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Author Topic: Training too much?  (Read 9267 times)
Maxx
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« on: July 11, 2007, 12:36:00 AM »

I train 7 days a week and tonight I was trying to do a basic intro into some Kali simple stuff not too heavy..All Weightless..Dips, Push ups, Crunches while to the conditioning punches in the stomach, Jumping jacks and then finishing off the sets with 60 more push ups..And then I felt weird..I started doing hand strikes on my bag and getting my movement down.Grabbed my stick and started doing strikes and movement high speed and then I felt like Crap..I got nausea and started getting weaker and weaker..So I tried to shake it off..And kept trying to go and it was no use..I was done....Is this a sign of "Fool...WAY TOO MUCH!!!!"  ??

« Last Edit: July 12, 2007, 12:01:30 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged

5thprofession47
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2007, 10:39:13 AM »

Hi Maxx,

          I'm not a doctor so I cannot comment from a medical perspective,  but I have trained martial arts for a significant number of years. I believe a recovery period is essential to avoid overtraining. I wish I could train 7 days a week like I did when I was younger! You sound like you really put a lot into your daily routine and that coupled with other factors (age, health, sleep habits, etc) could certainly lead to the effects you speak of. I'd work heavy exertion every other day and work finer skills sets on the off days. You'll still get workouts daily but avoid over exerting yourself too much. maybe consider a full day off once a week as a reward for the work the rest of the week. Good luck!
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Guide Dog
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2007, 11:12:20 AM »

Maxx,

5thprofessional47 has given you some really good advice.  That single day a week of rest is really important.  If you have a hard time with taking a day, think about that day off as part of your training.  That way, you won't feel guilty when that day comes.  Also, if you can plan some kind of fun activity on that day, you will find that it will really enrich your overall training.  Again, think about that activity (even if it's taking in a movie you've been waiting to see) as part of your overall training.  Also, remember that one of the missions of DBMA is that you should "walk as a warrior for all your days."  Each day is different and each decade is different.  That is not an excuse to be lazy but a reality.  Maybe you were tired during the training session you described.  Maybe you had a momentary head rush.  Maybe your usual training routine needs to be revamped.  One of my favorite things to do is evaluate how my work day has changed me when I train in the evenings.  Am I tired?  Am I pumped up?  Was I rushing to get to class?  Am I nervous about something?  Am I focused?  Am I taking too many mental vacations?  Your training should be working for you and for what you need.  That's my 2 cents.  Think about the day off each week, keep training, and most importantly, have fun.  Things usually balance themselves out so you'll probably have a work out soon where you do something you didn't think you could do or you go longer than you've ever gone before.
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Bandolero
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2007, 11:49:55 AM »

Today is day 108 in a row of working out for me.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2007, 12:07:37 PM »

Exercise.  Nutrition.  Rest.  

Everyone of us needs each of these.

How to know when we are getting/not getting enough Rest?  

Some general indicators:

a)  achy lower back.  Jean Jacques Machado drew my attention to this one.  My layman's theory is that the ache is actually the kidney-adrenal meridian talking to us.  Darkness under the eyes (more readily detectable amongst us caucasians  cheesy ) indicates tired/overworked kidneys

b) poor sleep:  when we are overtired sometimes good restful sleep becomes more elusive.

c) weaker or no erection in the morning, diminished sex drive.

d) Resting pulse is a great indicator.  Take your pulse every morning upon waking and before getting out of bed to get a sense of the band of your RP.  In my case this number is 48-52.  When my RP upon waking hits 55-56, I know it is time for a day of rest.

Also a good idea is to look at your training schedule on a weekly basis, a seasonal basis, and an annual basis.  Within the week there should be a mix of intense, moderate and mild days.  Similarly on a seasonal basis there should be some weeks of greater and lesser intensity.  On an annual basis, there should be a phase of rest.

