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DougMacG
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« Reply #500 on: January 28, 2014, 11:43:41 AM »

A good, well-written, and well-reasoned piece, but as best as I can tell it avoids dealing with the obvious rejoinder.  Apparently the man IS guilty of breaking the campaign finance laws in a stupid and obvious way.  The failure to address this point leaves me hesitant to spread this otherwise good piece forward.

None of us have any way of knowing if he is innocent or guilty.  After years of him fighting back, maybe we will discover he is innocent (and that the bundling Ambassador of Norway is guilty of that same charge).  The accusation (by Spencer) is enforcement targeting based on D’Souza's exercise of free speech.  If true, that offense is far worse, treason IMO, and not directly related to the merits of the D’Souza case.

Targeting of tea party organizations was worse because citizens were prevented from participating in the political process without being accused of doing anything wrong.

At some point, smoking guns will emerge on such widespread targeting abuse, along with the non-enforcement of everything on the other side.  The only person breaking this law happen to produce an anti-Obama documentary?

(Unfortunately, the unconstitutionality of the law being enforced on D'Souza is irrelevant.)

Meanwhile, illegal immigration is against federal law.  The sale and use of marijuana in Colo and Wash state is a violation of federal law.  Black Panther voter intimidation is a violation of federal law.  Fast and furious gun running was a violation of federal law.  IRS targeting is a violation of federal law.  Where is the enforcement? DOMA, as written, was a federal law?  The meaning of "the law of the land" depends on your political and/or governmental connection with those in power.

When do the indicted-innocent get back their good name?  Ask Tom DeLay.
Resigned 2006: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/03/AR2006040301787.html
(The money laundering indictment of course was a key part of Republicans losing control of congress.)
Convicted 2010: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/11/24/tom-delay-guilty-money-laundering_n_788325.html
Overturned: 2011
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/09/19/224070833/tom-delays-conviction-overturned-on-appeal
Tom DeLay's Conviction Overturned On Appeal
The state's Third District Court of Appeals concluded: "the evidence presented does not support a conclusion that DeLay committed the crimes that were charged".
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 12:27:09 PM by DougMacG » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #501 on: January 28, 2014, 12:34:02 PM »

I get all that.  My point though is that the article needed to address the point and its failure to do so, diminishes its persuasive power and leaves readers susceptible to feeling that it attempted to dupe them when they read about the basis for the charge.
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ccp
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« Reply #502 on: February 02, 2014, 11:18:22 AM »

From a poster on a yahoo board.  Has anyone here read rules for radicals?  Is this actually what is in it?

Saul David Alinsky (January 30, 1909 – June 12, 1972) was an American community organizer and writer. He is generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing. He is often noted for his book Rules for Radicals.
 There are 8 levels of control that must be obtained before you are able to create a social state.
 The first is the most important.
 1) Healthcare – Control healthcare and you control the people
 2) Poverty – Increase the Poverty
 level as high as possible, poor people are easier to control and will not fight
 back if you are providing everything for them to live.
 3) Debt – Increase the debt to an
 unsustainable level. That way you are able to increase taxes, and this will
 produce more poverty.
 4) Gun Control – Remove the ability
 to defend themselves from the Government. That way you are able to create a
 police state.
 5) Welfare – Take control of every
 aspect of their lives (Food, Housing, and
 Income)
 6) Education – Take control of what
 people read and listen to – take control of what children learn in
 school.
 7) Religion – Remove the belief in
 the God from the Government and
 schools
 Cool Class Warfare – Divide the people
 into the wealthy and the poor. This will cause more discontent and it will be
 easier to take (Tax) the wealthy with the support of the
 poor.
 Does any of this sound familiar???
« Last Edit: February 02, 2014, 11:28:47 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
objectivist1
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« Reply #503 on: February 06, 2014, 10:37:49 AM »

Yes, I have read the book, and no - that post is a cobbled-together list of socialist/Marxist principles.

Alinsky dedicated "Rules for Radicals" to Satan - seriously.  Take a look at the book for yourself - it's not a difficult or a long read.

Also - for an excellent analysis of just how Barack Obama is following Alinsky's blueprint to the letter - see this pamphlet written by David Horowitz:

www.amazon.com/Barack-Obamas-Rules-Revolution-Alinsky-ebook/dp/B009KSFK8U/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1391704347&sr=8-3&keywords=obama%27s+rules

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"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.
ccp
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« Reply #504 on: February 06, 2014, 11:28:32 AM »

Thank you for the reply.

