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Author Topic: Dog Brothers Team Kali Tudo  (Read 14958 times)
Dan Farley
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« on: February 21, 2009, 01:55:06 PM »

I've been thinking about my time spent with Crafty these days, and it's really been a blast to train the new Kali Tudo material with him.  The only thing that bums me out is not having a team of sparring partners to drill it with on a regular basis.  It seems like progress is hindered when you're only drilling things a couple times a week, without training other aspects of the game like you would at regular practice.

What if we had a team going?  I'm sure we could arrange a place for practice, where we could work to develop a solid mma base and then work to incorporate the KT material as we go.

Though KT is outside of the mma box, it seems to behoove the practitioner to be fluid in grappling/bjj, as well as stand up fighting before, or during his merging into the KT game.  In southern CA, I'm sure we could find good wrestlers, kickboxers, jiu jitsu guys, to come together on this, to help drill the fundamentals of the game.

I know there are guys out there who can't afford to train at the overpriced gyms down here anymore, and would probably be willing to put time into a new movement like this.  All we need is a gym with bags and mats, and some dedicated guys.  Maybe we could chip in and find a gym owner, or a local mcdojo who will let us use their space outside of their operating hours?

Our team would represent the greatest part of fight training because we would be away from all the signing contracts, and dishing out huge money to do what we love to do.  No BS politics of the bjj world, belts and ranks, etc.  Just a team that only has to worry about getting as good as we can. 

In a time of economic collapse, I think this type of bartering will be the new way of forming small communities such as this. 

Who's down?

     
« Last Edit: May 07, 2009, 11:35:41 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
prentice crawford
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2009, 02:03:01 PM »

Woof,
 You almost make me wish I lived in CA, almost. wink That's sounds like a great opportunity for anyone that wants to bring his game up to a pro level to get it going on. Great idea.
                   P.C.
                               
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Sisco T.
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« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2009, 09:15:48 AM »

 this is a really good idea dan. if anyone's out there in southern CA area even thinking about this i'd get in contact with dan. guro marc's empty hand/mma material would open up a lot of the standard mma ideas out there. there are things guro marc does/teaches that are ''unorthodox'' yet sound and effective. the way lyoto machida has had people looking at his strategies is the way,i feel, guro marc could have people thinking with his kali tudo stuff. not really in the actual techniques, but in the thinking outside the box (although there is a lot of footwork & sweeping that lyoto does that guro marc has been impressing on me for years now).

 Francisco
« Last Edit: February 23, 2009, 09:25:49 AM by Sisco T. » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2009, 02:08:27 PM »

Sisco is gently alluding to the interaction that Lyotto and I had together at RAW a few years ago. wink
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Dan Farley
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« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2009, 04:10:51 PM »

I do think there is an evolution happening in today's mma world.  What wound up as a consolidated hybrid is now going to move forward by stylists coming in with the unseen.   

Thanks for the bump, Cisco!  When are we going to meet up??
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2009, 05:21:25 PM »

If you guys would like to meet in the South Bay area, I think I could put together a couple of options (Boxing Works, Rigan's place, a couple of other things).
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Dan Farley
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« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2009, 05:41:44 PM »

Awesome!  Will guys outside of the pack be welcomed? 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2009, 06:20:18 PM »

I'm thinking all individuals involved should be screened by me , , , lets take this to email or the next time we meet (Sunday?)
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Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2009, 07:41:41 AM »

Woof Dan,

 I hear you preaching brother!  and I also wish I was closer to California to be a part of all this exciting stuff. Unfortunately i am stuck out here in the boondocks.

maybe sometime in the future we can get a dbma group out here in the midwest eh Crafty??

i am 7 hours from omaha and 9 hours from minneapolis but could probably make a seminar once or twice  a year. unfortunately my job and other responsibilities keep me close to home in Valentine NE population 2081, lol
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straw dog
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« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2009, 11:13:43 AM »

Hey, I'm in Long Beach and have been looking to explore kali empty hands (dumog/pangamut) in a MMA setting.  It would be cool if I could join in on this adventure. 