Concering the last one of these, this is something it has taken me many years to accept.  Decembers always used to make me very grouchy.  As I saw it, from Thanksgiving forward, entranced by the all pervasive music of thes season all the goyim were off on their annual pine tree killing frenzy fueled by sugary foods and material culture consumption triggered by the manipulations of mass advertising.    How could the gym be closed on Dec 25th?  Didn't they know that was my day for squats and deadlifts?!?

It drove me crazy--and it drove me to injury and getting sick.

Finally I figured out that in a evolutionary biological sense the reason for the season was to fatten up for a time of hibernation.  I still loathe all the sugary food and the false jocularity, but now I give myself permission to take it easier in December.
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Maxx
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2007, 12:28:01 PM »

Crap..Crafty!

I have been seeing some of these things you mentioned in me.

Dark Circles under my eyes for starters and I also get super grumpy and pissy when I can't work out or train..I push myself to far, I have been told..One of my friends told me, I was addicted to the high that working out gives me...

Here is a example of it..My right tendon in my left hand is swollen from getting hit durring Live Kali stickfighting..My right hand is scabbed up from getting hit durring kali, My left knee is in agoney from Grappling and dumping ppl down and also one of my left toes feels like it has frost bite lol!

But I keep training on this....From what it seems like is I am going to far and need to rest..But when I take a day off I get pissed and angry..And almost feel like I am wasting a day and actually get depressed lol!

I know it sounds stupid but I am serious.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2007, 03:27:56 PM »

Quite possible you have no idea how much I recognize all of that.

Perhaps this will help:  Think in terms of "active rest".   Frolic a bit in the swimming pool Do NOT turn it into a workout of doing laps!  cheesy  Use it to relax and open your breathing, your ribcage, your heart chakra.  For example, I like doing yoga positions that I can't really do on the ground underwater for as long as I can hold my breath.   Then later in the day a deep stretch.  Sex before bed and you should sleep very well.
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Maxx
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 05:45:00 PM »

I am gonna take your advice Crafty and the rest of you guys who gave me some great advice.

I am gonna get off work in a hour and head home and just chill..I really don't feel all to good but thanks for the advice.
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maija
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2007, 06:13:11 PM »

There's alot of science out there about optimal, sustainable training, like interval training for instance. Rest seems key in all of them, to let the body have time to physically change inside (build muscle, lengthen tendons etc). I like the comments about considering it training too.
Cross training, where you are focussing on different elements also seems good. The other week I rock climbed one day, played Sabre Fencing the next, Bagua on a couple of days, a Japanese sword class and Eskrima the rest. They all seem to play off eachother, some with more aerobic focus, some strength, some balance and co-ordination etc.
If i could add one more, i love the idea of Parkour. It encompasses so many different types of skill and fitness (strength to jump and grab, accurate hand eye co-ordination, running fast and far etc). Unfortunately i think i would have to be 20 years younger sad
But back to the context of this thread, what i also think is good about Parkour is if you are working on an obstacle to overcome, climbing or jumping, it becomes really obvious if you have reached your limit, because it becomes harder and harder to do. Instant feedback. Only by becoming stronger, quicker, more accurate and more balanced can you improve.
I am also a true believer that having fun is key, and Parkour sure seems like fun!.
Also, the mind is possibly the most important, if not the most difficult (!)thing to train. A quck, alert, relaxed mind that is controlled and fully focussed is perhaps not that easy to attain at first, especially when connected to physical movement, but doing activities that are mentally aswell as physically demanding such as yoga or rock climbing, do train the mind, and are IMHO, great additions to any purely physical workout.
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MonyetNakal
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« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2007, 09:06:31 PM »

I'd also like to add a small but very important thing to all the great advice you are  getting.

Make sue that you are drinking enough water. Seems a simple thing but a lot of people neglect it. If you are working out as much as you say that you are make sure you are taking steps to avoid dehydration. Sports  drinks are good but most of them have far too much sugar and although they work great as a "recovery drink" they do not help hydrate you as much as good ol' agua.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2007, 09:36:27 PM »

Excellent point!

