau in the mud of Chauvet Cave is a stark reminder that dogs and humans have traveled together for tens of thousands of years, from ancient hunting camps to farms, ranches cities and suburbs—from the tropics to the poles. The relationship has endured not because dogs are juvenilized wolves but because they are dogs—our faithful companions.

—Mr. Derr's most recent book is "How the Dog Became the Dog: From Wolves to Our Best Friends."
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Cranewings
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« Reply #75 on: November 07, 2011, 05:01:35 PM »

My martial arts teacher has a german police dog. This thing is the smartest dog I've ever seen.

The other day, his baby started crying upstairs. He told me he was tired and didn't immediately get up to go see what was wrong. After a minute or so, his dog walked up to him with the babies bottle in his mouth and dropped in on him.
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« Reply #76 on: November 07, 2011, 07:14:57 PM »

Impressive!
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prentice crawford
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« Reply #77 on: January 25, 2012, 01:30:45 PM »

WOOF,


http://earthsky.org/biodiversity/ancient-dog-skull-suggests-weve-lived-with-dogs-for-33000-years

Ancient dog skull suggests we’ve lived with dogs for 33,000 years
 
Image Credit: Nikolai D. Ovodov
   
A dog skull unearthed in a Siberian cave suggests that modern dogs may be descended from multiple ancestors.
 
 
 
A dog skull unearthed in a Siberian cave presents some of the oldest known evidence of dog domestication and suggests modern dogs may be descended from multiple ancestors.


A St. Bernard sure does look different from a dachshund ... and new evidence suggests that today's dogs might have originated from more than one ancient ancestor, contrary to what some DNA evidence previously has indicated. Photo credit: Soggydan
The ancient skull, preserved in a cave in the Altai Mountains of Siberia for 33,000 years, presents some of the oldest known evidence of dog domestication and, together with equally ancient dog remains from a cave in Belgium, indicates that domestication of dogs may have occurred repeatedly in different geographic locations rather than with a single domestication event.

Wild dogs didn’t go extinct in East Africa after all

In other words, today’s dogs might have originated from more than one ancient ancestor, contrary to what some DNA evidence previously has indicated.


'wolves have long thin snouts and their teeth are not crowded,' said Hodgins. Photo credit: Tambako the Jaguar
Greg Hodgins, a researcher at the University of Arizona’s Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory is co-author of the study that reported the find. He said:

Both the Belgian find and the Siberian find are domesticated species based on morphological characteristics. Essentially, wolves have long thin snouts and their teeth are not crowded, and domestication results in this shortening of the snout and widening of the jaws and crowding of the teeth.

The Altai Mountain skull is extraordinarily well preserved, said Hodgins, enabling scientists to make multiple measurements of the skull, teeth and mandibles that might not be possible on less well-preserved remains. Hodgins said:

The argument that it is domesticated is pretty solid. What’s interesting is that it doesn’t appear to be an ancestor of modern dogs.

The researchers used radiocarbon dating to determine the age of the Siberian skull. They determined that the Siberian skull predates the last great ice age, which occurred between 26,000 and 19,000 years ago. Because the ice sheets severely disrupted life for humans and animals during this time, Hodgins believes neither the Belgian nor the Siberian lineages survived the severe conditions.


Image Credit: Nikolai D. Ovodov
However, the two skulls indicate that the domestication of dogs by humans occurred repeatedly throughout early human history at different geographical locations, which could mean that modern dogs have multiple ancestors rather than a single common ancestor. Hodgins said:

Typically we think of domestication as being cows, sheep and goats, things that produce food through meat or secondary agricultural products such as milk, cheese and wool and things like that.

Those are different relationships than humans may have with dogs. The dogs are not necessarily providing products or meat. They are probably providing protection, companionship and perhaps helping on the hunt. And it’s really interesting that this appears to have happened first out of all human relationships with animals.

Bottom line: A dog skull, preserved in a cave in the Altai Mountains of Siberia for 33,000 years, presents some of the oldest known evidence of dog domestication and, together with equally ancient dog remains from a cave in Belgium, indicates that domestication of dogs may have occurred repeatedly in different geographic locations rather than with a single domestication event.