Meynard
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2009, 11:53:30 AM »

Straw Dog:

We'd be delighted to have you.

Guro Crafty
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straw dog
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« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2009, 12:14:27 PM »

Awesome, thanks Guro Crafty! 

For all those involved,

Please keep me in the loop.  Wherever and whenever I'll most certainly be there to play. 

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Howling Dog
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« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2009, 05:38:23 PM »

Woof Blackwolf, I hear you. I also live in a small town(about 30,00) here in Ohio....I often wish I was closer to Guro Crafty, and the Calif clan.
However take the Bull by the horns and get your own group going.
I don't know what your martial arts background is...but Through the DBMA Its entirely possible.
I started training Dog Brother material (Real contact stick fighting tapes) Mine are vhs. grin
Progressed to the attacking blocks tapes and  the others.....
Made a trip to Calif. did some Private triaining...with Guro Crafty and so the adventure began........Six years latter I have fought in several gatherings......I'am stoked to the gills to say I was promoted to Candidate Dog brother.....had the honor of having Guro Crafty here for a day of private training(Ohio)....He was doing a seminar in Akron.........and the adventure truley continues and its a blast!
So long story short.......You can do all the things you want to do with DBMA.......Put some feet to it......and let it happen and watch it grow.......
I thinks its safe to say....that this is a very tight group......Guor Crafty......is a great leader of the pack....and we all take intrest in each other as individuals......
So be positive and build your own group.....It starts with you...but were all here to help.
I might also put a plug in to join the members site....lots to be gleaned there as well.........
If I can help in anyway....please let me know.
                                                                  C- Howling Dog
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2009, 05:53:12 PM »

Woof Blackwolf, I hear you....

...and the adventure truley continues and its a blast!
So long story short.......You can do all the things you want to do with DBMA.......Put some feet to it......and let it happen and watch it grow.......
I thinks its safe to say....that this is a very tight group......Guor Crafty......is a great leader of the pack....and we all take intrest in each other as individuals......
So be positive and build your own group.....It starts with you...but were all here to help.
I might also put a plug in to join the members site....lots to be gleaned there as well.........
If I can help in anyway....please let me know.
                                                                  C- Howling Dog

Howl of RESPECT Brother. 

Dito wink cool
« Last Edit: February 24, 2009, 05:54:44 PM by C-Kaju Dog » Logged

Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2009, 06:55:00 PM »

Woof All:

I'm pulling on my own leash with regard to this lest I get too excited too soon, but this is something for which I have been WAITING for quite some time now , , ,

The Adventure continues!
Guro Crafty
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Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2009, 06:48:25 AM »

Woof

thanks for the great advice C-howling Dog. I guess maybe i should introduce myself to give everyone some idea of what my background is. My real name is Rich, I have been studying Kali and Jkd/Jun Fan, muay Thai, Judo and a few elements of Hapkido for some time now on my own. I have probably been with the Kali/escrima the longest (began studying back in the late 70's after watching Game of death in the theaters and became an instant Dan Inosanto fan) I have had a small local group off and on for years but continue to be plagued  with poor retention of students/training partners. most last about a month and then quit. It sucks. I have also started my own website to try and further my mission of creating a framework or method to allow people in situations like myself ( I live near an Indian reservation at the South Dakota/Nebraska Border) where there are no martial arts schools or groups organized within a reasonable distance to train with the resources available to them online and with instructional video. with Guru Crafty's permission.. my website is www.totalkombatarts.com  it is in desperate need of an update as I am managing it myself and don't know jack about coding, lol

The reason i live in such a remote area is because i am from here, i am Lakota this is where my family are and with a new baby ,17 months old, my wife and i want her to know her elders and grandparents as well as her culture and language. I feel that the material that DBMA teaches is very appropriate for self defense here on the reservation as we have all the social problems that exist in a inner city atmosphere and non of the resources to combat it. many people are scared and the Leo's are overwhelmed. getting people involved is the hard part but as Guru crafty so eloquently states, "ther adventure continues"  so I hope soon to be able to make a trip to California and train with some of you guys. It sounds like a lot of fun. right now my job has me tied to the home front as we are short staffed and wayyy overbooked but my resolve is strong. the martial arts is my passion so i look forward to each opportunty to train and learn.  smiley

