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Author Topic: The Unorganzied Militia: Citizens defend themselves/others.  (Read 61879 times)
JDN
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« Reply #50 on: December 19, 2008, 10:15:17 PM »

Actually, it is a little bit different.  While I agree "you face potential liability for anything and everything" one must play the odds.
As a peace officer, actually rarely do you personally face the consequences; the city or governmental agency gets sued and they
pay.  You simply go on with your life - note, that is how it should be; a law enforcement officer should not have to second
guess and concern themselves with personal civil liability.  However, as a private citizen, it's my pocketbook, no third party is going to
pick up the tab.  And even having no assets does not prevent a suit; in CA a judgment is good for 10 years and is renewable.
How long am I suppose to be poor?  smiley

Then again, I am not arguing with "doing what is right".  But in the LA Times example, she did what they thought is right.
And yet she will pay for it.  Sad, if the car had burned and she did not intervene, she has no liability.

And yet the CA Supreme Court said she is liable since she did intervene. 


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G M
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« Reply #51 on: December 19, 2008, 10:41:25 PM »

People can still sue a peace officer as an individual. The peace offivcer then has to demonstrate the he/she should be covered by qualified immunity as he/she was acting within the scope of his/her duties.
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JDN
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« Reply #52 on: December 19, 2008, 10:59:26 PM »

I understand; back to your anyone can sue anyone comment.

But rarely is a peace officer personally liable except in truly extreme egregious circumstances.
Going back to the issue of liability, a peace officer could accidental kill an innocent
bystander in a shootout; of course sad, but still within the scope of his/her duties.
The city/governmental agency might end up paying, but not the police officer.
In contrast, at least under CA law, the non peace officer would not have the "protection" of acting within the scope
of their duties.  Therefore, personal liability...  house and savings gone...
Better to stay out of it...?
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JDN
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« Reply #53 on: December 19, 2008, 11:04:55 PM »

As a side note, in the post "Knife Fight in my Apartment"" the guy put the individual in a crude choke hold"; it worked.
And he stopped the fight.

But what happened if he didn't do it right and the guy died?  Or was permanently injured.  The "good samaritan is liable
for all he's got... and then some.  And maybe should be...?  Choke holds are tricky.  LAPD stopped doing it
due to "problems"; and the City paid out millions.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #54 on: December 20, 2008, 12:49:40 AM »

Lets be precise now-- the LAPD stopped doing holds that attack the windpipe.  Stopping the blood flow is a completely distinct matter.

If I read the CA case correctly the question presented means that for the purpose of the question presented the court must assume the allegations to be true.  In this case the allegations are that the defendant got hyper and a bit hysterical and by so doing left the plaintiff crippled.  Did the law protect this behavior?  Was the defendant within the class protected by the law?

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G M
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« Reply #55 on: December 20, 2008, 08:40:53 AM »

I understand; back to your anyone can sue anyone comment.

But rarely is a peace officer personally liable except in truly extreme egregious circumstances.
Going back to the issue of liability, a peace officer could accidental kill an innocent
bystander in a shootout; of course sad, but still within the scope of his/her duties.
The city/governmental agency might end up paying, but not the police officer.
In contrast, at least under CA law, the non peace officer would not have the "protection" of acting within the scope
of their duties.  Therefore, personal liability...  house and savings gone...
Better to stay out of it...?

**As I've said before, this is an individual decision everyone must make. You face criminal and civil liability for stepping in to defend others. You might be injured or killed in the confrontation as well. I know what I'll do, you have to decide your own rules of engagement.**
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G M
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« Reply #56 on: December 20, 2008, 08:45:35 AM »

As a side note, in the post "Knife Fight in my Apartment"" the guy put the individual in a crude choke hold"; it worked.
And he stopped the fight.

But what happened if he didn't do it right and the guy died?  Or was permanently injured.  The "good samaritan is liable
for all he's got... and then some.  And maybe should be...?  Choke holds are tricky.  LAPD stopped doing it
due to "problems"; and the City paid out millions.

**Someone using a knife on others is deadly force. I'd be justified in shooting someone to stop them from attacking others with a knife. Using a restraint hold would be lesser force than shooting the attacker, given that you don't crush the windpipe or induce brain damage. Even if you do, depending on state statute, it's probably quite justifiable, under most circumstances.**
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JDN
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« Reply #57 on: December 20, 2008, 09:30:59 AM »

YOU would be justified shooting because you are law enforcement and are acting within the scope of your duties.  As a private citizen...?
And to exacerbate the problem, what is something went wrong, i.e. an innocent bystander was hit?  The City/governmental agency will
probably pay but for the citizen?  It's his house and savings ...

"Lets be precise now-- the LAPD stopped doing holds that attack the windpipe.  Stopping the blood flow is a completely distinct matter."

Yet even stopping the blood flow incorrectly can result in severe damage and even loss of life.  Plus a non expert
could attack the windpipe by mistake; I've done some ground work and frankly I am very leery of someone choking me out.  The facts would
be very similar to the above ruling; if a non trained medical (law enforcement) individual takes "good samaritan" action that causes injury or loss of life
that good samaritan is now open to civil suit and in CA may now most likely will be found personally liable.

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #58 on: December 20, 2008, 01:25:19 PM »

@ JDN:

My comments were in response to your overly broad/imprecise statement:
 
"Choke holds are tricky.  LAPD stopped doing it due to "problems"; and the City paid out millions."

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TonyPeters
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« Reply #59 on: December 20, 2008, 03:27:49 PM »

I recently read about the woman in CA who thought that if her co-worker didn't try to help her that she would be better off because a medical professional could help her.

I wonder if she ever gave thought to the fact that maybe if he didn't help her she would be a crispy mess right now if he left her alone and the car blew up...or she could be dead due to him leaving her there to bleed out externally or internally or get hit by a passing motor vehicle as they are rubber necking the wreck?

Unfortunate that she became a paraplegic and there is always a "would'a, could'a, should'a" decision that has to be made in a matter of seconds to make a difference at times.

"Good Faith" should cover citizens as it does LEO's.

I think that the average citizen should educate themselves on how to handle more common-scenario based trauma situations so that they can better gage low level risk up to and including a life threatening safety threat.

-Tony Peters   
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"Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." ~George Orwell
JDN
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« Reply #60 on: December 20, 2008, 05:41:14 PM »

As I did a search, I found "choke hold" often used interchangeably with control holds, carotid holds, and other holds including "stopping the blood flow".   Further, I think most laymen will use the term interchangeably.   

Between 1975 and 1982, 16 men died after the application of choke holds by officers with the Los Angeles Police Department. According to the LAPD's reports, five of the men had bar-arm holds placed on them, which cuts off air passage.
Nine of the deaths occurred after officers used the carotid artery hold, and in two of the cases, there was some uncertainty about which hold was used.
"The carotid hold -- it's a terrible idea, physically and medically," said Los Angeles civil rights attorney Michael R. Mitchell, who sought an injunction against the city of Los Angeles to bar the use of the control holds in the 1970s and 1980s.

