Dog Brothers Public Forum
Return To Homepage
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 19, 2014, 05:05:03 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the Dog Brothers Public Forum.
82538 Posts in 2250 Topics by 1062 Members
Latest Member: seawolfpack5
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Dog Brothers Public Forum
|-+  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities
| |-+  Science, Culture, & Humanities
| | |-+  The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 19 20 [21] 22 23 ... 32 Print
Author Topic: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:  (Read 189808 times)
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12041


« Reply #1000 on: November 03, 2011, 12:32:51 PM »

"[D]emocracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security, or the rights of property; and have, in general, been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths." --James Madison, Federalist No. 10, 1787

Oakland?
Logged
Body-by-Guinness
Power User
***
Posts: 2788


« Reply #1001 on: November 03, 2011, 12:43:27 PM »

RIOT, n. A popular entertainment given to the military by innocent bystanders.

Ambrose Bierce
The Devil's Dictionary
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1002 on: November 03, 2011, 08:04:03 PM »

"The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and that there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence. If 'Thou shalt not covet' and 'Thou shalt not steal' were not commandments of Heaven, they must be made inviolable precepts in every society before it can be civilized or made free." --John Adams, 1787
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1003 on: November 04, 2011, 08:09:35 AM »

"The foundation on which all [constitutions] are built is the natural equality of man, the denial of every preeminence but that annexed to legal office, and particularly the denial of a preeminence by birth." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to George Washington, 1784
Logged
c - Shadow Dog
Power User
***
Posts: 105


« Reply #1004 on: November 04, 2011, 10:53:57 AM »

that quote is impossible to follow, it can be read too many ways
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1005 on: November 04, 2011, 01:23:11 PM »

Not the best of sentence structure, but I see only one reading:

The only pre-eminence is that "annexed to legal office". 

What else are you seeing?
Logged
c - Shadow Dog
Power User
***
Posts: 105


« Reply #1006 on: November 04, 2011, 03:44:28 PM »

in context i am helped greatly.

http://www.familytales.org/dbDisplay.php?id=ltr_thj1398



TO General Washington.

Annapolis, April 16, 1784.

Dear Sir,

I received your favor of April the 8th, by Colonel Harrison, The subject of it is interesting, and, so far as you have stood connected with it, has been matter of anxiety to me; because, whatever may be the ultimate fate of the institution of the Cincinnati, as, in its course, it draws to it some degree of disapprobation, I have wished to see you standing on ground separated from it, and that the character which will be handed to future ages at the head of our Revolution, may, in no instance, be compromitted in subordinate altercations. The subject has been at the point of my pen in every letter I have written to you, but has been still restrained by the reflection that you had among your friends more able counsellors, and, in yourself, one abler than them all. Your letter has now rendered a duty what was before a desire, and I cannot better merit your confidence than by a full and free communication of facts and sentiments, as far as they have come within my observation. When the army was about to be disbanded, and the officers to take final leave, perhaps never again to meet, it was natural for men who had accompanied each other through so many scenes of hardship, of difficulty and danger, who, in a variety of instances, must have been rendered mutually dear by those aids and good offices, to which their situations had given occasion, it was natural, I say, for these to seize with fondness any proposition which promised to bring them together again, at certain and regular periods. And this, I take for granted, was the origin and object of this institution: and I have no suspicion that they foresaw, much less intended, those mischiefs which exist perhaps in the forebodings of politicians only. I doubt, however, whether in its execution, it would be found to answer the wishes of those who framed it, and to foster those friendships it was intended to preserve. The members would be brought together at their annual assemblies no longer to encounter a common enemy, but to encounter one another in debate and sentiment. For something, I suppose, is to be done at these meetings, and, however unimportant, it will suffice to produce difference of opinion, contradiction, and irritation. The way to make friends quarrel is to put them in disputation under the public eye. An experience of near twenty years has taught me, that few friendships stand this test, and that public assemblies where every one is free to act and speak, are the most powerful looseners of the bands of private friendship. I think, therefore, that this institution would fail in its principal object, the perpetuation of the personal friendships contracted through the war.