I haven't seen David Horowitz around much the last few years.  He used to write columns and appear on cable broadcasts.

Have you seen him?

Should I read both?  I hesitate to spend a dime for some scumbag's book - Alinsky.
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objectivist1
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« Reply #505 on: February 06, 2014, 12:23:26 PM »

Horowitz is still very active.  He continues to write extensively.  Go to www.frontpagemag.com to see what his organization puts out - including much which is authored by him.

With regard to Alinsky - it would benefit you to know exactly what he teaches in his book - but Horowitz's pamphlet provides a good summary and applies it to specific Obama policies.  Hillary Clinton also did her master's thesis on Alinsky.

Like "Mein Kampf" - it behooves you to know what the person behind the movement believed.  "Rules for Radicals" should be available very cheaply - it's a very short book.
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"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #506 on: February 14, 2014, 03:15:00 PM »

http://www.glennbeck.com/2014/02/14/awful-lib-reporter-goes-after-6th-grade-honor-roll-student/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #507 on: February 21, 2014, 08:18:15 PM »

The Goldberg File
By Jonah Goldberg
February 21, 2014

Fascism, Again

Timothy Snyder has written the best piece I've seen on what's going on in Kiev. It's worth reading just as a primer. But it's also interesting in other ways. I had not read a lot about the "Eurasian Union," a proposed counterweight to the European Union, in much the same way the Legion of Doom is a counterweight to the Justice League. Putin and a band of avowed "National Bolshevik" intellectuals are in effect trying to put the band back together. Snyder writers:

The Eurasian Union is the enemy of the European Union, not just in strategy but in ideology. The European Union is based on a historical lesson: that the wars of the twentieth century were based on false and dangerous ideas, National Socialism and Stalinism, which must be rejected and indeed overcome in a system guaranteeing free markets, free movement of people, and the welfare state. Eurasianism, by contrast, is presented by its advocates as the opposite of liberal democracy.

The Eurasian ideology draws an entirely different lesson from the twentieth century. Founded around 2001 by the Russian political scientist Aleksandr Dugin, it proposes the realization of National Bolshevism. Rather than rejecting totalitarian ideologies, Eurasianism calls upon politicians of the twenty-first century to draw what is useful from both fascism and Stalinism. Dugin's major work, The Foundations of Geopolitics, published in 1997, follows closely the ideas of Carl Schmitt, the leading Nazi political theorist. Eurasianism is not only the ideological source of the Eurasian Union, it is also the creed of a number of people in the Putin administration, and the moving force of a rather active far-right Russian youth movement. For years Dugin has openly supported the division and colonization of Ukraine.

The point man for Eurasian and Ukrainian policy in the Kremlin is Sergei Glazyev, an economist who like Dugin tends to combine radical nationalism with nostalgia for Bolshevism. He was a member of the Communist Party and a Communist deputy in the Russian parliament before cofounding a far-right party called Rodina, or Motherland. In 2005 some of its deputies signed a petition to the Russian prosecutor general asking that all Jewish organizations be banned from Russia.

Some of this was news to me. I was familiar with the National Bolshevism of the early Nazi years. Thinkers like the Ukrainian Bolshevik Karl Radek and the Nazi Otto Strasser dabbled with the idea of merging Bolshevik and Nazi ideology. After all, if you're already a National Socialist it's not that long a trip to being a National Bolshevik, now is it? Some left-wing members of the Nazi military described themselves as National Bolsheviks as well. But ultimately, National Bolshevism as an intellectual movement died in the crib. Or so I thought.

What I did not know is that National Bolshevism is making such a comeback. And while, it's evil and a national-security threat and all that, I can't help but smile.

The Opposite of Opposites

National Bolshevism must strike some on the left as quite perplexing. After all, Bolshevism and Nazism — like fascism and socialism — are opposites, right?

If you read my book, you'd know I consider this the greatest myth and/or lie of the 20th century (coming in a distant second: the idea that there is a difference between good flan and bad flan).

Funny enough, the Eurasianists are counting on this myth for their propaganda campaign. They insist that the protesters in Kiev are trying to stage a "brown revolution" or fascist coup. In other words the de facto fascists are calling the anti-fascists "fascists." And apparently lots of folks are falling for it. Snyder again:

Why exactly do people with such views think they can call other people fascists? And why does anyone on the Western left take them seriously? One line of reasoning seems to run like this: the Russians won World War II, and therefore can be trusted to spot Nazis. Much is wrong with this. . . .
The other source of purported Eurasian moral legitimacy seems to be this: since the representatives of the Putin regime only very selectively distanced themselves from Stalinism, they are therefore reliable inheritors of Soviet history, and should be seen as the automatic opposite of Nazis, and therefore to be trusted to oppose the far right.