Mitchell argued the case when it went before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1983. One count alleged that police officers "regularly and routinely" applied choke holds in situations where they are not threatened by the use of deadly force, and that numerous persons had been injured or killed as a result of the application of the carotid hold and other choke holds.
While the court did not side with Mitchell, the LAPD saw fit to raise the threshold for use, allowing the carotid hold only when there is an immediate threat of serious bodily injury or death.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2008, 11:20:18 AM »

"As I did a search, I found "choke hold" often used interchangeably with control holds, carotid holds, and other holds including "stopping the blood flow".   Further, I think most laymen will use the term interchangeably."


Ummm, , , this IS my point.  You used a term which covered bar-arm windpipe holds AND carotid holds, whereas it was only the bar-arm hold which was abandoned as a technique.

"Between 1975 and 1982, 16 men died after the application of choke holds by officers with the Los Angeles Police Department. According to the LAPD's reports, five of the men had bar-arm holds placed on them, which cuts off air passage.
Nine of the deaths occurred after officers used the carotid artery hold, and in two of the cases, there was some uncertainty about which hold was used."

Not quite the way I remember the data, but I could be wrong.  I do remember that this hit the papers shortly after I arrived in LA.  The police chief, Darryl Gates, had just responded to a reporter's question about why a disproportionate number of the dead in the bar-arm choke cases were black by saying something like "Maybe they (blacks) don't respond to the technique like normal people."  
shocked    New and naive to the ways of LA, I assumed that the black mayor and former police chief Tom Bradley would can hit butt PDQ, bu such was not the case.

"The carotid hold -- it's a terrible idea, physically and medically," said Los Angeles civil rights attorney Michael R. Mitchell, who sought an injunction against the city of Los Angeles to bar the use of the control holds in the 1970s and 1980s."

Well, like most of us here, I have a reasonably good idea of what it is and what it does, and IMHO the man is an ass looking to make a contingency fee.

Mitchell argued the case when it went before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1983. One count alleged that police officers "regularly and routinely" applied choke holds in situations where they are not threatened by the use of deadly force, and that numerous persons had been injured or killed as a result of the application of the carotid hold and other choke holds."

The allegations of this contingency attorney mean very little  evil

"While the court did not side with Mitchell,"

an occasional moment of sanity strikes!

"the LAPD saw fit to raise the threshold for use, allowing the carotid hold only when there is an immediate threat of serious bodily injury or death."

Which agrees with the point that I have been making here-- your original statement that the "LAPD stopped doing chokeholds due to "problems"" was overbroad.
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JDN
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« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2008, 05:58:44 PM »

Perhaps I was not clear, or perhaps not precise, or, simply we got off topic.

My original point was civil liability and how the recent CA Court ruling may affect "good samaritans".

I acknowledge that the LAPD stopped using chokeholds (only) and has raised the threshold when a carotid
hold is permitted.  My concern is that if the LAPD (trained officers; both physically trained to apply the hold
AND mentally trained as to when it is appropriate) has been forbidden to use a choke hold, and restrictions
because of injury/liability have been placed upon a carotid hold, perhaps the public should simply stay away from interfering, i.e. being a
good samaritan and leaving it to qualified personnel? 

Given the recent Supreme Court ruling, I think a layman (non professional) using a gun or a knife or applying a chokehold or even a carotid hold may and often
probably will be subject to civil liability if done so on behalf of another, i.e. being a good samaritan.  It depends upon the circumstances, but given the Court ruling the burden
of proof seems to have shifted.  And if something goes wrong, a stray bullet, a hold gone wrong, etc.....  unlike a police officer, you have little defense.  The police are
"acting within the scope of their duties; what is your defense?

Note, I am not talking about defending yourself, your family, loved ones or your home, I am saying liability as it affects interceding on behalf of an "unknown" third party.
Simply being a "good samaritan". 

I suggest "Do the right thing" is paramount; but think once, maybe twice before acting, however being a non professional, one's interpretation of the "right thing" may be different than a qualified police officer. 
It seems to me unless there is utterly no choice, better to abstain and if appropriate call the police.  Physically interceding, even though you think it's the "right thing to do" in a non life threatening
situation may severely cost you.  And while noble to interfere the CA Supreme Court seems to have said that if you don't do it 100% correctly, the burden of proof is on you and you may/will be liable.  You may
not care about the consequences at the time, but you will when you lose your house and savings later.





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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #63 on: December 22, 2008, 12:20:14 AM »

"Perhaps I was not clear, or perhaps not precise, or, simply we got off topic."

No.  As I have had to make clear with increasing bluntness, in support of your position you made an overly broad statement.  Getting called on it is not "getting off topic".

"My original point was civil liability and how the recent CA Court ruling may affect "good samaritans"."

Actually that is not a "point"-- it is the subject of the conversation at the moment.

"I acknowledge that the LAPD stopped using chokeholds (only) and has raised the threshold when a carotid
hold is permitted." 

There, that wasn't so hard now was it?

, , ,

"Given the recent Supreme Court ruling, I think a layman (non professional) using a gun or a knife or applying a chokehold or even a carotid hold may and often probably will be subject to civil liability if done so on behalf of another, i.e. being a good samaritan.  It depends upon the circumstances, but given the Court ruling the burden
of proof seems to have shifted."

My reading is not that the burden of proof has shifted but that a qualified immunity has been read narrowly.

"I suggest "Do the right thing" is paramount; but think once, maybe twice before acting, however being a non professional, one's interpretation of the "right thing" may be different than a qualified police officer.  It seems to me unless there is utterly no choice, better to abstain and if appropriate call the police.  Physically interceding, even though you think it's the "right thing to do" in a non life threatening situation may severely cost you."

A question of one's values and how one feels looking in the mirror I suppose.

"And while noble to interfere the CA Supreme Court seems to have said that if you don't do it 100% correctly, the burden of proof is on you and you may/will be liable."

Umm, , , NO.  The CA Supreme Court has NOT imposed a standard of absolute liability, nor even one of strict liability.  As best as I can tell from this non-legal news report, the standard is one of reasonableness under the circumstances.  This is a question for the trier of the facts, be it a judge or a jury.  As I previously noted, but apparently has not been noted here:

QUOTEIf I read the CA case correctly the question presented means that for the purpose of the question presented the court must assume the allegations to be true.  In this case the allegations are that the defendant got hyper and a bit hysterical and by so doing left the plaintiff crippled.  Did the law protect (i.e. did the law confer immunity for) this behavior?  Was the defendant within the class protected by the law? END QUOTE 

The court held it did not.  It has not held the defendant liable, it simply has said that given the facts ALLEGED, the defendant is subject to suit.


"And yet the CA Supreme Court said she is liable since she did intervene."

No, it held she is subject to suit.  Whether she is liable will be determined at trial.

"  , , ,  if a non trained medical (law enforcement) individual takes "good samaritan" action that causes injury or loss of life
that good samaritan is now open to civil suit"

At last your formulation is essentially correct!

"and in CA may now most likely will be found personally liable."

Most likely?  What is the basis for this assertion?

JDN, apart from your initial avoidance of acknowledging a simple point of logic simply and fairly made, my annoyance here comes from your having stepped on a pet peeve of mine- which is people giving legal conclusions based upon , , , what I'm not sure.   Our legal system is hostile enough to the values that most of us here share without our whipping ourselves into a panic based upon something other than what was actually held by the court.

