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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1300 on: June 19, 2013, 09:05:04 AM »

"The constitutions of most of our States assert that all power is inherent in the people; that they may exercise it by themselves in all cases to which they think themselves competent, or they may act by representatives, freely and equally chosen; that it is their right and duty to be at all times armed; that they are entitled to freedom of person, freedom of religion, freedom of property, and freedom of the press."
--Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Cartwright, 1824
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« Reply #1301 on: June 20, 2013, 10:04:05 AM »

"The safety of a republic depends essentially on the energy of a common national sentiment; on a uniformity of principles and habits; on the exemption of the citizens from foreign bias and prejudice; and on that love of country which will almost invariably be found to be closely connected with birth, education, and family. The opinion advanced in the Notes on Virginia is undoubtedly correct, that foreigners will generally be apt to bring with them attachments to the persons they have left behind; to the country of their nativity; and to its particular customs and manners. They will also entertain opinions on government congenial with those under which they have lived; or if they should be led hither from a preference to ours, how extremely unlikely is it that they will bring with them that temperate love of liberty, so essential to real republicanism?"
--Alexander Hamilton, From the New York Evening Post: an Examination of the President's Message, Continued, No. VIII, 1802
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« Reply #1302 on: June 24, 2013, 10:58:25 AM »

"Constitutions are not designed for metaphysical or logical subtleties, for niceties of expression, for critical propriety, for elaborate shades of meaning, or for the exercise of philosophical acuteness or judicial research. They are instruments of a practical nature, founded on the common business of human life, adapted to common wants, designed for common use, and fitted for common understandings."
--Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1303 on: June 25, 2013, 09:17:58 AM »

"At the establishment of our constitutions, the judiciary bodies were supposed to be the most helpless and harmless members of the government. Experience, however, soon showed in what way they were to become the most dangerous; that the insufficiency of the means provided for their removal gave them a freehold and irresponsibility in office; that their decisions, seeming to concern individual suitors only, pass silent and unheeded by the public at large; that these decisions, nevertheless, become law by precedent, sapping, by little and little, the foundations of the constitution, and working its change by construction, before any one has perceived that that invisible and helpless worm has been busily employed in consuming its substance. In truth, man is not made to be trusted for life, if secured against all liability to account."
--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Monsieur A. Coray, 1823

Marc:  Of course, this begs the question of what would be the outcome of no judicial review , , ,
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1304 on: June 26, 2013, 07:20:51 AM »

"[J]udges ... should be always men of learning and experience in the laws, of exemplary morals, great patience, calmness, coolness, and attention. Their minds should not be distracted with jarring interests; they should not be dependent upon any man, or body of men."
--John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776
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« Reply #1305 on: June 27, 2013, 10:45:42 AM »

"Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superiour to all private passions."
--John Adams, letter to Mercy Warren, 1776
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1306 on: June 28, 2013, 11:03:53 AM »

"Temporary delusions, prejudices, excitements, and objects have irresistible influence in mere questions of policy. And the policy of one age may ill suit the wishes or the policy of another. The constitution is not subject to such fluctuations. It is to have a fixed, uniform, permanent construction. It should be, so far at least as human infirmity will allow, not dependent upon the passions or parties of particular times, but the same yesterday, to-day, and for ever."
--Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution
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« Reply #1307 on: June 29, 2013, 09:56:46 PM »

"It is ... [the citizens] choice, and depends upon their conduct, whether they will be respectable and prosperous, or contemptable and miserable as a Nation. This is the time of their political probation; this is the moment when the eyes of the World are turned upon them."
--George Washington, Letter to the Governors, 1783

"If individuals be not influenced by moral principles; it is in vain to look for public virtue; it is, therefore, the duty of legislators to enforce, both by precept and example, the utility, as well as the necessity of a strict adherence to the rules of distributive justice."
--James Madison, in response to Washington's first Inaugural address, 1789

"The safety of a republic depends essentially on the energy of a common national sentiment; on a uniformity of principles and habits; on the exemption of the citizens from foreign bias and prejudice; and on that love of country which will almost invariably be found to be closely connected with birth, education, and family. The opinion advanced in the Notes on Virginia is undoubtedly correct, that foreigners will generally be apt to bring with them attachments to the persons they have left behind; to the country of their nativity; and to its particular customs and manners. They will also entertain opinions on government congenial with those under which they have lived; or if they should be led hither from a preference to ours, how extremely unlikely is it that they will bring with them that temperate love of liberty, so essential to real republicanism?"
--Alexander Hamilton, From the New York Evening Post: an Examination of the President's Message, Continued, No. VIII, 1802
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« Reply #1308 on: July 01, 2013, 09:49:32 AM »