The objections of those who are opposed to the institution shall be briefly sketched. You will readily fill them up. They urge that it is against the Confederation--against the letter of some of our constitutions--against the spirit of all of them;--that the foundation on which all these are built, is the natural equality of man, the denial of every pre-eminence but that annexed to legal office, and, particularly, the denial of a pre-eminence by birth; that however, in their present dispositions, citizens might decline accepting honorary instalments[sp.]into the order; but a time, may come, when a change of dispositions would render these flattering, when a well directed distribution of them might draw into the order all the men of talents, of office, and wealth, and in this case, would probably procure an ingraftment into the government; that in this, they will be supported by their foreign members, and the wishes and influence of foreign courts; that experience has shown that the hereditary branches of modern governments are the patrons of privilege and prerogative, and not of the natural rights of the people, whose oppressors they generally are: that besides these evils, which are remote, others may take place more immediately; that a distinction is kept up between the civil and military, which it is for the happiness of both to obliterate; that when the members assemble the, will be proposing to do something, and what that something may be, will depend on actual circumstances; that being an organized body, under habits of subordination, the first obstruction to enterprise will be already surmounted; that the moderation and virtue of a single character have probably prevented this Revolution from being closed as most others have been, by a subversion of that liberty it was intended to establish; that he is not immortal, and his successor, or some of his successors, may be led by false calculation into a less certain road to glory.

What are the sentiments of Congress on this subject, and what line they will pursue, can only be stated, conjecturally. Congress as a body, if left to themselves, will in my opinion say nothing on the subject. They may, however, be forced into a declaration by instructions from some of the States, or by other incidents. Their sentiments, if forced from them, will be unfriendly to the institution. If permitted to pursue their own path, they will check it by side-blows whenever it comes in their way, and in competitions for office, on equal or nearly equal ground, will give silent preferences to those who are not of the fraternity. My reasons for thinking this are, 1. The grounds on which they lately declined the foreign order proposed to be conferred on some of our citizens. 2. The fourth of the fundamental articles of constitution for the new States. I enclose you the report; it has been considered by Congress, recommitted and reformed by a committee, according to sentiments expressed on other parts of it, but the principle referred to, having not been controverted at all, stands in this as in the original report; it is not yet confirmed by Congress. 3. Private conversations on this subject with the members. Since the receipt of your letter I have taken occasion to extend these; not, indeed, to the military members, because, being of the order, delicacy forbade it, but to the others pretty generally; and, among these, I have as yet found but one who is not opposed to the institution, and that with an anguish of mind, though covered under a guarded silence which I have not seen produced by any circumstance before. I arrived at Philadelphia before the separation of the last Congress, and saw there and at Princeton some of its members not now in delegation. Burke's piece happened to come out at that time, which occasioned this institution to be the subject of conversation. I found the same impressions made on them which their successors have received. I hear from other quarters that it is disagreeable, generally, to such citizens as have attended to it, and, therefore, will probably be so to all, when any circumstance shall present it to the notice of all.

This, Sir, is as faithful an account of sentiments and facts as I am able to give you. You know the extent of the circle within which my observations are at present circumscribed, and can estimate how far, as forming a part of the general opinion, it may merit notice, or ought to influence your particular conduct.

It now remains to pay obedience to that part of your letter, which requests sentiments on the most eligible measures to be pursued by the society, at their next meeting. I must be far from pretending to be a judge of what would, in fact, be the most, eligible measures for the society. I can only give you the opinions of those with whom I have conversed, and who, as I have before observed, are unfriendly to it. They lead to these conclusions. 1. If the society proceed according to its institution, it will be better to make no applications to Congress on that subject, or any other, in their associated character. 2. If they should propose to modify it, so as to render it unobjectionable, I think it would not be effected without such a modification as would amount almost to annihilation: for such would it be to part with its inheritability, its organization, and its assemblies. 3. If they shall be disposed to discontinue the whole, it would remain with them to determine whether they would choose it to be done by their own act only, or by a reference of the matter to Congress, which would infallibly produce a recommendation of total discontinuance.