                        P.C.
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tim nelson
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« Reply #78 on: February 21, 2012, 07:54:18 AM »

In northern wisconsin a group of us just finished up with a wolf tracking intensive. basically two groups found usually 2 different wolf packs to follow on snow trails crossing roads and followed them for the day. In the evening we would share the events and observations of the time in the field. A kill site was found of a white tailed deer by one wolf later joined by 2 others. It was amazing this wolf chased in full tilt for 2 miles through thick trees, shrubs, galloping and bounding. At one point on this wolf's trail one could see there was a dead old growth pine laying down the wolf was approaching perpendicular at full speed. The wolf couldn't see over it, and chose to jump over this huge trunk leaping about 6 yards in distance. The danger at such high speeds of injury but full commitment to the hunt was impressive. It seemed the deer was taken by surprise as the deer was not running away at first, and when grabbed there was immediately huge patches of skin and soon blood and body rollovers in struggle.

The kill site brought in large amounts of scavengers. Fishers(large weasel), ravens, birds, red squirrels, red foxes, eagles.

Much of the week and when scouting for location of the packs is driving on roads and looking for the wolves tracks, urine or scat markings, along or crossing the roads.

It was quite fun to follow a trail that looked like one wolf in knee deep snow, then as they approached hunting areas one trail would split into 2 then 3 until sometimes 5-7 animals would be evident. Witnessing their coordinated movement and teamwork in the snow.

If all goes well, a few friends and I will be camping the next 3 days and following a wolf trail in snow to see what we see.

I am especially fascinated by the subject of the long time span of the human-wolf-dog relationship. Any interesting reading someone can point me to would great.

tim
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ccp
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« Reply #79 on: February 28, 2012, 02:14:30 PM »

http://www.westminsterkennelclub.org/2012/results/bis/index.html
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« Reply #80 on: April 02, 2012, 12:03:13 PM »

Charlie "dog"?

This karate expert chimp was on Ripley's last night.  Kind of cool.
They show him breaking boards with 360 degree spinning back kicks!
These animals are incredibly strong.  I recall it was estimated a 150 chimp could do the equivalent of a 600 pound deadlift.

Needless to add about the poor laday whose face was literally ripped off a few year back:

http://www.thekaratechimp.com/resume.htm
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« Reply #81 on: May 09, 2012, 05:11:28 PM »



http://www.wmur.com/video/31030457/detail.html?Source=Taboola
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« Reply #82 on: June 05, 2012, 03:01:41 PM »

June 5, 2012, 12:38 p.m. ET
The Boxer and His Best Friend

As Manny Pacquiao Trains for Saturday's Fight, His Jack Russell Terrier Sticks by His Side.
By BEN COHEN

Boxing champion Manny Pacquiao's secret weapon may be a four-legged-friend. Every champion boxer has a trainer and promoter in his corner. But the prizefighter Manny Pacquiao also has someone else: a Jack Russell Terrier named Pacman.

LOS ANGELES—One morning last month, as Manny Pacquiao ran laps around a track at the University of Southern California, his dog, Pacman, yelped from the bleachers in frustration, his bone-shaped name tag jingling with every leap.
 
Pacman, the Jack Russell terrier, has been Manny Pacquiao's companion and training partner for four years.
"Sorry, Pacman," said his handler, Noel Lautengco. "You cannot run today."

As Pacquiao, the champion boxer, prepares for Saturday's welterweight bout against Timothy Bradley, the most enthusiasm evident from any member of his entourage came from the smallest one: his Jack Russell terrier.

The dog, who bears his owner's nickname, wasn't allowed off his leash to run with his master that day, as he normally does on streets and trails around Los Angeles. As the boxer did sit-ups and push-ups on a mat, the dog pulled at the leash. And when Pacquiao was finished, he attacked the boxer with his own signature combination of comical jumping and crazy licking.