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G M
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« Reply #64 on: December 22, 2008, 03:14:19 AM »

On the point of values and California:

More than most, California faces serious threats from natural disasters, especially "the big one". In the case of "the big one" happening, it will be weeks before you see a in depth response from police/fire/ems/nat'l guard. So, do the survivors just ignore the screams from the trapped and injured?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #65 on: December 22, 2008, 03:37:41 PM »

From the WT forum on this case:
==========================================

Good Samaritan laws raise the standard for liability, they do not eliminate liability. Generally speaking, under a GS law, if you are a trained care giver, you are only liable for Gross Negligence, not Ordinary Negligence. These terms are defined as:

Ordinary negligence is the failure to exercise such care as the great mass of mankind ordinarily exercises under the same or similar circumstances (Clemens v. State, 176 Wis. 289; 57 Am. Jur. 2d Negligence, § 98).

Gross negligence, on the other hand, generally signifies more than ordinary inadvertence or inattention, but less than conscious indifference to consequences (Alspaugh v. Diggs 195 Va. 1, 77 S. E. 2d 362; Prosser on Torts, Gross Negligence).

Wilful and Wanton Negligence
The usual meaning assigned to wilful and wanton negligence is that the actor has intentionally done an act of unreasonable character, in disregard of a risk known to him or so obvious that he must be taken to have been aware of it, and so great as to make it highly probable that harm would follow. Second Restatement of Torts, Section 500; Cope v. Davidson 30 Cal. 2d 193; Prosser on Torts-Degrees of Negligence. It is usually accompanied by a conscious indifference to the consequences amounting almost to a willingness that they shall follow. Wilful or wanton negligence is an action or omission which amounts to an extreme departure from ordinary care, in a situation where a high degree of danger is apparent. Prosser on Torts, Degrees of Negligence. Such wilful or wanton negligence must be more than mere thoughtlessness, inadvertence, or simple inattention.

Federal law has spoken on this matter as well.

The Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 (P. L 105-19) became effective in September of 1997. In addition to establishing immunity for acts of negligence, it also establishes a clear and convincing standard of proof for punitive damages to be awarded against volunteers and makes them liable for noneconomic damages (pain and suffering) only to the degree their wrongdoing caused the harm.

The act preempts state laws to the extent they are inconsistent with it. It does not preempt state laws that provide additional protection from liability. But states can opt out of the law by passing an act explicitly doing so.

Scope of Limitation on Liability

Under the act, no volunteer of a nonprofit organization or governmental entity can be liable for harm caused by his act or omission on its behalf if:

1. he was acting within the scope of his responsibilities at the time of the act or omission;

2. he was properly licensed, certified, or authorized by the appropriate authorities in the state where the harm occurred;

3. the harm was not caused by willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless misconduct, or a conscious flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the person harmed by the volunteer; and

4. the harm was not caused by the volunteer operating a motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft or other vehicle for which the state requires the operator or owner to possess a license or maintain insurance.

The act specifies that it does not affect (1) any civil action brought by the nonprofit organization or governmental entity against the volunteer; or (2) such organization’s or entity’s liability with respect to harm a volunteer causes.

The act also specifies that a state law is not inconsistent with the federal act because it:

1. requires the organization or entity to adhere to risk management procedures including mandatory training of volunteers;

2. makes the organization or entity liable for the volunteer’s acts or omissions to the same extent as an employer is liable for its employees’ acts or omissions;

3. subjects the volunteer to liability if the civil action was brought by a state or local government officer under state or local law; or

4. limits liability protection to cases where the organization or entity provides a financially secure source of recovery such as an insurance policy for those harmed by the volunteer.

These laws are not on the books so everyone who wants to help can help without fear of liability. They have been enacted so that a dentist on his way to a golf game who sees a kid get hit by a car can stop, render aid under a stressful, sudden situation, and not be found liable for a mistake made in the course of treatment if the mistake does not rise to the level of gross negligence.

People off the street, even well meaning people, are on their own. Always have been, always will be.

==========

If you are going to do something for someone, you have to use ordinary care.

If you are a drunk chick in a car with another drunk chick who wrapped the car around a tree/poll/object, see the airbags deploy and panic, then drag your badly injured friend out of the car because you think its going to explode...then put her down next to the car...

GUESS WHAT?

You are NOT a medical professional to which the law is addressed, and even if you were, that's probably gross negligence..."Gross negligence, on the other hand, generally signifies more than ordinary inadvertence or inattention, but less than conscious indifference to consequences (Alspaugh v. Diggs 195 Va. 1, 77 S. E. 2d 362; Prosser on Torts, Gross Negligence)."

The sky is NOT falling. People can help people. Stop panicking about this and go back to watching the price of oil fall to 1990's prices.

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JDN
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« Reply #66 on: December 25, 2008, 02:11:13 PM »

A follow up to the recent CA Supreme Court ruling.

Patt Morrison LA Times
December 25, 2008

Uh, gentlemen? You three wise men? As your lawyer, I'm advising you not to go there.
No question, the family really needs help, especially with a newborn and all. But why take a chance? And the gifts? Honestly, you might just be opening yourselves up to a lawsuit. Frankincense? Myrrh? Somebody might be allergic. You know what those Roman attorneys say: abundans cautela non nocet -- better safe than sorry.

Crazy notion, isn't it?

Back then, certainly. Maybe not now. The California Supreme Court has given fresh meaning to "no good deed goes unpunished." It ruled last week that a woman who yanked a co-worker from a crashed car four years ago, and may have made her injuries worse, can be sued because what she did wasn't medical care.

The 4-3 decision goes to the heart of another biblical reference: the good Samaritan.
It was Halloween 2004 when several co-workers took two cars to go out for a night on the town. After one car, the second car stopped. Its passenger, Lisa Torti, leaped out to help. Torti, who said she thought the wrecked car was about to catch fire, grabbed Alexandra Van Horn and pulled her out.
Pulling her out "like a rag doll" allegedly made Van Horn's spinal injuries worse. The court's ruling allows Van Horn, now a paraplegic, to sue Torti. It also indicates that the provision that shields good Samaritans from liability, enacted by the Legislature in 1980, applies only to people giving medical care in an emergency.

There's a stink about this, and there should be. The implications for all of us are enormous. It's another chilling effect in a society where we're already freezing each other out.
You don't dare hug a hurting child who's not your own -- someone might call you a molester and call the cops. You don't ever apologize for anything, even if it's your fault; you'd be laying the groundwork for a lawsuit.

And now, when you see an accident or a crime, what will pop into your mind? "I have to help"? Or, "Will I get sued for trying to help?" Whatever your inner Samaritan is telling you, your inner Lawyer might be suggesting you just drive on past.
If everyone feels this way, we could be damaging a social compact that's deeply rooted -- the impulse to help others in trouble, even strangers.

My pal Michael Shermer, the author, science columnist and founder of the Skeptics Society, told me that evolution has an explanation for altruism. "By extending a helping hand to those who will reciprocate my altruism, I am helping myself." It's the Golden Rule, the expectation of getting back what you give.
In a complex world, we struggle to keep this going. But "if a good Samaritan," Shermer said, "can be held responsible for injuries resulting from the rescue attempt, this sends a signal to the rest of us to shut off our natural inclination to help, and [instead] to reinforce that other natural tendency we have of selfishness."

