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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1050 on: February 21, 2012, 09:20:06 AM »

"No pecuniary consideration is more urgent, than the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt: on none can delay be more injurious, or an economy of time more valuable." --George Washington, Message to the House of Representatives, 1793
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« Reply #1051 on: February 22, 2012, 07:54:09 AM »

"It has long, however, been my opinion, and I have never shrunk from its expression ... that the germ of dissolution of our federal government is in the constitution of the federal Judiciary; an irresponsible body, (for impeachment is scarcely a scare-crow) working like gravity by night and by day, gaining a little today and a little tomorrow, and advancing its noiseless step like a thief, over the field of jurisdiction, until all shall be usurped from the States, and the government of all be consolidated into one." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Charles Hammond, 1821
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« Reply #1052 on: February 22, 2012, 02:48:21 PM »

Coincidence you post quote from T. Jefferson.  while looking around the webiste of the National Muesem of African American History and Culture I came across this photo of "Jefferson", aka Isaac Granger who died a free man in the 1840s and hence this photo of him exists.  He, his two brothers, and parents were slaves of Jefferson:

http://www.slaveryatmonticello.org/slavery-at-monticello/enslaved-families-monticello/granger-family

Question posed:

"how could the author of the Declaration of Independence have also been a slave owner?"

I don't know how to answer that except that the Declaration can be seen as aspirational and since no one was or is perfect we all strive to live up to its stated goal.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1053 on: February 23, 2012, 12:24:56 PM »

Alexander's Essay February 23, 2012
The Model for Presidential Character -- George Washington
The REAL President's Day
"A few short weeks will determine the political fate of America for the present generation, and probably produce no small influence on the happiness of society through a long succession of ages to come." --George Washington (1788)
 
George Washington's birthday (February 22, 1732) was spontaneously celebrated nationally from the date of his death in 1799 until 1879, when Congress officially established the observance. In 1971, however, the celebration was changed from the date of his birthday to the third Monday in February, and with that change arose the generic "Presidents' Day."
Consistent with the degradation of civic knowledge since then, most Americans know little about Washington beyond his standing as our first president, and his having accepted responsibility for chopping down a cherry tree when confronted by his father. Of course, that "I cannot tell a lie" cherry tree tale is a legend, but what it portrays of Washington's character is not.
Today, the once-reverent observance of George Washington has devolved into a holiday that lumps Washington together with more recent presidential featherweights like Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Hussein Obama. The comparison is laughable, but given the implications, it is also appalling.
In this election year, we Patriots should take a moment to refresh our knowledge of the character attributes we seek in a president. Moreover, as the foundation of our nation, built by Washington and our other Founders and defended by generations of American Patriots since, is being undermined by the current generation of political oppressors, I encourage you to share this knowledge with others.
Perhaps no group is more in need of a proper understanding of American Liberty than those whose civic knowledge has been severely disabled by academic oppressors.
For example, consider how intellectually disabled a generation of students mentored by Mount Holyoke "presidential historian" Joseph Ellis must be, given his assertion in Time Magazine this week that "[Washington] began the political tradition that produced a Union victory in the Civil War, the Federal Reserve Board, Social Security, Medicare, and most recently, Obamacare. He had no patience in his own time with a states' rights interpretation of the Constitution and would have found the conservative agenda of the modern Republican Party and its Tea Party allies a repudiation of all he stood for."
Of course, Time's editors failed to issue a disclaimer noting that their esteemed source is a fraud and fabricator. In 2001, the Boston Globe revealed that Ellis had been telling his spellbound young students tall tales of his involvement in the civil rights movement in the South, of his valor as a combat platoon leader in Vietnam, and of his later activities as an intrepid anti-war leader at Yale. All lies.
Setting all this aside, however, Ellis and his cadres of historical revisionists have but one goal -- to subvert our Constitution and render it nothing more than what Thomas Jefferson described as "a mere thing of wax ... which they may twist and shape into any form they please."
Post Your Opinion: What are you doing to promote civic education for young Americans?
George Washington, and every president since, has sworn to uphold our Constitution, as prescribed in Article II, Section 1, which specifies: "Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation: 'I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.'"
Unfortunately for our Republic and for the future of Liberty, too many of them have forsaken that oath in exchange for partisan power.
Washington, however, was steadfast in his devotion and obedience to our Constitution, and his presidential character is a model for all generations.
He was chosen by unanimous decision of the Second Continental Congress as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in 1775, by delegates as President of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, and as our first national president by the electoral colleges of 1789 and 1792.
Despite modernist revision, it is evident through his own words, and those who knew him well, that Washington was a devoted Christian and demonstrated the character and humility according to his convictions. Though he was a strong proponent of religious liberty, it is his Christian spirit, which fortified his standing as the greatest political leader in history.
 