Mitakuye Oyasin (we are all related)
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 06:57:34 AM by Blackwolf_101 » Logged

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2009, 11:42:20 AM »

Welcome to our campfire Blackwolf.
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Glewis007
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« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2009, 11:23:01 PM »

Woof Blackwolf, I hear you. I also live in a small town(about 30,00) here in Ohio....I often wish I was closer to Guro Crafty, and the Calif clan.
However take the Bull by the horns and get your own group going.
I don't know what your martial arts background is...but Through the DBMA Its entirely possible.
I started training Dog Brother material (Real contact stick fighting tapes) Mine are vhs. grin
Progressed to the attacking blocks tapes and  the others.....
Made a trip to Calif. did some Private triaining...with Guro Crafty and so the adventure began........Six years latter I have fought in several gatherings......I'am stoked to the gills to say I was promoted to Candidate Dog brother.....had the honor of having Guro Crafty here for a day of private training(Ohio)....He was doing a seminar in Akron.........and the adventure truley continues and its a blast!
So long story short.......You can do all the things you want to do with DBMA.......Put some feet to it......and let it happen and watch it grow.......
I thinks its safe to say....that this is a very tight group......Guor Crafty......is a great leader of the pack....and we all take intrest in each other as individuals......
So be positive and build your own group.....It starts with you...but were all here to help.
I might also put a plug in to join the members site....lots to be gleaned there as well.........
If I can help in anyway....please let me know.
                                                                  C- Howling Dog
Hey there,C-Howling Dog was you meaning the sem in Canton Ohio, with the LEO's That Sem? I was at that one. Your from Ohio? What part? If I contacted you before forgive me.I think we might have meant down in Canton last year.Mongo
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2009, 08:11:44 PM »

Interesting article, I also posted this in the MMA thread.  I believe that DBMA has high standards for its members and with TUF showing de-evolution I think the DBMA TV Show would be great for for taking a higher road with its fighters.

http://sherdog.com/news/articles/mayeda-examines-mmas-role-in-society-16313

Wednesday, February 25, 2009
by Danny Acosta

16313
Fights inside and outside the cage and ring fall under the mixed martial arts umbrella. For David Mayeda, MMA has become as much about responsibility as excitement.

The “human cockfighting” phrase still reverberates, despite support from mainstream advertisers like Nike, Bud Light and Microsoft. Mayeda, who earned his PhD in American Studies from the University of Hawaii, set out to explore MMA’s place in society in 2005 after coming to know the sport through “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series.

“I knew, even though I was seduced by mixed martial arts as a fan, it potentially could have differing effects on society in terms of violence,” said Mayeda, who has placed his academic focus on violence prevention geared toward youth.

“Fighting for Acceptance: Mixed Martial Artists and Violence in American Society” was published in February 2008. Mayeda took his theses from print to film when he directed, co-produced and narrated the documentary “MMA 808: Inside Hawaii’s Fight Game,” which was later derived from his book.

“I’m going to stick to my assertion that because MMA is the closest thing to the complete sport of fighting, it holds -- the sport as a whole holds -- a broader social responsibility,” he said. “That overlap between MMA and street school or domestic violence is the most striking concern for me socially. I’d like to see the MMA community take a broader responsibility in distancing the sport from those types of violence and sending out the right social messages to prevent those types of violence.”

MMA enthusiasts charge Mayeda with taking the sport backward by acknowledging its warts. Detractors, on the other hand, view him as an apologist.

The Hawaiian recognizes reluctance to be honest about the sport because of the obstacles it has had to overcome to become accepted in the mainstream. If the UFC applies its marketing muscle to social issues, it can make a visible impact, according to Mayeda. He was pleased with UFC Fight Night 16 “Fight for the Troops” in December and hopes the show serves as the first step in significant social involvement.