I would add the importace of getting one's minerals, including trace minerals, which often become depleted with heavy sweating.
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Maxx
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2007, 10:42:50 PM »

ahhah..That's all I drink well that and tea but I drink water like its going out of style..I don't even drink soda..Crap, I lied..I dri nk Orange juice and cranberry juice also.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2007, 11:55:12 PM »

I have read that OJ is very high glycemic and that we are better off eating oranges to slow down the absorbtion rate.
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Maxx
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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2007, 11:19:21 AM »

Hmmm. Maybe I should make use of the orange tree in my back yard more. I used to eat that thing dry!
Now my Pitbulls guard it like it's some holy tree!

I took last night off and just sat around and kicked back and watched History Channel and Discovery channel and passed out..I woke up and I feel great now!

But before , I passed out. I saw some commercial on what I thought history channel is doing a coverage on Escrima?

Was I seeing things or was that what I saw?
« Last Edit: July 12, 2007, 11:22:15 AM by Maxx » Logged

maija
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« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2007, 05:53:51 PM »

 I don't have tv, but a friend forwarded me this...not sure what the quality of the info will be (just from reading the eskrima section), but anyway.....

 

MMA: NEW HISTORY CHANNEL SERIES HOSTED BY MMA FIGHTER TO TRACE HISTORY OF HAND TO HAND COMBAT, COMPLETE DETAILS
by Mike Johnson @ 3:53:00 PM on 6/28/2007

STARTING THIS SUMMER, THE HISTORY CHANNEL® VIEWERS CAN STEP INTO THE SHOES OF FIGHTERS FROM ACROSS THE CENTURIES AND AROUND THE WORLD FOR AN IMMERSIVE INTERNATIONAL JOURNEY INTO THE HEART AND ART OF HAND-TO-HAND COMBAT HUMAN WEAPON

Series Premieres on Friday, July 20 at 10pm ET/PT


HUMAN WEAPON follows Jason Chambers, America ’s own fighting Welterweight Champion & Bill Duff, former Pro Football Player & Wrestler, as they train with international hand-to-hand combat masters and learn the history behind the world’s most fascinating forms of combat…Culminating with a heart-pounding fight challenge.

New York , June 2007 – This summer The History Channel® embarks on a remarkable journey across the globe to reveal the history behind one of humankind’s most ancient skills: the art of hand-to-hand combat. Viewers will join hosts Jason Chambers – mixed-martial-artist and professional fighter – and Bill Duff – former professional football player and wrestler – as they embark on a mission: to explore the history and practice of these time-honored combat arts. Together, Jason and Bill fold back the rich historical and cultural layers of Muay Thai, Eskrima, Judo, Karate, Savate and more in the ultimate search of HUMAN WEAPON.

This journey of human experience is one the two hosts will take with their fists and their feet…with their sweat and blood. They will walk in the shoes of people of many cultures who used these fighting techniques – skills that were born out of each society’s need to defend itself. And at the end of each journey, one of these two warriors will face the ultimate test – he’ll try to survive a real fight with a true HUMAN WEAPON.

Their thrill-seeking quest takes hosts Jason and Bill to some extreme and exotic places. Each episode of HUMAN WEAPON charts an expedition through foreign continents, famous cities, exotic villages, back alleys and lush landscapes in their quest for a different type of combat. After learning about the history and culture, and training in it themselves, they will see if they have learned enough to take on one of the professional fighting masters in the discipline – and survive.

The first week of HUMAN WEAPON (July 20) takes the hosts to Bangkok to learn different forms of the ancient art of Muay Thai, also known as the “Science of Eight Limbs.” In this fighting technique the hands, shins, elbows and knees are developed into weapons designed to crush an opponent. As in every episode, the hosts experience the history of the art, how to train in it, and the culture it evolved from. In their journey through the exotic kingdom once known as Siam , Chambers and Duff discover the origins of Muay Thai in an ancient Buddhist temple, battle professional fighters in a hardcore rural gym and immerse themselves in the jungle camp of secretive Muay Thai Master Preang. They’ll become intimately acquainted with all eight limbs. Until one of them must use what they’ve learned in a fight against the Champion Yodecha.

