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Author Topic: Emergency Tips, Emergency Medicine, Trauma Care, and First Aid  (Read 46455 times)
DougMacG
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« Reply #100 on: September 28, 2010, 10:00:13 PM »

Very funny, and practical. 

For those of us who don't have a quick release bra handy, I keep a very heavy duty ($30-40) face mask hanging within reach of the bed.  In a fire, they say it is the smoke that gets you before the flames.  If it works, I should be able to put it on in a matter of seconds of the first smoke alarm going off and maybe have a chance at rescuing a family member and/or getting myself out.  I also recommend having a baseball bat or 2x4 etc. by the escape window for every family member in case the window doesn't open easily to smash your way out the way a fireman would.

A fire in your home is slightly more likely than a nuclear meltdown, but they do make masks for biological/chemical warfare, also for carbon monoxide protection:

http://www.aosafety.com/aosafety.com/products.htm
http://www.safetyrescuegear.com/toxic_gases_escape_fire_hood_p/fire-smoke-safety-hood.htm
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DougMacG
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« Reply #101 on: September 28, 2010, 10:28:14 PM »

You never know when you will wish you were prepared for inevitable emergencies.

My daughter worked her first hour of her first job ever last weekend at the desk of a small tennis club and a man dropped to the ground with a heart attack, not breathing.  Lucky for her and the man, the club manager/ my friend, was there.  He dialed 911 handed the phone to her and headed out with a defibrillator I believe, while someone else had CPR started.

Backtracking here, a Marine friend of mine emailed this video a few weeks ago saying it is the newest, best and simplest way to perform CPR. Please watch and forward/share.  (If someone here knows better, please post.) 
-----

http://medicine.arizona.edu/spotlight/learn-sarver-heart-centers-continuous-chest-compression-cpr

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcbgpiKyUbs
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #102 on: November 20, 2010, 03:55:41 PM »

Linda "Bitch" Matsumi recommends these:

http://www.traumeel.com/

http://www.alcis.com/

http://www.sombrausa.com/
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tim nelson
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« Reply #103 on: January 04, 2011, 11:39:38 PM »

this quick story i am going to share was inspired by a download link that is on the page Crafty just posted, about a book 'NATO Emergency War Surgery.' on:

http://modernsurvivalonline.com/top-10-downloads-you-should-have/

back in october 2 friends and i went into a large watershed wilderness. we expected to be out for 2 weeks, trapping beaver mostly for food and fishing as a supplement. well after travelling all day and carrying a large canoe between 5 lakes, at sunset one guy put his axe into his lower leg 4 inches long to the bone the whole way, the meaty part on the outer leg from the close to surface shin bone. anyways, we taped it up and moved him. he wasn't supposed to move as he did, but we were carrying the canoe and he walked away and ended up losing more than half his blood the hospital later said. that could have killed many people. and we made a stretcher and he was too heavy for 2 of us. it took 5 of us to carry him out during rescue for a mile or so and it was a workout.

so major lesson: don't move anyone with a serious wound even if its closed up and not bleeding much, it will trigger major bleeding and likely eventual death.

the rescue was quite an ordeal, we boated in, and it took from 6pm time of injury to 5 am next morning until an EMT was kneeling next to him.

http://elyecho.com/main.asp?SectionID=2&SubSectionID=2&ArticleID=10757&TM=55111.63
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Crafty_Dog
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CPR
« Reply #104 on: January 12, 2011, 08:20:00 AM »

New method of CPR.   Not necessary to check for pulse or utilize mouth to mouth resuscitation.

http://medicine.arizona.edu/spotlight/learn-sarver-heart-centers-continuous-chest-compression-cpr
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #105 on: February 12, 2011, 07:13:17 AM »

Story by kptv.com


PORTLAND, Ore. --


Police officers trying to get help after a man crashed his car outside a Portland hospital were told they had to call an ambulance, authorities say, but doctors assert they were acting on the information provided to them.

Portland police spokeswoman Kelli Sheffer says Officers Robert Quick and Angela Luty were at Portland Adventist Medical Center to follow up on an unrelated injury crash when someone flagged them down. Quick and Luty were told someone had crashed their car into a utility pole outside the hospital and the driver was unresponsive, police say. While one officer tried CPR to revive the man, the other ran into the emergency room to ask for help. Hospital workers told the officer to call an ambulance and that they would not leave the building to treat him, Sheffer says.