You will be sensible, Sir, that these communications are without reserve. I supposed such to be your wish, and mean them but as materials, with such others as you may collect, for your better judgment to work on. I consider the whole matter as between ourselves alone, having determined to take no active part in this or any thing else, which may lead to altercation, or disturb that quiet and tranquillity of mind, to which I consign the remaining portion of my life. I have been thrown back by events, on a stage where I had never more thought to appear. It is but for a time, however, and as a day-laborer, free to withdraw, or be withdrawn at will. While I remain, I shall pursue in silence the path of right, but in every situation, public or private, I shall be gratified by all occasions of rendering you service, and of convincing you there is no one, to whom your reputation and happiness are dearer than to, Sir,

your most obedient

and most humble servant,

Th: Jefferson.

Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1007 on: November 07, 2011, 08:45:38 AM »

"It is the duty of parents to maintain their children decently, and according to their circumstances; to protect them according to the dictates of prudence; and to educate them according to the suggestions of a judicious and zealous regard for their usefulness, their respectability and happiness." --James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1008 on: November 07, 2011, 08:54:32 AM »

It has been a few years since I began this thread, which with some pride I note I began before the advent of the Tea Party.  cheesy

For a long time the thread quiety bubbled along with a rather humble read-to-post ratio-- somewhere around 14.  I see that it is now about 77!-- which given that it had to offset the lower numbers of the early era means our current ratio is somewhere distinctly above that.

This speaks to a hunger for the timeless message of our Founding Fathers who gave us this exceptional republic founded upon the American Creed.  It is up to us to keep it such!

The Adventure continues!
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1009 on: November 08, 2011, 08:29:04 AM »

"As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight." --Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1010 on: November 09, 2011, 10:16:16 AM »

"In the first place, it is to be remembered, that the general government is not to be charged with the whole power of making and administering laws: its jurisdiction is limited to certain enumerated objects, which concern all the members of the republic, but which are not to be attained by the separate provisions of any." --James Madison, Federalist No. 14, 1787
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1011 on: November 10, 2011, 08:32:24 AM »

"Were we directed from Washington when to sow, and when to reap, we should soon want bread." --Thomas Jefferson, Autobiography, 1821
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1012 on: November 11, 2011, 06:28:32 AM »

"[W]hen all government, domestic and foreign, in little as in great things, shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will render powerless the checks provided of one government on another." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Charles Hammond, 1821
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1013 on: November 16, 2011, 03:44:17 PM »

"[T]he States can best govern our home concerns and the general government our foreign ones. I wish, therefore ... never to see all offices transferred to Washington, where, further withdrawn from the eyes of the people, they may more secretly be bought and sold at market." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Judge William Johnson, 1823
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1014 on: November 23, 2011, 06:51:30 PM »

"When you assemble from your several counties in the Legislature, were every member to be guided only by the apparent interest of his county, government would be impracticable. There must be a perpetual accomodation and sacrifice of local advantage to general expediency." --Alexander Hamilton, speech at the New York Ratifying Convention, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1015 on: November 24, 2011, 11:59:13 AM »

"It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favors." --George Washington, Thanksgiving Proclamation, 1789
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1016 on: December 06, 2011, 06:32:29 AM »

Sorry I've fallen behind here folks.  I now play catch up:

"Remember democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide." --John Adams, letter to John Taylor, 1814

"The State governments possess inherent advantages, which will ever give them an influence and ascendancy over the National Government, and will for ever preclude the possibility of federal encroachments. That their liberties, indeed, can be subverted by the federal head, is repugnant to every rule of political calculation." --Alexander Hamilton, speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, 1788