Would that Sylmar hospice nurse have risked her own skin last month to help elderly neighbors evacuate ahead of the fire that destroyed their mobile homes? It wasn't emergency medical care she was giving, after all.

Would the 19 people awarded the Carnegie Medal for heroism this week -- like the man who ran in front of a train to save a child -- have risked their lives if they'd known they were risking a lawsuit too?

Some states have "duty to rescue" laws; in Washington state, it's a misdemeanor not to help someone who's seriously injured, unless it would endanger you.
But laws vary. Some places require an "imminent peril" to the victim -- if there isn't one, the rescuer could be sued. ("Imminent peril" may mean one thing to paramedics and something else to the rest of us, who see crashed cars catch fire all the time on TV and in movies. In reality, collisions are a factor in only 3% of vehicle fires, according to data from the U.S. Fire Administration and a National Fire Protection Assn. survey.

This ruling is practically an engraved invitation to the Legislature to clear up the meaning in that 1980 code. Even with the budget apocalypse, legislators should attend to this fast, before the notion gets set in mental cement, that good Samaritans are just asking to get sued. While they're at it, why not devote, say, a couple of pennies from every traffic fine to help pay medical costs for victims inadvertently injured by a Samaritan's rescue attempt, like the woman who brought this case.

As for that New Testament passage, in which the Samaritan comes across a man who had been robbed, beaten and left for dead, "and bound up his wounds ... and took care of him" -- it'd be a shame to have to put an asterisk there, with the notation, "Not applicable in California."

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #67 on: December 26, 2008, 08:01:29 AM »

http://www.pnj.com/article/20081224/NEWS01/812240327/1052

Beach brawl suspect to be charged with murder

Saturday night fight ended in man's death

Kris Wernowsky • kwernowsky@pnj.com • December 24, 2008
Ryan Toole, 28, who spent about two months this year training as a mixed martial arts fighter, is charged in the death of Michael Chesney, 32. A conviction on the charge carries a possible state prison term of 20 years to life.
Chesney never regained consciousness after the fight early Saturday morning and spent the last hours of his life at Baptist Hospital in intensive care. The Beulah man was taken off life support early Sunday.
Toole's family has retained veteran criminal defense attorney Barry Beroset to represent him.

Beroset said Tuesday he could not speak about the details of his meeting with Toole, but he said his client's family is concerned about the well-being of Chesney's family.

"It's a very unfortunate situation for the family of this young man," Beroset said.

Attempts to reach Chesney's family Tuesday were unsuccessful. His visitation is scheduled for Friday.  Assistant State Attorney David Rimmer said he has reviewed transcriptions of six interviews, including statements from Toole and other witnesses, about the altercation. 

Escambia County Sheriff's Office homicide investigator Chris Baggett expects Toole will be allowed to surrender as early as today on the new charge.  The second-degree murder charge could lead to an increased bond for Toole, who originally was arrested on a count of second-degree attempted murder. He posted a $25,000 bond Sunday.

While Rimmer contends Chesney likely died when the back of his head struck the pavement and not directly because of the punch delivered by Toole, he says the act itself supports the new charge.

"It's going to be the state's position that Ryan Toole caused that to happen," he said. "If you push somebody off a 10-story building, hitting the ground may have killed them. But the mere act that someone pushed them means they can be held liable."

Toole was involved in an altercation with a woman outside The Islander on Pensacola Beach early Saturday. Chesney and a friend, Jason Campbell, 35, intervened about 2:40 a.m., the Sheriff's Office said.

Toole punched Campbell, then punched Chesney, who went down and hit his head on the pavement, Baggett said.

On Tuesday night, deputies assigned to Pensacola Beach were expected to begin checking in with each of the 13 bars at the beach.
Sheriff's Office Lt. Gary Montee said he was instituting the new policy as a result of the fatal fight.

"We can't put a cop on every street corner, but we can try to do what we can with the resources we have," Montee said.

Montee said when he worked at the beach in the 1970s, deputies walked into beach businesses and talked with the owner or employees.
"We would walk into these bars during every shift," he said. "You walk into these places and you get a good feel for its clientele. We are getting back to the basics."
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #68 on: January 03, 2009, 10:21:39 AM »

Woman fights carjacking:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=407_1230748256
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maija
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« Reply #69 on: January 03, 2009, 11:39:01 AM »

That's awesome! I shop there shocked
Yay! even the 'hippies' are fighting back  afro
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TonyPeters
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« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2009, 01:12:30 PM »

Woof,

Looks like that lady took the Martial Arts and Crafts to heart by stabbing the a**hole with scissors! cheesy It's great that she was able to "flip the switch" and go into survival mode. Thanks for sharing Guro.

-Tony
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"Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." ~George Orwell
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« Reply #71 on: January 06, 2009, 11:04:38 AM »

BJJ in action:

Boy stops pit bull attack with jujitsu choke hold
Drew Heredia, 9, said he and a friend were walking a small dog Dec. 30 when a pit bull attacked them. Heredia said he jumped on the pit bull and applied a choke hold that he learned while taking Brazilian jujitsu classes.

Link has video:

http://www.bakersfieldnow.com/news/local/37069754.html?video=YHI&t=a

Any of you all heard of a "reverse naked choke?"
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #72 on: January 06, 2009, 12:40:32 PM »

Awesome!!!
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David III
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« Reply #73 on: January 06, 2009, 04:53:42 PM »

That is one tough young man. I am really amazed that was possible. Choking out big dogs is not for the meek.  shocked
An outstanding example of quick, courageous action.
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G M
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« Reply #74 on: January 11, 2009, 10:03:48 AM »

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jMvjaSVrpk4FwqVzz1qByd_Txs2QD95KIKNO3

'Man shot my mommy': Ohio woman slain, son taken
By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS – 16 hours ago