"I consider the government of the United States as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. This results not only from the provision that no law shall be made respecting the establishment or free exercise of religion, but from that also which reserves to the States the powers not delegated to the United States. Certainly, no power to prescribe any religious exercise or to assume authority in any religious discipline has been delegated to the General Government. It must then rest with the States."
--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Samuel Miller, 1808
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« Reply #1309 on: July 03, 2013, 09:55:01 AM »

"Very many and very meritorious were the worthy patriots who assisted in bringing back our government to its republican tack. To preserve it in that, will require unremitting vigilance."
--Thomas Jefferson, Letter to William Berry, 1822
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« Reply #1310 on: July 03, 2013, 10:04:50 AM »

It was not because it was proposed to establish a new nation, but because it was proposed to establish a nation on new principles, that July 4, 1776, has come to be regarded as one of the greatest days in history. Great ideas do not burst upon the world unannounced. They are reached by a gradual development over a length of time usually proportionate to their importance. This is especially true of the principles laid down in the Declaration of Independence. Three very definite propositions were set out in its preamble regarding the nature of mankind and therefore of government. These were the doctrine that all men are created equal, that they are endowed with certain inalienable rights, and that therefore the source of the just powers of government must be derived from the consent of the governed.

If no one is to be accounted as born into a superior station, if there is to be no ruling class, and if all possess rights which can neither be bartered away nor taken from them by any earthly power, it follows as a matter of course that the practical authority of the Government has to rest on the consent of the governed. While these principles were not altogether new in political action, and were very far from new in political speculation, they had never been assembled before and declared in such a combination. But remarkable as this may be, it is not the chief distinction of the Declaration of Independence. . . .

It was the fact that our Declaration of Independence containing these immortal truths was the political action of a duly authorized and constituted representative public body in its sovereign capacity, supported by the force of general opinion and by the armies of Washington already in the field, which makes it the most important civil document in the world.

 - From President Calvin Coolidge's "Address at the Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence" in Philadelphia, July 5, 1926
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« Reply #1311 on: July 04, 2013, 08:28:43 AM »

"This was the object of the Declaration of Independence. Not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of, not merely to say things which had never been said before; but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take. Neither aiming at originality of principle or sentiment, nor yet copied from any particular and previous writing, it was intended to be an expression of the American mind, and to give to that expression the proper tone and spirit called for by the occasion."
--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Henry Lee, 1825
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« Reply #1312 on: July 05, 2013, 10:00:14 AM »

"Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence; true friendship is a plant of slow growth, and must undergo and withstand the shocks and adversity before it is entitled to the appellation."
--George Washington, letter to Bushrod Washington, 1783
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« Reply #1313 on: July 05, 2013, 01:49:42 PM »

"It will be of little avail to the people, that the laws are made by men of their own choice, if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood; if they be repealed or revised before they are promulgated, or undergo such incessant changes that no man, who knows what the law is to-day, can guess what it will be to-morrow." --James Madison
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« Reply #1314 on: July 08, 2013, 06:11:40 AM »

"The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible."
--George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796
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« Reply #1315 on: July 09, 2013, 12:09:17 PM »

"But should the people of America once become capable of that deep simulation towards one another, and towards foreign nations, which assumes the language of justice and moderation while it is practicing iniquity and extravagance and displays in the most captivating manner the charming pictures of candor, frankness, and sincerity, while it is rioting in rapine and insolence, this country will be the most miserable habitation in the world; because we have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other."
--John Adams, To the Officers of the First Brigade of the Third Division of the Militia of Massachusetts, 1798
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« Reply #1316 on: July 10, 2013, 10:06:59 AM »

"If in the opinion of the people the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation; for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance in permanent evil any partial or transient benefit which the use can at any time yield."
--George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796
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« Reply #1317 on: July 10, 2013, 06:27:39 PM »

Collection of quotes from the Founders, on the right to keep, and bear arms. http://www.americangunowner.com/the-armed-citizenry---historical-statements.html
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« Reply #1318 on: July 11, 2013, 09:46:14 AM »

"Who are the militia? Are they not ourselves? It is feared, then, that we shall turn our arms each man against his own bosom. Congress have no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birthright of an American... [T]he unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people."
--Tench Coxe, The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1788
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« Reply #1319 on: July 12, 2013, 08:41:00 AM »

"t is more convenient to prevent the passage of a law, than to declare it void after it has passed."
--James Madison, to Thomas Jefferson, 1787
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« Reply #1320 on: July 15, 2013, 09:23:06 AM »

"Without liberty, law loses its nature and its name, and becomes oppression. Without law, liberty also loses its nature and its name, and becomes licentiousness."
--James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1790
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« Reply #1321 on: July 16, 2013, 09:26:36 AM »

