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Author Topic: The Older Warrior  (Read 29171 times)
PhilipG
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« Reply #50 on: December 26, 2010, 11:39:10 AM »

As I pass 58 years on the life meter, I find myself getting back into training even more now. I am now relatively injury free and healthy and find myself starting to train harder. Three days of cardio based work with running, skipping, and body weight exercises. Three days of circuit training based on resistance bands, kettle bells and plyo boxes. Lots of warming up, stretching and several vain attempts to customize my diet to trim down my bulk. Hitting tires for various lengths of time.

I am seeing noticeable (to myself) improvements to my overall conditioning which is motivating me to try harder and add technique classes for skill preservation/improvement to my schedule. Looking forward to adding regular grappling training back into the mix as well. Have been toying with a wrestling class but I have to increase my flexibility a bit first. The drills required for general class participation can tweek knees that are not prepared for the strain.

Looking to swing the stick harder in '11, perhaps face someone at a gathering.

Well I can dream.

All the best charging into the new year.
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #51 on: December 27, 2010, 08:17:31 AM »

Woof Sled Dog, I'm glad to hear of what your doing and your progress. Stay with it Brother and make it a life long habit.
I turned 50 this year and have no intentions of slowing down.
I think your going to be well pleased with the levels you can get your self to.
Never be satisfied with where your at and never give in.........
As is a saying in DBMA "Consistency across category's"!
As for swinging a stick at a Gathering. IMO A older wiser high skilled guy is a force to be recconned with!
Old guys Rule!! WOOF!
 Respect.                                               Howling Dog
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #52 on: January 02, 2011, 01:51:01 PM »

Just to throw my encouragement in the mix gentlemen, my first fight at a Gathering was a couple years ago at age 56.
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Stickgrappler
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« Reply #53 on: January 03, 2011, 02:21:27 PM »

Woof all:

*LOL at myself* I thought I was over-the-hill at 46. I am going to get back to formal training after years of on-and-off training (mostly off), raising 3 kids. My youngest is 7 yrs old and in 2nd grade, my 2 older are 12 and 9. Stickgrappler Jr is pretty much self-sufficient now, also my 2 Stickgrapplerettes can watch out for him too.

Dog Howie is an inspiration to me, fighting not just at a Gathering, but his dealings with Real Life given his challenges are truly what sets him as a Warrior.

Very truly yours in the martial arts and Life,

~sg
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
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« Reply #54 on: January 03, 2011, 02:40:21 PM »

Quote
Just to throw my encouragement in the mix gentlemen, my first fight at a Gathering was a couple years ago at age 56.

Howie - I'm sorry I wasn't there that day when you made "dog", but let me just say that you kick a$$.

Sleddog - I have enjoyed the fights I have had with you. You're an inspiration to keep on going as you have for so long now, and to maintain such a high level, not just remain an inspiration for being there.
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Dog Howie
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« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2011, 02:01:07 PM »

SG, Guide Dog and Kostas: I happened to see your encouraging comments just now for the first time. I truly think that I am doing just nothing more than what you and what many others are doing. And that is simply doing what we were born to do. Many of us on these boards and at the Gatherings are here because we take seriously and literally Guro Crafty's call to walk as warriors for all our days. This is who we are. Its what we were born to do. We are here doing what we do because, more literally than figuratively,  this board... The Tribe and the joy of the fight is our home. Where else would we go? What else would we do?  And BTW Kostas...I am hoping to stand with the Tribe in May and fight again with the Tribe in September. Certainly... the adventure continues!
« Last Edit: January 18, 2011, 02:09:15 PM by Dog Howie » Logged
Kaju Dog
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« Reply #56 on: June 22, 2011, 11:46:24 PM »

Not sure but maybe this place fits my post undecided

First off, HUGE HOWL of RESPECT to those who continue to ascend and strengthen the Tribe as a whole.

I have severly aggrivated my lower back again and move like I need a walker (Wife wants to get me a Hoveround  cry cheesy ).