"He's part of my team," said Pacquiao, the World Boxing Organization welterweight champion, who hasn't lost a fight since Pacman came into his life. "He's a special dog."

Pacman (the dog) lives in Los Angeles full time, where Pacquiao often trains. He typically travels to the Philippines when his owner works out there and joins him in Las Vegas for his fights, where he stays at the pet-friendly Mandalay Bay. He used to sleep with Pacquiao before the boxer realized he was allergic to the dog's hair.

On the morning jogs before Pacquiao's fights, Pacman is often by the boxer's side. Pacman has nearly passed out from climbing the hills in Baguio City and scurried after coyotes while sprinting ahead of Pacquiao in their frequent jogs up to the Hollywood sign.

This training camp hasn't been an ideal one for the pooch, however. Since his last fight, a majority decision over Juan Manuel Marquez in November, Pacquiao says he has eliminated distractions like gambling and drinking while sharpening his focus with daily Bible studies. Pacquiao hadn't trained since then, and neither had Pacman.

"I kind of feel like he's now the Woody in 'Toy Story,'" said Brian Livingston, a marathoner who paces Pacquiao. "He's become part of the menagerie."

The Manny Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather boxing superfight may never happen, but Pacquiao says he ready and any stalling is from Mayweather's side. The boxer sat with WSJ's Lee Hawkins ahead of his fight against Timothy Bradley, this is a clip from that longer interview.

Before previous fights, Pacman wasn't just a mascot. He drove the fighter to train harder than ever by running ahead of the pack. "Nobody could keep up with that dog," said Freddie Roach, Pacquiao's trainer.

But this time, instead of darting around the Philippines in April, he stayed home and acquired an affinity for chicken kebabs and beef jerky. He still runs with Pacquiao, and his fitness has improved over the last month, but Pacman no longer pushes his owner's endurance. "He's getting old. He's become fat," Pacquiao said.

"Is he going to make weight?" asked Fred Sternburg, Pacquiao's media representative.

"This time," Pacquiao said, "he's overweight."

Other world-class fighters have embraced pets over the years. Boxing aficionados marvel about the time Mike Tyson filled a hotel room with pigeons. Floyd Patterson went on 4 a.m. runs with two German shepherds named Charlie Brown and Whitey. And for the Rumble in the Jungle with Muhammad Ali, George Foreman brought to Africa his own German Shepherd as a reliable running companion. He said his pet was his only friend after he lost and called his dogs "the best thing that's ever happened to me."

"I would not have been able to make it in my second career without my dogs," said Foreman, who now owns 11 German shepherds. "If you don't have a good dog, it's going to be the most lonesome training camp you'll ever have."

'He's part of my team,' said Pacquiao, the World Boxing Organization welterweight champion, who hasn't lost a fight since Pacman came into his life.

There are almost as many accounts of Pacman joining Team Pacquiao as there are legends about Pacquiao. No one can remember exactly when Pacman arrived—sometime in 2008, around Pacquiao's wins over David Diaz and Oscar De La Hoya—but it's certain the kinship started with Archie Banas, a friend who cooks for Pacquiao.

Banas picked Pacman, then named Amboy, from a litter of Jack Russell terriers. Banas said the puppies were direct descendants of Max, who played Milo in the 1994 film "The Mask." The late Jack Russell terrier's former owner, Joe McCarter, could not be sure about Pacman's lineage but said this was possible. Banas's wife wouldn't let him keep Amboy, so he gave the dog to Buboy Fernandez, Pacquiao's assistant trainer. Fernandez promptly renamed him Leonard. "He was sleeping on Buboy's tummy for three days," Banas recalled.

But then Pacquiao saw Leonard on a morning run and fell in love at first sight. There is some dispute over how the dog got his new name. Fernandez says he gave it to him; Pacquiao says he came up with the name himself.

Lautengco is Pacman's dog-sitter during camps. He takes temporary residence in a Hollywood motel—Pacman wakes him at 5 a.m. in a bed with a pink spread—and Lautengco sometimes finds unsavory presents waiting for him on his bath towel. "The hotel management is mad at him," he said. When he was a teething puppy, Lautengco says, Pacman scratched and clawed through three couches that Pacquiao replaced.