"The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite." --James Madison, Federalist No. 45

"The operations of the federal government will be most extensive and important in times of war and danger; those of the State governments, in times of peace and security." --James Madison, Federalist No. 45, 1788

"So that the executive and legislative branches of the national government depend upon, and emanate from the states. Every where the state sovereignties are represented; and the national sovereignty, as such, has no representation." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"The state governments have a full superintendence and control over the immense mass of local interests of their respective states, which connect themselves with the feelings, the affections, the municipal institutions, and the internal arrangements of the whole population. They possess, too, the immediate administration of justice in all cases, civil and criminal, which concern the property, personal rights, and peaceful pursuits of their own citizens." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"Another not unimportant consideration is, that the powers of the general government will be, and indeed must be, principally employed upon external objects, such as war, peace, negotiations with foreign powers, and foreign commerce. In its internal operations it can touch but few objects, except to introduce regulations beneficial to the commerce, intercourse, and other relations, between the states, and to lay taxes for the common good. The powers of the states, on the other hand, extend to all objects, which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, and liberties, and property of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the state." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"The true test is, whether the object be of a local character, and local use; or, whether it be of general benefit to the states. If it be purely local, congress cannot constitutionally appropriate money for the object. But, if the benefit be general, it matters not, whether in point of locality it be in one state, or several; whether it be of large, or of small extent." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground that 'all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states or to the people.' To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take possession of a boundless field of power, not longer susceptible of any definition." --Thomas Jefferson, Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank, 1791

"But ambitious encroachments of the federal government, on the authority of the State governments, would not excite the opposition of a single State, or of a few States only. They would be signals of general alarm. ... But what degree of madness could ever drive the federal government to such an extremity." --James Madison, Federalist No. 46, 1788

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever." --Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 18, 1781

"I have lived, sir, a long time; and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid?" --Benjamin Franklin, Motion for Prayers in the Constitutional Convention, 1787

"The belief in a God All Powerful wise and good, is so essential to the moral order of the world and to the happiness of man, that arguments which enforce it cannot be drawn from too many sources nor adapted with too much solicitude to the different characters and capacities impressed with it." --James Madison, letter to Frederick Beasley, 1825

"A State, I cheerfully admit, is the noblest work of man: But man, himself, free and honest, is, I speak as to this world, the noblest work of God." --James Wilson, Chisholm v. Georgia, 1793

"It is the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the SUPREME BEING, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship." --John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1017 on: December 07, 2011, 10:20:22 AM »

"I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and the state over which you preside, in his holy protection, that he would incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government, to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the field, and finally, that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all, to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility and pacific temper of mind, which were the characteristicks of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without an humble imitation of whose example in these things, we can never hope to be a happy nation." --George Washington, circular letter of farewell to the Army, 1783
Logged
JDN
Power User
***
Posts: 2004


« Reply #1018 on: December 07, 2011, 10:44:45 PM »

"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." -- John Adams, 'Argument in Defense of the Soldiers in the Boston Massacre Trials', December 1770.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1019 on: December 10, 2011, 07:00:21 AM »

"May the father of all mercies scatter light, and not darkness, upon our paths, and make us in all our several vocations useful here, and in His own due time and way everlastingly happy." --George Washington, letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, 1790
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1020 on: December 13, 2011, 09:47:51 AM »

"The instrument by which [government] must act are either the AUTHORITY of the laws or FORCE. If the first be destroyed, the last must be substituted; and where this becomes the ordinary instrument of government there is an end to liberty!" --Alexander Hamilton, Tully, No. 3, 1794
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1021 on: December 14, 2011, 07:55:34 AM »

"Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer." --Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1022 on: December 16, 2011, 10:19:21 AM »