The radio call between the officers at the scene and dispatchers was released Thursday.


Officer: "Hospital says they won't come out. We need to contact AMR first." Dispatcher: "They're en route. Code 3." Officer: "We've started CPR." Dispatcher: "Copy. Started CPR."

The officers continued to provide CPR to the 61-year-old man while they waited for paramedics' help, police say. The ambulance arrived six minutes later and paramedics took the man into the emergency room, which was 100 yards away.

Police say the officers were stunned.

"I think that would be a bit shocking for anyone when you're in that frame of mind and all the sudden, you're not able to get the help that you believe this person needs," Sheffer says.

Police say the man, identified as Birgilio Marin-Fuentes, was still alive when paramedics took him inside the hospital, but he eventually died. An autopsy showed Marin-Fuentes died of natural causes related to heart disease, according to a medical examiner.


The wreck was first reported at 12:47 a.m., but surveillance video suggests Marin-Fuentes crashed in the parking garage about 20 minutes before anyone noticed.

An emergency room physician defended the hospital's actions and says they followed protocol based on the information they had.

"'The message that our staff got was that a crash had occurred in our parking structure and that a potential trauma patient had been discovered," says Dr. Kelli Westcott, an Adventist physician.

She says they called 911 because ambulances are equipped with life-saving devices to pull someone from a wrecked car.

"That includes calling 911 because especially in the case of a trauma patient, they often need to be transported to the emergency department with specialized equipment: a back board, a cervical collar, things that trauma patients need," Westcott says.

Wescott also says they immediately notified security officers, who are trained in CPR, and a nursing supervisor and a charge nurse responded to the parking lot.

Judy Leach, a spokeswoman for Portland Adventist Medical Center, says the hospital doesn't have a policy against responding to emergencies in the parking lot.

"In fact, we always call 911 and send our own staff into these situations whether they are gunshot wounds, heart attacks or any other medical emergency. We have done so many times in the past year alone," Leach says.

Read: Statement From Adventist Medical Center

But Marin-Fuentes' family members still have questions.

“Sincerely, with pain in my heart, I feel what the hospital did to him is wrong. They denied him medical attention. To me that is not just for him or for other people,” says Faustino Luis Garcia, Marin-Fuentes' brother-in-law, also through a translator.

Congressman Calls For Investigation

U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer is calling for an independent investigation of the incident.

“If these reports are true, it is not just heartbreaking, but incomprehensible that a hospital fully capable of treating this medical emergency left police officers with no medical equipment to tend to a patient.

"If the police statements are correct, this incident defies common sense and it may well defy federal law,” he wrote in a statement.

Copyright 2011 by KPTV.com. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #106 on: February 18, 2011, 02:48:44 PM »

http://www.tgdaily.com/general-sciences-features/53901-skin-gun-treats-burn-victims-in-days-not-months
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #107 on: September 02, 2011, 08:24:29 PM »

I like this idea:

http://offgridsurvival.com/shtfsurvivalmanual/

Electronic storage is great, for years I have recommended things like survival laptops and tablets. With a good solar charger these devices can last for years in an off the grid environment.
If your anything like most of the survival minded people that come to this site, you probably bookmark and save a ton of good survival articles. While I love electronic devices, when the SHTF you need to have backups of all your valuable survival information.
You need your own SHTF Proof Survival Manual.
Lately I have been saving a ton of how to articles to my NOOK but I don’t stop there. The nook is great for storing survival books and articles but I also started laminating the most important articles and putting them into my own personal survival manual.
For under $40 bucks you can make yourself a good SHTF proof survival binder.
First, you need to buy a good laminator and a pack of lamination sheets.
You can get a Good Laminator on Amazon and a pack of 50 lamination sheets for around $40. This will allow you to put about 400 articles in your personal survival manual.
Second, I condense the articles down so I can fit at least 4 to a page (8 double sided) this gives you roughly 400 articles with only 50 pieces of paper. Remember the lamination adds some weight so you don’t want to go crazy here. Print only those articles that you think you will really need post SHTF.
I usually condense articles down in Microsoft word, or I shrink down specific pages from books so I can fit them into my 4up format. I then 3 ring punch the laminated pages and put them in a good zippered binder to protect them from the elements.
What kinds of articles do I add to my personal survival manual?
My NOOK can pretty much hold everything I need so I fill that up with as much information as I can get. For my Binder I take only the things that I think I will need in a post SHTF world.
Maps, Evacuation Routes and Bug Out Locations
Medical information and first aid instructions
How To articles
Pictures of edible plants
Communication frequency charts, notes and antenna diagrams / formulas
Primitive Skills & instructional materials
Trapping Diagrams
And anything that you may have a hard time remembering
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #108 on: September 02, 2011, 09:46:45 PM »