Washington astride Traveller
After having the new Declaration of Independence read to his troops, General Washington ordered chaplains for every regiment with the prescription that "every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier, defending the dearest Rights and Liberties of his country."
After the harsh winter of Valley Forge in 1778, he wrote, "While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian."
At the time, Reverend Henry Muhlenberg of a Lutheran church near Valley Forge wrote, "I heard a fine example today, namely, that His Excellency General Washington rode around among his army yesterday and admonished each and every one to fear God, to put away the wickedness that has set in and become so general, and to practice the Christian virtues."
At the conclusion of the Revolutionary War, George III heard that Washington was voluntarily laying down his sword to return to his beloved family and farm, and responded, "If he does that, he will be the greatest man in the world." And, of course, Washington did.
In 1783, Washington wrote the 13 governors of the several states, "I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and that state over which you preside, in His holy protection; that He would incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government; to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow-citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the field; and finally, that He would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility and pacific temper of mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without an humble imitation of whose examples in these things, we can never hope to be a happy nation. I have the Honor to be, with much esteem and respect, Sir, your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant."
As president in 1789, Washington wrote, "No man who is profligate in his morals, or a bad member of the civil community, can possibly be a true Christian."
His Thanksgiving proclamation declared, "It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor."
To gain real insight into Washington as president, it would be sufficient to read his First Inaugural Address, delivered on April 30, 1789, and his Farewell Address of September 19, 1796. These two addresses embody the real George Washington, and the true spirit of a Patriot.
Post Your Opinion: What other presidents were outstanding models of national character?
In the former, he stated, "The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American People."
In the latter, he wrote, "The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their Constitutions of Government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish Government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established Government."
He made plain in his Farewell, "Of all the dispositions and habits, which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of Men and Citizens. The mere Politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connexions with private and public felicity. ... Let us with caution indulge the supposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect, that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle."
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« Reply #1054 on: February 24, 2012, 09:16:33 AM »

"I consider the government of the United States as interdicted by the constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. This results not only from the provision that no law shall be made respecting the establishment or free exercise of religion, but from that also which reserves to the States the powers not delegated to the United States. Certainly, no power to prescribe any religious exercise or to assume authority in any religious discipline has been delegated to the general government. It must then rest with the States." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Samuel Miller, 1808
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« Reply #1055 on: February 28, 2012, 08:18:48 AM »



http://thehill.com/homenews/house/212913-presidents-day-should-be-all-about-george-lawmakers-say

"A man may, if he know not how to save, keep his nose to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last." --Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richards Almanack, 1742
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« Reply #1056 on: February 29, 2012, 09:09:05 AM »

"Men of energy of character must have enemies; because there are two sides to every question, and taking one with decision, and acting on it with effect, those who take the other will of course be hostile in proportion as they feel that effect." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, 1817
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« Reply #1057 on: March 01, 2012, 09:09:20 AM »

"It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself. Subject opinion to coercion: whom will you make your inquisitors?" --Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 17, 1781
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« Reply #1058 on: March 02, 2012, 09:23:45 AM »

