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Author Topic: Rest in Peace RIP R.I.P.  (Read 28168 times)
Crafty_Dog
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« on: January 29, 2009, 11:12:16 AM »

Helio Gracie is Dead:

 Helio Gracie : Dead at 95 years
"The day on January 29 morning more sad for lovers of art soft. Creator of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu along with his brother Carlos, Master Hélio Gracie, who had completed 95 years in 2008, died in Rio de Janeiro. The tatami not have details about the death of the Master, but the death is confirmed."

RIP Helio

 http://jbonline.terra.com.br/nextra/...e290126426.asp

in english vis a vis google translator: http://translate.google.com/translat...istory_state0=
« Last Edit: February 08, 2012, 11:20:58 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Ronin
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2009, 01:05:41 PM »

Helio will go down as one of the greats in  MA of the 20th century, easily.
GJJ/BJJ revolutionized the MA world and he was, arguably, the single greatest factor in that.
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Point Dog
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2009, 04:17:46 PM »

We have lost a pioneer of NHB fighting, RIP Master Helio.

An english article at Sherdog: http://www.sherdog.com/news/news/helio-gracie-dead-15977
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Guide Dog
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« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2009, 01:08:15 AM »

RIP

No doubt MANY will be heartbroken to lose a man whose life's work influenced whole generations of martial artists.
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Dr. Bryan Stoops, Ed.D.
Semi-Private/Private Instruction
Offered in Chino Hills, California
JKD/FMA/Silat/muay Thai/DBMA,
Savate/Wing Chun/grappling
http://stoops-martial-arts-academy.com/
bryan@stoopsma.com
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2009, 12:06:34 PM »

Two days before Royce was to fight Matt Hughes, I went to pick up someone who was a BB under Royce for a private.  He was from out of town and asked me to pick him up at Hennesey's in Redondo Beach.  It turns out he was having lunch with Royce and Helio Gracie.

I was flattered that Royce remembered me from our previous meeting (an introduction by Rigan Machado) and told him that he would establish guard on MH, and when MH went to hit him he would get past his elbow, slither to his back and choke him out.  He and Helio both laughed and Royce said to me "From your lips to God's ears!" 

I liked very much the enthusiasm for Life I sensed in Helio in that moment.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2009, 06:11:33 PM »

On Tuesday morning Grand Master Helio Gracie was tanning at his ranch
in Brazil, and on Thursday morning at 9:15 he passed on due to natural
causes. His legacy will survive forever in all members of the Gracie
Family, jiu-jitsu practitioners around the world, and all those who
have benefited from the revolution he began.

In his final years, the creator of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu often spoke of his
satisfaction with his life's work. He openly stated that he had
accomplished everything he had set out to do, displaying his
preparedness for the transition into the afterlife.

The Grand Master believed that such a transition should be seen as a
positive step in one's spiritual evolution. In a recent interview he
declared: "I've already told my sons that when I die I want there to
be a party. No drinking, no debauchery."

To honor his request and his legacy, the Gracie Academy will host a
celebratory gathering/slideshow presentation on Saturday, February 7,
2009. In anticipation of a large turnout of friends and family, we
intend to have three showings starting at 4:00pm, 5:00pm and 6:00pm.
If you can't make it to the party, but would like to express how the
Grand Master has affected your life, please send your story to
heliogracie@gracieacademy.com so we can post it on the Gracie Academy
website.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2009, 07:26:55 AM »

Surf Dog tells me he was swarmed by a large group.

==========================================

ESCONDIDO ---- A 17-year-old died Sunday after being stabbed during a fight at a house party on Felicita Road, officials said.

Julian Austin Rodriguez of San Jacinto was pronounced dead at the scene, the medical examiner's office said.

Escondido police Lt. Bob Benton said police were called to break up the fight in the 2000 block of Felicita shortly before midnight.

Officers found Rodriguez on the ground near the party, suffering from a stab wound, Benton said.

Police and paramedics were unable to save the boy's life, he said.

On Sunday afternoon, police were still interviewing people who were at the party, Benton said.

They did not yet have an estimate of the number of witnesses to the stabbing because they believe many people fled when police arrived, he said.

Benton said it remained unclear what started the fight. No information was available about possible suspects.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Police Department at (760) 839-4722, or call the department's anonymous Tip Line at (760) 743-TIPS (8477).
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Sebresos
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2009, 07:57:39 PM »

Rest in peace man!


http://sherdog.com/news/news/tapout-owner-dead-in-car-crash-16532
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Chad
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2009, 10:21:49 PM »


More news http://www.tmz.com/2009/03/11/tapout-owner-dies-in-horrific-ferrari-crash/

The crew just wont be the same....
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Glewis007
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« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2009, 09:57:42 AM »

Was standing five feet from the guy at the Arnold expo here in Ohio this past weekend.
Truly a man that made the American dream happen.
At the expo the crowd was going nuts, when they showed up. What a damn shame sad
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2009, 01:12:58 PM »

GM Roland Dantes passed away this weekend.  I met him at a BBQ years ago.
He was handing out food and making sure everyone had enough to eat when it should have been the other way around.

Aloha GM Dantes, till we meet again.

Robert
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2009, 12:47:43 PM »

Hoping GM Dantes and GM Presas are together doing Tapi-Tapi in heaven.

My sincerest condolences to GM Dantes' family, friends, and students.
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
Tom Stillman
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« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2009, 01:31:20 PM »

"Hoping GM Dantes and GM Presas are together doing Tapi-Tapi in heaven"

That made me think back when I trained with GM Presas back in 96, just a couple of months prior to my first DB gathering.
 Such a kind and carring man he was. GM Dantes is in good company if your hopes are true!
 