Again, much is wrong about this. . . .

Snyder's rebuttals are good (I've trimmed them mostly for space). But they don't cut to the heart of it.

First, let's clear some underbrush. The idea that Communism and Nazism are opposites is more of a utilitarian idea than a core conviction for the Left. It is a rationalization that allows the Left to cut around the historical tumor of Nazism and fascism and say, That has nothing to do with us.
But the simple fact is that the hard Left has always endorsed or at least sympathized with national-socialist countries. What do you think Cuba is? It's nationalistic and it's socialistic. Venezuela under Chávez and now Maduro is nationalist and socialist. Nicaragua in the 1980s, etc., etc. Read a speech by any socialist dictator and swap out the word "socialize" for "nationalize": The meaning of the sentences doesn't change one iota. Nationalized health care is socialized medicine. Even Obama's weak-tea socialistic rhetoric is usually dolled up in the rhetoric of nationalism, even militaristic nationalism. Let's all be like SEAL Team Six! Let's make this a " Sputnik Moment."

Most of the Left in the U.S. didn't really hate the German national-socialists until Stalin told them to. That the useful idiots thought Stalin's command to turn on his one-time Nazi ally was rooted in deep ideological conviction just proves the depths of their idiocy.

After all, it's not like the Left suddenly turned on Stalin when he embraced nationalism wholeheartedly and talked of fighting the Nazis as part of the "Great Patriotic War for Mother Russia." But, hey, maybe I'm missing the deep Marxist themes in the phrase "Great Patriotic War for Mother Russia."

North Korea by Another Name

If you think this is all semantic faculty-lounge argy-bargy, consider the fact that North Korea is in many ways as "Nazi" as the Nazis were. It's a nationalist country that subscribes to eugenic theories that it uses to justify the industrial torture and slaughter of its own citizens. In fact, North Korea's eugenics is crazier than Nazi Germany's was. I'm not trying to minimize the evil of the Holocaust, but "Jew" is a real category of human being and eugenics generally weren't discredited in the 1930s. Eighty years later, North Korea believes that the political views of people are genetically heritable for generations. So you can get sent to a death camp if your great uncle said something nice about America or if your second cousin lives in South Korea.

But because of the emotional and political investment in the idea that Nazism has nothing to do with Communism, North Korea is put in a category of lesser evil. If the Kims just described themselves as Nazis — but kept all of the same policies — it would be vastly easier to rally public opinion against their decades of murder. But when you talk about the evil of Communist regimes, a lot of people idiotically roll their eyes. Everyone is a brave anti-Nazi now that they're all gone, but many are afraid to devote a fraction of that passion when it comes to the heirs, imitators, and competitors of Nazism.

Heresies of Heresies

Richard Pipes had the best pithy summation of the difference between Nazism and Bolshevism. They aren't opposites, he argued, they're both "heresies of socialism."

I agree with this entirely, but step back from that a bit. Socialism itself is a heresy — a heresy of tribalism. Socialism is simply an attempt to gussy up ancient tribal tendencies in modern garb. Nazism was tribalism of one race. Communism is tribalism of one class. Italian fascism was tribalism of one nation.

There are of course, better and worse forms of tribalism. And, I would argue that a little tribalism, like a little nationalism, is a healthy thing, insofar as communities aren't held together by reason alone. They're held together by a complex set of sentiments, and a politics that doesn't take account of that will necessarily fail. As Edmund Burke writes, "politics ought to be adjusted not to human reasonings but to human nature, of which the reason is but a part, and by no means the greatest part."
But here is the important point. Looking back on the long history of humanity, tribalism — simple or complex — was the norm for 99 percent of our time on Earth. It wasn't until 200-300 years ago that a different path emerged. (Yes, Christianity was a big leap forward in advancing a universal conception of humanity, in principle. But in practice it was often coopted by tribalism in one form or another. We can talk about that more another time.) The different path emerged largely in England and spread from there. This different path recognized the sovereignty of the individual, the necessity of the rule of law, democratic legitimacy, and private property, and the inherent dignity of bourgeois labor.