Good point.  Would you please post that on the Survival thread on the SCH forum too please?
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #109 on: September 02, 2011, 10:52:46 PM »

Done Guro!
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Cranewings
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« Reply #110 on: September 03, 2011, 01:59:07 AM »

At least all the martial arts sticks and hand wraps you guys carry make good splints (;
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #111 on: September 03, 2011, 05:23:50 AM »

At least all the martial arts sticks and hand wraps you guys carry make good splints (;
[/quot
At least all the martial arts sticks and hand wraps you guys carry make good splints (;

IIRC In most cases it's good to remember, "One Bone = Two sticks / Two bones = One stick" 
IE.  There are two bones in the lower/distal arm (Radius and Ulna)  If the Ulna is broken but the Radius is not:  "Two bones = One stick"  but if the Humerous is broken:  "One bone = Two sticks". 

Splinting Knees and elbows are fun to. 

I love the idea of using the sticks for splinting.  I wonder how that would have worked out for Growling Dog going through Air Port security. 

Woof Smiley
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #112 on: January 15, 2012, 11:57:11 AM »

http://www.technologyreview.com/prin....aspx?id=17597


Nanosolution Halts Bleeding
A biodegradable liquid developed at MIT and the University of Hong Kong offers a new way to quickly treat wounds and promote healing.
By Jenn Director Knudsen
A team of researchers at MIT and the University of Hong Kong have developed a biodegradable liquid that can quickly stop bleeding.


Composed of peptides, the liquid self-assembles into a protective nanofiber gel when applied to a wound. Rutledge Ellis-Behnke, research scientist in the department of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and Kwok-Fai So, chair of the department of anatomy at the University of Hong Kong, discovered the liquid's ability to stop bleeding while experimenting with it as a matrix for regrowing brain cells in hamsters.


The researchers then conducted a series of experiments on various mammals, including rodents and pigs, applying the clear liquid agent to the brain, skin, liver, spinal cord, and femoral artery to test its ability to halt bleeding and seal wounds.


"It worked every single time," said Ellis-Behnke. They found that it stopped the bleeding in less than 15 seconds, and even worked on animals given blood-thinning medications.


The wound must still be stitched up after the procedure; but unlike other agents designed to stop bleeding, it does not have to be removed from the wound site.


The liquid's only byproduct is amino acids: tissue building blocks that can be used to actually repair the site of the injury, according to the researchers. It is also nontoxic, causes no immune response in the patient, and can be used in a wet environment, according to Ellis-Behnke. A paper outlining the findings is available online and will be published in the December issue of Nanomedicine.


Ellis-Behnke believes that first responders, say, on a battlefield or at a traffic accident, will save more lives with the nanosolution. Yet the most significant application may be in surgery, he says, especially on the liver and brain.


In fact, as much as half of the time during any operation is spent "doing some sort of bleeding control," says Ellis-Behnke. Consequently, such a liquid could "fundamentally change the pace of the operation."


Ram Chuttani, director of endoscopy and chief of interventional gastroenterology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, is familiar with their research. "Where I see huge applications is in patients who present with gastrointestinal bleeding," he says. "[Right now,] there's no ideal agent to endoscopically manage gastrointestinal bleeding."


"Technologically, this would be one of the easiest things for us to use," Chuttani adds. "It's an exciting agent, a very exciting agent...that's still quite far away. I'd definitely be an early adopter."