"If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place, oblige it to control itself." --James Madison, Federalist No. 51, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1023 on: December 20, 2011, 11:33:40 AM »

"Stability in government is essential to national character and to the advantages annexed to it, as well as to that repose and confidence in the minds of the people, which are among the chief blessings of civil society." --James Madison, Federalist No. 37, 1788

"The great desideratum in Government is, so to modify the sovereignty as that it may be sufficiently neutral between different parts of the Society to controul one part from invading the rights of another, and at the same time sufficiently controuled itself, from setting up an interest adverse to that of the entire Society." --James Madison, letter to Thomas Jefferson, 1787

"[A] wise and frugal government ... shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government." --Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801

"It has been said that all Government is an evil. It would be more proper to say that the necessity of any Government is a misfortune. This necessity however exists; and the problem to be solved is, not what form of Government is perfect, but which of the forms is least imperfect." --James Madison, 1833
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1024 on: December 26, 2011, 09:21:25 PM »

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever." --Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 18, 1781

"As our president bears no resemblance to a king so we shall see the Senate has no similitude to nobles. First, not being hereditary, their collective knowledge, wisdom, and virtue are not precarious. For by these qualities alone are they to obtain their offices, and they will have none of the peculiar qualities and vices of those men who possess power merely because their father held it before them." --Tench Coxe, An American Citizen, No. 2, 1787

"The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all. I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the atmosphere." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Abigail Adams, 1787

"The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to The Republican Citizens of Washington County, Maryland, 1809
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1025 on: December 27, 2011, 07:56:18 AM »

"How prone all human institutions have been to decay; how subject the best-formed and most wisely organized governments have been to lose their check and totally dissolve; how difficult it has been for mankind, in all ages and countries, to preserve their dearest rights and best privileges, impelled as it were by an irresistible fate of despotism." --James Monroe, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1026 on: December 30, 2011, 08:18:38 AM »

"That wise men have in all ages thought government necessary for the good of mankind; and, that wise governments have always thought religion necessary for the well ordering and well-being of society, and accordingly have been ever careful to encourage and protect the ministers of it, paying them the highest public honours, that their doctrines might thereby meet with the greater respect among the common people." --Benjamin Franklin, On that Odd Letter of the Drum, 1730
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1027 on: January 02, 2012, 06:00:07 AM »

"The natural aristocracy I consider as the most precious gift of nature for the instruction, the trusts, and government of society. And indeed it would have been inconsistent in creation to have formed man for the social state, and not to have provided virtue and wisdom enough to manage the concerns of the society. May we not even say that that form of government is the best which provides the most - for a pure selection of these natural aristoi into the offices of government?" --Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, 1813

"To form a new Government, requires infinite care, and unbounded attention; for if the foundation is badly laid the superstructure must be bad." --George Washington, letter to John Augustine Washington, 1776
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1028 on: January 05, 2012, 06:22:42 AM »

"The freedom and happiness of man ... [are] the sole objects of all legitimate government." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Thaddeus Kosciusko, 1810

"A good government implies two things; first, fidelity to the objects of the government; secondly, a knowledge of the means, by which those objects can be best attained." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"The pyramid of government-and a republican government may well receive that beautiful and solid form-should be raised to a dignified altitude: but its foundations must, of consequence, be broad, and strong, and deep. The authority, the interests, and the affections of the people at large are the only foundation, on which a superstructure proposed to be at once durable and magnificent, can be rationally erected." --James Wilson
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1029 on: January 06, 2012, 06:59:43 AM »

"This I hope will be the age of experiments in government, and that their basis will be founded in principles of honesty, not of mere force." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, 1796
Logged
JDN
Power User
***
Posts: 2004


« Reply #1030 on: January 08, 2012, 10:43:21 AM »

While Jefferson referred to "Nature's God" in the Declaration of Independence, he preferred to keep his personal beliefs to himself, a reticence that lined up with his philosophy of individual freedom and religious tolerance. In "Notes," he put it this way: "It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg."

Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1031 on: January 10, 2012, 08:13:51 AM »

"It may be considered as an objection inherent in the principle, that as every appeal to the people would carry an implication of some defect in the government, frequent appeals would in great measure deprive the government of that veneration which time bestows on every thing, and without which perhaps the wisest and freest governments would not possess the requisite stability." --James Madison, Federalist No. 49, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1032 on: January 11, 2012, 11:03:51 AM »

"If there is a form of government, then, whose principle and foundation is virtue, will not every sober man acknowledge it better calculated to promote the general happiness than any other form?" --John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1033 on: January 12, 2012, 11:08:19 AM »

"Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it." --John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776
Logged
JDN
Power User
***
Posts: 2004


« Reply #1034 on: January 14, 2012, 10:51:29 PM »

Woof,
 I wonder if the Founding Fathers, intended us to report to the government how often we exercised any of our rights? A Federal Judge has ruled that the government can force gun store owners to report  anyone that buys more than one gun at a time to them. So does this mean that on a whim of government intrusion into the lives of law abiding citizens, that they can now require us to fill out a form and turn it in to them anytime we go to church more than once a week, or say something negative about the government more than twice in the same day? If it applies to the Second Amendment it applies to all of them.
 We the People, need to wake up and understand that the attacks on the Second Amendment, are attacks on all of our rights protected by the Constitution.
                                               P.C.

 huh huh huh
Logged
prentice crawford
Power User
***
Posts: 775


« Reply #1035 on: January 14, 2012, 11:49:16 PM »

Woof,
 I wonder if the Founding Fathers, intended us to report to the government how often we exercised any of our rights? A Federal Judge has ruled that the government can force gun store owners to report  anyone that buys more than one gun at a time to them. So does this mean that on a whim of government intrusion into the lives of law abiding citizens, that they can now require us to fill out a form and turn it in to them anytime we go to church more than once a week, or say something negative about the government more than twice in the same day? If it applies to the Second Amendment it applies to all of them.
 We the People, need to wake up and understand that the attacks on the Second Amendment, are attacks on all of our rights protected by the Constitution.
                                                        P.C.
Logged

Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1036 on: January 15, 2012, 12:39:10 AM »

Please take this to the Issues in the American Creed/Constitutional Law thread.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1037 on: January 17, 2012, 08:41:30 AM »

"If our country, when pressed with wrongs at the point of the bayonet, had been
governed by its heads instead of its hearts, where should we have been now? Hanging
on a gallows as high as Haman's." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Maria Cosway, 1786
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1038 on: January 26, 2012, 08:22:52 AM »






"Men, to act with vigour and effect, must have time to mature measures, and judgment and experience, as to the best method of applying them. They must not be hurried on to their conclusions by the passions, or the fears of the multitude. They must deliberate, as well as resolve." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"How much more do they deserve our reverence and praise, whose lives are devoted to the formation of institutions, which, when they and their  children are mingled in the common dust, may continue to cherish the principles and the practice of liberty in perpetual freshness and vigour." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

"The Grecians and Romans were strongly possessed of the spirit of liberty but not the principle, for at the time they were determined not to be slaves themselves, they employed their power to enslave the rest of mankind." --Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 5, 1778

"Wisely, therefore, do they consider union and a good national government as necessary to put and keep them in such a situation as, instead of inviting war, will tend to repress and discourage it. That situation consists in the best possible state of defense, and necessarily depends on the government, the arms, and the resources of the country." --John Jay, Federalist No. 4

"The diversity in the faculties of men from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests. The protection of these faculties is the first object of government." --James Madison, Federalist No. 10, 1787

"t is the reason alone, of the public, that ought to control and regulate the government." --James Madison, Federalist No. 49, 1788

"The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse." --James Madison, speech in the Virginia constitutional convention, 1829

"History by apprising [citizens] of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views." --Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