Missing the last Tribal has left a deep void in my gut, Im inspired by Dog Howie and his Warrior spirit.  I don't care if I have to FIGHT from a wheelchair, I refuse to let this defeat me.  I fear that I may need the "Spinal Fusion" surgery sooner than hoped for.

Going back to the VA hospital Friday to find out more.

So why am I telling you this?  I AM a DOG BROTHER, I dont take the privilage lightly and felt I needed to communicate since I have tendencies to withdraw from social interaction at times due to my PTSD. 

Never been good with watching from the sidelines when it comes to being around Men / Women of ACTION. 


With respect always,
Dean "Kaju Dog" Webster
Fresno, CA.
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jcordova
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« Reply #57 on: June 23, 2011, 07:37:52 AM »

much respect to all of you.  I too have lower back problems. My specialist gave me a shot of cortizone two months ago and told me I have to slow down a little bit and since I have my L4 disk pinching one of my nerves  and like Kajudog, I can't be juat standing around and watch. As of this time I'm having pains but het I grab my sticks and to ow through the motions. I won't give up either that easy Dog brothers have given motivation to continue and live up as A Warrior For All My Days.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #58 on: June 29, 2011, 12:33:07 AM »

Here is some of my philosophy in no particular order:

a) Never argue with your joints; they always win.

b) The key to most things is alignment.

c) Where a muscle is tight, in that range of motion to complementary muscle is weak.  To maximize elasticity, it is as important to work complete contraction as it is to stretch.

d)  In my rather strongly held self-taught opinion (remember "Only you are responsible for you, so protect yourself at all times.") most lower back pain (e.g. L4 pinching a nerve) is the result of short, tight hip flexors (psoas, ilio, and quads) and weak hip extensors (hamstring, glute, and in a certain sense quadratus lumborum).  This leads the pelvis to tilt forward, which raises the pelvic crest towards the ribs which tends to compress the lumbar region of the spine e.g. L4.  If you restore range of motion to the hip flexors and extensors, this should lessen, perhaps dramatically, the compression on the lumbar portion of the spine, perhaps with near miraculous results.

No suing no one for no reason for nothing no how no way.  Consult a proper expert in these things.  Feel free to show him/her this post.
===========

I've been focusing on strength work the last couple of months.  I tend to organize my work in this regard by the joint in question e.g. the muscles that move the humerus i.e. the shoulder joint.



Defined thusly, many movements which are considered back movements (e.g. pulldowns) are part of the workout.



This week I stumbled on a pairing which I liked a lot.   Certainly under this concept it is obvious to pair overhead presses (I prefer dumbbells to bar) with pull down motions.  What I did differently this time was to apply a concept I learned from Chris Gizzi for activating/aligning the scapula.



Instead of doing a seated regular press I set the backrest of the seat bench at a slight angle from perpendicular and faced so that my front was resting on the backrest and did my set of dumbbell presses with a distinctly light weight.  Each set I increased the intensity not by increasing the weight, but by lowering the back rest a click or two towards horizontal.  Very subtle!  Very effective!
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 12:56:27 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
C-Mighty Dog
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« Reply #59 on: June 29, 2011, 09:00:53 AM »

I came back from my Post-Op shoulder surgery appt. The surgeon broke the bad news that when he went "in", they found that I was miss all my Cartilage on the lower half of my shoulder girdle, both anterior and posterior. He states that it is very rare and not sure how it happened. May be genetic.
He was AMAZED that I had all my range of motion back. I told him that he put "resume activity with NO restrictions", so I did. I don't take pain meds as I feel that my body eventually copes then blocks it out on it's own. But I am back to training with the same Zeal as I had before...just slower.
I made a commitment that I would work my weak side for 4 months, and will continue with that plan. My concern is that I have increased swelling in between my First and Second MPJ and it is very tender to lateral movement and full flexion since the Tribal. X-rays are negative for a fracture, so it obviously is Soft tissue damage, which now hinders my Left side in regards to grip and some swings.
At nearly 44 y/o, my body on the outside looks 25, the internal workings however...44!

