Dog Brothers Public Forum
Return To Homepage
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 16, 2014, 02:18:32 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the Dog Brothers Public Forum.
79055 Posts in 2226 Topics by 1036 Members
Latest Member: Evgeny Vasilyev
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Dog Brothers Public Forum
|-+  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities
| |-+  Science, Culture, & Humanities
| | |-+  Survival issues outside the home
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Survival issues outside the home  (Read 5502 times)
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« on: February 21, 2007, 05:33:31 PM »

All:

This thread is intended to be a companion thread to the Survival-- hunkering down in the home thread.  The idea is to enable the conversation in each to be more focused.

I'll begin this thread with:

In the eco-system in which I find myself, many plausible disaster scenarios could lead to the fellow members of my species also seeking gasoline making it very difficult and/or time-consuming to get gasoline.

Therefor I am interested in the advantages and disadvantages of buying a diesel pick up truck (my current truck is 17 years old and smells of 17 years of sweat  tongue ) and putting it through a conversion for about $800 that would enable it to ALSO run on

a) bio-diesel, which is eco-friendly and already available at some stations here in CA, and, more importantly

b) bio fuel e.g. soybean oil or the like.

My thought with the latter is that I could safely store quite a bit of soybean oil at the house and in the event of sustained non-availability of gasoline be good to go for quite some time.

Similarly, in an "Escape from LA" kind of scenario that I could throw 100 gallons (or whatever) in the back of the truck and be good to go for quite a ways-- again, without the safety issues of storing gasoline.

Does anyone know anything about this?

Marc

PS:  This also keeps money out of the pockets of the mad mullahs et al of Iran and the rest of the mideast as well as makes for a cleaner environment.

Logged
SB_Mig
Guest
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2007, 05:59:27 PM »

Crafty,

I have two friends driving bio-vehicles.

Both guys love their car (a converted volkswagen passat and a converted mercedes benz).

PROS: Less CO2 emissions, less reliance on petro-industry, less engine wear
CONS: Fuel is not always easy to find. However, there are many restaurants willing to strike deals and let you use their old fryer oil. One of my friends walks into Panda Express, Taco Bell, etc. talks to the manager and can often get the oil for free. Then it is just a matter of straining out particulates.

The biggest con (depending on how you look at it) is the fact that your vehicle will have a definite "restaurant" aroma. My buddy joe's mercedes always smells like fresh tortilla chips.  grin

Here's a link that might help:

http://www.biodiesel.org/
Logged
jvs9932
Newbie
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2007, 07:36:33 PM »

Hey Guys,

I own a Benz converted to run on vegetable oil.  There are many approaches to this concept, the key is to find the system that best works for you.

Your choices with regard to your car are two fold:
1 - run on BioDiesel (a blend of vegetable oil, methanol and lye that closer approximates the viscosity of petrodiesel).  You can make BioD in you driveway in a 55 gal drum or you can buy it at a number of gas stations that sell it.  It's no cheaper than PetroD to buy, but you can make it at your house for about 35 - 50 cents/gallon (assuming you use waste vegetable oil from a restaurant).
Pros: you don't have to convert your car, you can run BioD in your main tank.
Cons: you still have to deal with chemicals and that can be hazardous

2 - run on vegetable oil.  I did a TON of research before choosing my conversion.  There are many on the market.  They all fall into two basic categories: single tank or dual tank. 
 --Single tank conversions are much cheaper, generally $700 - $1000 installed.  But like most things, you get what you pay for.   A single tank conversion forces insufficiently heated oil through your fuel system when it is too thick to naturally flow.  Insufficiently heated oil will coat the inside of your engine with uncombusted oil and will eventually cost you a rebuild.  It also will ruin your injector pumps which is also a costly fix.  Plus if you're in a colder climate (like anywhere outside So Cal) you'll have a very difficult time making cold starts.
Pros - cheap
Cons - it will ruin your car

--Dual tank conversions leave the original petrodiesel tank and fuel system untouched, but add a second tank specifically for the vegetable oil.  The car runs on PetroD while this second tank has a heating element in it and brings the oil up to a sufficient temp so it is thin enough to be introduced to your fuel system.  Depending on the system you get, some switch over automatically, some you have to manually do it, but a two tank system is definitely better than any single tank system out there.  You will get a LOT of miles out of your diesel.  I know of a number of people who have made the mistake of getting a Lovecraft conversion done and they barely got 10,000 miles out of the car...!
Pros - you'll get a LOT of mileage out of your car
Cons - more expensive, ours was $2700 installed. (That will be paid off in fuel savings by this June, the one year mark.  I fill up on PetroD about every 5 or 6 weeks)

Regarding oil collection:
--Yes filtration is important, but your car has a fuel filtration system in it and would easily remove the particle of food suspended in the oil.  You would go through filters quicker, but you wouldn't damage your vehicle.  The real risk you run with waste vegetable oil is the suspended water in the oil.  It's essential that you let the collected oil sit for at least 6 hours at about 90 degrees to allow the suspended water to drop to the bottom of your filtration barrel, then you pump out of the top and you're good to go.  There are simple tests to check for suspended water in your oil.  I do these tests about once a month or so and have never had any water show up.  I cannot stress enough how much more important dewatering is compared to particle filtration when it comes to the life of your engine.  Water will not combust, and will ruin your engine.  Period.