"It is our duty to endeavor always to promote the general good; to do to all as we would be willing to be done by were we in their circumstances; to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before God. These are some of the laws of nature which every man in the world is bound to observe, and which whoever violates exposes himself to the resentment of mankind, the lashes of his own conscience, and the judgment of Heaven. This plainly shows that the highest state of liberty subjects us to the law of nature and the government of God."
--Samuel West, On the Right to Rebel Against Governors, 1776
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« Reply #1322 on: July 17, 2013, 10:17:28 AM »

"A constitution defines and limits the powers of the government it creates. It therefore follows, as a natural and also a logical result, that the governmental exercise of any power not authorized by the constitution is an assumed power, and therefore illegal."
--Thomas Paine, Constitutions, Governments, and Charters, 1805
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« Reply #1323 on: July 18, 2013, 12:39:04 PM »

"If justice, good faith, honor, gratitude and all the other qualities which ennoble the character of a nation and fulfill the ends of government be the fruits of our establishments, the cause of liberty will acquire a dignity and lustre, which it has never yet enjoyed, and an example will be set, which cannot but have the most favourable influence on the rights on Mankind. If on the other side, our governments should be unfortunately blotted with the reverse of these cardinal and essential virtues, the great cause which we have engaged to vindicate, will be dishonored and betrayed; the last and fairest experiment in favor of the rights of human nature will be turned against them; and their patrons and friends exposed to be insulted and silenced by the votaries of tyranny and usurpation."
--James Madison, Address to the States, 1783
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« Reply #1324 on: July 19, 2013, 12:35:40 PM »

"Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing."
--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Martha Jefferson, 1787
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« Reply #1325 on: July 22, 2013, 10:16:22 AM »

"Free government is founded in jealousy, and not in confidence; it is jealousy and not confidence which prescribes limited constitutions, to bind down those whom we are obliged to trust with power."
--Thomas Jefferson, The Kentucky Resolutions, 1799
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« Reply #1326 on: July 23, 2013, 09:55:51 AM »

"When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary."
--Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776
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« Reply #1327 on: July 24, 2013, 08:59:36 AM »

"It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives."
--John Adams, Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1756
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« Reply #1328 on: July 25, 2013, 06:26:24 AM »

"Repeal that [welfare] law, and you will soon see a change in their manners. St. Monday and St. Tuesday, will soon cease to be holidays. Six days shalt thou labor, though one of the old commandments long treated as out of date, will again be looked upon as a respectable precept; industry will increase, and with it plenty among the lower people; their circumstances will mend, and more will be done for their happiness by inuring them to provide for themselves, than could be done by dividing all your estates among them."
--Benjamin Franklin, letter to Collinson, 1753
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« Reply #1329 on: July 26, 2013, 08:46:00 AM »

"Government, in my humble opinion, should be formed to secure and to enlarge the exercise of the natural rights of its members; and every government, which has not this in view, as its principal object, is not a government of the legitimate kind."
--James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791
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« Reply #1330 on: July 29, 2013, 09:14:21 AM »

"Besides, to lay and collect internal taxes in this extensive country must require a great number of congressional ordinances, immediately operation upon the body of the people; these must continually interfere with the state laws and thereby produce disorder and general dissatisfaction till the one system of laws or the other, operating upon the same subjects, shall be abolished."
--Federal Farmer, Antifederalist Letter, 1787
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« Reply #1331 on: July 30, 2013, 09:55:57 AM »

"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right, from the frame of their nature, to knowledge, as their great Creator, who does nothing in vain, has given them understandings, and a desire to know; but besides this, they have a right, an indisputable, unalienable, indefeasible, divine right to that most dreaded and envied kind of knowledge; I mean, of the characters and conduct of their rulers."
--John Adams, Dissertation on Canon and Feudal Law, 1765
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« Reply #1332 on: July 31, 2013, 09:09:02 AM »

"No people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and Virtue is preserved. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders."
--Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 1775
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« Reply #1333 on: August 01, 2013, 08:46:53 AM »

"In the first place, it is to be remembered, that the general government is not to be charged with the whole power of making and administering laws: its jurisdiction is limited to certain enumerated objects, which concern all the members of the republic, but which are not to be attained by the separate provisions of any."
--James Madison, Federalist No. 14, 1787
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« Reply #1334 on: August 02, 2013, 11:05:52 AM »

"History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy... These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and animosities between the people favored and the people oppressed; whence a total separation of affections, interests, political obligations, and all manner of connections, by which the whole state is weakened."
--Benjamin Franklin, Emblematical Representations
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« Reply #1335 on: August 05, 2013, 11:05:34 AM »

"It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives."

