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Author Topic: MMA Disqualifications in California  (Read 2326 times)
Kumaw
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Posts: 27


« on: April 15, 2007, 03:11:37 PM »

Per Crafty's Request:

This is relating to Brian Ebersole's suspension stemming from the use of a cartwheel in a fight.

http://www.mmaontap.com/mma/category/Brian-Ebersole/
The California State Athletic Commission has announced that Shannon “The Cannon” Ritch and Brian Ebersole have both been suspended indefinitely after their fight this past weekend.

The CSAC believed that their fight was “worked” as they barely engaged and they could be seen talking while on the ground. Eventually Ritch tapped and Ebersole was declared the winner but the fight was quickly ruled a no contest and both fighters were suspended immediately.

http://mmacalifornia.net/index.php?cat=16
MMA California adds: a string of suspensions by Armando Garcia’s CSAC that has MMA insiders shaking their heads. Previous suspensions include Brian Ebersole for doing a cartwheel in his fight against Shannon Ritch last September (he got an ‘indefinite’ suspension) and Josh Thomson for wearing a “Frank Glamrock is my bitch” t-shirt (he got an ‘indefinite’ or six-month suspension from it). Ebersole is not listed on Frank Shamrock’s IFL team for competition in 2007.
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unstpabl1
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Posts: 13


« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2007, 04:14:10 PM »

Did it look fixed ? One of my concerns with the sport is the integrity factor. It would be a lot easier to fix, because of the submission aspect. Most people watching after a tap, wonder what the heck happened anyway. With one organization owning all the fighters match manipulations for big paydays would be very inticing. Betting fuels our sports. If the bettors don't trust the action the sport dies.Thanks
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Erik
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Posts: 14


« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2007, 05:53:24 PM »

Sorry, I don't understand.

How is a cartwheel guard pass grounds for disqualification?

It's a real technique and, in certain, quirky situations, it's a good choice for passing guard (though I prefer a more conservative approach).

Oh- qualifications for making this claim - ca. 5 years Judo/BJJ/Sub. Wrestling.  I'm no expert, but I've seen and used (not very well) the move before.
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Kumaw
Newbie
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Posts: 27


« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2007, 09:30:33 PM »

Sorry, I don't understand.

How is a cartwheel guard pass grounds for disqualification?

It's a real technique and, in certain, quirky situations, it's a good choice for passing guard (though I prefer a more conservative approach).

Oh- qualifications for making this claim - ca. 5 years Judo/BJJ/Sub. Wrestling.  I'm no expert, but I've seen and used (not very well) the move before.

My guess would be a lack of education in MMA on the part of the CSAC. Also guessing they had never heard of Capoeira. What it boiled down to was the belief by the CSAC that the theatrics of the cartwheel was evidence of a staged fight.
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MonyetNakal
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Posts: 22


« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2007, 03:36:26 PM »

Well from the description that I read, it didn't sound like it was done as a guard pass since they say it entailed a kick to the head. The only time that would happen in a "passing the guard" situation would maybe be as just a clip when your feet land on the far side of guard.

But I quickly and freely admit and acknowledge that I did not see the event so I cannot comment with certainty. Just responding based on what I imagine from the written descriptions.
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Cranewings
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« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2007, 01:59:02 AM »

Off topic, but I was watching a Pride match with a bunch of fire fighters one night. One of the guys said, "I hate all this UFC, Pride, WWE, Pro Wrestling crap. It isn't exactly boxing." I asked him to explain. He said that if it was real, they would be getting hurt a lot worse.

Well, I argued with him for a time, but during the fight one of the fighters was kicked in the face no less than seven times. When the fight was over, the victim didn't have a scratch or bruise on him. His face wasn't even red. The fire fighter stood up and said, "See, look at that. I told you it was rigged. I'm pretty sure if I kicked someone in the face like that I would kill them."

I didn't really know what to say. It was inexplicable.
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Kumaw
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Posts: 27


« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2007, 12:10:33 PM »

It is not so much how they look immediately after the fight, a lot of times it's how they look  2 or even 3 days later. How many here have woken up 2 days after a sparring match and found a massive bruise and went "where the hell did that come from." Right after a fight, blood is still pumping and adrenaline is flowing like crazy, you are less likely to show the effects of a fight. Ever notice that people's faces tend to bruise and swell up in between round instead of in the middle of the match? Thats partly because they are calming down and the wounds have a chance to show.

As far as the kicking thing, I've seen people who couldn't kick worth a damn, and I've also seen people who could take a soccer kick to the forehead and not flinch, so either of those could explain why the guy was still standing. I also point again to the adrenaline, it can keep you fighting longer than one expects.
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