Many restaurants are willing to give you their oil.  Some will reguire you register with the state so they don't get in trouble (they have to account for their used oil), but that is also a simple matter.

Hope this helps,
jvs





Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2007, 11:24:08 AM »


http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?productId=48072264&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&&ext_cat=REI_RELATED_ITEMS_PRODUCT_PAGE&vcat=REI_SEARCH

Seems like a cool idea, anyone have some less expensive options?
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2007, 09:17:50 PM »

Five Plants That Repel Mosquitoes

by Melanie Schwear, Jul 14, 2007
There are attractive garden plants that repel mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are horrible creatures that swarm around you and suck your blood. They cause itchy rashes and can carry disease.

The most common way of repelling or getting rid of mosquitoes involves spraying a large quantity of poisonous chemicals in your yard and on yourself. If you are interested in a more natural approach, consider these plants that repel mosquitoes.
Citronella Grass

Citronella grass is, of course, where companies get the citronella oil. This oil is put in candles and lanterns that can be burned in your yard to repel mosquitoes. Citronella grass is actually a tropic plant that grows to be six feet tall, so it might not be practical in the average suburban backyard.
Catnip

Catnip is an herb that is most commonly used to stuff in toys or feed to cats for their enjoyment. However, the oil from this plant has actually been found to be more than ten times better at repelling mosquitoes than DEET. Planting this plant near your patio or deck will help repel mosquitoes.
Rosemary

This garden herb also has an oil that repels mosquitoes. While they are attractive plants that both repel mosquitoes and can add interest to your cooking, they are truly tropical plants that are not hardy in cold climates. You can, however, grow rosemary in a pot and take it inside in the winter.
Marigolds

Marigolds have a particular smell that many insects and humans find objectionable. They are a good plant for repelling mosquitoes as well as insects that can attack vegetable plants and aphids. Marigolds are annuals with bright flowers that range from lemon yellow to dark oranges and reds.
Mosquito Plants

There are actually plants on the market that are simply called Mosquito plants. They are advertised as a plant that repels mosquitoes. There are different schools of thoughts on these plants. Some say they do nothing to repel mosquitoes, while other swear by them. More often than not, you can only find them through mail order and internet sales.

While all these plants repel mosquitoes in your yard, you can also make all-natural mosquito repellent from them. Simply crush the leaves or flowers to release the oils and put them in a quantity of alcohol or vodka. Once the mosquito repellent oils have infused the liquid, you can use it just as you would one of the more harmful chemical repellents.

Planting these plants that repel mosquitoes is a great choice for your yard. Not only is it an earth-friendly way of dealing with these pests, it will add beauty to your gardens, and will not jeopardize your health. These five plants that repel mosquitoes are great choices.

Wonder what else there might be, either in preparation and help day-to-day, or after in the longer term when the store's closed and Health Department can't spray for a while.
__________________
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2007, 06:14:09 PM »

Recommended to me for water purification issues:

http://www.survivalistbooks.com/faq/waterfaq.htm

 www.htiwater.com
« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 06:17:20 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2007, 12:51:38 PM »



This site comes recommended:

http://www.wilderness-survival-skills.com/index.html
Logged
prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 750


« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2007, 01:17:47 PM »

Woof,
 This site offers a DVD that covers skinning and processing large game. These are useful survival skills to have even if you don't normally hunt. These techniques can be use for wild game or domesticated herd animals. With tax and shipping, it costs about $18. www.fw.ky.gov  Go to the righthand side of the page and click on PURCHASE KY AFIELD DVDs HERE. There's more info on the site as well.
                         P.C.
 