My condolences to the Dantes family.   Dog Tom
« Last Edit: March 18, 2009, 01:34:33 PM by Tom Stillman » Logged

Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
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« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2009, 07:55:17 PM »

Saw this post earlier by Pat O'Malley on Martial Arts Planet:

   
Quote
It is with my heart and sould that I unfortunetly have to inform you that that on April 1, 2009 at 10:59am Cebu time, Mrs Vicenta Ong Canete died. Mrs Canete is the loving wife of GM Dionisio Canete.

    Our thoughts and prayers are with GM Dionisio Canete and his family at this sad time. We will miss Mrs Canete's kind hospitality and presence at the Doce Pares HQ. We are very grateful to Mrs Canete's hard work and help with many things over the years and we will never forget the extra mile Mrs Canete went to make our wedding day so special. Wishing a lovely lady well on her journey.

    The O'Malley Family xx.



My sincerest condolences to GM Dionisio Canete and his family.
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2009, 12:11:21 PM »

It is with a heavy heart that I must convey this message to the Martial Art Ohana's around the World.

I received a phone call this morning from Grand Master Greg Harper of Harper KAJUKENBO. 
     "SIJO passed away last night, around Midnight"  

Sijo will be missed by all but his "Legend" will forever be immortalized by those he touched.

Sincerely and with respect always,

Kajukenbo SIFU Dean "C-Kaju Dog" Webster

Sijo Emperado, GM Gumataotao, GM Harper, ME....

Ps.
More news to follow as information becomes available.


 
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2009, 12:33:43 PM »

It is with a heavy heart that I must convey this message to the Martial Art Ohana's around the World.

I received a phone call this morning from Grand Master Greg Harper of Harper KAJUKENBO. 
     "SIJO passed away last night, around Midnight"  

Sijo will be missed by all but his "Legend" will forever be immortalized by those he touched.

Sincerely and with respect always,

Kajukenbo SIFU Dean "C-Kaju Dog" Webster

Sijo Emperado, GM Gumataotao, GM Harper, ME....

Ps.
More news to follow as information becomes available.


 


http://www.kajukenbocafe.com/smf/index.php?topic=4949.0

 cry
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sting
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« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2009, 07:35:17 PM »

I'm saddened to read about the passing of legendary Sijo Adriano Emperado.  Your Art lives on in thousands around the world, as well as little ol' me, who will pass it to his sons.

With respect and gratitude,

Gints Klimanis
-------------------------
Allmighty and eternal God, protector of all who put their trust in thee,
accept the humble homage of our faith and love in Thee, our one true God.
Bless our efforts to preserve the integrity of our United States, a nation
founded on Christian principles.
Enlighten our rules, guide our lawmakers, protect the sanctity of our homes,
and bless our efforts in these exercises, whose sole purpose in developing our
bodies is to keep others mindful of thy commandments.
Give us perseverance in our actions so that we may use this as a means to keep
closer to you, our one true God.
Amen.
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Baltic Dog

Go Shin Jutsu Kenpo (Prof. Richard Lewis)
3rd Degree Black Belt Instructor

Bono JKD/Kajukenbo (Prof. John Bono)
Gentlemen's Fighting Club
Kaju Dog
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« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2009, 12:44:56 AM »

RIP:  15 June 1926 - 04 April 2009

Adriano D. Emperado was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, on June 15, 1926. He was born to Filipino-Hawaiian parents in the poor Palama section of Honolulu.
He started his self defense training at the age of 8. At this time in his life both his father and uncle were professional boxers, so of course he was taught how to box.
His next training came at the age of 11 while he was living with his older brother in Kauai. There he learned the basic 12 strikes of escrima.
At age 14 he found himself back in his old Palama neighborhood. There he trained in judo under Sensei Taneo at the Palama Settlement Gym.
A few years later at the age of 20 Emperado undertook the serious study of kenpo at the Catholic Youth Organization in Honolulu. These classes were taught by the legendary Professor William K.S. Chow. Professor Chow had been a student of kenpo jiu jitsu instructor James Mitose, and also held a 5th degree black belt in judo. Emperado trained daily with Chow and soon became his first black belt. Emperado spent years with Professor Chow becoming his Chief Instructor and attaining the rank of 5th degree black belt.

During the developmental years of Kajukenbo Emperado would train with the 4 other co-founders during the day and then teach classes for Chow in the evenings.
After the other 4 went off to war, Emperado started the first Kajukenbo school at the Palama Settlement Gym in 1950. The workouts that took place there are legendary for their brutality. Emperado has been quoted as saying that a workout wasn't over until there was blood on the floor. He felt "that you have to experience pain before you can give it. You have to know what your technique can do. "We lost a lot of students in those days, but we also got a lot from other schools, including black belts. He then described how his first black belt Marino Tiwanak joined his class after being soundly defeated by him in response to Tiwanak's challenge. What makes this such a astonishing story is the fact that Marino Tiwanak was the flyweight boxing champion of Hawaii at the time of the challenge.

With the success of the Palama Settlement school Emperado started expanding. He left the teaching at the Palama school to his brother Joe while he started classes at the Kaimuki Y.M.C.A. and the Wahiwa Y.M.C.A.. Soon the Kajukenbo Self Defense Institute of Hawaii, Inc. was the largest chain of karate schools in Hawaii. Emperado also became instrumental in the development of tournament karate in Hawaii. He sat on the Hawaii Karate Rules Board, which established standards for competition used throughout the islands. A lot of Emperado's knowledge of street fighting came from his many years in law enforcement. He had spent 14 years as a harbor policeman for the Hawaii Department of a Transportation, and a year with the Hawaii Attorney General's Office. While with the Attorney General's Office he served as a body guard to the governor. He then entered the private sector as the security director for a large company. He worked in the corporate security field until he suffered a heart attack in 1982.