Balance between violence and the “feel good” story seems paramount, and the former high school football player points to the NFL as a potential model for the UFC. That organization -- the most popular and powerful professional sports entity in America -- also walks arm-in-arm with violence.

“They have really strong charitable organizations that they promote during their commercials during their games,” Mayeda said.

Responsibility does not rest solely with the UFC. If an MMA promotion can profit from a community, it can give back to it, as well. Mayeda offered one startling example of MMA doing its best to curb violence. In Kailua, Hawaii, more than a year ago, a man beat his ex-girlfriend to death with the butt of his gun. MMA Hawaii executives who run MMA Hawaii Magazine and mmahawaii.com recognized the perpetrator as one of the spectators at an event they sponsored.

Photo courtesy of MMAHawaii.com

Kala Kolohe Hose
and the HSCADV.
In response, MMA Hawaii initiated partnerships with the Hawaii State Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Mothers Against Drunk Driving. MMA Hawaii Magazine also enlisted Icon Sport middleweight champion Kala Hose and had him pose with his daughter under the caption: “You love your daughter. You want to give her the world. Start by treating her mother with respect. Real fighters keep it in the ring.” Mayeda thinks responsible fighters should speak out against domestic violence, drunken driving, substance abuse and other social ailments more often.

Even with island MMA in recovery after the extended absence of Rumble on the Rock and Icon Sport -- Mayeda believes MMA was more popular in 2001 than it is now -- ads like the one involving Hose do more than educate fans; they educate lawmakers, too. It frustrates Mayeda that similar campaigns are not already fixtures in the sport.

“I think those icons need to be pushed, not just as athletes but as humanitarians, as well,” he said. “I think that can do a lot to change the culture of mixed martial arts.”

Mayeda thinks MMA has the power to use its popularity to bring about positive change. He and Antonio McKee -- a former International Fight League standout who also works with children in his community -- agree that youth violence prevention programs involving MMA appeal to at-risk kids because it provides a release through which they can draw on their physical abilities. However, advancing the culture of MMA has many obstacles, and one -- “The Ultimate Fighter” -- stands out above all the rest.

Each installment of the Spike TV reality series brings promising talent to the UFC. What happens along the way perturbs Mayeda. The fights may not be official, but UFC President Dana White’s presence -- along with prominent fighters serving as coaches -- makes the show a representation of the UFC, in particular, and MMA, in general. It has a heavy influence on first impressions.

“They already have the [male] 20- and 30-something demographic kind of hooked,” Mayeda said. “So I don’t know that ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ is bringing new fans from that demographic. They need to be reaching out to an older demographic, men and women.”

Mayeda sees it as a tug-of-war between long-term investment and a shortsighted play for ratings and cash. He points again to the NFL, which puts together family-friendly events despite the inherent violence associated with football. MMA role models abound, according to Mayeda.

“[Rosi Sexton has] a 2-year-old child and [is an] 8-1 mixed martial artist with a PhD,” he said.

Mayeda now watches traditional MMA programming as he continues his advocacy for a sport still struggling to find its identity. The more he speaks out, the more criticism he receives. His is a thankless job. Mayeda no longer watches “The Ultimate Fighter,” even though it brought him to MMA. He suggests Junie Allen Browning’s antics on the most recent season countered the UFC’s efforts to keep negative images -- like the infamous Noah Thomas-Marlon Sims street fight on season five -- under wraps. Mixed signals are being sent.

“It’s hard to reconcile that inconsistency,” Mayeda said. “It’s like ‘Jackass’ the movie for the series. They’re really helping to create that ambiance. I just don’t understand anymore. They should have learned from TUF 1. They’re not evolving. They’re devolving.”

Mayeda wants MMA to borrow from traditional martial arts. Teach it for discipline, self defense and self-esteem building. Teach younger students more grappling than striking. Build family relationships and educational goals.