In future episodes of HUMAN WEAPON we find the fighting pair battling an opponent in a jungle cockfighting pit, practicing ancient wrestling moves on a water buffalo and learning the secrets of a death strike in a Japanese temple. We follow Chambers and Duff as they travel the world from Japan to France , to the Philippines and Israel and beyond, absorbing each nation's singular history and traditions, while learning how each individual location gave birth to its distinct form of combat.

Some of the topics covered in HUMAN WEAPON, in addition to Muay Thai ( Thailand ), are: Eskrima ( Philippines ), Judo ( Japan ), Karate ( Japan ), Savate ( France ), Pankration ( Greece ), and Krav Maga ( Israel ).

HUMAN WEAPON Hosts
Jason Chambers. A Total Fighting Challenge Welterweight Champion, Jason Chambers has a record of 16 wins and 4 losses as an MMA fighter. He has been training in various martial arts since the age of six. Jason has fought in “Deep” in Japan and “Rento Maximo” in Mexico and all over the USA . He has trained under Renzo Gracie and currently trains under Eddie Bravo in Jiu-Jitsu. In addition, Jason also holds the rank of “Phase 1 Instructor” in Jeet Kune Do under Joe Goytia. Some of Jason’s current training partners are Karo Parisayn, Bas Rutten, and Randy Coture at Legends Gym in Hollywood , California .

Bill Duff. Pro Football player, bodyguard, wrestler and stunt double, Bill Duff holds a brown belt in Korean street fighting (Toa So Dou) under Master Davis of the Wa Wrang Studios in Riverside , New Jersey . He is a two-time heavyweight state champion wrestler, member of the New Jersey Hall of fame, and undefeated in bar fights. Bill, 6-foot 4 inches tall and 280 pounds, was a professional football player for seven years. He started for the Orlando Rage in the XFL and spent the 2000 and 2002 NFL Europe seasons with the Berlin Thunder, helping them win the 2002 World Bowl Championships. Continuing his career with the Arena Football league, he played for the Indianapolis Firebirds and Columbus Destroyers. Prior to this, he played for the Cleveland Browns in their expansion year 1999-2000. He was also co-captain of the 1997 SEC champion Tennessee Volunteers.

On History.com, HUMAN WEAPON will include a game, the history of all different forms of hand-to-hand combat, exclusive fighting short-form video, and “motion-capture” footage showing the different types of moves. There will also be host photos, bios, and video interviews, a glossary of terms, an episode guide, tune-in information and more. One fight in each episode of HUMAN WEAPON will be shown in detail on History.com.

The new series HUMAN WEAPON is produced for The History Channel by Jupiter Entertainment. Executive Producer for The History Channel is Marc Etkind. Executive Producers are Steven Land and Zak Weisfeld.

The History Channel® is a leading cable television network featuring compelling original, non-fiction specials and series that bring history to life in a powerful and entertaining manner across multiple platforms. The network provides an inviting place where people experience history in new and exciting ways enabling them to connect their lives today to the great lives and events of the past that provide a blueprint for the future. The History Channel has earned four Peabody Awards, three Primetime Emmy® Awards, ten News & Documentary Emmy® Awards and received the prestigious Governor's Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for the network's Save Our History® campaign dedicated to historic preservation and history education. The History Channel reaches more than 93 million Nielsen subscribers. The website is located at www.History.com.

###

Upcoming episodes of HUMAN WEAPON:

MUAY THAI (July 20)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff journey to Bangkok , Thailand , home to one of the world’s most distinctive and devastating fighting arts, Muay Thai. After witnessing beat downs and knockouts at legendary Lumpinee Stadium, they’ll travel across the country perfecting the moves of the fighting style known as the Science of Eight Limbs.