All of his life Emperado has studied various martial arts. In his 30s he expanded his knowledge of escrima by training with his step father Alfredo Peralta. Peralta taught him a method using the single stick. Emperado described how they would take 2x4s and taper down handles and then train with them. He said that "after a workout with the 2x4 you could make a rattan stick go like lighting".

About the same time he started a serious study of various kung fu systems. He studied under Professor Lau Bun of the Choy Li Fut system and Professor Wong of the Northern Shaolin system. Several years later these professors and the Hawaii Chinese Physical Culture Association awarded Emperado the title Professor 10th degree. Also at this time he was awarded a certificate by Grandmaster Ho Gau of Hong Kong appointing him as a advisor and representative of the Choy Li Fut system. This certificate was signed by Grandmaster Ho Gau, Professor Cheuk Tse, and the directors of the Hawaii Chinese Physical Culture Association. This was truly an accolade when one considers that the Hawaii Chinese Physical Culture Association was the first kung fu school outside of China.

Because he had been exposed to many fighting systems Emperado has always been one to welcome innovation. Unlike most of the traditional systems, his Kajukenbo evolves constantly. To date there are 4 systems within then kajukenbo style.

The first of course is the Original Method, sometimes referred to as the kenpo karate branch. This is the system that Emperado, Holck, Choo, Ordonez, and Chang formulated between 1947 and 1949. The original method uses kenpo karate as a base and adds selected techniques from the tang soo do, judo, jujitsu, and sil-lum pai kung fu systems. The second system is the Tum Pai branch. This system was in development from 1959-1966 by Emperado, Al Dacascos, and Al De La Cruz. Development was suspended in 1966 when Dacascos moved to the mainland. Its development was then re-activated in 1984 by Jon Loren. The Tum Pai system incorporates the original kajukenbo techniques along with tai chi chuan elements. The third system is the Chuan Fa branch. This system started development in 1966. Again this was a collaboration of Emperado, Al Dacascos, and Al De La Cruz. This system incorporated the Northern and Southern styles of kung fu with the original method of kajukenbo.
The result was a blend of soft and hard techniques. The Chuan Fa system also opened the door to the richness and unlimited techniques that the Chinese arts had to offer. The last system is the Won Hop Kuen Do (combination fist art) branch. This branch was the brain child of Al Dacascos. When he moved to the San Francisco area in the early 60s Dacascos supplemented his kajukenbo training with an extensive study of the Chinese and Filipino arts. In 1969 he saw that his kajukenbo was becoming a blend of the various systems that he was learning. This system that he named Won Hop Kuen Do contained the original kajukenbo forms and 25 exclusive fighting principles. Like all of the systems, Won Hop Kuen Do is in a constant state of evolution. Although kajukenbo has 4 systems Emperado has always stressed that no system is superior to another and that they are not improvements on the original method. They are just kajukenbo expressions that emphasize different techniques.
In his lifetime Emperado has seen his kajukenbo style grow into a major martial art that is practiced all across the United States and in several countries.
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2009, 12:57:09 AM »

GM Allen Abad passed away today:  06 April 2009

Grandmaster Allen Abad is an 9th degree black belt under the founder of Kajukenbo Sijo Emperado.  He is an international acclaimed instructor of the Kajukenbo system for over the last 30 years.

Grandmaster Abad has over four decades of martial arts training and expertise.  He began training at the age of nine in Hawaii under notable instructors like Walter Aiona (Judo) Ernest Rodrigues, Larry Kawaauhau, Marce Totor (Kenpo), and Sifu James Ibrao (Kung Fu).

Grandmaster Abad has been recognized with many awards and magazine articles.  In 1994 he received the Golden Master's Martial Arts Instructor Award.  This award recognized Grandmaster Abad for teaching and sharing at the highest standard of martial arts at the mental, physical and spiritual levels. He also appeared in such publications as Secrets of the Masters and Blackbelt Magazines.

As of 2002, Grandmaster Allen Abad has been awarded the highest rank of Golden Dragon by Sifu James Ibrao.  Grandmaster Abad's patience and wisdom make his classes both fun and educational.



Uncle Abad, you will be missed.   cry
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Ronin
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2009, 08:00:40 AM »

My goodness...
3 Titans of Kajukenbo in the same month...
My heart goes out to our MA brothers in the Kajukenbo clan.
Keep the fire alive !
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Sebresos
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« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2009, 02:28:47 PM »

Man its getting to the point where I am afraid to pop on the internet. Seems like someone is always dying.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2009, 05:18:44 PM »

Someone always is.
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2009, 07:26:22 PM »

 cry

Fact Box
Adriano Emperado

June 15, 1926 - April 4, 2009

* WHAT: Adriano Emperado funeral service

* WHEN: 10 a.m. to noon visitation; noon to 1:30 p.m. service; lunch to follow at Maui Waena Intermediate. A second service will be on May 30 at Nu'uanu Mortuary on Oahu.





* WHERE: Ballard Family Mortuary, 440 Ala Makani Place in Kahului

* DETAILS: Call 205-4765 or e-mail kawahinekoa2004@yahoo.com




Kajukenbo
A rough-and-tumble martial art has lost legendary street-fighting man and beloved teacher, Adriano Emperado

By LEHIA APANA, Staff Writer


Sijo Adriano Emperado was a true product of his environment. Growing up in Oahu's rough Palama Settlement neighborhood where brawls and confrontations were a daily reality, the young Emperado learned firsthand what it meant to fight for survival.