The researchers don't yet understand how the nanosolution works to stop bleeding, beyond that it doesn't clot the blood. "Maybe it's creating a nanoscale patch and knitting the materials back together," says Ellis-Behnke, adding that "this is just speculation." Clinical trials on humans are at least three years away, he says.


The research was funded by the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation at MIT as well as the Technology Transfer Seed Fund of the University of Hong Kong and the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong.


The U.S. military already uses several agents to stop bleeding, including ones made by Z-Medica and HemCon. Z-Medica of Wallingford, CT, uses zeolite-based agents in its pourable products, called QuikClot, and bioactive glass. HemCon of Tigard, OR, uses an organic substance called chitosan in its bandages.


Both QuikClot and bioactive glass, a silica- and calcium-based material, are porous, and thus work like a sponge to mop up blood and adhere to tissue at and around the wound site.


The chitosan in HemCon's bandages binds to tissue and seals wounds. (Chitosan is found in shrimp shells, but extensive tests have shown that people with shellfish allergies don't suffer allergic reactions to chitosan, according to HemCon's president and CEO, John Morgan.) HemCon plans to sell a consumer version of its product next year.


"Both [Z-Medica and Hem-Con's products] have saved lives in my hands," says Captain Peter Rhee, a military trauma surgeon based at the Los Angeles County Medical Center, who oversaw the first study using pourable agents to halt bleeding on animals.


The liquid solution made by the MIT and University of Hong Kong researchers could offer several advantages, however. One is speed. In studies, the nanoliquid took only seconds to work, while competing products take around two minutes. The nanoliquid can also be used on a wound of any shape, unlike HemCon's square bandages, which don't fit over oddly shaped gashes. And the nanoscale solution doesn't have to be removed from the patient, unlike Z-Medica's bioactive glass, which cannot remain at the wound site indefinitely.

Copyright Technology Review 2006.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #113 on: January 19, 2012, 09:34:05 AM »

http://blog.al.com/businessnews/2012...tml#incart_hbx

Birmingham and Georgia physicians invent new tourniquet for the battlefield
Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 8:00 AM
By Stan Diel -- The Birmingham News The Birmingham News

The abdominal aortic tourniquet should save lives on the battlefield, said its co-inventor, Birmingham's Dr. John Croushorn.

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama -- A Birmingham emergency medicine doctor and a Georgia physician have developed an inflatable tourniquet they believe will save lives on the battlefield by stopping bleeding from severe abdominal wounds.

Dr. John Croushorn, former head of emergency medicine at Trinity Medical Center and a former combat surgeon and helicopter door gunner in Iraq, on Tuesday said the inflatable device is an answer to gunshot wounds just below soldiers' body armor.

Insurgents often aim below the body armor, where damage to large, inaccessible blood vessels in the pelvis can be fatal within minutes. The device developed by Croushorn and Dr. Richard Schwartz, head of emergency medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, is placed around the body at the level of the belly button and inflated to compress the aorta.

The device mimics a long-standing combat medicine technique of using one's knee to apply pressure to the abdomen, cutting off all blood flow to lower extremities.

"Those wounds are devastating," Croushorn said in an interview. "They make very large holes and injure a lot of different things. So you just sort have to turn all of the blood flow off for a little bit."

Such wounds aren't the most common on a battlefield, he said, but they are among the most common causes of preventable combat deaths.

The device, which Croushorn said looks a little like a fanny pack, secures around the waist and is inflated using a hand pump. A gauge turns green when the pressure is sufficient to halt blood flow. Then the patient can be evacuated to a medical facility.

Studies on pigs have shown that the device can be left in place for an hour, which should be enough time to get the wounded to more sophisticated care.

Research on the device was bankrolled in part by the U.S. Department of Defense, and its path through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration bureaucracy was expedited because the military believed it could save lives on the battlefield. It won FDA "premarket" approval in October, a little more than a year after the application was filed. Most medical devices take three to five years to win premarket approval.

Croushorn and Schwartz have created a company to market the device, Compression Works LLC, and hope to have it in full production by April or May, Croushorn said. Military special operations commands, which have budgets separate from the military at large, already have placed orders, he said.

