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Author Topic: Articulating our cause/strategy against Islamic Fascism  (Read 47588 times)
ccp
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« Reply #200 on: November 18, 2017, 11:35:27 AM »

well I am not sure the West exactly "let" communism rise

what were we supposed to do ?  go to war with the Soviets right after we went through what we did with Nazis
though Roosevelt did let Stalin get Eastern Europe too easily - in hindsight

we did fight in Korea and Vietnam
and have a cold war
and fought communism at home despite the Hollywood and liberal commies here
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #201 on: December 12, 2017, 08:12:32 AM »

https://clarionproject.org/us-criminalize-radical-islam/
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ccp
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« Reply #202 on: December 12, 2017, 09:36:23 AM »

 angry

https://nypost.com/2017/12/11/family-of-port-authority-bombing-suspect-is-outraged-at-investigators-tactics/
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G M
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« Reply #203 on: December 12, 2017, 12:43:23 PM »


Which is strange, because you never see muslim outrage.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #204 on: January 16, 2018, 11:57:15 AM »

Analysis: Why the Muslim Brotherhood Declared U.S. an Enemy State
by Hany Ghoraba
Special to IPT News
January 16, 2018
https://www.investigativeproject.org/7247/analysis-why-the-muslim-brotherhood-declared-us

 
 In the first official statement of its kind, the Muslim Brotherhood announced last month that it now regards the United States of America as an enemy, following President Trump's decision to move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. The statement was published on the Brotherhood's Arabic language website, where it often publishes more incendiary rhetoric.

"Jerusalem is an Islamic and Arab land, for which we make blood, freedom and life, and we fight every aggressor and every supporter of aggression," the statement said.
It called for a unified Islamist and Palestinian response "to ignite an uprising throughout the Islamic world against the Zionist occupation and the American administration in support of the occupation and against the rights and freedoms of the peoples."

A week later, the Brotherhood issued a second release, an open letter to Arab leaders with similarly inciteful rhetoric, accusing the leaders of weakness in face of the "Zionist entity." It urged these leaders to "enable their people" to defend Jerusalem and the Al-Aqsa mosque.

This statement cannot be brushed aside as simply harsh words or empty threats by some anonymous jihadist group online. The Brotherhood is the world's oldest and most famous Islamist group. Its message declaring America an enemy state is enormous because it reaches millions of followers across the globe. It is an unprecedented official confrontation with the United States.

While the statements mark a change in strategy by the Muslim Brotherhood, it isn't likely to lead to immediate violent action. The Brotherhood does not issue statements like these without a careful plan. It may wait to see if the U.S. embassy relocation takes place before any escalation.

The Diplomatic English language Message

Despite issuing an official statement in Arabic, the Brotherhood never posted it on its London-based English language website, Ikhwanweb. Instead, it published an alternative version of the second statement in the form of a plea to Muslims and their leaders convened in Istanbul to remain united on the Jerusalem issue. This is standard Brotherhood behavior, to striking a more "moderate" tone to Western audiences, while showing its true face to Arabic-speaking Muslims.

The toned down message published on Ikhwanweb called for "peaceful" protests in contradiction to the Arabic call to ignite "an Intifada." Though the message was directed to Arab and Muslim leaders, it was meant to be read by Western readers.

"The group urges Muslims in various parts of the World to rise up in peaceful popular protests to express their support of the freedom fighters in Palestine in their rejection of this move..." It called upon the Muslims and others "to express firmly the rejection of all evils committed (sic) against Palestine, and the determination to fully restore Palestinian people rights."

Antipathy toward the United States is nothing new for the Muslim Brotherhood. The group's literature includes dozens of references vilifying America. In addition, the group's most famous scholar, Sayyid Qutb, berated Americans in his 1951 essay, "The America I have seen."

"It is the case of a people who have reached the peak of growth and elevation in the world of science and productivity, while remaining abysmally primitive in the world of the senses, feelings, and behavior," he wrote.