Pacquiao has his own history with canines. He adored his childhood dog until his estranged father reportedly cooked and ate him. Pacquiao declined to comment on this.

He now maintains Pacman as part of an entourage that the journalist Gary Andrew Poole wrote in his Pacquiao biography "could easily be called the most ridiculous in sports history." Livingston, the long-distance runner, met Pacquiao when they collided several years ago in Griffith Park, around the time Pacquiao's associates were urging him to find a pacesetter without a wagging tail. And yet Pacman hasn't disappeared since then.

"Manny likes to have this aura around him, and he's created this patchwork of people who are essentially a reflection of him," Livingston said. "Everybody serves a purpose. The dog is an extension of that."

Lautengco recently drove Pacman to USC as the sun was rising. Pacman soon learned he wouldn't be running with Pacquiao's posse and was so fussy that Lautengco took him outside the stadium to calm down.

"When I bring him to the track, he forgets me," Lautengco said. "His fun is to run with Manny."

Lautengco finally gave in and let his son take Pacman for a lap. Before long, they were galloping right behind Pacquiao. "He keeps up with him in the mountains and everything," said Kevin Hoskins, one of Pacquiao's sparring partners. "He runs better than me."

By the time Lautengco guided Pacman to Pacquiao—not until the dog sipped bottled water from Lautengco's cupped hands—the boxer was on a yoga mat strengthening his core. Pacman sat behind Pacquiao as he did them. When Pacquiao stood up and leaned over, Pacman jumped to his waist.

It was 8 a.m. and Pacman hadn't been let off his leash all morning. "Sometimes he chases squirrels," Pacquiao said.

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« Reply #83 on: September 30, 2012, 04:50:34 PM »

http://www.michaelyon-online.com/momma-squirrel-breaks-bad.htm
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« Reply #84 on: October 01, 2012, 02:50:01 AM »



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmGKtby43Oc&feature=related
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« Reply #85 on: October 01, 2012, 09:54:31 AM »



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE-3aggrAHI
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« Reply #86 on: October 27, 2012, 06:39:32 AM »


Welcome Back, Wolves. Staying for Dinner?
By MATT RIDLEY..
  
The return of the wolf is one of the unexpected ecological bonuses of the modern era. So numerous are wolves that this fall Wisconsin and Wyoming have joined Idaho and Montana in opening wolf-hunting seasons for the first time in years. Minnesota follows suit next month; Michigan may do so next year. The reintroduced wolves of Yellowstone National Park have expanded to meet the expanding packs of Canada and northern Montana.

Is the return of predators a good thing? Depends on the meaning of 'good.

The same is happening in Europe. Wolf populations are rising in Spain, Italy and Eastern Europe, while in recent years wolves have recolonized France, Germany, Sweden and Norway, and have even been seen in Belgium and the Netherlands. Nor are wolves the only "apex predators" to boom in this way. In the U.S., bears and mountain lions are spreading, to joggers' dismay. Coyotes are reappearing even within cities like Chicago and Denver.

The effect of top predators on lesser predators, like foxes, raccoons and skunks, not to mention domestic cats, can be devastating. Wolves may kill deer and cows, but they also kill these smaller "mesopredators"—middle-of-the-food-chain carnivores. That may be good news for other creatures, especially birds. The very presence of large predators can intimidate the mesopredators: In the Bahamas, large groupers cause small ones to spend more time in hiding, allowing smaller reef fish to thrive.

In 1988 ecologists coined the term "mesopredator release" for the theory that the original disappearance of apex predators at the hand of human beings had caused a population boom in small opportunistic predators and omnivores. In Africa, for instance, baboons have boomed where leopards have been exterminated, to the detriment of antelopes as well as crops. In one marine case, overharvesting of Atlantic sharks caused an expansion in the number of rays, which in turn hurt the stocks of scallops.