In addition to its military application, the device also may have civilian applications for victims of auto accidents and other such trauma, he said.

And it also could be proven to improve the survival rate for heart attack victims by increasing the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart during chest compressions, Croushorn said.

Both Croushorn and Schwartz have experience in military medicine. Croushorn served as command surgeon of Task Force 185 Aviation in the U.S. Army in Iraq in 2004, he said. He left the Mississippi National Guard as a major. Schwartz was a member of the Fifth Special Forces Group during Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm,
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #114 on: January 21, 2012, 07:48:36 PM »

Looking for basic input on the proper use of Quick Clot; when to use, when not to use.

I gather there are now "QC sponges" for civilian use, to lessen the risk of inappropriate use.

I am coming at this not only from a desire to inform myself, but also because I am moving forward on our catalog offering a trauma kit.  I'm thinking that QC should be included, but I'm also wondering about what info should be included.
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #115 on: January 23, 2012, 11:34:11 PM »

Looking for basic input on the proper use of Quick Clot; when to use, when not to use.

*QC is primarily for use in situations when there is an arterial bleed or external bleeding that cannot be controlled by a tourniquet or clamps due to location of the wound.  IE Femoral artery near the groin area like in the scene from Blackhawk down.

*Think of QC as the "Last Resort" for life threatening bleeding in a combat environment. Tourniquets become number 1. Don't use QC if you can stop the bleeding with less invassive techniques.  FYI:  A surgeon is going to have to clean out all the QC before getting to work.

I gather there are now "QC sponges" for civilian use, to lessen the risk of inappropriate use.

*It's hard to keep up with all the variations of QC and HemaCon products.

I am coming at this not only from a desire to inform myself, but also because I am moving forward on our catalog offering a trauma kit.  I'm thinking that QC should be included, but I'm also wondering about what info should be included.

*IMHO QC is a must for the kits but proper training is impotant with QC etc.  Not sure of the Civilian legalities but I did have to go and get certified to use QC as a Corpsman/Devil Doc.  

*Improper use can lead to 2nd-3rd degree burns to both patient and medical responder.  QC reacts on contact with moisture.  The applicators hands must be dry as well as the surface area around the wound openning.  The wound may have to be modified into a "bowl shape" with very close access to the source of the severed artery.  The QC is packed into the wound and with gauze or dressing material being pressed into possition until it turns into a clay like substance that clogs the leaking artery (aprox 2 mins time spent holding QC in place).  In addition moving the patient can cause the QC to become dislodged and bleeding resumes.

As with any tool, the value becomes apparent when the situation calls for it.  I plan on expanding on this more at the Winter Camp if Crafty deems fit to do so.

Hope this helps.
KD
« Last Edit: January 24, 2012, 12:47:42 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged

Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #116 on: January 24, 2012, 09:23:15 AM »

Yes it does. 

BTW, if you're game I'm thinking we should be thinking about you being given more time than we first discussed.  Please email me.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #117 on: February 07, 2012, 09:49:51 PM »

Woof All:

I made a good connection at the SHOT Show for a trauma kit.  We have ordered 40 kits which should sell for about $40 each.  Each kit will include civilian grade quick clot.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #118 on: February 08, 2012, 11:17:04 PM »

The Trauma Kits are in.
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Dr Dog
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« Reply #119 on: February 08, 2012, 11:26:26 PM »

Awesome!  One for each car!
The thing I DREAD hearing when I'm out and about is "Is there a doctor in the house?" because most of the time I am helpless other than simple first aid when I have no equipment of any kind. Terrible feeling.  Been meaning to put one of these together for years and probably never will get around to it. THis is much better. I am curious if Kaju has any suggestions for additions or modifications when he gets a look at this. I will post anything obvious I see.

Dog Rick
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #120 on: February 09, 2012, 10:25:04 AM »

Pretty Kitty is supposed to be taking pictures of the kit and its contents later today; then they will be posted in the catalog.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #121 on: February 14, 2012, 11:47:11 AM »

Email Print Save ↓ More .
.smaller Larger  A new push is under way to improve the care people get after they call 911, when minutes can make the difference between life and death.

 The inside of the ambulance is changing as it is being stocked with new techniques and devices to improve trauma victims' survival.