"Every child in America should be acquainted with his own country. He should read books that furnish him with ideas that will be useful to him in life and practice. As soon as he opens his lips, he should rehearse the history of his own country." --Noah Webster, On the Education of Youth in America, 1788

"Without wishing to damp the ardor of curiosity or influence the freedom of inquiry, I will hazard a prediction that, after the most industrious and impartial researchers, the longest liver of you all will find no principles, institutions or systems of education more fit in general to be transmitted to your posterity than those you have received from your ancestors." --John Adams, letter to the young men of the Philadelphia, 1798
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1039 on: January 31, 2012, 08:16:35 AM »

"A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, 1817

"History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy... These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and animosities between the people favored and the people oppressed; whence a total separation of affections, interests, political obligations, and all manner of connections, by which the whole state is weakened." --Benjamin Franklin, Emblematical Representations

"History will also give occasion to expatiate on the advantage of civil orders and constitutions, how men and their properties are protected by joining in societies and establishing government; their industry encouraged and rewarded, arts invented, and life made more comfortable: The advantages of liberty, mischiefs of licentiousness, benefits arising from good laws and a due execution of justice. Thus may the first principles of sound politics be fixed in the minds of youth." --Benjamin Franklin, Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pennsylvania, 1749
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1040 on: February 01, 2012, 09:49:34 AM »



http://www.pbs.org/benfranklin/index.html
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1041 on: February 01, 2012, 09:52:39 AM »


"If it be asked what is to restrain the House of Representatives from making legal discriminations in favor of themselves and a particular class of the society? I answer, the genius of the whole system, the nature of just and constitutional laws, and above all the vigilant and manly spirit which actuates the people of America, a spirit which nourishes freedom, and in return is nourished by it." --James Madison, Federalist No. 57, 1788
Logged
JDN
Power User
***
Posts: 2004


« Reply #1042 on: February 07, 2012, 09:10:08 AM »

Thomas Jefferson, in a 1789 letter to James Madison, once said that every constitution “naturally expires at the end of 19 years” because “the earth belongs always to the living generation.”
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1043 on: February 07, 2012, 11:56:02 AM »

Well, that's not what was passed.


"There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism." --Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1044 on: February 08, 2012, 08:24:33 AM »

"Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?" --James Madison, Federalist No. 51, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1045 on: February 14, 2012, 09:15:22 AM »

"As there is a degree of depravity in mankind which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust: So there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form. Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us, faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another." --James Madison, Federalist No. 55, 1788
« Last Edit: February 14, 2012, 09:17:11 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1046 on: February 15, 2012, 10:07:17 AM »

"In a society under the forms of which the stronger faction can readily unite and oppress the weaker, anarchy may as truly be said to reign as in a state of nature." --James Madison, Federalist No. 52, 1788
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1047 on: February 16, 2012, 09:13:12 AM »



"Born in other countries, yet believing you could be happy in this, our laws acknowledge, as they should do, your right to join us in society, conforming, as I doubt not you will do, to our established rules. That these rules shall be as equal as prudential considerations will admit, will certainly be the aim of our legislatures, general and particular." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Hugh White, 1801
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1048 on: February 17, 2012, 09:03:08 AM »

"Strangers are welcome because there is room enough for them all, and therefore the old inhabitants are not jealous of them; the laws protect them sufficiently so that they have no need of the patronage of great men; and every one will enjoy securely the profits of his industry. But if he does not bring a fortune with him, he must work and be industrious to live." --Benjamin Franklin, Those Who Would Remove to America, 1784
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 31247


« Reply #1049 on: February 20, 2012, 10:33:53 AM »

"Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness." --George Washington

"The bosom of America is open to receive not only the opulent and respectable stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all nations and religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment." --George Washington, Address to the Members of the Volunteer Association of Ireland, 1783
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 11:18:03 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 19 20 [21] 22 23 ... 32 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!