Woof! C-Mighty Dog
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C-Mighty Dog      small dog...Big Balls
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #60 on: June 29, 2011, 09:06:52 AM »

MPJ?
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Dr Dog
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« Reply #61 on: June 29, 2011, 12:54:22 PM »

Metacarpal Phalangeal joint (also abbreviated MCPJ) - the big knuckle at the base of the fingers or thumb - do you mean 1st and 2nd (that would be between thumb and index finger)  or between index and middle?
Hematoma? that can take a while to resolve.
If you really mean between the index finger and the thumb, did you tear/strain one of the thumb muscles? That would affect grip, swell - should be a fair amount of bruising.
Good news is that if there is no fracture most of these things (short of frank tendon rupture) really should get better in plenty of time for September.

Listening to the joints is key. I took up jumping rope as part of my new boxing regimen back in February and got so enthralled with it I gave myself a patellar tendonitis. Now, I can't jump rope and my running (which has never been an issue before) is markedly affected - so I'm having more trouble with weight, etc. I ignored the initial soreness......stupid.

Aren't we supposed to at least be getting wiser?  Isn't that in the contract somewhere?

Rick
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C-Mighty Dog
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« Reply #62 on: June 29, 2011, 01:11:17 PM »

It's between the index and middle. Mild lateral movement really hurts, also, just hitting the speed bag straight on with it again pain.
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C-Mighty Dog      small dog...Big Balls
C-Mighty Dog
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« Reply #63 on: June 29, 2011, 01:14:33 PM »

Rick, All this news of you having limited movement because of knee pain brings tears to my eyes!....Tears of joy that is! I believe we have a dance coming up. Though I would like to fight you when you're at 100%. We are both old men now and I'll take any advantage I can get! Smiley
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C-Mighty Dog      small dog...Big Balls
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #64 on: June 29, 2011, 09:02:46 PM »

a) "Intelligence is the amount of time it takes to forget a lesson."

b) "Knees are escape valves for hips."
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #65 on: July 02, 2011, 11:28:17 AM »

Sometimes I have to cross many time zones.  A month or so ago it was 10 time zones to Israel.  On Wednesday it will be 8 times zones as I travel to Bern, Switzerland.

I have read articles which say that time zone changes becomes harder as we get older.

Many years ago I asked Guro Inosanto how he managed a far, far tougher travel schedule than mine.  Here is a part of his answer:

Yoga headstands:  He felt that blood to the brain was a very good way to get the body to WAKE UP when it was the local time to do so.
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C-Mighty Dog
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« Reply #66 on: July 02, 2011, 06:46:38 PM »

The Headstand is something that I need you to "demonstrate" at Fight Camp! Not that I doubt that you can, but the visual of your Five Fingers in the air while your face turns red is hysterical!  cheesy
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C-Mighty Dog      small dog...Big Balls
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #67 on: July 02, 2011, 08:01:09 PM »

You're on! grin
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #68 on: July 16, 2011, 04:32:55 PM »

Other things I do for preparation for and/or recovery from long trips:

1)  Massage.  There is an AWESOME Chinese place in my neighborhood that does great work for $20 per hour.  I get 90 minutes a day or two before my travel.  Sometimes both days! My body is the tool with which I generate my living and tools require upkeep and maitainence.  Some people might regard this as wimpy, my attitude is I am worth it.

2) Airplane travel becomes an ever more challenging experience.  Crummier seats, less leg room, no entertainment on some airlines (included in this Hall of Shame are , , , ahem , , , US Airways on its domestic flights and Iberia).  The seats are really, really tough on my hips and lower back and so in addition to the massage, I have particular workout routines that focus on alignment of the hips.

3) When big time zone changes are involved LOTS OF DRUGS cheesy  but not alcohol (I have maybe 2 or 3 drinks per years, I find it to be very counterproductive) specifically 10 mgs of melatonin (that is considered a big dose) and a Benadryl.

4) If I need the caffeine I will have a diet Coke or a coffee.  Because I only drink caffeine on special occasions (to fire up for a seminar in another time zone, to stay awake when driving) one Diet Coke and I am seriously wired.