That fierce little boy grew up to become one of the best-known figures in the martial arts community. Considered the granddaddy of kajukenbo, his teachings are revered by diehard fighters throughout the world. On April 4 the art form lost its icon when Emperado, 82, died in his sleep at Hale Makua.

"Everybody who does kajukenbo knew who Sijo was," says Sigung Kailani Koa, his former student and caregiver. "He's the root of everything and he really started it all."

Fighting was literally in his blood, with both his father and uncle professional boxers. Emperado's early training included basic escrima techniques, a Filipino martial arts using stick and sword fighting. He later took up kempo under the legendary William K.S. Chow.

In 1947, Emperado combined his own street-fighting styles with four peers to create the Black Belt Society, proving that when it comes to fighting, the sum is greater than its parts. Peter Choo was a champion boxer and black belt in tang soo do; Frank Ordonez a black belt in se keino ryu; Joe Holck a black belt in kodenkan; Clarence Chang an expert in kung fu; and Emperado a black belt in kenpo.

Together they created a deadly kajukenbo system that combined each person's expertise: Korean karate (KA), Japanese judo and jujitsu (JU), Okinawan kenpo (KEN) and Chinese boxing (BO). This chameleon of the martial arts world was meant to adapt to any situation.

The men perfected their techniques during secret meetings in abandoned buildings during the late 1940s. When the Korean War broke out, all but Emperado were drafted into service, leaving him to carry on the system. He did exactly that by opening the first kajukenbo school in 1950 at the Palama Settlement Gym.

"He's a legend and he's the one who really started mixed martial arts," says Grandmaster Gary Forbach, who studied under Emperado. "He was so far ahead of his time in the 1940s by putting together all these martial arts and mixing them into one."

Forbach describes Emperado as a "generous, loving man who accepted everyone." While Emperado was a master at his art, Forbach says his greatest legacy is his acceptance of those around him.

"I can talk about how great he was at martial arts, but it was more than that," explains Forbach. "It didn't matter if you were rich, poor, black, white, green, purple ... He was never prejudiced and never turned anyone away."

Kajukenbo has come a long way from its scrappy beginnings and undercover training sessions. From its Hawaii roots, the style spread throughout the world and today students spanning all ages and backgrounds are picking up where Emperado left off. It's a movement not even Emperado expected.

"Never in his wildest dreams did he think kajukenbo would be worldwide like this," says Koa. "He just thought it would be this small thing in a garage."

But its growth has also brought about various technical changes, causing some confusion and disagreement among its membership. The Black Belt Society was revived in 1978 in an attempt to reunify the system, bringing together top kajukenbo instructors to share their knowledge. Today many kajukenbo students use their skills for tournament competition or mixed martial arts matches; however, the basic goal of kajukenbo remains: survive a street fight. It's a style where points don't matter and the winner is the last one standing.

"It's a true street-fighting art where you can put somebody out on the street and they'll be able to defend themselves," explains former student Sigung Henry Aiau Koa.

Emperado's early workouts were notorious for this kind of no-nonsense brutality that routinely left fighters with broken bones and bruises. During a 1992 interview, Emperado was quoted as telling his students, "I'm not satisfied until I see blood on the floor." The mentality being you have to know how to take pain to give it.

That intensity was keenly evident at a recent training session in Wailuku, where one student limped off the mat with a split knee cap. Next stop, emergency room.

"(Emperado) would always say, "Make pain your friend,' " Koa explains.

Hearkening back to its street- fighting roots, true kajukenbo is executed with an "anything goes" mentality. Nothing is off limits, including scratching an opponent's eyes or kicking a person's groin. Despite its renegade reputation, kajukenbo students say it's a form of protection rather than aggression.

"It means that I can go on the street and I know I can defend myself - that's what Sijo taught us," Koa says.

"As a woman I know I can walk down the street by myself and be ready for anything."

Forbach credits his kajukenbo skills to saving his life on several occasions, adding that he's been shot at and stabbed.

"In those kinds of situations it's either you or me, so there's no limits," he explains. "But at the same time the idea is that when you take control you stop, so there's no overkill. (Emperado) never told anyone to beat the ---- out of someone."

Kailani Koa points out that younger kajukenbo students learn differently than the adults. They are still taught self-defense techniques, although with slightly subdued intensity.

"The martial art that I teach the kids is self defense," she explains. "So say they're walking home from school and somebody comes up and grabs them, they'll be able to protect themselves."

Like many martial arts, respect and discipline are equally important as learning the techniques. She points out that she has turned away students who she felt "weren't ready, weren't pono" to learn the lethal art.

"Students have to have the right attitude and they gotta have the right heart," explains Kailani Koa. "You don't want to teach something like this to someone whose heart is dark and evil."

Emperado's family, friends and former students will gather for a memorial service Saturday at Ballard Family Mortuary in Kahului to bid a final goodbye a true legend. A second service will be held May 30 at Nu'uanu Mortuary on Oahu.

"He's gonna live forever in history and I'll never ever forget that man," says Forbach.

"If you met him one time you'll never forget him."





Back row:  GM Larry Gumataotao & GM Greg Harper (aka) Kajupit
Front row:  Kaju Dog, Sijo Emperado, Sifu Mikel Harper
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2009, 08:19:30 AM »

Kaju:

Nice piece.  Nice picture.

All:

I regret to inform that Poi Dog's uncle has died in a motorcycle accident.  Our prayers to the family and Poi.