From ancient killing techniques in the jungles on the border of Burma to weapons training among the ruins of a Buddhist temple, they’ll master all aspects of this centuries-old discipline in the hopes that one of them can survive a fight against an international Muay Thai champion. Thailand

ESKRIMA (July 27)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff travel to the island nation of the Philippines , where the indigenous fighting style, Eskrima, was formed. From ancient forts in Cebu City to a modern military base in Manila, our hosts will learn the stick and knife techniques that were used to kill famed Spanish explorer Ferdinand Magellan in the 16th century, battle the Japanese in WWII guerrilla raids and wage an ongoing struggle against the terrorist organization Abu Sayef in the jungles of Mindinao.

Along the way, they’ll attempt to take down a 2,000-pound water buffalo using techniques developed on the rice paddies at the foot of the Manalanga Mountains , and perfect their Eskrima stick-twirling techniques on rickety bamboo rafts beneath the waterfalls in the jungles of Badian. Finally, one of our hosts will enter a gritty cockfight ring for an Eskrima stick fight against a five-time world champion. Philippines

JUDO (August 3)

Our hosts, Jason Chambers and Bill Duff, are in Japan to explore the techniques and history of Japan ’s national art of hand-to-hand combat: Judo – the science of the Samurai. Derived from the bloody battlefields of feudal Japan and jujutsu fighting styles of the samurai, judo has an illustrious past of deadly skills and honor. Along their journey, our hosts travel through the towering metropolis of Tokyo and the Samurai capital of Kyoto . They’ll train with an elite police force and journey to the mountaintop hideaway of legendary master, the descendent of a 400-year-old line of samurai

Under the intense training of the masters, Jason and Bill quickly discover the spectacular throws, merciless pins and strangling chokeholds that are an integral part of this powerful combat art. Jason and Bill’s journey eventually leads them to Tokai University , where one of them will muster the strength and newly acquired judo skills required to take on a world-class judo champion. Japan

KARATE (August 10)

Hosts Chambers and Duff travel to the island of Okinawa , Japan , the birthplace of one of the most deadly hand-to-hand combat arts in the world, Karate. Our hosts will journey across this legendary island, learning all aspects of the fighting art Okinawans created to help battle invading Samurai warriors over 400 years ago.

After practicing the shocking techniques of Iron Body Training in a 600-year-old castle, mastering heart-stopping vital point strikes in an ancient temple and putting themselves through the rigorous training regiments of ancient Karate masters, one of the hosts will step onto the mat to face a black belt, and Okinawan Champion, in a true Karate battle. Japan

SAVATE (August 17)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff are in France , to study the combat art of Savate. Literally translated to mean “old boot,” Savate developed through necessity. In the early 1800s, violent street gangs looking for trouble ruled the Parisian underground scene. Their prey was the aristocratic class who, to protect themselves, began taking self-defense classes. Over the years this training evolved into modern Savate – an exacting combat sport, and also the official hand-to-hand assault system of the French RAID police.

On their mission to uncover Savate’s distinct style, Jason and Bill navigate the dockyards of Marseille, roam the grounds of a 14th-century castle, and even breach a secret police training site to practice and perfect the painfully efficient kicks and punches that comprise this elegant yet ruthless art of combat. Finally, one of our hosts will enter the ring to take on a Savate heavyweight champion. France

PANKRATION (August 24)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff plunge into the cradle of civilization, Athens , Greece , to explore what some thing is the world’s original mixed martial art. Literally translated as “all powers,” Pankration is the ancient Greek art of hand-to-hand combat. Nearly four thousand years old and made famous by Spartans and ancient Olympians, Pankration has recently been revitalized as a modern sport. One that Jason and Bill will experience firsthand.

From back alley gyms to the oldest standing fortress in all of Greece, our hosts immerse themselves in the origins of wrestling, boxing, grappling and kickboxing and come to understand why Pankration has inspired art and literature and martial arts for centuries. At the end of their journey, one of them will face the ultimate test: a legal Pankration match with a World, European, and six-time national champion Pankration fighter - a true Human Weapon. Greece

KRAV MAGA (August 31)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff travel to Israel to study one of the deadliest and most effective hand-to-hand combat systems in the world. Specifically designed for the Israeli Defense Forces in the 1940s, Krav Maga is a dirty, anything-goes fighting style that is used to disarm and destroy assailants carrying multiple weapons.