5) Both before and after a long trip I make a point of a session at Bluff Cove.  This entails about 40 to 445 minutes of LSD aerocis with variable heart rate.
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bigdog
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« Reply #69 on: July 19, 2011, 09:16:23 AM »

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1188159/index.htm

A nice, short article about remaining active as you age.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #70 on: July 19, 2011, 10:39:06 AM »

Good one  smiley
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C-Mighty Dog
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« Reply #71 on: July 19, 2011, 12:30:38 PM »

great article! Yesterday as sat at my desk, I went to pick up the phone and a strange sharp pain entered my right wrist. As if one of my Carpal bones had shifted, and I needed to somehow do some joint mobilization and get it back in place. Poor timing had it, that a patient showed up for me to consult and I found that I was attempting to "recrack" my hand back in place....it never did. As I got home, I spent most of the time guarding it and icing what seemed to be an Arthritic joint. You see, genetically, I'm predisposed to Rheumatoid Arthritis, which is probably why I have no Cartilage in my right shoulder (that too will be a "dead arm" as stated in the article). As I am attempting to healing from my Shoulder Arthroscopy, my left hamstring lambrum (from a recent tear), my left hand contusion (from the Tribal)...now the right hand "arthritis", I am reminded of how old I am. It is easy to forget when you are 5'2" and still look young on the outside. But my "internal" wiring, like a car, is deteriorating. My wife jokingly stated that I may be too old to fight anymore. What?....I know eventually I will have to be a mentor rather then a fighter (like Crafty), but it is difficult to deal with since I have fought for 3 decades now, and found in the Dog Brothers a "true love" again in fighting.
So, As I sit with my splint on my right hand, Ice machine on my right shoulder, performing massage on my left hand and stretching my hamstring any time I stand without moving too long (All of which I do everyday), I remind myself that there will be a time to stop, but just not now,...AND that it is better to be a "Has been" then a "wanna-be".

Woof C-Mighty Dog
« Last Edit: July 19, 2011, 01:26:05 PM by C-Mighty Dog » Logged

C-Mighty Dog      small dog...Big Balls
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #72 on: July 19, 2011, 02:06:43 PM »

or a "never was".

As the country music song says "I ain't as young as I once was, but I am as young once as I ever was."
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bigdog
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« Reply #73 on: July 19, 2011, 02:27:06 PM »

or a "never was".

As the country music song says "I ain't as young as I once was, but I am as young once as I ever was."

I thought this exact thing when I read the article. 

I am glad you liked it C-Mighty Dog.
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #74 on: July 19, 2011, 08:11:52 PM »

I remind myself that there will be a time to stop, but just not now,...AND that it is better to be a "Has been" then a "wanna-be".

Woof C-Mighty Dog


My thoughts exactly.  Im know where near the shape I was in at my first Gathering and to be honest, post the DB Coral Gathering, I have been craving the level of enlightenment found then.  I stand in my own way alot but hope to make a personal comeback.  I fear being one of those sort that earns Dog status and then begins to fade away. 

OTOH I also find it harder to come out with the fear that I once had and the intensity when on the attack.  I respect the damage that comes from harder contact but as I get to know my fellow DB's, it becomes harder to knowingly harm a Brother.   I also realize that I pose challenges that favor me due to my bum knees and thats not fair to my Brothers/Sisters either. 

OK, done rambling in self pitty. 

Sad
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c - Shadow Dog
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« Reply #75 on: July 19, 2011, 09:39:25 PM »

Quote
AND that it is better to be a "Has been" then a "wanna-be".


WOOF to that!

Dog Terry
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Stickgrappler
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« Reply #76 on: July 19, 2011, 10:01:27 PM »

Woof all:

*Bows deeply to all*


Just some ramblings on my part... after this post, many may think I'm a crackpot or whatever... but just wanted to get some food for thought added to the table.

@Guro ... that is great insight from Guro I. Thank you for sharing! I massage my head/scalp and neck at times to invigorate it with bloodflow with a similar idea to 'wake up'.

@Kaju ... although you miss the Gatherings and the brothers of the Tribe miss testing themselves against you, I know they all understand. Heal yourself first! We have a mutual brother/friend in the process of healing himself which should be inspiration (if not already) on your road to recovery. Only you are responsible for yourself. Good luck and speedy recovery!