Next to Brotherhood founder Hassan al-Banna, Qutb remains the ultimate scholar for jihadist rhetoric. Yet Brotherhood Secretary General Ibrahim Munir recently described Qutb as a humanitarian teacher.

Nevertheless, the Muslim Brotherhood – through diplomacy and duplicity – managed to keep its real attitude toward the United States hidden over the years. That finally changed in the Dec. 6 official statement, and it remains quite a gamble. It could cost the Brotherhood diplomatic relations that it forged with the U.S. politicians in recent years. It also risks being lumped in with terrorist organizations that express blatant hostility towards the United States and its interests. But it is a gamble that the Brotherhood seems to be willing to take because the Palestinian cause has been its bread and butter issue since the 1940s. Traditionally, the group would use offshoots such as Hamas to do its bidding against America. For instance, Hamas leader Ismail Radwan said this after the Jerusalem embassy announcement: "Trump's decision will open the gates of hell on U.S. interests in the region."

This method provided the luxury of deniability and distancing itself from such inflammatory statements while presenting the Brotherhood as the "moderate" Islamist group to western media and political circles. In this case, however, the Muslim Brotherhood chose a more zealous stance in its Arabic statement in a desperate attempt to garner some of its lost popularity in the Middle East after its political fortunes suffered in Egypt, Tunisia, Syria, Iraq and elsewhere.

The Muslim Brotherhood is beleaguered; its leadership is either in jail or on the run. It may feel a tougher line is necessary to maintain relevance in the streets that it once dominated. The Muslim Brotherhood has exploited the Palestinian-Israeli conflict for decades to maintain its "Vanguard of the Faith" reputation. At this critical and desperate moment in its history, its leadership is willing to place all its chips on this cause, even if it means the group is in a direct political conflict with the United States.

Hany Ghoraba is an Egyptian writer, political and counter-terrorism analyst at Al Ahram Weekly, author of Egypt's Arab Spring: The Long and Winding Road to Democracy and a regular contributor to the BBC.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #205 on: January 20, 2018, 01:42:09 PM »

Editor's Note

With the start of a new year, we once again examine the state of the global jihadist movement. Shared from Threat Lens, Stratfor's unique protective intelligence product, the following column includes excerpts from a comprehensive forecast available to Threat Lens subscribers.
In some ways "the global jihadist movement" is a misleading phrase. Rather than the monolithic threat it describes, jihadism more closely resembles a worldwide insurgency with two competing standard-bearers: al Qaeda and the Islamic State. To make matters more complicated, grassroots extremists have been known to take inspiration from each group's ideology — and, in some cases, both.
 
This complex network of international organizations, local militancies and individual adherents cannot be dismantled by simply killing its members and leaders one by one. Instead, governments around the globe will have to split off local groups from the Islamic State and al Qaeda ideologies they have chosen to adopt and tackle them separately using the principles of counterinsurgency if the jihadist movement is to be eradicated once and for all.
Al Qaeda: Surviving Under Pressure
Last year was a tough one for the al Qaeda core:

 
(Stratfor)
Throughout 2017, the group tried to promote Hamza bin Laden — the son of Osama bin Laden — as its new figurehead. But while Hamza's rhetoric seems to have found a receptive audience in the world of jihadism, it is unclear whether the warm welcome will translate into new recruits for his father's cause.
 
Even so, the al Qaeda core and many of its franchises remain intact at the start of 2018, albeit under mounting strain. Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), for instance,
(Stratfor)
Al Qaeda's offshoots in Egypt have made inroads among the locals as well, in part by criticizing their Islamic State rival in the area — Wilayat Sinai — for attacking civilians. (By contrast, Jund al-Islam and Ansar al-Islam tend to target Egyptian security forces.) The latter al Qaeda branch, led by former Egyptian special operations forces officer Hisham Ashmawy, is a particularly capable force. But Jund al-Islam has worked to earn the trust of Bedouin tribes in Sinai that have been appalled by Wilayat Sinai's brutality; the group has even attacked some of the Islamic State affiliate's fighters outright.
 
