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Author Topic: Donald Trump  (Read 17158 times)
ccp
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« Reply #750 on: January 29, 2016, 08:18:20 PM »

WSJ is not really a conservative rag.  It is a Wall Street rag.  Sells us out for cheap labor brought in from overseas and when that doesn't work they take the companies and use the cheap labor there. 

WSJ is only is good for America if it is good for Wall Street.

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ccp
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« Reply #751 on: January 29, 2016, 08:30:39 PM »

http://www.wnd.com/2016/01/the-civil-war-of-the-right/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #752 on: January 30, 2016, 10:45:44 PM »

Remarkable article   shocked

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/01/donald-trump-timeline.html
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ccp
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« Reply #753 on: January 31, 2016, 10:55:52 AM »

I would not say I am a fan of Beck anymore, but do think he is probably right about this.  Since the topic is Trump I post it here rather than under Beck:

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/01/30/2903448/

OTOH Dick Morris thinks that Trump DOES have the temperament to be President.
On this I am with Beck.

Perhaps the best way to get a handle on how Trump would be is to find out from as many of his employees or ex employees as possible how he treated them since he has full power over them.
If he is kind and fair then I think it is reasonable to assume he would be so as President.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 03:04:30 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #754 on: January 31, 2016, 03:13:38 PM »

http://thefederalist.com/2016/01/27/donald-trump-let-me-tell-you-about-smaug/
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G M
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« Reply #755 on: January 31, 2016, 03:22:33 PM »


That was awesome!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #756 on: January 31, 2016, 09:05:17 PM »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3424519/The-comb-creep-hates-women-know-SELINA-SCOTT-reveals-Donald-Trump-failed-seduce-stalked-20-years.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #757 on: January 31, 2016, 10:10:38 PM »

second post

y Kimberley A. Strassel
Jan. 31, 2016 6:27 p.m. ET
232 COMMENTS

Of all the Republicans campaigning in Iowa, perhaps none is campaigning harder than Ben Sasse, a Republican senator from Nebraska. Mr. Sasse isn’t running for president. He’s running against Donald Trump. The particular focus of his opposition deserves a lot more attention.

Mr. Sasse is a notable voice in this debate. He’s a heavyweight conservative—a grass-roots favorite, the furthest thing from the “establishment.” Before winning his Senate seat in 2014, he had never held elected office. He was the president of Midland University in Fremont, Neb., when he decided that he had to try to get to Washington and help restore the constitutional vision of the Founders.

Which is his point in Iowa: “We have a President who does not believe in executive restraint; we do not need another,” said Mr. Sasse in a statement announcing that he would campaign with Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz and other “constitutional candidates.” On Twitter, Mr. Sasse issued a string of serious questions for Mr. Trump, including: “Will you commit to rolling back Exec power & undoing Obama unilateral habit”?

That’s a good question for every Republican candidate. President Obama has set a new lawless standard for Washington that might prove tempting for his successor from another party. Why suffer Democratic filibusters when you can sign an executive order? Why wait two years for legislation when you can make it happen overnight? The temptation to cut constitutional corners would be powerful given the pent-up conservative desire for a Washington overhaul.

Here’s another question for the Republican contenders, a corollary to the Sasse challenge: Do you promise to reject dark power?

How the candidates answer ought to matter to every conservative voter. For almost a decade conservatives have suffered under a liberal movement that has honed the tactic of deploying government against its political opponents.

The Internal Revenue Service targeted conservative nonprofits—after Mr. Obama and Democrats encouraged the tax agency to act. Prosecutors hostile to Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker staged predawn raids on conservative activists, part of a secret John Doe probe into bogus campaign-finance violations. Powerful Democratic senators harassed and intimidated conservatives for giving money to free-market groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council. Democrats singled out conservative donors, who found themselves subject to government audits.

The Republican presidential contenders would undoubtedly decry those nefarious acts—and be offended if asked whether they would do the same. Yet power is seductive, and plenty of voters are angry enough to embrace a “Republican Obama”—that is, someone who would go after their perceived political enemies. Witness the Washington Republicans who last year called on the IRS to hound the Clinton Foundation. Somewhere, Lois Lerner was smiling.

Mr. Trump’s broadsides are no doubt part of his allure. But how would he conduct himself in a post-Obama White House? Mr. Trump, after all, doesn’t merely call out opponents; in this campaign he has threatened individuals and organizations for daring to criticize him. In September he sent a cease-and-desist letter to the Club for Growth, promising a “multi-million-dollar” lawsuit if the group didn’t stop running ads in Iowa highlighting his tax ideas.

In December Mr. Trump’s representatives sent a letter threatening litigation to a wealthy Florida businessman, Mike Fernandez, who ran an ad against the candidate in a local newspaper. Another Trump letter threatened to sue a political-action committee backing presidential rival John Kasich. The company StopTrump.us, which was selling anti-Trump merchandise, was another object of Mr. Trump’s litigious saber-rattling. He has also threatened lawsuits against newspapers, including this one. Mr. Trump in November threatened to sue The Wall Street Journal if it didn’t retract and apologize for an editorial that criticized him for not understanding the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. The Journal refused, and his lawyer withdrew the threat.