@C-Mighty Dog ... I'm a wannabe and probably may end up a "never was" ... lol @ myself. BTW,  good luck and speedy recovery!

-------------

Here's the rambling...

Some times 'things' are written off because it is not the norm. Society says we must lift weights to be healthy, we must have muscle definition to look good, we must do this or do that because it is society's norms. Sadly that would be the easy way. We are all individuals, we must find out what works for us and what doesn't. Society's way may not be my way. My way may not be your way. Sounding very JKD-ish I realize, but it's Truth.

Who hasn't lifted weights because society says lifting weights is good? Like anything, if you have the wrong form, do it the wrong way, lasting injuries may happen. Sometimes there are alternatives which may not be accepted by the norm, but yet may work if you give it a try. Forgot which DBMA dvd mentioned this:  Guro Lonely was sick with a flu and something else, but there was filming to be done and he showed up, not 100%. Guro Crafty took him to a Doctor of Oriental Medicine and the Dr. prescribed some herbs to make an herbal tea... Guro Lonely mentions boiling the herbs for 10 hrs or so... after the tea, he felt better, nowhere near 100% but way better before he left Switzerland. Is Oriental Medicine accepted by society yet? It may still have that witch doctor/shamanism stigma attached to it that keeps it from wide acceptance as an alternative to Western medicine. I am of the belief that Western Medicine suppresses symptoms while Oriental Medicine seeks to heal the sickness which causes the symptoms...Western medicine is also about getting doctors, pharmaceutical co's and insurance co's paid but I digress.  I could go on about acupunture, qigong/chi kung etc. which faces the same stigma that Oriental Medicine faces.

There is yin and yang, there is hard and soft... to the commonly accepted Western conditioning/training hardness perhaps some of the soft arts like yoga or the Chinese internal martial arts (neijia - taiji/tai chi, bagua/pa kua, xing yi/hsing i) and qigong/chi kung may help. We hear stories of Chinese masters who are in their 70's-90's who seem as lively and energetic of someone in their 30's-40's. The Sports Illustrated article mentioned 37 as an age where things seem to go downhill... the Chinese have a saying, I forget the exact translation, but it's words to the effect of "Before 30 yrs of age, one fears nothing... after 30, one starts fearing sickness/ailments/body malfunctions starting". Perhaps if a good foundation is laid with understanding the body with the internal arts, there is lessened chance of the effects of aging? Westerners hear someone 60+ yrs old and they think they need a cane to walk... there are many Asians who are 60+ who are still active...of course there are also non-active 60+, but most of the active elderly I encountered have practiced Tai Chi/Taiji or Qigong/Chi Kung... perhaps there is something to this mysterious (unproven scientifically to Western mindsets) 'thing' called Chi/Qi? The basic idea is that qi/chi/blood/energy is flowing and if it flows, your body is healthy and the effects of aging are retarded.

For the record I'm 46 this year, I am nowhere what I used to be physically. I regret not keeping up tai chi practice when my dad taught me when I was 10. He taught me some yoga when I was younger than that. My dad never forced me to do anything and unfortunately, I regret not keeping up with the valuable lessons I learned when younger. I'm exploring them again along with qigong/chi kung and some internal martial arts. We will see where it takes me. My sojourn continues...



It's late, I'm rambling, I'm sure you all think me wacked after this post... thank you for letting me 'speak' and present food for thought.

Very truly yours in the martial arts,

~sg
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
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« Reply #77 on: July 19, 2011, 11:45:12 PM »

Woof SG.  Very nourishing and a pleasure to read your words of wisdom. 

V/r,
KD cool
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #78 on: July 20, 2011, 11:18:09 AM »

Kaju Dog:

You have been places and done things.  You are a "made" Dog Brother and a "made" man. 

Stand proud.

TAC!
Crafty Dog
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sting
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« Reply #79 on: July 20, 2011, 01:27:18 PM »

While I don't doubt that exercise (circulation therapy) extends bodily function, it is important to avoid over-looking a selection process :  those that are able continue to exercise.  In any hard contact martial arts class, I notice a high drop out rate.  Does the class toughen the student or does the class select for tough students?
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« Reply #80 on: July 20, 2011, 05:24:21 PM »

Quote
Does the class toughen the student or does the class select for tough students?

wow thats super insightful!  in all these years i had missed that possibility.