As I've written before, what makes America special is that we took England's culture of liberty and broadened it out into a virtual tribe of liberty. I say virtual because we took the ethnic and racial components out of it (and, no, we didn't do it overnight). You can be a progressive or a liberal or a social democrat and still believe in all of the things that define the tribe of liberty. You can also be a nationalist, a patriot, or a traditionalist and believe in all of these things. But go too far in either direction and you can fall off the path. Perhaps path is the wrong word. Bridge might make more sense. After all there's a left side and a right side of the road. But if you fall off a bridge, all you do is fall down.

Seen from this perspective the differences between Bolshevism, Nazism, Maoism, Italian Fascism, North Korean Juche, et al may be interesting or meaningful (the differences between football and rugby are interesting and meaningful, but at the end of the day they're both just games). But seen from the broadest perspective, they're simply different ways to fall off the bridge and back into the wilderness below.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #508 on: February 22, 2014, 05:44:09 PM »

http://www.theblaze.com/blog/2014/02/20/10-quotes-that-shred-progressivism-from-a-best-selling-british-author-who-left-the-left/
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ccp
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« Reply #509 on: February 22, 2014, 08:23:09 PM »

Fox should hire her as a counterpoint to Piers Morgan.

She would trounce him.  Though that is not saying much from what I read about his ratings recently.

Maybe he will be cancelled. 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #510 on: February 26, 2014, 06:14:29 PM »

http://www.glennbeck.com/2014/02/26/its-true-government-agents-are-infiltrating-online-communities/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #511 on: March 18, 2014, 11:44:28 AM »

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Journalism/2014/03/17/The-Economist-Calls-Out-Crony-Capitalism-But-Misses-the-Point
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ccp
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« Reply #512 on: March 19, 2014, 07:32:04 AM »

"The Economist’s crony-capitalism index also isolates business sectors like casinos, oil and gas, and real estate as crony sectors while ignoring things like high-tech, healthcare, and entertainment."

Wow.  What a huge and preposterous "oversight".   High tech, and entertainment are the biggest backers of the liberals.  Health care seems to be a monster unto itself.

Overall the Economist is to some degree calling out the Bamster some, and recently have started to actually say something good about the right, but overall they are still progressives at heart.   I would still label them maybe just a tad to the right of MSM - but only a tad.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #513 on: March 19, 2014, 09:09:04 AM »

I was first exposed to The Economist when I went back to college, to U. of PA, in 1975.  At the time I was quite impressed with it.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #514 on: March 19, 2014, 08:03:57 PM »



A Lesson in Irony.

The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing this year the greatest amount of free Meals and Food Stamps ever, to 47 million people.

Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us "Please Do Not Feed the Animals." Their stated reason for the policy is because "The animals will grow dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."

Thus ends today's lesson in irony.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #515 on: March 28, 2014, 10:22:13 AM »



http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303325204579463581942405804?mg=reno64-wsj


WONDER LAND
Why Can't the Left Govern?
The Left can win elections. Why can't it run a government?
 
By
DANIEL HENNINGER

March 26, 2014 7:12 p.m. ET
Surveying the fall in support for the governments of Barack Obama, New York City's progressive Mayor Bill de Blasio and France's Socialist President François Hollande, a diagnosis of the current crisis begins to emerge: The political left can win elections but it's unable to govern.
Once in office, the left stumbles from fiasco to fiasco. ObamaCare, enacted without a single vote from the opposition party, is an impossible labyrinth of endless complexity. Bill de Blasio's war on charter schools degenerated into an unseemly attack on poor New York minority children. François Hollande's first act in 2012, like a character in a medieval fable, was to order that more tax revenue be squeezed from the French turnips.
 
Mr. Obama's approval rating is about 43%, Mr. de Blasio's has sunk to 45% after just two months in office, and Mr. Hollande hit the lowest approvals ever recorded in the modern French presidency. The left inevitably says their leaders failed them. The failure looks self-inflicted.

Three European academics asked themselves recently how 19 United Nations summit meetings have been unable to produce a treaty on global warming. Why the cause of climate change has fallen apart is described in "Melting Summits," a paper and cautionary tale just published in the Academy of Management Journal by Elke Schüssler of Germany, Charles Clemens Rüling of France and Bettina Wittneben of the U.K.