"We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our won country's honor, all call upon us for vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the cause, and the aid of the supreme being, in whose hands victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble actions." --George Washington, 1776
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« Reply #1059 on: March 05, 2012, 06:31:01 AM »

"The right of freely examining public characters and measures, and of free communication among the people thereon ... has ever been justly deemed the only effectual guardian of every other right." --James Madison, Virginia Resolutions, 1798
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« Reply #1060 on: March 07, 2012, 10:14:07 AM »

"All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external trappings of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it, beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity." --George Washington, letter to Catherine Macaulay Graham, 1790
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« Reply #1061 on: March 08, 2012, 08:21:23 AM »

"Democratical States must always feel before they can see: it is this that makes their Governments slow, but the people will be right at last." --George Washington, letter to Marquis de Lafayette, 1785
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« Reply #1062 on: March 12, 2012, 09:21:35 AM »

"My confidence is that there will for a long time be virtue and good sense enough in our countrymen to correct abuses." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Rutledge, 1788
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« Reply #1063 on: March 13, 2012, 08:43:55 AM »



"What is to be the consequence, in case the Congress shall misconstrue this part [the necessary and proper clause] of the Constitution and exercise powers not warranted by its true meaning, I answer the same as if they should misconstrue or enlarge any other power vested in them ... the success of the usurpation will depend on the executive and judiciary departments, which are to expound and give effect to the legislative acts; and in a last resort a remedy must be obtained from the people, who can by the elections of more faithful representatives, annul the acts of the usurpers." --James Madison, Federalist No. 44, 1788
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« Reply #1064 on: March 14, 2012, 09:52:39 AM »



"The executive branch of this government never has, nor will suffer, while I preside, any improper conduct of its officers to escape with impunity." --George Washington, letter to Gouverneur Morris, 1795
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« Reply #1065 on: March 15, 2012, 07:18:01 AM »



"To cherish and stimulate the activity of the human mind, by multiplying the objects of enterprise, is not among the least considerable of the expedients, by which the wealth of a nation may be promoted." --Alexander Hamilton, Report on Manufactures, 1791
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« Reply #1066 on: March 16, 2012, 08:47:19 AM »



"I had always hoped that the younger generation receiving their early impressions after the flame of liberty had been kindled in every breast ... would have sympathized with oppression wherever found, and proved their love of liberty beyond their own share of it." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Coles, 1814
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« Reply #1067 on: March 19, 2012, 07:49:27 AM »

"Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall, when the wise are banished from the public councils, because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded, because they flatter the people, in order to betray them." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833
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« Reply #1068 on: March 20, 2012, 05:44:49 AM »

"The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them." --Thomas Jefferson, Rights of British America, 1774
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« Reply #1069 on: March 21, 2012, 09:48:01 AM »

"Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." --Benjamin Franklin, letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, 1789
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« Reply #1070 on: March 22, 2012, 07:29:51 AM »

"To all general purposes we have uniformly been one people each individual citizen everywhere enjoying the same national rights, privileges, and protection. As a nation we have made peace and war; as a nation we have vanquished our common enemies; as a nation we have formed alliances, and made treaties, and entered into various compacts and conventions with foreign states." --John Jay, Federalist No. 2, 1787
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« Reply #1071 on: March 26, 2012, 09:41:55 AM »

"A little matter will move a party, but it must be something great that moves a nation." --Thomas Paine, Rights of Man, 1792
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« Reply #1072 on: March 30, 2012, 10:07:57 AM »

"[W]here there is no law, there is no liberty; and nothing deserves the name of law but that which is certain and universal in its operation upon all the members of the community." --Benjamin Rush, letter to David Ramsay, 1788
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« Reply #1073 on: April 02, 2012, 09:45:53 AM »



"Man, once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind. With such persons, gullibility, which they call faith, takes the helm from the hand of reason and the mind becomes a wreck." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Smith, 1822
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« Reply #1074 on: April 04, 2012, 08:38:07 AM »