There is plenty of room for improvement: Survival rates among sudden-cardiac-arrest patients, for example, vary widely among different regions in the country. One problem: Medical advances that save lives in hospitals and on the battlefields are often slow to become available to civilian emergency responders.

Emergency medical systems and ambulance companies are driving the efforts to change. A growing number of communities are training their 911 call centers to instruct bystanders by telephone in the best way to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, which has been shown to increase a patient's chance of surviving. Some emergency responders are equipping ambulances with new technologies like digital transmission systems to beam electrocardiograms to hospitals and quick-clotting bandages, developed for troops fighting in Iraq, to stop bleeding faster. Paramedics—the most skilled providers of pre-hospital emergency care—also are being trained to chill cardiac-arrest patients after resuscitating them, as is often done in hospitals; the procedure has been shown to increase patients' chances of surviving without brain damage.

Enlarge Image

Close.Cardiac arrest kills close to 300,000 people a year in the U.S., and trauma is the No. 1 killer of people under age 44. Of those who die, more than half do so in the first two hours, before they ever arrive at a hospital.

"The goal is to train the paramedics to be as good as physicians when treating patients in the field," says Andreas Grabinsky, head of emergency and trauma anesthesia at the University of Washington-Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, where the city and county EMS providers offer free training programs to other emergency systems.

It is difficult to introduce innovations. Emergency medical systems are generally overseen by a state or regional agency and vary by community. Ambulances may be operated by fire departments, hospitals, volunteer groups or private companies. When a 911 call comes in, firefighters, who at minimum have basic emergency medical technician certification and may also be paramedics, are dispatched as first responders. Ambulances staffed by paramedics with advanced life support equipment are summoned either by their proximity to the call or on a rotation.

Enlarge Image

ClosePro EMS
 
Paramedics at Pro EMS, a Cambridge, Mass., ambulance company, train to use hand-held ultrasound devices, which can assess internal bleeding.
.Emergency responders must meet basic regulatory standards, but it is generally voluntary whether they equip their vehicles with the latest technologies and train their crews in the most up-to-date procedures and skills. A 2008 study led by Graham Nichol, director of the University of Washington-Harborview Center for Prehospital Emergency Care, found that survival rates for EMS-treated cardiac arrest in 10 major regions varied from a high of 16.3% in Seattle to a low of 3% in Alabama. New data for 2010, though not yet available by city, show the national average has been improving, according to Dr. Nichol.

Some ambulances are being fitted with machines that provide continuous chest compressions so paramedics can insert breathing tubes and perform other lifesaving procedures without pausing to restore breathing.

Another new device finding its way into some ambulances is a digital transmission system that speeds sophisticated electrocardiogram readings to the hospital so cardiac patients can get treated faster. When heart-attack victims require a balloon angioplasty, a procedure that opens blocked blood vessels, hospital staff often rush to get this done within 90 minutes, the time required to avoid heart-muscle damage. The transmission device is usually combined with a monitor to track the patient's pulse, heart signs and breathing.

The new digital technology helped save the life of 43-year-old Robert Douglas, who passed out at his home in Cambridge, Mass., in August, feeling weak with chest pains radiating to his left arm. Paramedics from the Cambridge fire department and ambulance company Professional Ambulance and Oxygen Service Inc., known as Pro EMS, performed the ECG at Mr. Douglas's home. Trained to interpret electrocardiograms, they transmitted to Mount Auburn Hospital images showing signs of a type of heart attack in which an artery is totally blocked by a blood clot. Doctors in the ER were able to get Mr. Douglas in for a balloon angioplasty within 42 minutes.

Enlarge Image

ClosePro EMS
 
Tthe paramedics are training to listen to lung sounds.
."Before this system, the communication was like a child's game of telephone," with paramedics and doctors at the hospital often not understanding each other's verbal descriptions, says Todd Thomsen, an emergency physician at Mount Auburn. "Had this system not been in place or had there been other delays, Mr. Douglas would have had a worse outcome." Mr. Douglas says he has recovered fully.