--John Adams, Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1756
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« Reply #1336 on: August 06, 2013, 10:20:18 AM »

"The good Education of Youth has been esteemed by wise Men in all Ages, as the surest Foundation of the Happiness both of private Families and of Common-wealths. Almost all Governments have therefore made it a principal Object of their Attention, to establish and endow with proper Revenues, such Seminaries of Learning, as might supply the succeeding Age with Men qualified to serve the Publick with Honour to themselves, and to their Country."
--Benjamin Franklin, Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania, 1749
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« Reply #1337 on: August 07, 2013, 07:43:16 AM »

Cherish, therefore, the spirit of our people, and keep alive their attention. Do not be too severe upon their errors, but reclaim them by enlightening them. If once they become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress, and Assemblies, Judges, and Governors, shall all become wolves."
--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Carrington, 1787
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« Reply #1338 on: August 08, 2013, 08:48:47 AM »

"To give to every citizen the information he needs for the transaction of his own business; To enable him to calculate for himself, and to express and preserve his ideas, his contracts and accounts, in writing; To improve, by reading, his morals and faculties; To understand his duties to his neighbors and country, and to discharge with competence the functions confided to him by either; To know his rights; to exercise with order and justice those he retains; to choose with discretion the fiduciary of those he delegates; and to notice their conduct with diligence, with candor, and judgment; And, in general, to observe with intelligence and faithfulness all the social relations under which he shall be placed."
--Thomas Jefferson, Report of the Commissioners for the University of Virginia, 1818
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« Reply #1339 on: August 09, 2013, 10:45:45 AM »

"It is an object of vast magnitude that systems of education should be adopted and pursued which may not only diffuse a knowledge of the sciences but may implant in the minds of the American youth the principles of virtue and of liberty and inspire them with just and liberal ideas of government and with an inviolable attachment to their own country."
--Noah Webster, On Education of Youth in America, 1790
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« Reply #1340 on: August 12, 2013, 12:05:05 PM »

"Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph." --Thomas Paine
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« Reply #1341 on: August 13, 2013, 09:20:09 AM »

"There is not in the whole science of politics a more solid or a more important maxim than this -- that of all governments, those are the best, which, by the natural effect of their constitutions, are frequently renewed or drawn back to their first principles."
--James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791
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« Reply #1342 on: August 14, 2013, 10:28:11 AM »

"The apportionment of taxes on the various descriptions of property is an act which seems to require the most exact impartiality; yet there is, perhaps, no legislative act in which greater opportunity and temptation are given to a predominant party to trample on the rules of justice. Every shilling which they overburden the inferior number is a shilling saved to their own pockets."

–James Madison, Federalist No. 10, 1787


"There are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations." --James Madison
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« Reply #1343 on: August 15, 2013, 11:13:00 AM »

"Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle, is a species of vice."
–Thomas Paine, Letter Addressed to the Addressers on the Late Proclamation, 1792
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« Reply #1344 on: August 16, 2013, 07:30:42 AM »

"No morn ever dawned more favorable than ours did; and no day was every more clouded than the present! Wisdom, and good examples are necessary at this time to rescue the political machine from the impending storm."

–George Washington, letter to James Madison, 1786
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« Reply #1345 on: August 26, 2013, 12:44:06 AM »


"Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in
almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce
unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and
constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any
pretence, raised in the United States."

–Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal
Constitution, 1787


============

"The instability of our laws is really an immense evil. I think it would be
well to provide in our constitutions that there shall always be a twelve-month
between the ingross-ing a bill & passing it: that it should then be offered to
its passage without changing a word: and that if circum-stances should be
thought to require a speedier passage, it should take two thirds of both
houses instead of a bare majority."

–Thomas Jefferson, Letter to James Madison, 1787

=========================

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« Reply #1346 on: August 26, 2013, 06:19:49 AM »


"As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not
sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity:
And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into
debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and
pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take
our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life;
that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and
prejudices conceal from our sight."

–Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776
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« Reply #1347 on: August 28, 2013, 12:06:55 PM »

"I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer."
–Benjamin Franklin, On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor, 1766
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« Reply #1348 on: August 29, 2013, 10:23:32 AM »

"The power of the people pervading the proposed system, together with the strong confederation of the states, will form an adequate security against every danger that has been apprehended."
–John Dickinson, Letters of Fabius, 1788
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« Reply #1349 on: August 30, 2013, 07:00:18 AM »



"But the safety of the people of America against dangers from foreign force depends not only on their forbearing to give just causes of war to other nations, but also on their placing and continuing themselves in such a situation as not to invite hostility or insult; for it need not be observed that there are pretended as well as just causes of war."

–John Jay, Federalist No. 4, 1787
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