Now, as exemplified by the wolf, top predators are returning little by little. This is due to legal protection and the increasing retreat of people to cities and suburbs (teenagers who play computer games would once have staked out wolf kills to protect the family's herd).

So is the return of top predators now suppressing rather than releasing mesopredators?

In parts of Europe, introduced American mink have harmed birds, water voles and other waterside wildlife. But now newly abundant predators of mink, once devastated by DDT, have caused mink populations to fall. In Finland sea eagles are hunting mink; in Britain otters are.

Complicating the picture, some species can be either apex predators or mesopredators. In Yellowstone National Park, coyotes are mesopredators that appear to have declined at the paws of wolves, which is good news for rodents and other creatures. But in suburbs the coyote is more like an apex predator, whose return lays waste the domestic cats that kill so many birds. Even in rural areas, the coyote is an efficient predator of foxes, skunks and badgers. So the arrival of coyotes in an area may be bad for rabbits but good for birds.

Likewise, raccoons are usually a classic mesopredator, but controlling their numbers in Florida to save turtle eggs from their depredations proved counterproductive, because egg-eating crabs then thrived.

Ecology is a complicated and unpredictable business. To test whether the revival of large predators is generally good news for ecosystems, Dr. Laura Prugh of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks is setting out to compare coyote, fox and lynx populations in an area with intensive wolf control, compared with nearby Denali National Park and Preserve, where wolf populations are intact. As she and her co-writers said in a recent paper, given what programs to control mesopredators cost, letting apex predators thrive may provide an "ecosystem service" by controlling them cheaply and more effectively.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 06:48:22 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
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« Reply #87 on: November 23, 2012, 08:47:30 AM »



http://www.tgdaily.com/general-sciences-features/67658-dogs-learn-language-differently-from-humans
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« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2012, 08:16:20 PM »

Can someone translate the Chinese here?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfQaPPKBYJk&NR=1&feature=endscreen

And is that an Akita playfighting with the lion?!?
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« Reply #89 on: January 02, 2013, 11:05:02 AM »



http://www.dogheirs.com/larne/posts/1880-faithful-dog-refuses-to-leave-his-owner-s-graveside-for-six-years
By Martha
September 12, 2012


Capitán stays faithfully on vigil by his owner's graveside. Photo credit: La Voz
 
For six years, a dog named Capitán has stayed by his owner's graveside in Villa Carlos Paz Cordoba, Argentina. Every day at 6pm, he lays by Miguel Guzmán's headstone, on faithful vigil.
 
The dog's remarkable story of loyalty began on March 24, 2006, when Miguel, who was Capitán's owner, passed away. As soon as Capitán realized Miguel was no longer at home, he left to search for him and miraculously managed to find Miguel's grave in the nearby cemetery. Since then, the dog has stayed by his deceased owner's side and refuses to return home.
 
Miguel had brought Capitán, a German Shepherd mix, home as a surprise for his son Damián in 2005. His wife Veronica told La Voz that when Capitán disappeared just after her husband’s death, she and her son searched for him, but were unable to find him. They thought he may have died or been adopted by another family.
 

 
But soon after, when Damien went to visit his father in the cemetery, there was Capitán! No one could explain how Capitán had discovered where Miguel was resting, but he had. The family had a joyful reunion but when they tried to bring Capitán home, he refused. Veronica and Miguel tried several times, but Capitán would not leave. He would sometimes follow them home for a short time, but then Capitán would always return to the cemetery.
 
The cemetery is now considered home for Capitán. According to cemetery director, Hector Baccega, the dog has earned the affection of precinct workers and cemetery caretakers, who make sure he is fed and kept up-to-date on his immunizations. At one point, Capitán had broken his front leg, so a vet was called over to give Capitán care.
 

 
Capitán will occassionally go to his old home to visit Veronica and Damien. However, Veronica said she has come to accept that Capitán does not want to stay home and that he wishes to stay close to his best friend. Damien, now 13, also recognizes Capitán is caring for his dad. Damien admits he had wanted to bring Capitán home to stay over the years, but knows the dog will want to return to his dad's side.
 