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — The 4-year-old boy's explanation was even more startling than the sight of him, barefoot and clad in pajamas, standing alone in the lobby of a highway rest stop.
Judith McConnell and her husband, Michael, had pulled into the rest stop on Interstate 70 about 50 miles outside of Dayton just after 9 p.m. on Jan. 2.
The boy was by himself, staring out a window. Judith McConnell waved at him as they walked in. What he said next was chilling: "A man came into my house without knocking and shot my mommy."
The man then left him alone at the rest stop, the boy said.
The couple, driving home to Maryland after Christmas in Colorado, took the boy into their car to warm up and called police.
"He's been abandoned here by a man with a gun," Michael McConnell told police. "He's quite disturbed."
As they waited for deputies to arrive, the boy recited the information his mother had drilled into him — his address, his parents' names, two phone numbers.
When Montgomery County sheriff's deputies arrived at his family's small white bungalow in Dayton later that night, they found the body of his 29-year-old mother, shot to death.
The woman died after struggling with her attacker, said Sheriff Phil Plummer. The killer also sexually assaulted the boy before taking him to the rest stop and abandoning him, police said.
The Associated Press is not naming the family so as not to identify the victim of an alleged sexual offense.
Police say a man under arrest has confessed to the crimes. Montgomery County Prosecutor Mathias Heck is considering whether to seek the death penalty.
The chilling story began about a week before Christmas, when the 4-year-old's parents' car was stolen while they celebrated their fourth wedding anniversary at a rock concert in Columbus.
Police say the car, and the information inside it, led the killer directly to the family's home, about 75 miles away.
The young couple were struggling to make ends meet in a working-class Dayton neighborhood. She had left her job at a grocery store to stay home with her son. Her husband held down assorted jobs to support the family, working as an exterminator, a grocery store manager and a trainee at a bar-restaurant.
Neighbor Steve Hopkins, 41, described the boy as a precocious kid quick to make friends, even with adults.
"When he met you, he knew you," Hopkins said, saying the boy greeted him on the street with "How you doing, Steve?"
On Dec. 16, 10 days after their fourth anniversary, the couple drove to Columbus to see the band Duran Duran, Hopkins said.
Their Honda was reported stolen from an Ohio State parking garage on Dec. 17. The husband told police the car was unlocked and the keys had been left inside along with his wallet, which contained three credit cards and his Social Security card, according to a police report.
On the night of Jan. 2, he was working at a bar near their home. Police say his wife was home with their son, running a bath before bed.
The McConnells said the boy told them he was playing with his Ninja Turtle toys when a man carrying a shotgun walked up the sidewalk and broke into the house — "without knocking."
The Dayton Daily News, citing investigators, reported that the woman broke free, grabbed a knife, stabbed the intruder in the back and was shot twice in the abdomen during a struggle. She was found lying on a hallway floor.
Two days later, police arrested Charlie Myers, 22, of Columbus, who investigators say confessed to the crime.
FBI agents found that the woman's cell phone was used twice in Columbus after her death, including a call made to Myers' phone, according to a search warrant affidavit filed in Franklin County Municipal Court.
Investigators also found written directions to the woman's home in Myers' apartment, along with a computer, a Playstation 2 video game console and a cell phone, all consistent with items taken from the couple's house.
Police say Myers used information found in the unlocked vehicle to track down the couple.
Myers is charged with aggravated murder, kidnapping and gross sexual imposition involving a child under 13. He is being held in Montgomery County Jail in lieu of $5 million bail. No plea was entered, and Myers said he had no attorney.
Myers made an impromptu statement to reporters as he was being led into jail Wednesday, offering an apology and saying he had made a mistake and only wanted the family's "stuff."
He also gave an odd explanation for why the boy was taken: "I want to make sure the child could stay away from their parent because the parent had passed away."
___
Myers had it rough from an early age, when his mother died of a drug-related heart attack when he was just 4. He lived in homeless shelters with his father, who beat him with a belt, and struggled with a hearing impairment that wasn't addressed until he was 6 years old. He spent most of his childhood being shuttled between more than 20 foster homes in the Columbus area, according to court documents filed in Union and Franklin counties.
Myers started smoking marijuana at age 7, drank alcohol at age 8, and when he turned 11 he attempted suicide while living in a home for troubled boys, court documents show.
At age 17, living with an aunt in Marysville, Ohio, he broke into the empty house of elderly neighbors, stole valuables and set the house on fire. A juvenile court judge declined to transfer Myers' case to adult court, saying he was emotionally and psychologically damaged because treatment for his disability had been so delayed.
"I don't want you to hurt anyone else and I don't want you to hurt yourself," said Judge Charlotte Coleman Eufinger of Union County Juvenile Court. "I believe you can be a productive citizen."
Myers served three years in a juvenile detention center and was released on July 4, 2007, his 21st birthday.
Later that year, he stole a woman's car in Columbus, then showed up at her door a day or so later.
Sky Cunningham, 25, said Myers came to her apartment in December 2007 saying he had information about the missing vehicle. She was gone at the time and a roommate told Myers she wasn't home.
Myers later pleaded guilty to stealing the car, along with another belonging to Cunningham's roommate. She said the memory of the hassle had faded until she heard of the young mother's slaying.
"That could have been me," Cunningham told The Associated Press Thursday. "I got lucky. The timing was good that I was at my other job."
The little boy found in the highway waiting area turned 5 on Saturday and is staying with relatives.
His father returned to the house once last week to put the garbage on the curb, and says he won't ever allow his son back inside.
He told NBC's "Today" that he's grateful that his wife insisted they teach the boy his address and phone numbers. He admires his son for the bravery he showed through the ordeal.
"My focus is on him," he said. "I'm doing everything I can to bring a little bit of home to him."
Associated Press Writer James Hannah contributed to this report.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #75 on: January 26, 2009, 01:36:52 PM »

http://www.officer.com/web/online/Top-News-Stories/Atlanta-Woman-Uses-Taser-Gun-to-Help-Officer-in-Distress/1$45111

Atlanta Woman Uses Taser Gun to Help Officer in Distress


Posted: Monday, January 26, 2009
Updated: January 26th, 2009 11:40 AM GMT-05:00

Story by wsbtv.com
LITHONIA, Ga. --

Tanisha Cross never thought the Taser stun gun she received for Christmas would come in handy so soon. Cross said she was headed to Wal-Mart in Lithonia with her mother when she noticed a DeKalb County police officer in distress.

"I just told my mom pull over, let's try to help," said Cross.

The 20-year-old mother, who received the taser as a gift from her husband, said she kept it in a diaper bag. Cross said while others gathered to watch, she sprung into action.

"I went straight for my kid’s diaper bag and I got it and asked it if he [officer] wanted me to do it and he said, 'Yea,'" said Cross.

Cross said the officer had a hard time defending himself because the attacker had taken the officer's radio and managed to rub pepper spray in the officer's face and eyes. Jolting the attacker, Cross' timing couldn't have been better. Cross said she tasered the suspect in his arms and legs. Cross said she stunned the attacker to where the officer regained his composure and fought back until a security guard came to their aid. "He's brave," she said. "He did his best to keep him from his gun. He handled the situation very well. I was just glad I could help him," said Cross. Cross doesn't consider herself a hero. "I'm just a bystander trying to help do the right thing," said Cross.

Copyright 2009 by . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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G M
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« Reply #76 on: January 26, 2009, 07:20:43 PM »

Thank god for citizens like that.
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nonkosherdog
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« Reply #77 on: February 01, 2009, 06:08:29 AM »



this one in hebrew starts with an animated re-enactment - then some actual footage that is kind of graphic on the American PC scale , so be warned before the click 




I dont know who has the bigger balls, the ones who helped people get out of harms way, the ones who stop to help the injured & scared, the ones who run toward the danger and put an end to it? I hope that with all my preparing and training that if & when... at the very least I dont just freeze up
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 12:01:14 PM by nonkosherdog » Logged

G M
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« Reply #78 on: February 01, 2009, 04:52:03 PM »

Under extreme stress, you default to your level of training. If your training is good, you'll do fine.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #79 on: February 02, 2009, 11:05:39 PM »

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,487047,00.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by foxnews
NEW YORK — Police say a cab driver who tried to take a purse from a woman fare beater was beaten by a group of good Samaritans who thought they were seeing a robbery.

Police say it happened Saturday morning near the Staten Island Ferry Terminal when four woman, who had been club-going, got into a fight with the cab driver over the fare.  Police say the women left the taxi without paying and the cab driver gave chase, grabbing one of the women's purses.  That's when a group of men in a passing car thought they were witnessing a mugging and jumped on the cab driver, beating him and then fleeing the scene.  The cab driver was treated for cuts on his face.