TAC,
CD
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Poidog
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« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2009, 12:16:13 PM »

All:

I regret to inform that Poi Dog's uncle has died in a motorcycle accident.  Our prayers to the family and Poi.

TAC,
CD
Woof Guro,

Big Mahalo for the best wishes.  I just returned from Wisconsin where the family had a fitting ceremony for my uncle.  It was a jarring reminder that there are no guarantees in life and to take advantage of the opportunities I have and to appreciate the present.

Aloha, Poi
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Who dares wins - British SAS
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2009, 12:33:08 PM »

http://movies.yahoo.com:80/news/movies.ap.org/actor-david-carradine-found-dead-bangkok-ap
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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2009, 06:00:06 PM »

I found this article on bulshido.  It sounded at first like a suicide rumor was started. dunno

David Carradine Dead at 73 
The Kill Bill and Kung Fu actor was found dead in a hotel room in Bangkok Thailand, where he was on location to shoot an upcoming film.

Carradine, according to his agent, had been feeling fine and was in good spirits.

It is believed he died of natural causes.

Thai police spoke with the BBC, telling them the 72-year-old was found this morning by a hotel maid sitting in a wardrobe with a rope around his neck and body.

There are reports coming out of Thailand this morning that David Carradine was found, "hanged in his luxury hotel room and is believed to have committed suicide."

The report cites "police sources" who are connected to the investigation.

http://perezhilton.com/2009-06-04-not-a-suicide

 
« Last Edit: June 04, 2009, 06:11:34 PM by Tom Stillman » Logged

Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
Stickgrappler
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« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2009, 09:16:59 PM »

dayum...

Shek Kin dead at 96

http://www.kungfucinema.com/martial-arts-actor-shek-kin-dead-at-96-7734



http://stickgrappler.blogspot.com/2009/06/news-martial-arts-actor-shek-kin-dead.html

My sincerest condolences to his family, friends and students. RIP Shek Kin
« Last Edit: June 04, 2009, 09:39:04 PM by Stickgrappler » Logged

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« Reply #28 on: June 07, 2009, 01:24:13 AM »

I am informed through multiple sources that highly regarded and well-liked savateur of the Inosanto Tribe Tony Adams has committed suicide.  cry

I saw him at the IAMA last Saturday.  I do not claim to have known him well, but always liked him a lot.  We chatted a bit about some new ideas I was working on in my Kali Tudo.  I cannot claim that I was alert enough to have spotted anything unusual-- maybe he seemed a little down, but nothing that really caught my attention.

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« Reply #29 on: June 08, 2009, 06:53:18 PM »

http://inosanto.com/?p=1163 on Tony Adams
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« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2009, 03:17:40 AM »

Services for Tony Adams
Sunday June 14, 2009
11:00 am
Royal Palm Beach
DIRECTIONS
Take 110 Freeway South Until it Ends on "Gaffey Street"
in San Pedro
Exit Left onto Gaffey Street
Follow Gaffey Street till it ends and veers right at Paseo
Del Mar
Turn onto Paseo Del Mar and Travel about a Mile and a
Half till you see an Entry Point to White Point / Royal
Palms (There's a Guard Shack there and Gate).
Pay for Parking and Proceed all the way Down the Hill.
When you reach the Bottom - Turn Right and Park all the
way at the end.
Remembering Tony Adams
For further information please contact:
Zeke Rodriguez
zekeiii@hotmail.com
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« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2009, 11:56:58 AM »

off topic (i.e. not MA-related):

RIP Farrah Fawcett

62 ... lost her bout with cancer

http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/TV/06/25/obit.fawcett/index.html

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« Reply #32 on: June 25, 2009, 05:57:36 PM »

off topic (i.e. not MA-related):

RIP Michael Jackson

50 yrs old... icon of the 1980's

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_michael_jackson
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« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2009, 07:20:19 PM »

Ed McMahon of the tonight show died June 23. When celebrities die, They say it usually comes in groups of three..
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« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2009, 06:59:04 AM »

Neither FF or EM were really on my radar screen, but please forgive me my curmdgeonly moment.  Why is the fcuk is MJ here?
================

Q: Why does Michael Jackson have a tough guy reputation?
A: He has licked every kid possible.

Q: Why did Michael Jackson get food poisoning?
A: He ate a nine year old wiener!

Q: Why were Michael Jackson's pants so small?
A: They belonged to somebody else.



Q: What do Michael Jackson and Walmart have in common?
A: They both have small boys pants at half off!

Q: How many Michael Jacksons does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A: None. Michael Jackson only screws little boys!

Q: What did the man on the beach say to Michael Jackson?
A: Get out of my sun!

Q: What do Michael Jackson and zits have in common?
A: They both wait till your 12 to come on your face!

Q: How do we know Michael is guilty?
A: Several children have fingered him.

Q: Why does Michael Jackson like to lose foot races to little boys?
A: He likes to come in a little behind.

Q: How do you know when it's bedtime at the Jackson residence?
A: When the big hand touches the little hand...
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« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2009, 04:10:52 AM »

Billy Mays, The Oxy Clean infomercial guy, died this morning at 7:45 am at his home in Tampa Florida. He was 50.
Hopefully, he saved his best pitch for St. Peters gates.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROqzBCHAr3Y
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« Reply #36 on: July 01, 2009, 05:51:43 PM »

Hall of Fame boxer found dead; reports cite suicide

MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP) - Alexis Arguello, who fought in one of boxing's most classic brawls and reigned supreme at 130 pounds, was found dead at his home early Wednesday.

Coroners were conducting an autopsy to determine the cause of death. Sandanista Party's Radio Ya and other local media were reporting it appeared to be a suicide.