No idea in our time has had deeper political support. Al Gore and John Kerry have described disbelievers in global warming as basically idiots—"shoddy scientists" in Mr. Kerry's words. But somehow, an idea with which "no serious scientist disagrees" has gone nowhere as policy. The collapse of the U.N.'s 2009 Copenhagen climate summit was a meltdown for the ages.

In an interview with the Academy of Management about her paper, Bettina Wittneben of Oxford University, who supports a climate-change treaty and has attended 13 climate meetings, summarized the wheel-spinning: "Sometimes I just find myself shaking my head after talking to participants in recent COPs [the U.N.'s climate meetings]. They'll come back from the meetings simply brimming with enthusiasm about the networking they've done, the contacts they've made, the new ideas about their research they had or the new angles to lobbying they thought of. But ask what progress was made in terms of global policy initiatives, and all you get is a shrug."
Put differently, it's not about doing something serious about global warming. It's really all about them (a virus threatening American conservatism as well). The "them" at the U.N. summits included not just the participating nations but a galaxy of well-financed nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs.

They travel under their own acronyms. The environmentalists are ENGOs, the trade unions are TUNGOS, indigenous peoples are IPOs, business and industry are BINGOs and women, gender and youth groups are YOUNGOs.

These are the left's famous change agents. The authors dryly describe what they actually do as "field maintenance." Instead of being "catalysts for change," they write that "more and more actors find COP participation useful for their purposes, but their activity is increasingly disconnected from the issue of mitigating climate change."
And little wonder. The failed efforts to get the global-warming treaty done reflect the issue's departure from anything practical. It's impossible to read this history of global warming's demise without hearing resonances of ObamaCare's problems.

The text of the climate-change treaty at Copenhagen in 2009 included "thousands of 'brackets,' or alternative wordings." A participant described the puzzle palace: "There are more and more parallel processes, and everything must be negotiated at the same time. The number of . . . negotiation issues has increased and many of these issues . . . are discussed in different places at the same time. . . . Very few people understand the whole thing." Maybe they could just pass it to find out what's in it.

One organization specialist calls this phenomenon "social deadlock." ObamaCare is social deadlock. But the American left keeps doing it. This isn't the 1930s, and smart people on the left might come to grips with the fact that the one-grand-scheme-fits-all compulsion is out of sync with the individualization that technology lets people design into their lives today.

Rather than resolve the complexities of public policy in the world we inhabit, the left's default is to simply acquire power, then cram down what they want to do with one-party votes or by fiat, figuring they can muddle through the wreckage later. Thus the ObamaCare mandates. Thus candidate de Blasio's determination, cheered on by the city's left-wing establishment, to jam all its kids through an antique public-school system. The ObamaCare mandates are a mess, and the war on charter schools is an embarrassment.

Making the unworkable work by executive decree or court-ordered obedience is one way to rule, and maybe they like it that way. But it isn't governing.
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G M
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« Reply #516 on: March 28, 2014, 10:29:13 AM »

Socialism is the system of the future. It's never worked in the past, it doesn't work now but they are so sure it'll work the next time.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #517 on: April 09, 2014, 10:00:19 AM »

http://townhall.com/columnists/benshapiro/2014/04/09/the-rise-of-american-totalitarianism-n1820552/page/full
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ccp
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« Reply #518 on: April 19, 2014, 05:08:32 AM »

Thomas Piketty:   A new favorite of Obama and his economic council, Jack Lew Treasury Secretary and the rest of the globalist progressive crowd. 

*********Economist Receives Rock Star Treatment

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLERAPRIL 18, 2014

French economists who boldly question the dominance of capital over labor — and call for a progressive global tax on wealth — visit the American halls of power about as often as French rock stars headline Madison Square Garden.

But those halls of power are where Thomas Piketty, a 42-year-old professor at the Paris School of Economics, has been singing his song of late.

Since touching down in Washington this week to promote his new book, “Capital in the 21st Century,” Mr. Piketty has met with Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, given a talk to President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers and lectured at the International Monetary Fund, before flying to New York for an appearance at the United Nations, a sold-out public discussion with the Nobel laureates Joseph Stiglitz and Paul Krugman, and meetings with media outlets ranging from The Harvard Business Review to New York Magazine to The Nation.

The response from  fellow economists, so far mainly from the liberal side of the spectrum, has verged on the rapturous. Mr. Krugman,  a columnist for The New York Times,  predicted  in The New York Review of Books that Mr. Piketty’s book would “change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics.”