Hector Baccega said that Capitán walks with him through the cemetery every day, but when the early evening approaches, he goes to Miguel's tomb and lays down next to the headstone. Hector feels the amazing dog is sharing a valuable lesson with humans – to appreciate the memories of the dearly departed.
 
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« Reply #90 on: February 03, 2013, 12:34:12 PM »

Why Dogs Are Smarter Than Cats
A not-so-smart best friend? Experiments in language and cognition show Fido's (sporadic) brilliance.
By BRIAN HARE and VANESSA WOODS

With half as many neurons in their cerebral cortex as cats—and half the attitude, some would say—dogs are often taken to be the less intelligent domestic partner. While dogs drink out of the toilet, slavishly follow their master and need a chaperone to relieve themselves, cats hunt self-sufficiently and survey their empire with a regal gaze.

But cats betware-- Research in recent years has finally revealed the genius of dogs.

Like other language-trained animals—dolphins, parrots, bonobos—dogs can learn to respond to hundreds of spoken signals associated with different objects. What sets dogs apart is how they learn these words.

 
Cats can hold grudges and look like kings—but when it comes to memory, dogs get the pat on the head.

If you show a child a red block and a green block, and then ask for the chromium block, not the red block, most children will give you the green block, despite not knowing that the word "chromium" can refer to a shade of green. Children infer the name of the object. They know that you can't be referring to the red block.

In 2004, Juliane Kaminski from Britain's University of Portsmouth and her colleagues published the results of a similar experiment with a dog called Rico who knew the names of hundreds of objects.

Dr. Kaminski showed Rico an object that he had never seen before, along with seven other toys that he knew by name. Then she asked Rico to fetch a toy using a word that was new to him, like "Sigfried." Just like human tots with the word "chromium," Rico was immediately able to infer that "Sigfried" referred to the new toy. Since the report on Rico, several other dogs have also been shown to make inferences this way. Dogs are the only animals that have demonstrated this humanlike ability.

Based on the ability of cats to hold a grudge, you might think that they have better memories than dogs. Not so. Several years ago, Sylvain Fiset of Canada's University of Moncton and colleagues reported experiments in which a dog or cat watched while a researcher hid a reward in one of four boxes. After a delay, they were allowed to search for the treat. Cats started guessing after only one minute. But even after four minutes, dogs hadn't forgotten where they saw the food.

Still, dog owners should not be too smug. In 2010, Krista Macpherson and William Roberts of the University of Western Ontario published a study that tested navigational memory, in which dogs had to search for food in a maze with eight arms radiating out from a central position. The researchers then looked at rats previously given the same test. They beat dogs by a wide margin.


Even the dog's closest relative, the wolf, beat its cousin when food was placed on the opposite side of a fence, as shown in a 1982 study by Harry and Martha Frank of the University of Michigan. In 2001, Peter Pongrácz and colleagues from Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary published a study with an important qualification to this earlier finding: When the experimenters showed dogs a human rounding the fence first, the dogs could solve the problem immediately.

This is the secret to the genius of dogs: It's when dogs join forces with us that they become special.

Nowhere is this clearer than when dogs are reading our gestures. Every dog owner has helped her dog find a lost ball or treat by pointing in the right direction. No other animal—not even our closest relatives, bonobos and chimpanzees—can interpret our gestures as flexibly as dogs.

So are dogs smarter than cats? In a sense, but only if we cling to a linear scale of intelligence that places sea sponges at the bottom and humans at the top. Species are designed by nature to be good at different things.

And what might the genius of cats be? Possibly, that they just can't be bothered playing our silly games or giving us the satisfaction of discovering the extent of their intelligence.