The women were later picked up by police as they exited the Staten Island Ferry and issued summonses for fare beating.
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G M
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« Reply #80 on: February 02, 2009, 11:22:40 PM »

This is why you've got to be sure of what is going on before you jump into it.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #81 on: February 13, 2009, 06:51:48 PM »

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=b50_1197180749
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #82 on: February 23, 2009, 09:18:52 AM »

Fast food giant McDonald's has denied workers compensation benefits to a minimum wage employee who was shot when he ejected a customer who had been beating a woman inside the restaurant.

A representative of the administrator for McDonald's workers compensation plan explained that "we have denied this claim in its entirety as it is our opinion that Mr. Haskett's injuries did not arise out of or within the course and scope of his employment."

Nigel Haskett, then aged 21, was working at a McDonald's in Little Rock, Arkansas last summer when he saw a patron, later identified as Perry Kennon, smacking a woman in the face. A surveillance video of the incident, which had been posted to YouTube, was taken down after McDonald's charged copyright infringement, but according to written descriptions of the video, Haskett tackled Kennon, threw him out, and then stood by the door to prevent him from reentering.

(Update: The video is now available in a news report from KARK4 in Little Rock, which is not subject to copyright claims and which can be seen below.)

Kennon went to his car, returned with a gun, and shot Haskett multiple times. Haskett staggered back into the restaurant and collapsed.

Kennon, who has a long criminal record, was arrested a few days later and charged with first-degree battery. The judge at his arraignment praised Haskett as a hero.

Haskett has since undergone three abdominal surgeries and has incurred over $300,000 in medical bills. McDonald's has declined to comment on their reasons for refusing his claim, because the case is still pending before the Workers Compensation Commission, but according to Haskett's lawyer, Philip M. Wilson:

"McDonald's position now is that during thirty-minute orientation Mr. Haskett and the other individuals going through the orientation were supposedly told that in the event of a robbery or anything like a robbery . . . not to be a hero and simply call 911. Mr. Haskett denies that anything like that was even mentioned during orientation or at any time during his employment with McDonald's."

McDonald's may be on shaky legal ground in their attempt to deny benefits. As explained by the blog "Joe's Union Review," courts have repeatedly ruled that injuries incurred in the course of "good samaritan" acts while on the job are entitled to compensation, especially if they result in good will towards the employer.

"McDonald’s is really living up to it’s reputation as an evil empire," another blog comments. "They’re no longer merely all about moving in on the little guy, or clogging your arteries with fry grease, or making kids big chunkers, but are also now turning on their employees."

This video was broadcast by KARK4 News and was posted at YouTube on February 22, 2009.

===========

If you want to let McDs know what you think , , ,

http://www.mcdonalds.com/contact/contact_us.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #83 on: March 20, 2009, 01:12:45 PM »

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Matters in Hand


News article by Mike Royko for the Chicago Tribune

We've had the year of the woman and it is still going on, with females being elected to high office and named to the Cabinet posts, and the power of Hillary Rodham Clinton.
But what about Curtescine Lloyd? You never heard of her? Well, she is my choice as one of the most amazing and heroic women of recent years. Ms. Lloyd is a middle-aged nurse who lives with an elderly aunt in the rural hamlet of Edwards, Miss., near Jackson This is her story, most of it taken from the court transcript.

One night, Ms. Lloyd was awakened by a sound. She thought it was her aunt going to the bathroom. Suddenly a man stepped into her bedroom. Terrified, she sat up. He shoved her back down and said: "Bitch, you better not turn on a light. You holler, you're dead. You better not breathe loud." He declared his intentions, which were to rob her and to commit sexual assault. Of course, he phrased it far more luridly. He then took off most of his clothing and jumped into bed.

Here is what happened next, according to court records: Ms. Lloyd: "I got it. I grabbed it by my right hand. And then I grabbed it, I gave it a yank. And when I yanked it, I twisted all at the same time." (Need I explain what Ms. Lloyd meant by "it"? I think not.) "He hit me with his right hand a hard blow beside the head, and when he hit me I grabbed hold of his scrotum with my left hand and I was twisting it the opposite way. He started to yell and we fell to the floor and he hit me a couple more licks, but they were light licks. He was weakening some then." With Ms. Lloyd still hanging on with both hands, squeezing and twisting the fellow's pride and joy, they somehow struggled into the hallway.
"He was trying to get out, and I'm hanging onto him; and he was throwing me from one side of the hall wall to the other. I was afraid if I let him go, he was going go kill me" "So I was determined I was not going to turn it loose. So we were going down the hallway, falling form one side to the other, and we got into the living room and we both fell. He brought me down in front of the couch and he leaned back against the couch, pleading with me." "I said, 'Do you think I'm stupid enough to turn you loose and call the police?' He said, 'Well, what am I gonna do?' I said, 'You're gonna get the hell out of my house.' He said, 'How can I get out of your house if you won't let me go? How can I get out? I can't get out.' "
Ms. Lloyd, still twisting and squeezing, dragged the lout to the front door, which had two locks, and told him to unbolt them. It was a difficult process because he kept collapsing to the floor and she kept hauling him back to his feet. Ms. Lloyd, now confident that she had the upper hand (or should I say the lower hands?) and a full grasp of the situation, said: "When I turn you loose, I'm going to get my gun and I'm going to blow your (obscenity) brains out, you nasty stinking, low-down dirty piece of (obscenity), you."
"And when I did that, I gave it a twist, and I turned him loose. And he took a couple of steps and fell off the steps and he jumped up and grabbed his private parts and made a couple of jumps across the back of my aunt's car." "And I ran into my aunt's room, got her pistol from underneath the nightstand, ran back to the screen door and I fired two shots down the hill the way I saw him go. And then I ran back into the house and dialed 911."

The police came and examined the man's clothing. Inside the trousers was written the name Dwight Coverson. They found Coversion, 29, at home, in considerable pain and wondering if he could ever be a daddy. A one-day jury trial was held. As coverson's court-appointed lawyer put it: "The jury was out 10 minutes. Long enough or two of them to go to the bathroom." And the judge gave him 25 years in prison.
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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #84 on: March 20, 2009, 03:46:58 PM »

That was an inspirational story of courage indeed. What wouldn't surprise me is,  the cops knocking on her door one day and arresting her for taking those unnecessary shots down the hill in the direction that the assailant was last seen heading. She's very lucky in my opinion.  She could be doing some serious prison time for that act. 
My ex brother in law goes to court next month for pulling a gun on a guy (gang banger neighbor) who was trying to bum rush him as he was entering the front door of his apartment one evening.  No shots were fired . This guy called the cops on him and produced some false witnesses. Soon after, the cops came and took him away in handcuffs.  He faces a 4 to 12 year prison sentence accordind to California state law. It's getting to the point that you can't even defend youself without the risk of going to jail. also: To add insult to injury, his landlord kicked him out of his apartment. WTF !  He has no criminal record and is very responsible so, we are hoping the judge will go easy on him?
« Last Edit: March 20, 2009, 09:23:23 PM by Tom Stillman » Logged

Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #85 on: March 21, 2009, 01:05:08 AM »

Please keep us informed on development's in your ex-BiL's case Dog Tom.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #86 on: March 22, 2009, 08:53:16 AM »

http://www.kvbc.com/Global/story.asp...&nav=menu107_2

A local couple came home from work last Saturday night to find not one but five people burglarizing their home. As News 3's Anita Roman reports, the husband and wife took matters into their own hands before they called the police. Emery Childress III and his wife Brenda knew right away that something was wrong.