Logged

prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 750


« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2007, 10:57:28 AM »

Woof,
 When people think about survival food, they generally think about freeze dried or can rations that they keep on hand for emergencies and that's about it. If something happened to their stash or they couldn't get to it for whatever reason, then they would be out of luck. So having a plan as to how to procure food beyond stockpiling some beefjerky sticks is a good idea. If you're out in the country you'll have plenty of options but you'll need certain skills to capitalize on them. You'll need to learn primitive hunting and gathering techniques even if you have firearms to help take game. This is especially true if we're talking long term survival situations. If you're in the city you will need a different set of skills to locate food and get out of town if necessary. There is always looting and lawlessness to deal with. Being prepared and having a plan to deal with these problems before something goes wrong will make your survival more likely to happen.
 So, learning how to fish, hunt, trap/snare and recognize edible plants then prepare them to eat is one set of skills to pick up and then learning how to barter, trade, network and deal with the realities of a city run-a-muck is another set. Remember, "a" plan is better than no plan but a well thought out plan is more likely to work. wink Of course you could always wait for the government to come and help you. grin Try www.survival.com for more ideas and learning materials.
                                                         P.C.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 11:07:43 AM by prentice crawford » Logged

prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 750


« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2007, 04:04:05 PM »

Woof,
 I've talked to a number of folks who are opposed to hunting or squeamish about killing and especially, cleaning game. Most however, say that they would do it if they had to in order to live. The problem with that is a survival situation is no time to start on the job training. Hunting, trapping and processing game involve a set of skills that need to be developed over time and experienced hunters still fail to take game. Survival hunting is going to be even more difficult because you're not likely to have the modern weapons and equipment at hand. Learning primitive skills like making snares from available materials in the wild and fashioning and using a spear or throwing stick also takes some time to gain proficiency.
 So if you're serious about being able to survive and can bring yourself to do it, the next time a friend or relative goes hunting , tag a long. I know it's an emotional issue on many fronts but the reality is if you don't learn at least some of the basics of building a shelter, finding water, starting a fire, and hunting and trapping, your survivability beyond a few days in the wild will be near zero. Going on a hunt with a friend is a good start to working out the emotional issues and squeamishness. For those of you who are opposed to hunting because of humane and environmental reasons, with just a little effort you will come to realize that if you like the all the wetlands and forest full of game animals that we enjoy here in the U.S. you need to thank a hunter. Hunting maintains healthy populations of game animals and money from hunting permits goes to wildlife habitat restoration programs and covers the cost of enforcing game laws; I'm talking billions of dollars and millions of acres of land that's protected from development. As for the humaneness of hunting: how humane is it to let game over populate and die of starvation and disease and at the same time let them damage the environment? Look, I know people like to put their own human emotions onto animals as if they feel the same way we do. They don't. They don't process pain the same as we do either; I've shot deer in the vitals with an arrow and have them run away for a few yards and start grazing again like nothing had happened, then within a few minutes they die. Most hunters have had this same experience. I know I'll never be able to convince die hard anti hunters and PETA members to take up hunting but for those of you with an open mind and thoughts of having half a chance at making it through a survival situation, please give it a shot. grin
                                         P.C.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2007, 05:04:11 PM by prentice crawford » Logged

prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 750


« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2007, 12:41:15 AM »

Woof,
 The recent survival story of the family in California that went missing four days, when a snow storm caught them off guard during a short trip to cut a Christmas tree, highlights some points I made in my last post. Finding shelter, procuring water etc all came out to be apart of their ability to survive. However,the most interesting point that the story brings up is what I call the three hour tour syndrome (Gilligan's Island). This family did some things right and were lucky that a search chopper showed up when it did to rescue them but I'll state the obvious here and say it would have been better if they hadn't gone through four days in the cold to begin with. If they at least had a backpack with some space blankets, a camp stove, some food and maybe a signal flare with them or if they had kept a check on the weather forecast, it may have never happen in the first place. But you see they were just going out to cut a Christmas tree; what could go wrong? Right!
  They didn't want to spend four days in the cold, that was the last thing on their mind. You see the key survival lesson here is to remember that if anything can go wrong , it will. It doesn't matter if it's just a short hike or a day trip you should always have the appropriate survival gear with you. In your home, in your car and on your person. And keep an eye on the weather. grin Merry Christmas and happy tree cutting!
                                            P.C.
                         
Logged

prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 750


« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2007, 01:12:05 AM »

Woof,
 Learning how to make snares and setting them as traps is a very important survival skill. A snare can be made from a variety of materials but wire or cable is normally what is used. Basically you make a small loop on one end and then pass the other end through the loop to make a noose. You then tie the free end to something and when something comes along and sticks its head into the noose, it tightens up on the neck of the animal as it continues forward, and ultimately strangles it. The snare's usefullness in a survival situation comes from the fact that it's working for you while you're doing something else, like keeping warm in a shelter. The more snares you set out the more likely it is that you'll catch something and setting them out on visible animal trails and burrows of course makes it more likely that something will put its head in your noose.
                                        P.C.
Logged

Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2008, 08:56:59 AM »

3. New OSHA booklet is designed to protect first responders from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear hazards. "Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies" is viewable at
http://www.osha.gov/Publications/3335-security-personnel.pdf
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2008, 04:30:03 PM »

Biggs's Tips for Rich: Expect War, Study Blitz, Mind Markets

Review by James Pressley

Jan. 30 (Bloomberg) -- Barton Biggs has some offbeat advice for the rich: Insure yourself against war and disaster by buying a remote farm or ranch and stocking it with ``seed, fertilizer, canned food, wine, medicine, clothes, etc.''

