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Author Topic: Energy Politics & Science  (Read 109524 times)
DougMacG
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« Reply #550 on: October 27, 2014, 11:02:53 AM »

With the abundance now available, why are we NOT making it available for cars, trucks and jets more quickly?  Why are voters letting Democrats get away with blocking pipelines for safest transport of our cleanest fuels.  Forget "energy independence".  We should be producing, transporting, exporting and importing.  Government has a role in keeping it clean and keeping it safe.  After that, let the market sort it out.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8224295.stm

"Natural gas is our cleanest fossil fuel. It can be used in cars, to generate electricity. It can be liquefied and used as jet aviation fuel," he says.  "The natural gas that's being used in this country at this time can really get us to energy independence."
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DougMacG
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« Reply #551 on: October 27, 2014, 11:07:03 AM »

Taking the Carbon Out of Coal
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/10/27/taking_the_carbon_out_of_coal_124374.html

When coal burns, it emits a "flue gas" teeming with hard-to-separate pollutants -- but it doesn't have to. Instead, it can create a simple flow of carbon dioxide that's easy to capture.

That's the bold idea behind coal-direct chemical looping, or CDCL. The technology has been proven only in the lab, and it has many hurdles to clear before it can be used to generate electricity and capture carbon on a commercial scale. But it holds the promise of electricity from coal with very little pollution, in a nation where coal provides 18 percent of all energy and 24 percent of all carbon emissions.

According to an economic analysis Ohio State helped to conduct, if brought to a commercial scale, CDCL could capture 96.5 percent of the carbon released during the process while increasing the cost of electricity by 28.8 percent.

In a best-case scenario, the demonstration could be built later this decade, followed by a commercial plant in the 2020s.
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ccp
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« Reply #552 on: October 29, 2014, 07:03:53 AM »

Thanks Doug.  Interesting promise of technology.  I don't know if many coal companies can survive two more years of Duh Bamster and if the Hill/Bill team gets in it might be curtains for them.
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DougMacG
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« Reply #553 on: October 29, 2014, 09:55:01 AM »

It's frustrating that this technology is commercially a decade out, but it is also disingenuous to hype climate predictions for a century as if technology advancement is over.  All that is needed to solve our energy and environmental challenges is the will to do it and prosperity - the means to do it. 

The centrally planned governments always had the worst environmental records, and still do.
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ccp
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« Reply #554 on: November 02, 2014, 10:00:53 AM »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2014/11/02/opec-oil-stocks-energy-gas-middle-east/18247191/
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #555 on: December 11, 2014, 07:05:37 PM »

This struck me as well-balanced and fair.


http://www.vox.com/2014/11/14/7216751/keystone-pipeline-facts-controversy
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ccp
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« Reply #556 on: December 19, 2014, 08:48:42 AM »

And surely Obama wants much lower energy prices (sarcasm emphasized).  How is this for liberal spin and twisting logic on its head?:

How Obama (and Bush) helped drive down oil prices
Yahoo Finance By Rick Newman
21 hours ago

 In this Friday, Dec. 12, 2014 photo, Quick Trip clerk Roxana Valverde adjusts the gas price sign numbers at a Tolleson, Ariz. QT convenience store as gas prices continue to tumble nationwide. The price of oil has fallen by nearly half in just six months, a surprising and steep plunge that has consumers cheering, producers howling and economists wringing their hands over whether this is a good or bad thing. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
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View photo
In this Friday, Dec. 12, 2014 photo, Quick Trip clerk Roxana Valverde adjusts the gas price sign numbers at a Tolleson, Ariz. QT convenience store as gas prices continue to tumble nationwide. The price of oil has fallen by nearly half in just six months, a surprising and steep plunge that has consumers cheering, producers howling and economists wringing their hands over whether this is a good or bad thing. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Few people foresaw the nearly 50% plunge in oil prices this year. But the forces reshaping the oil market have been aligning for nearly a decade, with part of the impetus coming from Washington.

In 2007, Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act, which President George W. Bush promptly signed. The EISA raised federal mileage requirements for passenger cars for the first time since 1990, in an effort to reduce U.S. gas consumption and make America less dependent on foreign oil.

The new rules required automakers to achieve average fuel economy of 35 miles per gallon among all the new vehicles in their fleet by model year 2020 -- up sharply from a requirement of 27.5 MPG for cars and 22.2 MPG for light trucks (pickups and SUVs) at the time.

President Obama raised the MPG goal further in 2012, requiring average fuel economy of 54.5 MPG for all new vehicles sold by model year 2025. Automakers argued that the technology developments necessary to reach those levels would add thousands of dollars to the cost of a car, but so far they've been making progress without causing sticker shock for car buyers. A combination of electric vehicles, hybrids, diesels and far more efficient gas engines has helped improve overall average fuel economy by 5.3 MPG during the last seven years, according to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. That's a big improvement that would cut the typical driver's gas consumption by about 70 gallons a year.

Overall, the MPG improvements have been working, with lower U.S. oil and gas consumption achieved, as this chart shows:

View photo
.Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
The consumption decline that began in 2007 is partly due to people driving less during the recession of 2008 and 2009. However, gas consumption continued to fall until 2012, before ticking up in 2013. Even with that slight increase, gas consumption last year was at 2002 levels. When adjusted for population growth, consumption has fallen to levels of the late 1960s, when there were far fewer cars per household.

Reduced gas consumption in the United States is hardly the only factor affecting the price of oil, which trades globally and is determined by many variables. A surge in U.S. crude production has added to global supplies and aided in pushing down prices. Saudi Arabia has kept its own production levels steady rather than decreasing output -- as it has done during past gluts -- to prop up prices. Meanwhile, a sluggish global economy has kept demand for oil lower than many producers expected.

Still, weaker demand for gasoline in the world's largest economy accounts for some of the slack demand for oil. With the government's performance generally poor during the last decade of partisan fighting, the hike in MPG standards is a rare example of a policy with bipartisan support accomplishing what it was supposed to.

That's helping now in political confrontations with long-time foes such as Russia and Iran. Bush and Obama couldn't have foreseen the way cheap oil is inadvertently helping the West turn up the pressure on Russia in response to its role in Ukraine's civil war. But Iran and other oil producers, such as Venezuela, are U.S. antagonists that policymakers have long sought leverage over. Score one for Washington.

Fuel-economy improvements should continue and even accelerate, since the biggest gains are slated for the years approaching 2025. From 2020 through 2025, for instance, the MPG goal will rise from 41.7 MPG to 54.5, a 31% increase. From 2009 through 2014, it rose from 27.5 to 34.1, a 24% improvement. (MPG figures are slightly different from the Michigan numbers, which measure actual fuel economy of vehicles on the road.) That will continue dampening U.S. oil and gas consumption for the foreseeable future.

Demand for oil and gasoline will rise elsewhere, as more people drive in emerging economies such as China, India and Brazil. But those nations also will benefit as technology developed to reduce gas consumption in America proliferates and becomes cheaper. And that's an American export they won't even have to pay for.

Rick Newmanís latest book is Rebounders: How Winners Pivot From Setback To Success. Follow him on Twitter: @rickjnewman.
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