—Dr. Hare is the director of the Duke Canine Cognition Center, and Ms. Woods is a research scientist at Duke University. This essay is adapted from their new book, "The Genius of Dogs," published by Dutton.
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« Reply #91 on: February 08, 2013, 12:04:02 AM »

http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/2744-disabled-veteran-asks-for-public-support-service-dog-faces-euthanasia-for-biting-woman-who-beat-him-with-metal-poles
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« Reply #92 on: February 10, 2013, 09:19:07 AM »


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/sports/many-animal-lovers-now-see-american-kennel-club-as-an-outlier.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20130210
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 11:00:33 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
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« Reply #93 on: April 07, 2013, 10:42:22 AM »



http://theoatmeal.com/comics/dog_paradox
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« Reply #94 on: May 15, 2013, 08:33:37 PM »

My favorite food was always prime rib too...though I rarely eat it these days....

http://news.yahoo.com/dogs-humans-evolved-together-study-suggests-190353779.html
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« Reply #95 on: June 18, 2013, 07:49:31 AM »



http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/news/canada/blog.html?b=news.nationalpost.com%2F2013%2F06%2F14%2Fbanff-motorcyclist-pursued-by-massive-grey-wolf-along-stretch-of-b-c-highway-takes-pictures
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« Reply #96 on: June 30, 2013, 09:07:05 PM »



http://www.indiandogs.com/
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« Reply #97 on: July 02, 2013, 03:01:47 PM »

Posted  July 1, 2013 - 4:33pm Updated  July 2, 2013 - 11:23am


Justices to consider Onion the dog's fate Wednesday
 


COURTESY CHRISTOPHER SHAHAN
 
Jeremiah Eskew-Shahan is pictured with the family dog, Onion, in this undated family handout photo. The Lexus Project, an animal rights group based in New York, is trying to save Onion.
 

COURTESY CITY OF HENDERSON
 
Onion is housed at the Henderson Animal Care and Control Facility.
 





ONION HEARING

The 30-minute oral arguments on the fate of Onion will be at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Nevada Supreme Court in Carson City, 201 S. Carson St. But anyone interested in the legal debate can tune in and listen.

Oral arguments are streamed live on the Nevada Supreme Court website. The link to access the webcast will become active about five minutes before the arguments are scheduled to begin. The webcast is not archived, but a podcast of the arguments will be posted and archived on the webpage, usually by the end of the day of arguments.
 







By SEAN WHALEY
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL CAPITAL BUREAU
 

CARSON CITY — The Nevada Supreme Court often must decide matters of life and death, such as cases involving death row inmates.
 
Less common are such weighty matters involving the life of a dog.
 
That will be the case Wednesday when the full seven-member court considers the fate of a 6-year-old, 120-pound, tan and black mastiff mixed breed named Onion.
 
Henderson officials decided to euthanize Onion after he killed a 1-year-old boy in 2012. The Lexus Project, an animal rights group based in New York, is trying to save Onion and move him to a Colorado sanctuary.
 
Meanwhile, Onion awaits his fate as he remains in solitary confinement at the Henderson Animal Care and Control Facility.
 
Las Vegas animal rights advocate Gina Greisen, president of Nevada Voters for Animals, said she remains concerned that Onion has been kept in a cage for more than a year, without exercise or human interaction.

It could be several more months before the court rules on the case, she said.
 
Henderson city spokesman Bud Cranor said Onion is under constant care, supervised by trained professionals and overseen by a veterinarian who ensures he receives care and treatment required by law.
 
Greisen said city officials should have allowed the dog to go to a sanctuary rather than spend so much time and expense fighting the effort in court.
 
She said that she has seen owners appeal vicious dog decisions as far as District Court, but that a case going all the way to the state Supreme Court is rare.

The major legal issue in the case is whether Lexus Project president and co-founder Robin Mittasch has legal authority to act on Onion’s behalf though the project doesn’t own him.
 
A lower court ruled against the animal rights group, resulting in Lexus’ appeal. The state high court will hear oral arguments in the case and rule later.
 
The case has generated a lot of attention from the news media, particularly in Southern Nevada. But the dispute has not seen any legal involvement from other groups, either in favor of or in opposition to Onion’s fate.
 
And there is more than one canine fan on the court.
 