“Those are the things that martial arts schools are known for doing,” he said. “If MMA schools can capture that identity and really pursue those goals, it’ll have a much easier time gaining acceptance across the country.”
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
peregrine
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« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2009, 12:25:51 AM »

I agree with much of what Mayeda wrote. TMA has a code that is instilled upon it's students that carries over to society. These tools are for protection not blind destruction.
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Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2009, 07:41:56 AM »

Woof

Nice Post Robert. I would also have to agree with the statement that the UFC, while being the vehicle that brought my attention to the MMA world,  The Reality TV show TUF continues to drag the martial arts through the mud by focusing on the antics of emotionally under-equipped EMO generation fighters.  I especially liked the aspect of the article where Mayeda talks about the influences of violent culture on the youth. this has been an interest of mine for many years. In the past i have spent a lot of time volunteering at youth activities on the reservation. many of the "at risk kids" i think do tend to gravitate toward dangerous  activities with MMA being one of those activities.  I often get a bit peeved at the social workers that shout their mantra: "Violence is learned behavior", while i agree that progressively sophisticated levels of violence are most likely learned behaviors. i feel that an innate instinct for aggression is present in every living thing. and especially in human beings. without that instinct we would be much lower on the food chain my friends! and in as such that instinct does need to be honored and given a place to be exorcised. we do not have to battle daily for survival anymore from wild creatures or from the elements as our great ancestors did.  so we have few options left with which to express that part of the life force that can be seen as destructive.  this is one of the things that attracted me to this organization. DBMA has within its structure both the necessary ritualistic elements as well as the practical elements to honor this yang energy. In the Lakota culture we Refer to this energy as Wioh'piyata,  it is the western direction and the west is where the thunderstorms come from out here. The west represents Energy and power that can be both destructive as well as healing. the winds and lightning of the west can be destructive but the rains heal the land and bring new growth.  this energy has an equal and important place in the culture and it is honored as the first direction we pray to when we pray.

Mitakuye' oyasin

Blackwolf_101
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maija
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« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2009, 09:59:33 AM »

@ Blackwolf_101
Absolutely! I heartily agree with your comments.
Very interesting about the Lakota way of thinking about 'yang' energy. Can you tell us any more about how this yang energy in young people is channeled to the positive side, within the traditions of the Lakota culture? The teaching of discipline, self responsibility and moral values have to go hand in hand with this 'yang' power, which has been something teachers have known through history. It is also something that seems lacking in today, at least in the general population.
It is sad that the media is drawn to 'the lowest common denominator' and spends so much time fabricating grudge matches, focusing on revenge and creating forced anger to make a good spectacle. This fake emotional rollercoaster is one reason I don't even own a TV any more.
But anyway ......
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Chad
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« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2009, 11:08:16 AM »

This fake emotional rollercoaster is one reason I don't even own a TV any more.

Here is a quote from Mike Dolce's blog from TUF 7. At the time, most of the MMA fans around the net basically blamed Docle for being hypersenetive. That was the last season I watched after Dana White dropped Jesse Taylor from the finale (which was good), then brought him back  angry  Of course when we as a society as a whole put these people (athletes, musicians, politicians) on a pedestal, as more than human, how should we expect them to act? inhuman.

http://www.mmaweekly.com/absolutenm/templates/dailynews.asp?articleid=6422&zoneid=3

"Personally, I knew something was seriously wrong with this production when, as a sequestered, professional athlete in the midst of a major sporting event, I could not obtain a free range chicken breast for almost 48 hours of repeated requests, but a bottle of tequila, a half rack of beer and a funnel could be delivered in twenty minutes at any time of day or night with a single belligerent phone call. All under the guise of trying to determine just who was The Ultimate Fighter…the epitome of professional athletics.

 To me The Ultimate Fighter is a term that should be reserved for a gentleman-athlete who stands above his peers, not just in his ability to perform within the confines of competition, but within the confines of civility and life.

 Call me an old-fashioned square but, “It is the Ul-ti-mate,” right?

 That is a very definite term with no room for flaws, inside the cage or not.

 Is Spike TV, The Ultimate Fighter, the UFC or our rapidly growing fan-base really interested in finding the next great representative that can cause the most destruction to a rented home while getting drunk, pissing his pants and sacrificing his dignity?