This follows a lifetime of Mr. Trump’s using the judicial branch, or simply the threat of legal action, to try to silence his critics. He (unsuccessfully) sued the author of a book that claimed he wasn’t really a billionaire. He (successfully) sued a Miss USA contestant for claiming the pageant process was “rigged.” He threatened legal action against an activist who had ginned up a campaign to get Macy’s to stop selling Trump-branded products (he didn’t sue in the end).

Sometimes Mr. Trump’s legal actions are less about hushing critics than blocking business competition. He sued New York state for letting bars offer a lottery game that might have cut into his casino revenue. He sued New Jersey for funding a tunnel project that would have funneled more people to a rival casino owner’s resort.

More worrisome is Mr. Trump’s willingness to use government to punish a critic. In September on Fox News, National Review’s Rich Lowry praised GOP candidate Carly Fiorina by saying that in a debate exchange with Mr. Trump, she had “cut his balls off with the precision of a surgeon.” Mr. Trump—who often derides political correctness—called on the Federal Communications Commission to fine Mr. Lowry.

Mr. Trump is a fan of government power generally, as alarmed constitutional conservatives will tell anyone willing to listen. He has never offered deeply considered views about the office of the presidency—on its obligations, the limits of its power, the need to exercise restraint.

“The current administration has resurrected Nixon’s weaponization of the bureaucracies against its opponents,” says Mr. Sasse. “And I don’t have great hope that a guy who brags, ‘If someone screws you, screw them back,’ is going to return to the rule of law.”

Mr. Trump on Friday night last week finally responded, sort of, to Mr. Sasse’s tweeted queries. “@BenSasse looks more like a gym rat than a U.S. Senator. How the hell did he ever get elected?” Mr. Trump tweeted. Mr. Sasse responded: “Thanks. As the sonuva football &wrestling coach, this is high praise.” Then he went back to prodding Mr. Trump about how he would wield power if elected president.

A few of Mr. Trump’s GOP rivals, perhaps caught up in the public anger or desperate to catch him in the polls, have also flirted with suggesting that they would govern beyond the law. Maybe that’s what some voters want. But as those voters weigh their choices, they might spare five minutes to remember the years-long IRS nightmare suffered by dozens of tea party groups, or the fear that grass-roots conservatives felt as Wisconsin police swept into their homes.

Government possesses a terrible power that must be used sparingly. Conservatives should prefer a president who agrees.

Ms. Strassel writes the Journal’s Potomac Watch column.
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ccp
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« Reply #758 on: February 01, 2016, 07:19:58 AM »

Good post CD.
This use of government including the legal side to silence critics is particularly troubling.
It is like using the IRS against those you don't like, like Clinton or Obama.

Filing lawsuits for every criticism he doesn't like is not good for someone running for public office IMHO
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ccp
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« Reply #759 on: February 03, 2016, 08:29:56 AM »

Where is PP?

Sam Altman points out Trump got "shlonged".
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #760 on: February 03, 2016, 10:39:39 PM »

That is very funny!

BTW WTF with the Donald asking for a do-over on Iowa because "Cruz cheated"?!?
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ccp
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« Reply #761 on: February 04, 2016, 06:26:22 AM »

"BTW WTF with the Donald asking for a do-over on Iowa because "Cruz cheated"?!?"

My sense he is wasting his time, sounds like a whiner, and should mover forward.   While he can point it out I don't believe he is endearing himself to new voters by dwelling on this.  Just my opinion.

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DougMacG
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« Reply #762 on: February 04, 2016, 08:37:01 AM »

"whiner"

Right!  Trump is still out saying Cruz is ineligible and Cruz crossed a line?!  Good grief.

Some of us were hoping that seeing the loser side of Trump would not be pretty to his supporters.

Mpls Startribune political cartoon yesterday:

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #763 on: February 04, 2016, 11:34:23 PM »

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/430628/donald-trump-business-record-bully
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ccp
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« Reply #764 on: February 05, 2016, 10:52:10 AM »

Knowing what to think about Trump, with regards to how will he govern is an enigma.  It is really hard to tell since he has never governed before.  On one hand we think he will be fair though committed to principles and rebuilding America.  OTOH we see his personality, the lack of humility, the temper tantrums, the name calling
.

I remember many years ago my Mom and I were walking from the corner bank and we ran into our retired dentist.  I don't recall the conversation exactly but I remember word for word something he said to my mother:  "one can never know what is going on in the back of a man's mind".  Something about that and the way he said it, struck me as words only an older person who has seen a lot could know. I never forgot it though I admit I didn't really understand it.  
Now many years later having been through experiences already posted over many years, I now understand it.  
I've have read books and spoken to intelligence people who confirm that there are very few people who can be totally trusted.
Sex , money, power maybe drugs can shift what seems to be a person's character to something else.