The ``etc.'' must mean guns.

``A few rounds over the approaching brigands' heads would probably be a compelling persuader that there are easier farms to pillage,'' he writes in his new book, ``Wealth, War and Wisdom.''

Biggs is no paranoid survivalist. He was chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley before leaving in 2003 to form hedge fund Traxis Partners. He doesn't lock and load until the last page of this smart look at how World War II warped share prices, gutted wealth and remains a warning to investors. His message: Listen to markets, learn from history and prepare for the worst.

``Wealth, War and Wisdom'' fills a void. Library shelves are packed with volumes on World War II. The history of stock markets also has been ably recorded, notably in Robert Sobel's ``The Big Board.'' Yet how many books track the intersection of the two?

The ``wisdom'' in the alliterative title refers to the spooky way markets can foreshadow the future. Biggs became fascinated with this phenomenon after discovering by chance that equity markets sensed major turning points in the war.

The British stock market bottomed out in late June 1940 and started rising again before the truly grim days of the Battle of Britain in July to October, when the Germans were splintering London with bombs and preparing to invade the U.K.

`Epic Bottom'

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plumbed ``an epic bottom'' in late April and early May of 1942, then began climbing well before the U.S. victory in the Battle of Midway in June turned the tide against the Japanese.

Berlin shares ``peaked at the high-water mark of the German attack on Russia just before the advance German patrols actually saw the spires of Moscow in early December of 1941.''

``Those were the three great momentum changes of World War II -- although at the time, no one except the stock markets recognized them as such.''

Biggs isn't suggesting that Mr. Market is infallible: He can get ``panicky and crazy in the heat of the moment,'' he says. Over the long haul, though, markets display what James Surowiecki calls ``the wisdom of crowds.''

Like giant voting machines, they aggregate the judgments of individuals acting independently into a collective assessment. Biggs stress-tests this theory against events that shook nations from the Depression through the Korean War, which he calls ``the last battle of World War II.''

Refresher Course

Biggs has read widely and thought deeply. He has a pleasing conversational style, an eye for memorable anecdotes and a weakness for Winston Churchill's quips. His book works as a brisk refresher course.

What really packs a wallop, though, is his combination of military history, market action, maps and charts. It's one thing to say that the London market scraped bottom before the Battle of Britain. It's another to show it.

In May and June 1940, some 338,000 British and French troops had been evacuated from Dunkirk by a flotilla of fishing boats, tugs, barges, yachts and river steamers. The French and Belgian armies had collapsed; the Dutch had surrendered. Britain stood alone, as bombs shattered London and the Nazis prepared to invade. Yet stocks rallied.

Mankind endures “an episode of great wealth destruction” at least once every century, Biggs reminds us. So the wealthy should prepare to ride out a disaster, be it a tsunami, a market meltdown or Islamic terrorists with a dirty bomb.

The rich get complacent, assuming they will have time ``to extricate themselves and their wealth'' when trouble comes, Biggs says. The rich are mistaken, as the Holocaust proves.

``Events move much faster than anyone expects,'' he says, ``and the barbarians are on top of you before you can escape.''

Wealth, War and Wisdom is from Wiley (358 pages, $29.95).

(James Pressley writes for Bloomberg News. The opinions expressed are his own.)
Logged
Tony Torre
Power User
***
Posts: 160


« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2008, 08:53:03 AM »

Hi All,

Here's some thoughts.  Survival hunting could also include animals not normally hunted, such as squirrels, rats, cats etc.  These can be caught with traps, 22 cal guns, blowguns, even bb guns.  Any normal kid can develop these skills fairly quickly:wink:  A good portable water filter or two are invaluable and should be at the top of your list. 

Pines needles can act as insect repellent when rubbed directly on the skin.  Pine needles can also be used to make a tea which is high in vitamin c ( good for colds).  If you continue adding pine needles you'll eventually end up with glue.

My 2 cents
Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com   
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 29541


« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2008, 05:11:00 PM »

I didn't know that about pine needles.  Good one.
Logged
hague720
Newbie
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2008, 09:37:39 AM »

Reference Water filters ....

This is a good pdf  - dowloadable and can be made from inexpensive bits and pieces and used throuhout the 3rd world for filtering water

http://www.echotech.org/technical/techn ... Filter.pdf

Hope thia helps....

Cheers Thomas , Wales , UK cool
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.17 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!