Our hosts journey to some of the most sacred religious locations in the world as they learn to escape deadly chokes, deflect weapons, and perfect ruthless counterattacks in their quest to become true human weapons. Never before have our hosts learned a martial art that is not only physically demanding, but also a combative necessity in this war-torn country. Their journey ends with a fight against an entire unit of elite-level Krav Maga professionals.
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It will seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first.
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Maxx
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« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2007, 06:35:32 PM »

Holy crap that sounds awesome!

We should have a topic for this to let others now that this is gonna go down on the history channel..

Thanks for the update!
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Bandolero
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« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2007, 06:45:26 PM »

Quote
PANKRATION (August 24)

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff plunge into the cradle of civilization, Athens , Greece , to explore what some thing is the world’s original mixed martial art. Literally translated as “all powers,” Pankration is the ancient Greek art of hand-to-hand combat. Nearly four thousand years old and made famous by Spartans and ancient Olympians, Pankration has recently been revitalized as a modern sport. One that Jason and Bill will experience firsthand.

From back alley gyms to the oldest standing fortress in all of Greece, our hosts immerse themselves in the origins of wrestling, boxing, grappling and kickboxing and come to understand why Pankration has inspired art and literature and martial arts for centuries. At the end of their journey, one of them will face the ultimate test: a legal Pankration match with a World, European, and six-time national champion Pankration fighter - a true Human Weapon. Greece

I think this is Aris Makris from Canada.  Dino from the Warrior's Forge has brought him in several times to do seminars that were very well received.
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MonyetNakal
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« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2007, 06:58:28 PM »

Here's the promo webpage for the episode in question:

http://www.history.com/minisite.do?content_type=Minisite_Generic&content_type_id=55000&display_order=3&sub_display_order=6&mini_id=54986
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Maxx
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« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2007, 08:12:59 PM »

Thank you for putting that up..I can't wait to watch this show. It looks interesting all except one thing..I took Krav Maga for awhile back in the day..About 3 years worth and I am not impressed with it at all...Alot of it seems based on Hocus Pocus..Alot of wild rolls and super men feats..If anything I would have put something with alittle bit more..Like good old fashion American Whoop ass  ahhahah!
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Guard Dog
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« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2007, 01:20:13 AM »

I "DVR'ed" it!  I'm looking forward to this series as well.

Gruhn
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Maxx
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« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2007, 12:15:52 PM »

I can say the first two shows are gonna be HOT..First one is Thai and the next is Escrima and I am looking forward to the PANKRATION but I am not really looking forward to the savate or the Krav Maga..I seriously think they should have choose a wicked form of Kung Fu or something else.
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krait44
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« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2007, 12:33:55 PM »

Maxx,

Below is a link to an article from Pavel Tsatsouline's website. He has bulit a training philosophy based on the exercise science of Dr. Vladimir Zatsiorsky. It is based on efficiency rather than what they call "training to fail." Being 42 years of age this information was extremely helpful to me. High intensity training(HIT) is great but as one ages the chance of injury increases and recovery from those injuries takes longer. 

http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/57/
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Maxx
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« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2007, 01:46:49 PM »

That was very helpful..I read that all and really liked it. I agree with Quality Versus Quantity..I read in one of Bruce Lees books "Expressing the Human body" that even he mentions only do weights that you can do with out struggle..If it happens to be a 20 or 25 lbs curl then so be it..I also noticed that before I would lift weights and lift weights and keep going higher and higher and I always felt weak. When I started Fighting arts and dropped my weights down to stuff I can handle and also picking up explosive work outs , I found myself getting actually alot stronger and having more energy..Except when I blow myself out and work out 7 days a week..By taking your guys advice and taking that day off..It really helped me..
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5thprofession47
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« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2007, 07:49:21 PM »

Maxx, why not make Friday your "off" day. You can enjoy the HUMAN WEAPON show and still be contributing to your training!
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Maxx
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« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2007, 12:34:31 PM »

You are correct  grin  I was thinking about doing that..But tomarrow is my B-day and I am taking that off as well. I have no say..My Lady said "No working out tomarrow!!" See has plans for us..But maybe I can get out of work alittle early and get some stick time in..