Some of al Qaeda's partners throughout the Middle East and Africa had bigger problems to grapple with last year. Amid Yemen's protracted civil war;
(Stratfor)

In much the same way, the United States cracked down on the positions of al Shabaab, al Qaeda's Somali franchise.
(Stratfor)

Despite the renewed pressure brought to bear against them, these groups have maintained their allegiance to the al Qaeda core. The same may not be true of al Qaeda's erstwhile ally on the Syrian battlefield, formerly known as Jabhat al-Nusra. The group now belongs to an umbrella organization called Hayat Tahrir al-Sham that advocates a nationalist agenda rather than al Qaeda's transnationalist goals.
(Stratfor)
Either way, Jabhat al-Nusra's decision to rebrand itself as a group with more interests at home than abroad will make it more difficult for al Qaeda to launch far-flung attacks from Syria this year.
Islamic State: Resorting to Old Tactics
Once the United States and its coalition partners started launching airstrikes against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria in August 2014, the group was bound to lose its grip on the vast territory it had claimed. The so-called caliphate met its inevitable fate in 2017 as the Islamic State was beaten back from most of its strongholds in the region.
(Stratfor)
The Islamic State core may no longer function as an effective polity, but it still thrives as an insurgency and terrorist group. As a result, the Islamic State will keep planning and conducting attacks across Iraq and Syria over the coming year, in part to stoke ethnic and sectarian unrest.
 
The group's foreign partners will follow suit as the Islamic State's ideology continues to resonate around the globe. But like the central organization with which they have aligned, many of these branches have met stiff resistance in their traditional havens.
 
Among them is Wilayat al Sudan al Gharbi, the Islamic State's Nigerian cell that is often better known by its former name, Boko Haram. The group has split into two factions with somewhat different means and ends: One led by Abubakr Shekau, whose use of women and children in suicide bombings has caused even the Islamic State to rebuke him, and one led by Abu Musab al-Barnawi, the son of Boko Haram's founder. The first wing, though larger, has had to retreat from most of its holdings in northeastern Nigeria into the Sambisa Forest, where it now wages a deadly campaign of insurgent and terrorist attacks throughout the region. Meanwhile, the second wing has concentrated its operations in Lake Chad Basin, where it harries military and security forces.

We believe al-Barnawi's faction would like to conduct attacks against Western interests in Nigeria, such as bombings or kidnappings.

To the north, Wilayat Barqa — the Islamic State's Libyan offshoot and, at one point, its strongest franchise — has likewise sought shelter from the punishing advances of its enemies.
(Stratfor)

Next door, however, another Islamic State affiliate has risen to prominence as Wilayat Barqa has faded from view: Wilayat Sinai. Though the Egyptian group has lost much of its manpower since its peak in 2015, Wilayat Sinai may be the largest and most capable Islamic State branch left today.
(Stratfor)
The Islamic State has fared better than we expected in Afghanistan and Pakistan as well. There the organization's Khorasan chapter has shown an impressive resilience to operations against it by Afghan security forces, the Taliban and the United States. Rather than being crippled by these efforts, Khorasan remains able to launch raids against rural communities and suicide attacks against the Afghan capital of Kabul.
 
But the Islamic State's most surprising success of 2017 was the capture of Marawi City in the southern Philippines. The group's supporters defied our forecast by drawing hundreds of heavily armed fighters to their cause and trying to seize territory — just as the Islamic State had in Iraq and Syria.
(Stratfor)
Grassroots Jihadists: A Rare but Present Danger
Since 9/11, al Qaeda and the Islamic State have struggled to project their terrorist power beyond their core operating areas. Consequently, grassroots jihadists — rather than the trained professionals among the ranks of established jihadist groups — have been responsible for most of the terrorist attacks waged on the West in recent years.
(Stratfor)
Inspired jihadists were responsible for the bulk of the terrorist attacks to hit the West last year. Even in operations involving cells of extremists, such as the London Bridge incident in June 2017 and a series of attacks in Barcelona in August, the perpetrators had no contact with and received no direction or equipment from their professional peers.
 