"Saturday evening I picked my wife up from work. She was going to take the evening off. We pulled up to the garage, we opened the garage door. When the garage was half-way up, the dogs ran out to us. And normally, the dogs are inside the house.  He went in first so I opened the door and let him in," continues Brenda. "And then I shut the door and...it only took about three seconds and I heard him say...Freeze. I use foul language - I say get on the ground, drop it. I walk over...to these guys...and I have them at gun point."

Inside their Henderson home were four perpetrators, all holding valuable weapons: guns, knives, and even a sword that belonged to them.

"I then entered from the garage, came around the corner where he had two suspects laying down on the floor," says Brenda. "They had our .45 down there and I picked it up."

While Emery's wife held the two perpetrators at gun point, he ran outside with the other gun and tried to catch two more that were waiting outside in an SUV.

"We had two adults and two juvenile girls were arrested," confirms Keith Paul, Henderson Police Department. "There is one suspect that is outstanding."

27-year-old Billy Hicks was booked on conspiracy; 18-year-old Avion Wilkins was booked on burglary, home invasion, conspiracy, and grand larceny of a firearm; and a 17-year-old girl and a 15-year-old girl were taken to the Clark County Juvenile Hall.

"It goes through my mind if, I did anything differently, maybe I would have got shot with my own gun when I entered my house," ponders Emery.

The Childresses know what they did was brave and Henderson Police agree. But if there is the possibility that someone is in your home, police ask that you call 911.  The fifth burglar, who is on the run, escaped with jewelry and money. If have any information on this case, please call the Henderson Police Department.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #87 on: March 25, 2009, 04:37:15 PM »

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/southflorida/story/966133.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #88 on: March 31, 2009, 11:33:26 PM »

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/09/09/whe....ap/index.html

NEW YORK (AP) -- Margaret Johnson might have looked like an easy target.

But when a mugger tried to grab a chain off her neck Friday, the wheelchair-bound 56-year-old pulled out her licensed .357 pistol and shot him, police said.

Johnson said she was in Manhattan's Harlem neighborhood on her way to a shooting range when the man, identified by police as 45-year-old Deron Johnson, came up from behind and went for the chain.

"There's not much to it," she said in a brief interview. "Somebody tried to mug me, and I shot him."

Deron Johnson was taken to Harlem Hospital with a single bullet wound in the elbow, police said. He faces a robbery charge, said Lt. John Grimpel, a police spokesman.

Margaret Johnson, who lives in Harlem, has a permit for the weapon and does not face charges, Grimpel said. She also was taken to the hospital with minor injuries and later released.
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ponytotts
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« Reply #89 on: April 22, 2009, 06:47:04 PM »

if i tried to rob a hair dresser, got beat up by a girl, locked up and raped buy her for three days. I dont think I would tell anyone,,,,,,  cheesy


Hairdresser turns robber into sex-slave

14 April, 2009, 14:05
A hairdresser from the small Russian town of Meshchovsk has subdued a man who tried to rob her shop, and then raped him for three days in the utility room, Life.ru reports.

The incident occurred on Saturday, March 14. The working day was coming to an end at a small hairdressers, when a man armed with a gun rushed in and demanded the day’s earnings.The frightened employees and customers agreed to fulfill his demand, but when the shop’s owner, 28-year-old Olga, was handing the money to the robber, she suddenly knocked him down on the floor and then tied him up with a hairdryer cord. The 32-year-old Viktor couldn’t have known that the woman was a yellow belt in karate.

Olga locked the unlucky robber in the utility room and told her colleagues that she was going to call the police – but didn’t do so. When everybody left home, she approached the man and ordered him to ‘take of his underpants’ threatening to hand him over to the police if he refuses to cooperate.

After that Olga raped her hostage for three long days. She chained Viktor to the radiator with pink furry handcuffs and fed him Viagra.

She eventually let the man go on Monday, March 16, saying: “Get out of my sight!”
Viktor went straight to hospital as his genitals were injured, and then to the police.
Olga was resentful when she was taken by the police.

“What a bastard,” the woman said about Viktor. “Yes, we had sex a couple of times. But I’ve bought him new jeans, gave him food and even gave him 1.000 roubles (around $ 30) when he left.”
After that she wrote a notice to the police claiming the man tried to rob her shop.
Both Olga and Viktor may now face prison terms. The woman could be convicted of rape, while the man of robbery.

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #90 on: April 23, 2009, 03:25:52 AM »

California Ride-Along Explorer Rescues Deputy

Posted: April 22nd, 2009 11:44 AM EDT
DANA M. NICHOLS
The Stockton Record


VALLEY SPRINGS, Calif. -- A 16-year-old Explorer Scout riding along Friday with a Calaveras County sheriff's deputy may have saved the deputy's life during a brawl in Valley Springs, a Sheriff's Department spokesman said Monday.
Sgt. Dave Seawell, a department spokesman, did not identify the teenager but said Deputy Michael Dittman was on the verge of losing consciousness during a Friday night brawl when the Explorer intervened to pull an assailant's forearm off of Dittman's throat.
"I think he probably saved Dittman's life," Seawell said.

According to a written release, Dittman was called about 11:30 p.m. to a disturbance in the 100 block of Daphne Street in Valley Springs. Dittman reported that he arrived to find three men fighting on the front porch of a residence.
The deputy reportedly ordered the men to stop fighting. They ignored the command, and Dittman prepared to use his stun gun, Seawell said in the release.

The release described the events as follows:

Thomas E. Jones, 51, at the time was reportedly trying to restrain his son, Thomas C. Jones, from assaulting Michael Koppi, 22. But when the elder Jones realized the stun gun was pointed at his son, he confronted Dittman.
The deputy warned Thomas E. Jones to get out of the way. At that point, Thomas C. Jones broke free from Koppi and charged at Dittman.

The stun gun malfunctioned, and all three men then assaulted Dittman.

The deputy, realizing his stun gun failed to operate, tried to reholster it.

Thomas E. Jones grabbed the stun gun while Thomas C. Jones punched Dittman in the face. The deputy lost the stun gun to the elder Jones, who tried to turn it on the deputy. He failed to do so when Dittman struck the elder Jones on the arm with his baton.
The deputy said he struck both Joneses with his baton multiple times with little or no effect. The younger Jones wrestled the baton away while the older Jones punched the deputy in the face.

The fight continued, and Dittman and the younger Jones fell to the ground while the older Jones punched the deputy in the face. The younger Jones pushed his forearm into the deputy's throat.

Dittman reported he felt himself on the verge of losing consciousness when the Explorer intervened, pulling the arm away.
Then the elder Jones pushed the Explorer away.

As Dittman tried to get control of the younger Jones, his father tried to choke Dittman.