   Thomas Piketty at one of his New York talks this week. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times 
But through all the accolades, Mr. Piketty seems to be maintaining a most un-rock-star-like modesty, brushing away comparisons to Tocqueville and Marx with an embarrassed grimace and a Gallic puff of the lips.

“It makes very little sense: How can you compare?” he said on Thursday between gulps of yogurt during a break in his packed schedule — before going on to list the 19th-century data sets that Marx neglected to draw on in “Das Kapital,” his 1867 magnum opus.

“If Marx had looked at them, it would have made him think a bit more,” he said. “When I started collecting data, I had no idea where it would go.”

Mr. Piketty’s dedication to data has long made him a star among economists, who credit his work on income inequality (with Emmanuel Saez and others) for diving deep into seemingly dull tax archives to bring an unprecedented historical perspective to the subject.

But “Capital in the 21st Century,” which analyzes more than two centuries of data on the even murkier topic of accumulated wealth, has elicited a response of an entirely different order. Months before its originally scheduled April publication, it was generating intense discussion on blogs, prompting Harvard University Press to push the release forward to mid-February.

Since then, it has hit the New York Times best-seller list, and sold some 46,000 copies (hardback and e-book) — a stratospheric number for a nearly 700-page scholarly tome dotted with charts and graphs (as well as references to Balzac, Jane Austen and “Titanic”).

And not all those readers are economists. Six years after the financial crisis, “people are looking for a bible of sorts,” said Julia Ott, an assistant professor of the history of capitalism at the New School, who appeared on a panel with Mr. Piketty at New York University on Thursday. “He’s speaking to a real feeling out there that things haven’t been fixed, that we need to take stock, that we need big ideas, big proposals, big global solutions.”
Photo

Mr. Piketty's book on sale after he spoke Wednesday at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times 
Those big ideas, and the hunger for them, were on ample display at N.Y.U., where the standing-room crowd was treated to Mr. Piketty’s apology for having written such a long book, followed by a breakneck PowerPoint presentation of its main arguments, illustrated with striking charts.

At the book’s center is Mr. Piketty’s contention — contrary to the influential theory developed by Simon Kuznets in the 1950s and ’60s — that mature capitalist economies do not inevitably evolve toward greater economic equality. Instead, Mr. Piketty contends, the data reveals a deeper historical tendency for the rate of return on capital to outstrip the overall rate of economic growth, leading to greater and greater concentrations of wealth at the very top.

Despite this inevitable-seeming drift toward “patrimonial capitalism” that his charts seemed to show, Mr. Piketty rejected any economic determinism. “It all depends on what the political system decides,” he said.

Such statements, along with Mr. Piketty’s proposal for a progressive wealth tax and income tax rates up to 80 percent, have aroused strong interest among those eager to recapture the momentum of the Occupy movement. The Nation ran a nearly 10,000-word cover article  placing his book within a rising tide of neo-Marxist thought, while National Review Online dismissed it as confirmation of the left’s “dearest ‘Das Kapital’ fantasies.”

But Mr. Piketty, who writes in the book that the collapse of Communism in 1989 left him “vaccinated for life” against the “lazy rhetoric of anticapitalism,” is no Marxian revolutionary. “I believe in private property,” he said in the interview. “But capitalism and markets should be the slave of democracy and not the opposite.”

Even if he doesn’t expect his policy proposals to find favor in Washington anytime soon, Mr. Piketty called his meetings there gratifying. Mr. Lew, he said, seemed to have read parts of the book carefully. A member of the Council on Economic Advisers corrected a small error concerning Balzac’s novel “Le Père Goriot,” which includes a discussion of getting ahead through advantageous marriage rather than hard work. “I was impressed,” Mr. Piketty said.

His book, however, ends not with an appeal to policy makers, but with a call for all citizens to “take a serious interest in money, its measurement, the facts surrounding it and its history.”

“It’s too easy for ordinary people to just say, ‘I don’t know anything about economics,’ ” he said, before rushing to his next appearance. “But economics is not just for economists.”
 

A version of this article appears in print on April 19, 2014, on page C1 of the New York edition with the headline: Economist Receives Rock Star Treatment.********
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #519 on: April 19, 2014, 01:53:38 PM »

Please post on the Economics thread on SCH as well.  Thank you.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #520 on: April 21, 2014, 10:19:59 AM »

http://dailycaller.com/2014/04/21/obama-admin-wants-to-require-companies-to-give-workers-numbers-addresses-to-unions-before-labor-elections/
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