The La Prensa newspaper reported that Arguello — elected mayor of Nicaragua's capital last year — was found with a gunshot wound to the chest.

The 57-year-old Arguello retired in 1995 with a record of 82-8 with 65 knockouts and was a champion in three weight divisions. He was perhaps best known for two thrilling battles with Aaron Pryor and fights with Ray Mancini, Bobby Chacon and Ruben Olivares.

"I'm kind of in a daze right now. I can't believe what I'm hearing," Pryor told The Associated Press. "Those were great fights we had. This was a great champion."

Nicknamed "The Explosive Thin Man," Arguello was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1992, where flags were flying at half-staff in his honor Wednesday.

In 1999, a panel of experts assembled by The AP voted Arguello the best junior lightweight and sixth-best lightweight of the 20th century. He never lost at 130 pounds, and his popularity in his own country was so great that he carried the flag for Nicaragua at the Beijing Olympics.

"Not only was he one of the greatest fighters I've ever seen, he was the most intelligent fighter," Bob Arum, who promoted some of his biggest fights, told The Associated Press. "He was a ring tactician. Every move was thought out. And he was a wonderful, wonderful person."

Arguello turned pro in 1968 and promptly lost his first bout. He didn't lose much more, and six years later knocked out Olivares in the 13th round to win the featherweight title.

Arguello went on to win the super featherweight and lightweight titles, his 5-foot-10 frame allowing him to move up in weight without losing his tremendous punching power. At the time, he was only the sixth boxer to win championships in three weight classes, and was considered for a while the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world.

He moved up in weight again in November 1982 to challenge Pryor for the 140-pound belt, a match billed as "Battle of the Champions." More than 23,000 fans packed the Orange Bowl in Miami, and the two waged an epic battle before Pryor knocked out Arguello in the 14th round.

"It was a brutal, brutal fight," Arum said. "That was something I will never, ever forget as long as I live. That was one of the most memorable fights I ever did."

The bout was named "Fight of the Year" and "Fight of the Decade" by Ring Magazine, but was shrouded by controversy. Pryor's trainer, Panama Lewis, gave him a water bottle after the 13th round that many believe contained an illegal substance — an accusation Pryor denied.

A rematch was ordered and they met again a year later at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. This time, Pryor knocked out Arguello in the 10th round.

"We always talk to each other about that first fight," Pryor said. "I never went into the fight knowing I could beat Alexis, I just went into the fight to beat Alexis."

Arguello announced after the fight that he would retire from boxing, but as so often happens in the sport, Arguello couldn't stay away from the ring.

He returned to win two fights in 1985 and 1986, then didn't step in the ring until 1994, when he made a brief comeback. He retired for good the following year.

"Alexis Arguello was a first-class fighter and a first-class gentleman," said Hall of Fame executive director Edward Brophy. "The Hall of Fame joins the boxing community in mourning the loss of a great champion and friend."

Arguello fought against the Sandinista government in the 1980s after it seized his property and bank account, but later joined the party and ran for mayor of the capital last November. He defeated Eduardo Montealegre, though opponents alleged the vote was fraudulent.

Arguello had returned Sunday from Puerto Rico, where he honored the late baseball Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente. His death prompted Nicaragua President Daniel Ortega to announced he was canceling a trip to Panama for the inauguration of President-elect Ricardo Martinelli.

"We are upset," presidential spokeswoman Rosario Murillo said. "This is a heartbreaking announcement. He was the champion of the poor, an example of forgiveness and reconciliation."
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« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2009, 11:24:56 PM »

He was one of my favorite boxers of all time. I was sad to here he went out like that. The boxing world will never see another quite like him again. A true class act!  sad
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« Reply #38 on: July 11, 2009, 09:41:07 PM »

ugh... boxing lost another.

Arturo Gatti... dead at 37.. foul play suspected

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/boxing/news/story?id=4321150

my sincerest condolences to the Gatti family.

« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 09:47:40 PM by Stickgrappler » Logged

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« Reply #39 on: July 27, 2009, 08:41:15 AM »

July 27, 2009

Forrest, Ex-Boxing Champ, Is Killed

By DERRICK HENRY
Vernon Forrest, a former middleweight boxing champion also known for his charitable work, was shot and killed Saturday night in Atlanta. The police said that he had apparently been robbed and then exchanged gunfire with his assailant.

Forrest, 38, is the third prominent boxer to die this month. Arturo Gatti, a super featherweight and light welterweight, was found dead July 11 at a Brazilian resort. Alexis Argüello, a champion in the lightweight divisions, was found dead on July 1 at his home in Managua, Nicaragua. He had been elected mayor of Nicaragua’s capital last year.

Last September, Forrest reclaimed his World Boxing Council title at 154 pounds by beating Sergio Mora, an opponent 10 years younger. Forrest, who had a 41-3 career record with 29 knockouts, had been sidelined by injury and vacated his crown. In 2002, he twice defeated Shane Mosley and was named Ring Magazine’s Fighter of the Year.

Forrest, who lived in Atlanta, had stopped at a gas station on Whitehall Street in central part of the city to put air into the tires of his Jaguar when a man robbed him at gunpoint, the police said. Forrest, who also was armed, chased the man several hundred feet, toward a nearby intersection. The two exchanged gunfire, Atlanta Police Det. Lt. Keith Meadows told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Forrest suffered seven to eight shots to the back, the police said. Lt. Meadows said there was evidence that Forrest had used his weapon, but the police did not know if the assailant had been shot.

An 11-year-old boy who was in Forrest’s vehicle gave police a description of the assailant. The boy, the son of Forrest’s girlfriend, did not witness the shootings, the police said.