"Objects of the most stupendous magnitude, and measure in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn are intimately interested, are now before us. We are in the very midst of a revolution the most complete, unexpected and remarkable of any in the history of nations." --John Adams, letter to William Cushing, 1776
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« Reply #1075 on: April 05, 2012, 11:06:14 AM »

"Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive, that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them." --Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 78, 1788
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« Reply #1076 on: April 06, 2012, 12:02:53 PM »

"Give up money, give up fame, give up science, give the earth itself and all it contains rather than do an immoral act. And never suppose that in any possible situation, or under any circumstances, it is best for you to do a dishonorable thing, however slightly so it may appear to you... From the practice of the purest virtue, you may be assured you will derive the most sublime comforts in every moment of life, and in the moment of death." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, 1785
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« Reply #1077 on: April 09, 2012, 10:56:58 AM »

"It is a singular advantage of taxes on articles of consumption that they contain in their own nature a security against excess. They prescribe their own limit, which cannot be exceeded without defeating the end purposed -- that is, an extension of the revenue." --Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 21
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« Reply #1078 on: April 10, 2012, 06:24:54 AM »

"It will not be too strong to say, that there will be a constant probability of seeing the station [of President] filled by characters pre-eminent for ability and virtue." --Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 68, 1788
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« Reply #1079 on: April 12, 2012, 06:25:42 AM »

"Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing." --Thomas Paine, Rights of Man, 1791
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« Reply #1080 on: April 20, 2012, 05:30:06 AM »


"There is no good government but what is republican. That the only valuable part of
the British constitution is so; for the true idea of a republic is 'an empire of
laws, and not of men.' That,as a republic is the best of governments, so that
particular arrangement of the powers of society, or in other words, that form of
government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the
law, is the best of republics." --John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776
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« Reply #1081 on: April 23, 2012, 08:57:53 AM »

"If, then, the control of the people over the organs of their government be the
measure of its republicanism, and I confess I know no other measure, it must be
agreed that our governments have much less of republicanism than ought to have been
expected; in other words, that the people have less regular control over their
agents, than their rights and their interests require." --Thomas Jefferson, letter
to John Taylor, 1816

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« Reply #1082 on: April 24, 2012, 05:55:25 PM »

"In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first
principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend." --Alexander Hamilton,
Federalist No. 31, 1788

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« Reply #1083 on: May 02, 2012, 08:19:27 AM »

"It is sufficiently obvious, that persons and property are the two great subjects on which Governments are to act; and that the rights of persons, and the rights of property, are the objects, for the protection of which Government was instituted. These rights cannot well be separated." --James Madison, Speech at the Virginia Convention, 1829
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« Reply #1084 on: May 03, 2012, 08:33:37 AM »

"All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride legitimately, by the grace of God." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Roger C. Weightman, 1826
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« Reply #1085 on: May 04, 2012, 11:05:40 AM »

"During the course of administration, and in order to disturb it, the artillery of the press has been levelled against us, charged with whatsoever its licentiousness could devise or dare. These abuses of an institution so important to freedom and science are deeply to be regretted, inasmuch as they tend to lessen its usefulness and to sap its safety." --Thomas Jefferson, Second Inaugural Address, 1805
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« Reply #1086 on: May 07, 2012, 04:32:29 PM »

"An opportunity society awaits us. We need only believe in ourselves and give men and women of faith, courage, and vision the freedom to build it. Let others run down America and seek to punish success. Let them call you greedy for not wanting government to take more and more of your earnings. Let them defend their tombstone society of wage and price guidelines, mandatory quotas, tax increases, planned shortages, and shared sacrifices. We want no part of that mess, thank you very much." --Ronald Reagan
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« Reply #1087 on: May 08, 2012, 08:39:40 AM »



"There exists in the economy and course of nature, an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained." --George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789
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« Reply #1088 on: May 09, 2012, 10:43:00 AM »

"The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people." --George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789