Thanks,

Dog Terry
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Dr Dog
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« Reply #81 on: July 20, 2011, 06:43:31 PM »

"Does the class toughen the student or does the class select for tough students?"

The question I am asking myself is how to do both - challenge the tough students and toughen the less so, without making EVERYONE unhappy. That's the question - we were discussing similar questions on the DBMA facebook page recently.

Rick
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #82 on: August 28, 2011, 03:15:26 PM »

With travel (both business and family) my conditioning level dropped quite a bit this summer and now I have begun rebuilding.  I'm back to the Sand Dune in Manhattan Beach (with my son in tow, his BJJ is already getting more physical grin) and doing open mat rolls on Friday afternoons.

As we get older, it can be very difficurlt in such moments to discern the difference between the inevitable declines of age and using the inevitable declines of age as an excuse!

FWIW my solution is to avoid this apparent dichotomy altogether:  To walk as a warrior for all our days is to increase our impeccablility.
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dreatx
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« Reply #83 on: November 12, 2011, 08:22:05 PM »

I want to thank all of you that posted here.  I am in my 40s and have just become interested in what you do.  I am not a long time martial artist or anything like that.  Anyway, I have a stick, I have DBMA dvds and I have a park.  Since I am in Tx, I hope to pop my cherry in a Houston Stickfighting Organization gathering and then come visit all of you.  Again, thanks for this post. 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #84 on: December 03, 2011, 07:44:19 PM »

Foam roller on my quads has REALLY helped my back and hips  grin
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #85 on: April 22, 2012, 08:46:10 PM »

http://msn.foxsports.com/olympics/wrestling/story/andre-metzger-52-us-olympic-trials-greco-roman-wrestling-john-e-du-pont-dies-in-prison-shot-at-dream-042012

There’s a long list of too-old athletes attempting an ill-fated comeback after retirement.


LONDON CALLING
Are you ready for the 2012 Summer Games? FOXSports.com covers the Olympics like never before. GET FULL COVERAGE HERE
Michael Jordan, who decided he could amaze again on the basketball court at age 38, saw his Washington Wizards miss the playoffs two years in a row. Jim Palmer, who finished his Hall of Fame career with the Baltimore Orioles in 1984, tried to come back seven years later at 45 and made it through two innings of a spring-training game before calling it quits. Brett Favre’s retire-then-unretire pathology finally ended at 41, after he ignominiously finished his career with a 5-8 record and a sexting scandal.

The story is often the same: a world-class talent trying to put off the inevitability of life after sport.

The story of Andre Metzger is very different.

When the 52-year-old from Michigan tries to make the US Olympic Greco-Roman wrestling team at this weekend’s trials in Iowa City, he’ll be chasing no small achievement. The oldest US wrestler to medal at an Olympics? Chris Campbell, who took bronze in 1992 at age 37 — 15 years younger than Metzger is today.

But what makes Metzger stand out even more than his age is the event that sparked his comeback: the death of a 72-year-old multimillionaire in a western Pennsylvania prison in 2010.

Anyone who follows wrestling knows the story of John E. du Pont. Not long ago he was the savior of USA Wrestling, the heir to the du Pont chemical fortune who made amateur sports, specifically wrestling, one of his main philanthropies. But in 1996, du Pont, who was schizophrenic, shot and killed Dave Schultz, a champion freestyle wrestler who had won gold in the 1984 Olympics and was one of du Pont’s closest friends. Du Pont was found guilty but mentally ill the following year and died in prison in December 2010.




And what, exactly, does du Pont’s death have to do with this 52-year-old trying to beat wrestlers half his age and make the Olympic team?

It’s because Metzger’s chance at Olympic glory was cut short in the 1980s and 1990s through a series of bizarre events involving du Pont.