Chief Justice Kris Pickering has filed a voluntary disclosure indicating she donates to local and national humane societies and the Texas Border Collie Rescue, among other related groups.

Pickering said she disclosed the information should a party in the case wants to request that she recuse herself from the case. She said she has no bias in the matter.
 
Other justices are dog owners too.
 
“Some justices have dogs as their cherished pets, just as many other Nevadans do,” court spokesman Bill Gang said. “Their personal pet ownership, however, is not relevant to the legal issues involved in the case.”
 
HOW IT HAPPENED
 
The Henderson incident could not be more tragic.
 
According to court papers, on April 27, 2012, Jeremiah Eskew-Shahan was celebrating his birthday with his father, grandmother and other family members at their Henderson home.
 
Onion was celebrating a birthday too, and both received presents, including squeak toys for Onion, according to the appeal filed by attorneys for the Lexus Project.
 
Onion had become a family member as a puppy, serving as an emotional therapy dog to help Jeremiah’s grandmother, Elizabeth Keller, keep her spirits up while battling lung cancer.
 
Onion had been around Jeremiah all of his life and had never snapped or growled at the boy, the family said.
 
About 10 p.m., Keller was putting Jeremiah to bed but thought he wanted to say good night to Onion. Jeremiah tripped and fell onto Onion, who was resting in a dark room. Onion grabbed and shook Jeremiah.
 
The child was severely injured in the brief attack, including having the right side of his face torn from his forehead down to his chin. He died from his injuries.
 
An officer from Henderson Animal Care and Control arrived at the scene, and Keller signed a document giving ownership to the agency and allowing Onion to be euthanized as a vicious dog.
 
Keller, citing the chaos at the home when she signed the document, then asked the Lexus Project to get involved to try to save Onion’s life.
 
The Lexus Project created a trust for the benefit of Onion and sought a temporary restraining order in Clark County District Court to stop his death.
 
The efforts were rejected by District Judge Joanna Kishner in a ruling in 2012, but Onion’s future was put on hold pending the Supreme Court review.
 
The Nevada animal trust statute “permits any person having a demonstrated interest in the welfare of the animal beneficiary” to be appointed as trustee, the attorneys for Onion said in their appeal to the court.
 
Ownership is not required, they argue.
 
HENDERSON: PUBLIC SAFETY ISSUE

The Henderson city attorney’s office said in its response that the court does not even have jurisdiction over the dispute because Lexus is not an aggrieved party in the matter.
 
“Because Lexus has never, and cannot now establish any right in the dog, it cannot possibly demonstrate that its personal or property rights were adversely affected by any ruling made by the District Court,” the response said.
 
The Henderson officials’ response said the dog continued to show aggression when being examined by the city veterinarian.
 
Cranor said that although there are costs and time involved in continuing with the case rather than simply releasing the dog to Lexus, the overriding issue is public safety.
 
There is a concern that the dog could remain a public safety threat even if it was released to a sanctuary, he said.
 
MORE GRIEF PREDICTED
 
But Lexus general counsel and co-founder Richard Rosenthal said nothing can be gained by putting Onion to death.
 
“The death of a child is an absolute tragedy, but it was an accident, not an intentional attack,” he said.
 
Euthanizing Onion will only cause the family to grieve all over again, Rosenthal said.
 
“The family raised the dog from 4 or 5 weeks old. His death will only exacerbate their pain,” he said.
 
If there was the potential to place the dog with another family, then the decision by the city of Henderson might have merit, Rosenthal said.
 
But the plan for Onion is to let him live out his days with other animals, he said.
 
Contact Capital Bureau reporter Sean Whaley at swhaley@reviewjournal.com or 775-687-3900.
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« Reply #98 on: July 22, 2013, 10:40:33 AM »

http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/theotherendoftheleash/the-tragedy-of-wolf-dogs
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« Reply #99 on: July 22, 2013, 11:08:18 AM »


At a crime scene course I attended, I saw the photos taken of an adult female victim of three wolf hybrids. They killed and partially devoured her in front of her 10 year old son.
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