There were some noteworthy exceptions to this pattern, though.
(Stratfor)

Grassroots jihadists may not boast the sophisticated terrorist tradecraft needed to launch spectacular attacks, but it would be unwise to dismiss the danger they pose. At the right place and the right time, an inexperienced terrorist can still wreak havoc, leaving devastation in his or her wake. That said, circumstances rarely align in grassroots jihadists' favor — and certainly not as often as the groups calling them to action would like.
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Martel
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« Reply #206 on: January 30, 2018, 08:13:17 AM »

This is part of the preamble to the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran

An Ideological Army

In the formation and equipping of the country's defense forces, due attention must be paid to faith and ideology as the basic criteria.  Accordingly, the Army of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps are to be organized in conformity with this goal, and they will be responsible not only for guarding and preserving the frontiers of the country, but also for fulfilling the ideological mission of jihad in God's way;

that is, extending the sovereignty of God's law throughout the world (this is in accordance with the Koranic verse

"Prepare against them whatever force you are able to muster, and strings of horses, striking fear into the enemy of God and your enemy, and others besides them" [Quran 8:60].
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Martel
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« Reply #207 on: January 30, 2018, 08:14:21 AM »

“Do they not see that We are advancing in the land, diminishing it by its borders on all sides?”

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #208 on: January 30, 2018, 08:18:20 AM »

It doesn't surprise me, but I didn't know that.  Good to have the citation for purpose of making our case.

Yet this sort of thing is rampant:  https://clarionproject.org/nj-mom-sues-school-islam-indoctrination/
 
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 08:55:42 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Martel
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« Reply #209 on: February 07, 2018, 10:17:50 AM »

Hamas

Also known as the Islamic Resistance Movement. Their aims are in their Charter. From the preamble:

Israel will exist and will continue to exist until Islam will obliterate it, just as it obliterated others before it" (The Martyr, Imam Hassan al-Banna, of blessed memory, [founder of the Muslim Brotherhood]).

Article 2: The Islamic Resistance Movement is one of the wings of Moslem Brotherhood ...

Article 5: ... the Koran is its constitution.

Article 7: It goes back to ... the Jihad operations of the Moslem Brotherhood in 1968 and after.

"The Day of Judgement will not come about until Moslems fight the Jews (killing the Jews), when the Jew will hide behind stones and trees. The stones and trees will say O Moslems, O Abdulla, there is a Jew behind me, come and kill him." (related by al-Bukhari and Moslem).

Article 8: Allah is its target, the Prophet is its model, the Koran its constitution: Jihad is its path and death for the sake of Allah is the loftiest of its wishes.

Article 11: The Islamic Resistance Movement believes that the land of Palestine is an Islamic Waqf consecrated for future Moslem generations until Judgement Day.

This is the law governing the land of Palestine in the Islamic Sharia (law) and the same goes for any land the Moslems have conquered by force, because during the times of (Islamic) conquests, the Moslems consecrated these lands to Moslem generations till the Day of Judgement.


So note - "Palestine" is Waqf, or endowment. The charter specifies that the land was conquered by the Muslims and thus must never pass out of their hands as it is now consecrated to Allah. Their aim, in the full document, is to return it to Islamic control. And again, Jihad has a strictly military connotation.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 10:29:15 AM by Martel » Logged

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #210 on: February 14, 2018, 11:36:04 PM »

https://pjmedia.com/homeland-security/mattis-no-single-solution-captured-isis-foreign-fighters/?utm_source=PJMCoffeeBreak&utm_medium=email&utm_term=February2018
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