Started getting alittle more harder stick in..I got brusied up rather bad..But, I am trying to condition myself to fight at the next gathering.  evil
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LEFTJAB22
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« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2007, 06:15:05 PM »

try taking a day off? it helps...
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Maxx
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« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2007, 11:58:07 PM »

Ya..I have been trying to get that in...I just got addicted to the training and am trying to BREAK THE HABIT  wink

Now here is a question...How many times a week do you need to lift weights?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2007, 12:00:43 AM »

What is your purpose in lifting them?
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Maxx
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« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2007, 12:15:56 AM »

Explosive Str.

Good fuctional muscle not the over sized monster muscle..

I am trying to gain alittle bulk and good shape but over all explosive power.
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Bandolero
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« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2007, 06:12:18 AM »

To best achieve explosive strength and power via weight training, you will most need to do explosive exercises.  Such as Olympic weightlifting movements, which can be done with a barbell, or dumbbells, or kettlebells.  Even Olympic lifting has several basic "categories" to it.  Some exercises work on explosive power with an emphasis on anaerobic stamina.  Others work on explosive strength but because they are so taxing physically you will likely not be able to do enough reps of them to really get huffing and puffing. 

For example, if you start each movement from the ground, such as power cleans, squat cleans, snatches, clean and presses, etc., you will find yourself huffing and puffing pretty quickly.  If you are not using too much weight, to where you can only do 3 reps max before your strength fades, you will usually find yourself huffing and puffing long before your actual strength disappears.  For example doing power cleans, from the ground up each rep, with 95 pounds.  That is not so much weight that your strength will give out before your lungs do.  At least that is the case for me.  I feel like I could do them almost forever, if I did not need more air.

Doing movements from the hang is more of a strength movement.  You don't have momentum helping you out as you do with movements from the ground up.  From the hang (e.g. hang cleans, hang snatches) are movements you really need to muscle up more than anything else.  At least with me it is usually the case that my strength fades long before my lungs do when doing work from the hang.

Another good exercise for explosive power are dumbbell (or barbell) thrusters.  Vary the weight.  Lower weight means you can do more reps and get more of an anaerobic benefit.  Heavier weights will develop more explosive strength.  Again think of the difference between doing thrusters with 95 pounds, and doing them with 155 lbs.  They tend to benefit different areas, both vital, of your overall conditioning.

JMHO.....
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"This is a war, and we are soldiers. Death can come for us at any time, in any place." ~ Morpheus
SB_Mig
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« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2007, 02:35:11 PM »

Maxx,

I've been doing workouts from Crossfit for the past 3 months and I've found them to be great. Olympic weightlifting plus high intensity cardio, gymnastics, and varied workouts. It's not for everyone, but it may be what your looking for. I'm usually in the gym 6 days a week, for no longer than 40 minutes, which gives me plenty of time to get in my martial arts training.

SB_Mig
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rio
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« Reply #31 on: July 17, 2007, 02:51:33 PM »

MAXX, is your diet sustaining your schedule? overworked bodies need rest AND proper nutrition for combat athletics. even eating what you might think is the proper diet, could be too low for your schedule. another option to present for the non day off person is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. recharge the body and repair all those little aches and pains. need more info on HBOT contact me at chris@ranchomiragehyperbarics.com.
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maija
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« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2007, 06:01:31 PM »