An autopsy was planned for Sunday, The Associated Press reported.

Forrest, a former W.B.C. super welterweight champion, was just as noted for his work outside the ring. In 1998, he started Destiny’s Child, a foundation for people with mental disabilities in Atlanta.

Forrest said he thought of starting the foundation after seeing an autistic child struggle to tie his shoes. “If you sit there and watch a person take about an hour to tie his shoestrings, then you realize that whatever problems you got ain’t that significant,” he said in a 2006 New York Times interview. “A light just turned on in my head.”

The foundation set up group homes in the Atlanta area.

“We teach mathematics and how to count money,” Forrest said in a 2003 Times interview. “We had this one 18-year-old boy to whom all money looked the same. He had trouble with quarters and nickels. Then one day, he said, ‘Uncle Vernon, I got it, I got it.’ ”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/27/sp...7boxer.html?hp
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« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2009, 12:48:15 PM »

http://blip.tv/play/AYGJ5h6YgmE     
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« Reply #41 on: August 17, 2009, 09:47:02 AM »

What do you think? Was it the smartest thing to go after the guy. Should have called the police first, what a loss.
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« Reply #42 on: February 24, 2010, 11:42:05 AM »

http://www.michaelyon-online.com/colr-robert-l.-howard.htm
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« Reply #43 on: April 30, 2010, 07:33:05 AM »

Someone had called to say the Ku Klux Klan was coming to bomb Robert Hicks’s house. The police said there was nothing they could do. It was the night of Feb. 1, 1965, in Bogalusa, La.

 
Associated Press
Robert Hicks in 1965, the year of a sit-in by blacks at a cafe in Bogalusa, La., where he lived.
The Klan was furious that Mr. Hicks, a black paper mill worker, was putting up two white civil rights workers in his home. It was just six months after three young civil rights workers had been murdered in Philadelphia, Miss.

Mr. Hicks and his wife, Valeria, made some phone calls. They found neighbors to take in their children, and they reached out to friends for protection. Soon, armed black men materialized. Nothing happened.

Less than three weeks later, the leaders of a secretive, paramilitary organization of blacks called the Deacons for Defense and Justice visited Bogalusa. It had been formed in Jonesboro, La., in 1964 mainly to protect unarmed civil rights demonstrators from the Klan. After listening to the Deacons, Mr. Hicks took the lead in forming a Bogalusa chapter, recruiting many of the men who had gone to his house to protect his family and guests.

Mr. Hicks died of cancer at his home in Bogalusa on April 13 at the age of 81, his wife said. He was one of the last surviving Deacon leaders.

But his role in the civil rights movement went beyond armed defense in a corner of the Jim Crow South. He led daily protests month after month in Bogalusa — then a town of 23,000, of whom 9,000 were black — to demand rights guaranteed by the 1964 Civil Rights Act. And he filed suits that integrated schools and businesses, reformed hiring practices at the mill and put the local police under a federal judge’s control.

It was his leadership role with the Deacons that drew widest note, however. The Deacons, who grew to have chapters in more than two dozen Southern communities, veered sharply from the nonviolence preached by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They carried guns, with the mission to protect against white aggression, citing the Second Amendment.

And they used them. A Bogalusa Deacon pulled a pistol in broad daylight during a protest march in 1965 and put two bullets into a white man who had attacked him with his fists. The man survived. A month earlier, the first black deputy sheriff in the county had been assassinated by whites.

When James Farmer, national director of the human rights group the Congress of Racial Equality, joined protests in Bogalusa, one of the most virulent Klan redoubts, armed Deacons provided security.

Dr. King publicly denounced the Deacons’ “aggressive violence.” And Mr. Farmer, in an interview with Ebony magazine in 1965, said that some people likened the Deacons to the K.K.K. But Mr. Farmer also pointed out that the Deacons did not lynch people or burn down houses. In a 1965 interview with The New York Times Magazine, he spoke of CORE and the Deacons as “a partnership of brothers.”

The Deacons’ turf was hardscrabble Southern towns where Klansmen and law officers aligned against civil rights campaigners. “The Klan did not like being shot at,” said Lance Hill, author of “The Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement”(2004).

In July 1965, escalating hostilities between the Deacons and the Klan in Bogalusa provoked the federal government to use Reconstruction-era laws to order local police departments to protect civil rights workers. It was the first time the laws were used in the modern civil rights era, Mr. Hill said.

Adam Fairclough, in his book “Race and Democracy: The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana, 1915-1972” (1995), wrote that Bogalusa became “a major test of the federal government’s determination to put muscle into the Civil Rights Act in the teeth of violent resistance from recalcitrant whites.”

Mr. Hicks was repeatedly jailed for protesting. He watched as his 15-year-old son was bitten by a police dog. The Klan displayed a coffin with his name on it beside a burning cross. He persisted, his wife said, for one reason: “It was something that needed to be done.”

Robert Hicks was born in Mississippi on Feb. 20, 1929. His father, Quitman, drove oxen to harvest trees for the paper mill. He played football on a state championship high school team and later for the semi-professional Bogalusa Bushmen.

He was known for his generosity: at the Baptist congregation where he was a deacon, he bought new suits for poor members. As the first black supervisor at the mill, he helped a young man amass enough overtime to buy the big car he dreamed of. Children all over town called him Dad, his son Charles said.

A leader in the local N.A.A.C.P. and his segregated union, Mr. Hicks was the logical choice to head the Bogalusa Civic and Voters League when it was formed to lead the local civil rights effort. He was first president, then vice president of the Deacons in Bogalusa.