Pro EMS has been participating in a program at Emory University in Atlanta called the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival, or CARES, which the ambulance company says has helped it double its cardiac-arrest-survival rate in the last two years. CARES has been gathering data from 911 call centers, EMS providers and hospitals around the country since 2004 to compare results and to help communities improve emergency care.

At Pro EMS, which submits data to the CARES program as part of Cambridge's fire-department EMS system, staff members undergo about five times the national standard of 72 hours of continuing education, refresher courses and recertification in CPR and advanced life-support skills, says chief executive Bill Mergendahl. The company has also purchased 16 sophisticated monitors, including the ECG systems, cardiac- and breathing-monitoring devices and defibrillators at a cost of $25,000 each. "It can get expensive to add new technologies to EMS, but we are improving outcomes that lead to savings in health care all the way down the line," Mr. Mergendahl says.

The San Francisco fire department, which began participating in CARES in 2009, trained all 1,400 of its staff last year in updated CPR and advanced cardiac-life-support techniques. The department purchased electronic monitors that provide visual feedback about the effectiveness of chest compressions, and it is using new airway tubes that are easier to insert without interrupting CPR.

Fire department captain Justin Schorr says the emergency survival rate in the city has risen over the two-year period. But the city wanted also to measure survival in another way—-for victims whose cardiac arrest was witnessed and someone, either a bystander or EMS staff, intervened with CPR or a defibrillator. "We focused on how well we did when we had the best chance to help someone," he says, and results improved dramatically—from 9% to 23% over the period.

Researchers also are investigating possible new techniques to boost survival rates. For example, people admitted to the hospital ER at high risk for traumatic brain injury or hemorrhagic shock currently are given a dose of estrogen within two hours of injury, which has been shown to reduce dangerous inflammation. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, a group of 10 regional centers based at the University of Washington that conducts clinical trials, plans to investigate whether estrogen given intravenously before the patient gets to the hospital would improve survival.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #122 on: September 14, 2012, 11:15:10 AM »



http://www.latimes.com/news/local/lafddata/la-me-fire-report-20120914,0,5129089.story
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #123 on: September 22, 2012, 12:07:17 AM »

The DoD has the IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit)

Im thinking FFAK (Fighter First Aid Kit) for the DBs kit or maybe Doggie Bag?

Point is there is a first aid kit available here that one as a fighter could become familiar with at the Gatherings of the Pack.

KD
« Last Edit: September 22, 2012, 12:10:19 AM by Kaju Dog » Logged

Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #124 on: September 22, 2012, 12:55:14 AM »

Though there may not be many gunshot wounds or stabbings, we do offer this Trauma Kit:

http://dogbrothers.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=47&products_id=166
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« Reply #125 on: January 12, 2013, 06:32:43 PM »



http://www.richardcyoung.com/lifestyle/lifesaver/survive-or-die-put-quikclot-in-your-bug-out-bag/
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« Reply #126 on: April 15, 2013, 10:11:58 PM »



http://www.algemeiner.com/2013/04/15/boston-marathon-blasts-doctor-credits-israelis-with-helping-set-up-disaster-team-video/
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« Reply #127 on: May 02, 2013, 10:25:08 AM »

News Release
 
 
Alliqua to Present Results Demonstrating Antimicrobial Properties of SilverSeal® at SAWC SPRING 2013
 
 
 
NEW YORK, NY - May 2, 2013 -- Alliqua, Inc. (OTCQB:ALQA) ("Alliqua" or the "Company") today announced it will present the results of two in vitro studies investigating the antimicrobial properties of the Company's SilverSeal® hydrogel dressing. Data from these studies indicate that SilverSeal may be capable of rapid and sustained efficacy in managing the occurrence of wound contamination by reducing the bioburden from multiple bacterial pathogens and by sustaining this activity for up to eight days. Complete data will be presented at the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care and Wound Healing Society (SAWC/WHS) meeting taking place May 1-5, 2013 in Denver, CO.
 
The first study tested the bactericidal activity of SilverSeal against pathogens commonly associated with wound infections, including MRSA and VRE. SilverSeal dressings were exposed for up to 24 hours to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Concentrations of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, MRSA, E. faecalis and K. pneumoniae had been reduced by >99.99%; and of VRE after 24 hours.
 