One of my training partners does kettlebell "ladders" for explosive strength, alignment and dynamic co-ordination. He loves them. Apparently a 25 minute workout is all it takes.
Also recommended, the book "Infinite Intensity" by Ross  Enamait. He has another one too, but i forget it's name. Think it's only available online... but i could be wrong. Here is a link to his website.......possibly not the place to go if you are trying NOT to overtrain...but you did mention explosive strength......http://www.rosstraining.com/
Check out the vid clips. LOVE the sledgehammer exercise grin
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It will seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first.
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Bandolero
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« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2007, 07:27:53 PM »

One of my training partners does kettlebell "ladders" for explosive strength, alignment and dynamic co-ordination. He loves them. Apparently a 25 minute workout is all it takes.
Also recommended, the book "Infinite Intensity" by Ross  Enamait. He has another one too, but i forget it's name. Think it's only available online... but i could be wrong. Here is a link to his website.......possibly not the place to go if you are trying NOT to overtrain...but you did mention explosive strength......http://www.rosstraining.com/
Check out the vid clips. LOVE the sledgehammer exercise grin

Never Gymless.  Ross's material is second to none.
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"This is a war, and we are soldiers. Death can come for us at any time, in any place." ~ Morpheus
Maxx
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« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2007, 11:54:40 PM »

Maxx,

I've been doing workouts from Crossfit for the past 3 months and I've found them to be great. Olympic weightlifting plus high intensity cardio, gymnastics, and varied workouts. It's not for everyone, but it may be what your looking for. I'm usually in the gym 6 days a week, for no longer than 40 minutes, which gives me plenty of time to get in my martial arts training.

SB_Mig


Where do I find this crossfit?
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MonyetNakal
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« Reply #35 on: July 25, 2007, 01:00:21 PM »

Start at http://www.crossfit.com/ and then scroll down and look to the right side of the page for a local affiliate.
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SB_Mig
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« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2007, 01:57:54 PM »

Maxx,

Sorry for the delayed response, I just returned from 5 days in Yosemite.

Crossfit is not a program you just want to jump into without first doing some reading and research. All of the basic information you need is on their website, but it is highly recommended that you either  take part in one of their seminars OR at the very least, have a quick session with one of their trainers (which can be found per MonkeytNakal's directions). This will at least get you tuned up and will help you with basic form and technique for the Olympic lifts that you'll be doing.

Again, it is important that you ease into their workouts (something they explain on their website in detail) in order to avoid serious injury. I find Crossfit to be great because the workouts always change, they are always challenging, and best of all, they are provided for FREE!

Good training to you!

SB_Mig
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Maxx
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« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2007, 04:32:01 PM »

I check out alot of their site and alot of their stuff is really something else.
I like it alot and have picked a few things and started moving it into my normal stuff.
Thanks for the info!
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Maxx
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« Reply #38 on: July 31, 2007, 11:54:03 PM »

Is it nessessary to work out the Biceps with curling dumbells more the a Bulgarian Squat curl and pull  ups?
Most Curl work out with a bar hurt and dmg my wrist except those two that I have mentioned..And for my next question.

I found that taking a Day off at the begining of the week (Monday) and then coming into the weights on Tuesday is hard..Almost like I took longer off..Has anyone tried starting off the work out week "Weightless" and then later in the week using weights see a difference?
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Bandolero
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« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2007, 09:09:15 PM »

When it comes to biceps curls and upright rows, I stay away from the big bar.  I do not feel the necessary grip angles are conducive to proper body mechanics, especially as the weight starts getting heavier.  Dumbbells are perfect.
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"This is a war, and we are soldiers. Death can come for us at any time, in any place." ~ Morpheus
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2007, 10:01:22 PM »

Also worth noting is that Jerry Robinson of "The 7 Minute Rotator Cuff Solution" feels that a goodly percentage of the population should avoid upright rows period.  Something about the bones in many people having a shape that makes this movement rub on a narrow slender muscle and irritate it so as to lead to scar tissue.
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Maxx
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« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2007, 11:22:41 AM »

I find after doing benchpresses to heavy my Rotator Cuff's hurt to..Not with push ups..Just bench presses..and if I skip weights totally and do weightless work out sometimes I feel like I got more out of my hour and a half then I did with weights.
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