"No government ought to be without censors (meaning here "without critics") & where the press is free, no one ever will." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to George Washington, 1792

"If virtue & knowledge are diffused among the people, they will never be enslav'd. This will be their great security." --Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 1779

"As a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights. Where an excess of power prevails, property of no sort is duly respected. No man is safe in his opinions, his person, his faculties, or his possessions." --James Madison, National Gazette Essay, 1792

"The invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the Constituents." --James Madison, letter to Thomas Jefferson, 1788

"All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression." --Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801

"The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for, among old parchments, or musty records. They are written, as with a sun beam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power." --Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775

"Government, in my humble opinion, should be formed to secure and to enlarge the exercise of the natural rights of its
members; and every government, which has not this in view, as its principal object, is not a government of the legitimate kind." --James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791
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« Reply #1089 on: May 09, 2012, 08:29:33 PM »

"But the mild voice of reason, pleading the cause of an enlarged and permanent interest, is but too often drowned, before public bodies as well as individuals, by the clamors of an impatient avidity for immediate and immoderate gain." --James Madison
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« Reply #1090 on: May 10, 2012, 12:31:05 PM »

"Among the natural rights [of the people] are these: first, a right to life; secondly, to liberty; thirdly to property; together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can." --Samuel Adams (1772)

"Human felicity is produced not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day." --Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography, 1771
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« Reply #1091 on: May 11, 2012, 11:08:40 AM »

"A just security to property is not afforded by that government, under which unequal taxes oppress one species of property and reward another species." --James Madison, Essay on Property, 1792
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« Reply #1092 on: May 14, 2012, 11:48:44 AM »

"t doesn't require expropriation or confiscation of private property or business to impose socialism on a people. What does it mean whether you hold the deed or the title to your business or property if the government holds the power of life and death over that business or property? Such machinery already exists. The government can find some charge to bring against any concern it chooses to prosecute. Every businessman has his own tale of harassment. Somewhere a perversion has taken place. Our natural, inalienable rights are now considered to be a dispensation of government, and freedom has never been so fragile, so close to slipping from our grasp as it is at this moment." --Ronald Reagan
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« Reply #1093 on: May 16, 2012, 07:49:38 AM »

"Sometimes it is said that man can not be trusted with government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others? Or have we found angels in the forms of kings to govern him? Let history answer this question." --Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801
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« Reply #1094 on: May 17, 2012, 10:35:50 AM »

"There is no part of the administration of government that requires extensive information and a thorough knowledge of the principles of political economy, so much as the business of taxation. The man who understands those principles best will be least likely to resort to oppressive expedients, or sacrifice any particular class of citizens to the procurement of revenue. It might be demonstrated that the most productive system of finance will always be the least burdensome." --Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 35
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« Reply #1095 on: May 24, 2012, 07:31:34 AM »

"I am not influenced by the expectation of promotion or pecuniary reward. I wish to be useful, and every kind of service necessary for the public good, become honorable by being necessary." --Nathan Hale, remark to Captain William Hull, who had attempted to dissuade him from volunteering for a spy mission for General Washington, 1776
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« Reply #1096 on: May 25, 2012, 07:47:15 AM »



"The legislative department is everywhere extending the sphere of its activity and drawing all power into its impetuous vortex." --James Madison, Federalist No. 48, 1788
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« Reply #1097 on: May 28, 2012, 10:06:09 AM »

"The consciousness of having discharged that duty which we owe to our country is superior to all other considerations." --George Washington, letter to James Madison, 1788
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« Reply #1098 on: May 29, 2012, 10:32:44 AM »

"On every question of construction carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Johnson, 1823
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« Reply #1099 on: June 01, 2012, 10:08:32 AM »

"Let each citizen remember at the moment he is offering his vote that he is not making a present or a compliment to please an individual - or at least that he ought not so to do; but that he is executing one of the most solemn trusts in human society for which he is accountable to God and his country." --Samuel Adams, in the Boston Gazette, 1781
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