 "The ability of SilverSeal to control these bacterial pathogens is a very important finding in today's environment where health officials around the globe are voicing concern over the rising prevalence of resistant hospital-acquired infections, including surgical site infections," stated David Johnson, Alliqua's chief executive officer. "The timing of these findings is particularly opportune as we institute plans to increase our marketing of these dressing solutions through our growing sales organization to the acute care and post-acute care marketplace."
 
The second study measured the time during which silver ions are released from SilverSeal dressings in concentrations sufficient to provide antimicrobial activity. These findings indicate that SilverSeal delivers a sufficient, sustained concentration of silver ions to provide antimicrobial activity for up to eight days in both water and normal saline in vitro and supports a seven-day dressing change period.
 
The above results are summarized in two posters, both of which will be on exhibit May 2-4 in the Korbel Ballroom: "Silver Ion Release from a Silver Fiber Hydrogel Wound Dressing" (abstract #LB-27), and "Bactericidal Activity of a Silver-coated Nylon Fiber Hydrogel Wound Dressing" (abstract #LB-45).   
About Alliqua, Inc.
Alliqua, Inc. (ALQA) ("Alliqua") is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development, manufacturing, and distribution of proprietary transdermal wound care and drug delivery technologies. Alliqua's technology platform produces hydrogels, a 3-dimensional cross-linked network of water soluble polymers capable of numerous chemical configurations.
 
Alliqua currently markets its new line of 510K FDA-approved hydrogel products for wound care under the SilverSeal® brand. Alliqua's electron beam production process, located at its 16,000 square foot GMP manufacturing facility in Langhorne PA, allows Alliqua to aggressively develop and custom manufacture a wide variety of hydrogels. Alliqua's hydrogels can be customized for various transdermal applications to address market opportunities in the treatment of wounds as well as the delivery of numerous drugs or other agents for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Additionally, Alliqua's drug delivery platform, in combination with certain active pharmaceutical ingredients, can provide pharmaceutical companies with a transdermal technology to enhance patient compliance and potentially extend the patent life of valuable drug franchises. Additionally, our subsidiary, HepaLife Biosystems, Inc., focuses on the development of a cell-based bioartificial liver system, known as HepaMate™.
 
For additional information, please visit www.alliqua.com. To receive future press releases via email, please visit: http://alliqua.com/contacts.
 
Any statements contained in this press release regarding our ongoing research and development and the results attained by us to-date have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
 
Legal Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This release contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are generally identifiable by the use of words like "may," "will," "should," "could," "expect," "anticipate," "estimate," "believe," "intend," or "project" or the negative of these words or other variations on these words or comparable terminology. The reader is cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, as these statements are subject to numerous factors and uncertainties outside of the our control that can make such statements untrue, including, but not limited to, inadequate capital, adverse economic conditions, intense competition, lack of meaningful research results, entry of new competitors and products, adverse federal, state and local government regulation, termination of contracts or agreements, technological obsolescence of our products, technical problems with our research and products, price increases for supplies and components, inability to carry out research, development and commercialization plans, loss or retirement of key executives and research scientists and other specific risks. We currently have no commercial products intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease. The statements contained in this press release regarding our ongoing research and development and the results attained by us to-date have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. There can be no assurance that further research and development, and/or whether clinical trial results, if any, will validate and support the results of our preliminary research and studies. Further, there can be no assurance that the necessary regulatory approvals will be obtained or that we will be able to develop new products on the basis of our technologies. In addition, other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on April 16, 2013 and our most recent Form 10-Q filings with the SEC. Investors and security holders are urged to read these documents free of charge on the SEC's web site at www.sec.gov. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise our forward- looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
 
Contacts for Alliqua, Inc.  Steven Berger
Chief Financial Officer
646-218-1450
info@alliqua.com
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #128 on: June 20, 2013, 06:45:18 AM »



We all have walked by the Red Cross sign in airports indicating where a heart machine is located.  Do you know what is inside and how to use it?

Watch this video to learn...
http://www.heartrescuenow.com/
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G M
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« Reply #129 on: March 11, 2014, 05:54:34 PM »



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2_EU1T-o-g&safe=active

Easy to carry and use to keep the red stuff inside until EMS is on scene.
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