 I don’t think so.

 Are they looking for a house full of socially inept, moral delinquents that couldn’t channel their mental energy into anything more meaningful than a wall mural of penises and vaginas?

 What was once a ground-breaking format that introduced the world to the most exciting combat sport in history, has slowly degraded into a low-brow compilation of alcohol induced, frat boy antics that could serve to destroy the very concept it was intended to create. "

« Last Edit: February 28, 2009, 02:50:38 PM by Chad » Logged
Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2009, 07:02:25 AM »

Woof Maija

Thanks for the kind comments. As far as the Lakota traditions and how we channel the "dangerous" energy, there are a variety of ways that western (the direction not the culture) energy is utilized.  Lakota spiritual ceremonies are all very physical affairs. The "Inipi" or sweat lodge utilizes heated rocks and water to remind us of our connection to all that is.  The sun Dance requires that people suffer to make their prayers stronger and to help heal the community in general. committing to the sun dance requires a year of preparation as you must fast for 4 days and go without water during the day while you dance for up to 12 hours, often in 100+ degree heat. Many people elect to be pierced through the arm or chest by skewers in order to make their prayers and mind stronger.  I have never participated in a Sun Dance But I have been on what many people would call a "vision quest" My Favorite experience with this was My first time spending all night out on a Hill in the Black hills of South Dakota. It was Pitch black, i couldn't even see my hand in front of my face but as the sun began to rise and the mist formed I could hear Bull elk Bellowing all around me. It's still one of my favorite sounds. when the mist cleared there were elk all around me some withing 50 feet. I think the Hanblecia or "vision quest" reflects the dog brothers philosophy most closely because when my father was preparing me for this experience he told me, " when you go out there you must be clear and ready for anything. the spirits will be present and if they want they can take you at anytime." this was my first realization that I was completely responsible for a decision that put me in a situation that could possibly end my life. the outcome however was a better understanding of myself and my connection to all that moves on the earth.  hopefully that gives you some idea of what i think has helped me along the way understand the principle of "only you are responsible for you" i have been aware of this principle for many years and have tried to live it, not always being completely successful every day but in my defense, I keep trying. I think it was Bruce Lee who once said,"Balance is when you run like hell to catch up to it."  grin

Miyakuye Oyasin


Blackwolf_101
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maija
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« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2009, 10:51:07 AM »

Thanks Blackwolf_101!
You said:"Lakota spiritual ceremonies are all very physical affairs". It's interesting that there is also a Taoist view that the gate to emotional, mental and spiritual development is the physical body. Another similarity is the strong connection in Taoist belief with Nature, as a place to understand one's place in the universe.
One of the big downsides to modern life is the inevitable disconnect with our physical bodies that comes from office jobs, cars and supermarkets. Similarly the disconnect from the natural world and our relative vulnerability within it. I heard somewhere that the average life expectancy of a lone 'mountain man' at the turn of the century was 38 years old - I guess it's hard to make it alone in the wild. There is a reason why people work together as a group to increase their chances of survival.
OK - I've wandered way off the thread here .... sorry.
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Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2009, 02:33:11 PM »

Ok, to hopefully get things Back on the thread ... oops....sorry,  what progression of DBMA material would be recommended to start utilizing kali in the cage. i have seen discussions on other boards related to this topic with people who "supposedly"  have MMA experience and expertise stating that JKD and Kali will never work In the cage which is interesting to me because when i watch the UFC in particular i see a lot of Fighters all with the exact same set of skills like they have all been turned out on an assembly line and then you Get someone Like Machida or Kung lee who break the mold and still have success yet the "experts" still still say, say MMA is just defined By certain technical parameters. T me, I see an opening for someone who thinks outside the Box to begin training a dynasty of fighters That can move differently and strike more effectively both from the standing and the ground position. 

one Thing i have always wondered about is  trapping hands, why aren't fighters in MMA using more Trapping hands, the gloves are designed to allow such attachments?
« Last Edit: March 22, 2009, 03:56:06 PM by Blackwolf_101 » Logged

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2009, 12:32:30 AM »

"I see an opening for someone who thinks outside the Box to begin training a dynasty of fighters That can move differently and strike more effectively both from the standing and the ground position."