Metzger had won medals in three senior world championships between 1979 and 1987, including silver in 1986. The man to whom he lost in that championship match, Arsen Fadzayev of the Soviet Union, went on to win Olympic gold in 1988 and 1992. Metzger seemed destined to get his opportunity at gold.

But Metzger didn’t have a chance to go to Seoul or Barcelona. He was a recipient of du Pont’s wrestling largesse; du Pont was helping out a financially struggling sport, so there was a feeling of being beholden to him, even as he tried to assert maniacal control over the wrestlers. Each time Metzger won nationals, du Pont gave him a $10,000 bonus. Du Pont also hired Metzger to be a wrestling coach at Villanova University, one of the biggest recipients of du Pont’s philanthropies, paying Metzger $75,000 a year plus a free house.

“It was a pretty sweet deal, too sweet to turn down,” Metzger told FOXSports.com. “But I didn’t know about him.”

 
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Accepting du Pont's money meant Metzger was also subjected to his erratic behavior, which Metzger said included sexual harassment (Metzger sued and they settled out of court), threats on Metzger’s life and one attempt to kill him.

When Metzger mounted a comeback attempt for the 1992 Olympics, du Pont threatened to kill his children, Metzger said.

“The bottom line is he was an evil guy, and he had a lot of money,” Metzger told FOXSports.com. “I just wasn’t going to risk my family’s life. There was no reason to stay in the sport. So I stepped away.”

“And once he died, I had an opportunity.”

So here Metzger is, after three knee surgeries and a hyperextended knee, trying to be America’s hope in the 74-kilo weight class in Greco-Roman wrestling. His body fat is about 5 percent. He does anywhere from two to seven workouts a day: swimming, lifting, sauna workouts, hot yoga, wrestling.




“I said, ‘OK, this guy is crazy,’ ” US national Greco-Roman coach Steve Fraser told the Detroit Free Press. “I hadn’t heard from Andre in years. He was the real deal, a great competitor. The guy has been a real pleasure to have in our training room. He’s training early in the morning and late at night; he’s definitely a breath of fresh air.”

Think he doesn’t have a chance? Logic says of course not. But Metzger says he’s learning the new rules, he’s honed a strategy to beat the youngsters, and he’s beating the top US wrestlers in practice.

“I’ve got potential to do this,” Metzger said. “I wish I’d never been forced to retire early. But there was nothing I could do about that. Now I’m just (trying) to see if I can get it done.”

The chance of him getting it done this weekend in Iowa City is remote. But if he does, you’ll be hearing the name Andre Metzger a lot in the months leading to the Olympics — this time as a story of inspiration.

You can follow Reid Forgrave on Twitter @reidforgrave, become a fan on Facebook or email him at reidforgrave@gmail.com.
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
bigdog
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« Reply #86 on: May 02, 2012, 03:11:34 PM »

http://now.msn.com/now-plus/0501-spectator-wins-mma-fight.aspx

It sounds like a movie plot: A paunchy 53-year-old man arrives at a low-level MMA card, and, when he finds out one of the fighters in an upcoming bout is a no-show, volunteers to fight. With only an hour to prepare, the man faces off against a 21-year-old challenger -- and knocks him out. This was the scene April 28 in Kankakee, Ill., where a middle-aged man named Tim lived out his real-life "Rocky" moment. Tim gets knocked down 30 seconds in, but two minutes later, lands a ferocious right hand that floors his opponent, earning him the victory -- and the crowd's adoration.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #87 on: June 14, 2012, 12:29:16 PM »

http://devour.com/video/uncle-drew/
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bigdog
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« Reply #88 on: June 14, 2012, 03:42:59 PM »

"Don't reach, youngblood.  Don't reach." evil 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #89 on: November 14, 2012, 06:17:44 PM »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2231867/Former-Army-boxing-champion-71-floors-6ft-4in-thug-Mark-Pearce-punched-face-Torquay-attack.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #90 on: November 25, 2012, 12:06:05 PM »

5 years ago internet friend Geezer died.  Herewith some of his words:

One of the things I learned accidentally, as most things I learned, is that it simply isn't possible to accurately imagine being older, although it is terribly and sometimes tragically easy to imagine being younger.