I've also read that the best, though far from perfect way to know who might be the one who is telling the truth, or stay honest, is the one who has demonstrated throughout his or her life this trait, or similar traits.  Always go by how a person has lived and NOT by what they say, such as, "you can trust me", or "I a am a person of God".  Unfortunately words mean little to nothing.  Character is based on demonstrated living not on words.

All this said, bottom line, is this this National Review hit piece, while another piece of the puzzle, is just one example of Trump's character.  One could argue that this is a positive trait and when he commits to something he stands by his commitment.  He did offer her to buy her house.  Probably offered her a lot of premium.

One could assume from this that if he commits to building a border wall, he will do it.  Not just empty words.
The National review sees this as a bully.  I agree one could look at it this way.  But I counter that one could also look at it as story that shows Trump is a man who sticks to his guns.

BTW, I used to go to Atlantic City when I lived in Camden, NJ and Philadelphia and I would shoot across South Jersey to AC to play blackjack and I remember this scene of two or three giant casinos surrounding this tiny little island of dirt with a tiny house in the middle of these giant concrete monstrosities.  Someone in that house refused to sell, it was obvious.  So the moguls simply built up these skyscrapers all around her and up to the very and every inch of the property from all sides.  Wow.  When the little gal who is stubborn butts horns with the big guys who are also stubborn this is what we get.  Both stick to their guns.

I still would like to know how Trump is with his employees.  If he is fair and kind with them then that IS how he is likely to be as President.  In business all I want to know is he good for his word. I am less impressed than if he is forceful.  
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 11:02:47 AM by ccp » Logged
ccp
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« Reply #765 on: February 10, 2016, 09:50:22 AM »

Agree with everything this writer concludes about the media and Trump except one.  He spends the whole article pointing out how so many people were wrong about betting against Trump and those who were supportive were right.

But then he ironically bets against Trump by saying he will lose the general election..  I don't agree.  But other than that I agree with the rest:

http://www.mediaite.com/online/donald-trumps-new-hampshire-win-means-these-media-members-are-winners-losers/

PS  I like the sound of "The President Donald" better than "President Trump".

Hey, where is PP?
« Last Edit: February 10, 2016, 09:56:37 AM by ccp » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #766 on: February 10, 2016, 10:01:34 PM »

Trump’s Eminent Disdain
Donald is wrong about the Keystone Pipeline and property rights.
Feb. 10, 2016 7:06 p.m. ET
29 COMMENTS

You can’t build a real estate empire unless government helps you snatch private property, or so says Donald Trump, who routinely defends eminent domain as an inevitable business reality. Maybe he needs broader business experience.

In Saturday’s Republican debate, Mr. Trump fielded a question about eminent domain and had a ready answer. “You need eminent domain,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of the big conservatives that tell me how conservative they are,” they “all want the Keystone Pipeline. The Keystone Pipeline, without eminent domain, it wouldn’t go 10 feet, OK?”

Not OK, or accurate. In the decade since TransCanada proposed the pipeline system, which includes the Keystone XL route President Obama rejected last year, the company says it has negotiated voluntary easements with 96% of 2,600 landowners across 3,000 miles and nine states. That includes 100% of landowners on the Keystone XL path in Montana and South Dakota, and 91% in Nebraska. TransCanada has on rare occasion turned to eminent domain, a process that usually involves a panel of experts determining fair compensation.

In other words, market negotiations have determined what TransCanada offers an owner for using his property in an overwhelming majority of cases. By the way, the company plans to build the 1,179-mile Keystone XL pipeline almost entirely underground, so property owners could forget about the gusher once it was buried.

Mr. Trump’s version of eminent domain is to bulldoze your house, and he tends to haul in government when he doesn’t get his way. In the 1990s a house owned by an elderly widow in Atlantic City blocked a potential limousine parking lot outside a Trump casino. After Vera Coking refused to sell, the state casino authority tried to condemn the place. Ms. Coking prevailed against Mr. Trump after a long legal fight. When Jeb Bush mentioned this tale at Saturday’s debate, Mr. Trump assailed the booing audience as Bush partisans.

Mr. Trump is spinning property seizure as the price of admission for economic progress, whether bridges or factories, but it isn’t true. TransCanada shows that not all developers go the Trump route when closing a deal.
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ccp
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« Reply #767 on: February 11, 2016, 05:58:14 AM »

96 % 91 %;

Well what about the few hold outs?  They alone could mess up the whole thing.

Just like Atlantic City.  Everyone sold except this one old lady.

I am not for kicking people off their land.

Just saying.

He does have a very good point.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #768 on: February 11, 2016, 10:10:23 PM »

https://pjmedia.com/trending/2016/02/11/trump-lets-slip-were-going-to-keep-common-core/
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G M
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« Reply #769 on: February 11, 2016, 11:11:12 PM »

 rolleyes

The most luxurious, classiest common core, though.


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