What a coincidence!  Me too!!!  cheesy

"one Thing i have always wondered about is  trapping hands, why aren't fighters in MMA using more Trapping hands, the gloves are designed to allow such attachments?"

I offer a part of my approach to trapping in the Running Dog DVD. wink

 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2009, 07:37:49 PM »

Hope to kick things off in a week or two.  We are looking at Tuesdays, mid-day in Hermosa Beach.

 cool
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straw dog
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« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2009, 11:48:35 PM »

got to work a living...

Can't just take off on Tuesday afternoons...

 undecided
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Dan Farley
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« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2009, 01:36:58 AM »

Looking forward to this!  Who else is going to get in on it?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2009, 10:54:58 AM »

Frankfurter for one  cool
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2009, 09:09:59 AM »

Starting this coming Tuesday at 14:00 at Boxing Works in Hermosa Beach.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2009, 11:38:50 AM »

Woof All:

An outstanding time was had by all at our initial session.  We identified and worked the four power lines of the Arfful Dodger chamber, then focused on the Dracula/Dodger. 

At my wife's request, the regular time is now Monday at 13:30.

The Adventure continues,
Guro Crafty
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Dan Farley
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« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2009, 01:14:48 PM »

A good time it was indeed!  I'm pretty happy to hear that you're changing it to Mondays, as I almost always have that day off. 

If any of the Chatsworth guys are following this, I am in Studio City, not too far from you all, should you want to get some extra practice in up here in the Valley. 

Thanks to Crafty for a great afternoon  afro
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Matt Tucker
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« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2009, 12:15:39 AM »

Oh to have Mondays off..........and to live in California  rolleyes
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2009, 12:08:04 AM »

From here forward the plan is for Monday's at 11:00.  We should have the place to ourselves then.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2009, 02:47:49 PM »

TOMORROW (MONDAY) will be held at 12:30!!!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #37 on: May 22, 2009, 03:12:52 PM »

Due to Memorial Day, next session will be Monday June 1 at 11:00
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Poidog
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« Reply #38 on: May 29, 2009, 12:12:43 PM »

Due to Memorial Day, next session will be Monday June 1 at 11:00
Woof Guro,

I'll be there.

Aloha, Poi
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Who dares wins - British SAS
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #39 on: May 29, 2009, 12:14:56 PM »

Outstanding!
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Dan Farley
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« Reply #40 on: May 29, 2009, 02:00:21 PM »

Me too!!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2009, 03:03:38 PM »

Night Owl may need a ride down. Would you check in with him please?
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MHouston
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« Reply #42 on: June 02, 2009, 03:28:49 PM »

Once again thanks for the opportunity. We will definitely be there Monday.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #43 on: June 02, 2009, 03:30:37 PM »

A pleasure meeting and working with you yesterday.  See you next Monday.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #44 on: June 07, 2009, 11:51:57 PM »

Looking forward to pairing Poi Dog and Kevin tomorrow  cool
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #45 on: June 09, 2009, 01:18:13 PM »

An awesome day.

Deep work on the application of Dodger Dracula on the Half Carrot.  I'm really liking this material a lot.  Seems to be particularly useful for the shorter man against the taller man.
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Stickgrappler
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« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2009, 03:04:16 PM »

 cool
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #47 on: June 15, 2009, 05:03:04 PM »

Today we worked our way along a nice little progression that led to boxing gloves on and entry with Dodger-Dracula against the Jab Cross with follow ups.

The last 40 minutes (typical session is 90-120 minutes) were dedicated to the Ilustrisimo step vs the MT round kick.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #48 on: June 20, 2009, 09:10:20 AM »

Looking forward to a rocking good time on Monday!
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MHouston
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« Reply #49 on: June 22, 2009, 07:46:30 PM »

Enlightening class as usual. Really enjoy employing the new angles, definitely not enjoying having them done to me wink.
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