Everything I believe about SD is based on where I am today, and thus flows from my current physical state and limitations.

That means a much different take on things than I had even three years ago.

As I age, the world's perception of me changes. I no longer can walk more than a couple steps with a confident, purposeful stride. Today, much more than ever before, some of the world around sees me as prey. Tempting, juicy, fat, easy prey.

From that perspective, I would consider being in a two-way "gunfight" an absolute catastrophic failure of all of my perceptions and senses. I have experienced extremely close incoming before and I discovered I had a rather firm distaste for the experience. I have no wish to repeat it to see if my tastes have changed over the years.

Secondly, my experience, and the experience of my training partners, and a few other folks with similar experiences that I have met and talked to, all say the same thing. Motor skills not only did not deteriorate, they became better. Time slowed down for me, so much so that my opponents seemed to be walking under water. Ditto for everyone I've talked to. I don't know where that statement originated, but that's not the way it was. Thinking was sharper, clearer and faster than at any other time in my life before or after, except for the two major car accidents I experienced.

I don't think anyone should train as I do unless they have had the same experiences and have reached the same level of senescence. A year from now I will have probably changed what I do to accommodate the accelerating aging process.

Regarding Todd. I have had the opportunity to have had close contact over extended periods of time with a few really bad people, people on the cutting edge of sociopathology, so to speak. I really try to take an honest perspective of who I am, and what I am capable of and frankly, I would not stand a chance against them. It is not a physical issue, not even an issue of ruthlessness or viciousness, it is something else that I cannot define. My solution is to not go where Todd goes, and to try not to do anything to attract Todd's attention. I am not like them, and I thank God that I am not.

Time stretches out in front of us for most of our lives. Limitless, endless, abundant, more than enough to be spent on whatever catches our fancy. Then all of a sudden, one day, while looking at a pretty colored picture in a catalog and lusting after one more toy, the thought comes that "why, why buy this? It's just one more thing for Jill to have to try to sell at a great loss when I die." Then you realize that it is no longer time to buy stuff, it is time to start selling off stuff now to save my wife the stress of dealing with it later. There is no time any more.

At one point or another during every session, I do try to shoot small groups using two hands, hard focus on front sight, and so on. I can still make the 4-6" standard from 7 yards most days. But that is for fun. I do not expect that that would ever be a useful skill in my personal SD probabilities.

Darn insomnia, I get to musing and typing, and all sorts of things pop out of my head. Sorry about boring y'all.

God bless and y'all be mindful out there.
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Tony Torre
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« Reply #91 on: December 05, 2012, 10:07:33 AM »

Here's an older warrior worthy of admiration.  Enjoy.

http://gawker.com/5965753/79+year+old-ex+bull-rider-throat-punched-burglar-stoned-on-bath-salts

Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #92 on: February 02, 2013, 07:50:51 PM »



http://growingbolder.com/media/health/aging/never-leave-the-playground-793777.html
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bigdog
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« Reply #93 on: February 16, 2013, 12:08:39 PM »

http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/page/Michael-Jordan/michael-jordan-not-left-building
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #94 on: March 12, 2013, 12:41:06 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/03/11/robber-confronts-81-year-old-man-and-demands-everything-you-got-turns-out-what-he-had-was-a-38-caliber-revolver/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #95 on: July 30, 2013, 05:20:26 PM »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2231867/Former-Army-boxing-champion-71-floors-6ft-4in-thug-Mark-Pearce-punched-face-Torquay-attack.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #96 on: August 25, 2013, 08:37:55 PM »



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2401655/She-gave-75-years-life-96-year-old-man-enters-heartbreaking-song-wrote-late-wife-contest-producers-record-iTunes.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #97 on: December 29, 2013, 02:54:42 PM »

http://biggeekdad.com/2012/01/how-old-people-park-their-car/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #98 on: January 02, 2014, 02:05:26 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/01/02/hoodie-wearing-thug-demands-cash-from-90-year-old-laundromat-owner-and-gets-a-great-big-surprise/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #99 on: January 11, 2014, 01:41:02 PM »

http://vitaminl.tv/video/2096
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