Besides Valeria Hicks, his wife of 62 years, and his son Charles, Mr. Hicks is survived by three other sons, Gregory, Robert Lawrence and Darryl; his daughter, Barbara Hicks Collins; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

By 1968, the Deacons had pretty much vanished. In time they were “hardly a footnote in most books on the civil rights movement,” Mr. Hill said. He attributed this to a “mythology” that the rights movement was always nonviolent.

Mrs. Hicks said she was glad it was not.

“I became very proud of black men,” she said. “They didn’t bow down and scratch their heads. They stood up like men.”
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« Reply #44 on: July 16, 2010, 03:39:22 AM »

THE CONSIDERATE BAGPIPER
As a bagpiper, I play many gigs. Recently I was asked by a funeral director to play at a
grave side service for a homeless man.
He had no family or friends, so the service was to be at a pauper's cemetery
in the Kentucky back-country.
As I was not familiar with the backwoods, I got lost; and being a typical man
I didn't stop for directions. I finally arrived an hour late and saw the funeral guy
had evidently gone and the hearse was nowhere in sight.
There were only the diggers and crew left and they were eating lunch. I felt badly
and apologized to the men for being late. I went to the side of the grave and looked
down and the vault lid was already in place. I didn't know what else to do, so I started to play.
The workers put down their lunches and began to gather around. I played out my heart and
soul for this man with no family and friends. I played like I've never played before for this homeless man.
And as I played 'Amazing Grace,' the workers began to weep. They wept, I wept, we all
wept together. When I finished I packed up my bagpipes and started for my car.
Though my head hung low my heart was full.
As I was opening the door to my car, I heard one of the workers say, "I never seen nothin'
like that before and I've been putting in septic tanks for twenty years.
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« Reply #45 on: December 15, 2010, 11:17:12 AM »





It is with a heavy heart that I inform you of the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian A. Terry who was shot and killed during an encounter with armed subjects.  Agent Terry was working in the “Peck Well” area near Rio Rico, Arizona when he was fatally injured. 

 

During the encounter, one assailant was wounded and immediately taken into custody.  Three additional suspects were apprehended shortly thereafter.  Border Patrol agents are currently tracking a fifth suspect and I assure you that every effort will be expended to bring this remaining suspect into custody.       

 

Agent Terry entered on duty with Academy Class 699 on July 23, 2007.  He is survived by his parents and sister in Detroit, Michigan. Please keep Agent Terry and his family in your thoughts and prayers as they have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our country. 

 

This is a stark reminder of the realities we face in our mission to protect our borders and our communities. We will continue to stand firm in our commitment to that mission. 

 

In difficult times like these it is important that we turn to and support one another.  Peer Support members, the Tucson Sector Chaplaincy Program, and the Employee Assistance Program are all available to any employee who may need them.  Updates will be provided about this tragic situation as soon as information becomes available.

 

Respectfully,

 

Richard A. Barlow
Deputy Chief Patrol Agent
Tucson Sector Headquarters 
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« Reply #46 on: December 16, 2010, 09:33:27 AM »

Woof,
 His blood and the blood of countless other American citizens is on the hands of our politicians and bureaucrats that put ideology and votes above doing their sworn duty. I hope they rot in hell for it! And for the people who keep putting them in office, shame on you, the families of these innocent people that are murdered by illegal aliens should spit in your face when you leave the polling place. tongue
                                           P.C.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 10:05:29 AM by prentice crawford » Logged

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« Reply #47 on: December 16, 2010, 10:59:35 AM »

Woof,
 His blood and the blood of countless other American citizens is on the hands of our politicians and bureaucrats that put ideology and votes above doing their sworn duty. I hope they rot in hell for it! And for the people who keep putting them in office, shame on you, the families of these innocent people that are murdered by illegal aliens should spit in your face when you leave the polling place. tongue
                                           P.C.

While I am against illegal immigration and my heart goes out to the family of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry, I think your comments are a bit absurd, virulent and over the line towards illegal immigrants.    Most illegal immigrants come to America because they simply want a job.  Hardly an offense for a politician or bureaucrat to "rot in hell".

Was Agent Terry even killed by illegal immigrants?

"Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was shot and killed near Rio Rico, Arizona, while attempting to apprehend a group of armed subjects. The suspects had been preying on illegal immigrants with the intent to rob them.

Agent Terry and several other agents were attempting to arrest the group when shots were exchanged between the suspects and agents. Agent Terry was reportedly struck in the back by rounds fired by a suspect armed with an AK-47."

http://www.odmp.org/officer/20596-border-patrol-agent-brian-a.-terry
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« Reply #48 on: December 16, 2010, 11:11:46 AM »

Woof,
 Yeah it's absurd
    www.immigrationshumancost.org/text/crimevictims_2.html
 Listen, I'm all for immigrants coming to our country but they need to do it by our laws; the laws are there for a reason and the reason is to prevent the F'ing chaos we have now. So, yes it is on the people that are suppose to secure our border and enforce our laws. I hope you or some of your family don't end up on this list but unless we citizens wake up to the reality, the list will continue to grow and that is unacceptable to me and these sorry sh#theads in our government need to be held accountable; they are complicit with every one of these murders. I know it sounds harsh but how harsh were these needless deaths?
                                P.C.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 11:54:28 AM by prentice crawford » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2010, 12:06:53 AM »

JDN:

Forgive me, but the point is NOT "most illegals/most immigrants".  The point that when we do not control our border SOME illegals will be doing what we saw here and responsibility for that DOES fall on those who are not defending our borders.  IMHO first and therefore foremost, that would include our current Commander in Chief.
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