For a second time, Dittman felt himself on the verge of passing out and reluctantly was finally reaching for his firearm when Deputy Josh Crabtree arrived and successfully stunned Thomas E. Jones with a stun gun. Dittman and the Explorer were then able to handcuff Thomas C. Jones.

The father was booked into Calaveras County Jail on charges of battery on a peace officer, assault on a peace officer with a stun gun, resisting arrest, removing a weapon from a peace officer and public intoxication. His bail was set at $110,000.
His son was jailed on charges of assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer, battery on a peace officer, resisting arrest, removing a weapon from a peace officer and public intoxication. His bail was set at $125,000.

Koppi was booked into jail on charges of battery on a peace officer, resisting arrest and public intoxication. A 16-year-old girl was also arrested at the scene for public intoxication and resisting or delaying an officer.

Dittman was treated at Mark Twain St. Joseph's Hospital for multiple cuts and bruises to his head and neck.

The Explorers program is a division of the Boy Scouts of America devoted to exploring careers.
"This is not something we expect our Explorers to do," Seawell said.
Combat is not part of the program, he said.
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maija
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« Reply #91 on: April 30, 2009, 08:29:21 AM »

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090430/ap_on_fe_st/odd_marching_band_beating  grin
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #92 on: April 30, 2009, 11:15:33 AM »

 
Maija I just read that, hilarious and awesome!
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matinik
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« Reply #93 on: April 30, 2009, 11:57:00 AM »


for those who thought  marching band was nerdy in high school.....
 
From AP news

Thu Apr 30, 7:41 am ET

QUARTZ HILL, Calif. – Don't mess with a marching band girl, especially one armed with a baton. A 17-year-old high school marching band student beat up two assailants who tried to mug her as she walked to school in this high desert community about 40 miles north of Los Angeles, sheriff's officials said Tuesday.

The girl punched one of the men in the nose, kicked the other in the groin and beat both with her large baton before she ran away on Friday morning, officials said.

"The moral to this story is don't mess with the marching band girls, or you just might get what you deserve," said Los Angeles County sheriff's Deputy Michael Rust.

He said two men approached the girl from behind, grabbed her coat and demanded money. Deputies searched near Quartz Hill High School for the muggers, looking for a man who was holding his bloodied nose and the other limping.

No arrests have been made, but Rust said it appears the girl made her point to her assailants.

"Final score: Marching band 2, thugs 0," Rust quipped.  afro  cool
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pau
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« Reply #94 on: May 01, 2009, 12:29:36 AM »

Well i just found this.... i have not much to say just

this guys are nuts ore realy brave i just hope NO ONE gets hurt

you guys have a look

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da1ADqPplQ4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZH0oAFCxxw&feature=channel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfxH7yoz7rc&feature=channel

(sorry for my sppeling)  embarassed

« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 12:31:07 AM by pau » Logged

guau desde mex ^^

woof from mex ^^
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #95 on: May 07, 2009, 01:42:31 PM »

College Student Shoots, Kills Home Invader

COLLEGE PARK, Ga. -- A group of college students said they are lucky to be alive and they’re thanking the quick-thinking of one of their own. Police said a fellow student shot and killed one of two masked me who burst into an apartment.

Channel 2 Action News reporter Tom Jones met with one of the students to talk about the incident.

“Apparently, his intent was to rape and murder us all,” said student Charles Bailey.

Bailey said he thought it was the end of his life and the lives of the 10 people inside his apartment for a birthday party after two masked men with guns burst in through a patio door.

“They just came in and separated the men from the women and said, ‘Give me your wallets and cell phones,’” said George Williams of the College Park Police Department.

Bailey said the gunmen started counting bullets. “The other guy asked how many (bullets) he had. He said he had enough,” said Bailey.

That’s when one student grabbed a gun out of a backpack and shot at the invader who was watching the men. The gunman ran out of the apartment.

The student then ran to the room where the second gunman, identified by police as 23-year-old Calvin Lavant, was holding the women.

“Apparently the guy was getting ready to rape his girlfriend. So he told the girls to get down and he started shooting. The guy jumped out of the window,” said Bailey.

A neighbor heard the shots and heard someone running nearby.

“And I heard someone say, ‘Someone help me. Call the police. Somebody call the police,’” said a neighbor.

The neighbor said she believes it was Lavant, who was found dead near his apartment, only one building away.

Bailey said he is just thankful one student risked his life to keep others alive.

“I think all of us are really cognizant of the fact that we could have all been killed,” said Bailey.

One female student was shot several times during the crossfire. She is expected to make a full recovery.

Police said they are close to making the arrest of the second suspect.
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ponytotts
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« Reply #96 on: June 09, 2009, 04:59:07 PM »

or maybe the joke thread? improvised weapon thread, perhaps?  huh


http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,627139,00.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #97 on: June 09, 2009, 06:31:17 PM »

The Humor/WTF? thread on the SCE forum would have worked too, but not worth the bother to change it  cheesy

I'm having a hard time picturing how the goose allowed itself to get grabbed , , ,
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #98 on: June 23, 2009, 11:38:44 AM »

Woman puts man in sleeper hold, stops bank heist

Monday, June 22, 2009

(06-22) 20:09 PDT Mission Viejo, Calif. (AP) --
Cyndi Orel worked as a police officer for 25 years and never caught a bank robber. She was apparently saving that hobby for retirement.

The retired Long Beach police officer foiled a bank robbery at a grocery store Saturday when she put a 220-pound bank robber in a chokehold until he passed out. Orel is about 5 feet 7 inches and 128 pounds

"I never caught a bank robber," Orel said Monday at press conference held by the Orange County sheriff's office. "This was pretty exciting just because of the nature. You don't have time to think about it. You just react."

Orel was at the Mission Viejo Albertsons store when a bank employee shouted that a man with a gun was trying to rob the branch. As another shopper scuffled with the robber, Orel put a sleeper hold on him, blocking blood to his brain and making him pass out twice. Later, they discovered the man did not have a gun. (NOTE: certainly the possibility of things turning out differently was quite possible had he been armed).


Orel credited the man who helped subdue the robber, but sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said she was "being modest because if it wasn't for the control hold that she placed on him he would not have been rendered unconscious."

Orel said she learned the move at the police academy 28 years earlier, and only used it a few times during her years on patrol. She retired in 2006 but said she keeps active by running laps and lifting small weights.
Deputies arrested Tony Fennell, 52, of Las Vegas, who they believe committed eight to 10 bank robberies, Amormino said.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2009/06/22/state/n200930D89.DTL
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #99 on: August 30, 2009, 08:11:39 PM »

http://www.newsday.com/man-killed-du...sion-1.1387525


Quote:
Man killed during Jonesboro home invasion
August 22, 2009 By The Associated Press

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — Jonesboro police say a man was killed after being beaten by a homeowner during an apparent home invasion.

Police say a man armed with a shotgun broke into the home about 11 p.m. Friday.

Witnesses told police the homeowner scuffled with the intruder before striking him in the head with a tire iron. The suspected intruder was taken to a local hospital, where he died.

No names were released, and a police supervisor did not immediately return a telephone message left Saturday by The Associated Press.

___

Information from: KAIT-TV, http://www.kait8.com/

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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