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Author Topic: Dog Brothers.....The Stick....and The Fox  (Read 2232 times)
Blackwolf_101
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« on: March 01, 2009, 07:55:52 AM »

Woof Everyone,

As I become more involved with this forum and with the dog brothers organization in general, applied for DBMAA membership this week  grin, I thought it might be interesting to mention some of the similarities I am noticing between the tribal philosophy of the dog Brothers and The Tohkala or Fox society of the Lakota people. The Tohkala were the elite warrior society of the lakota. there were other societies but the Tohkala were the bravest and the strongest.  What brings this comparison to mind for me is the stick. While dog brothers are known primarily for their stick fighting skills. The Tohkala would also run or ride into battle with a stick and attempt to touch an enemy. this became known as "counting coup." There is a scene in the movie little big man showing a Sioux (Lakota) warrior riding in and touching a cavalry officer, it might have even been Custer I can't remember, haven't seen the movie in ages. As i thought more about it over the years i came to the conclusion that that scene probably wasn't all that representative of how it really was in battle.  think about a battlefield where your side is equipped with: knives, bow and arrow and you with an stick. The other side is equipped with guns and bayonets. chances are you didn't just walk or ride up and touch someone and then ride or walk away unhindered. i would bet there were often cases where the warrior armed with his Coup stick had to use it to defend himself. I am not aware of any organized Lakota combat system But i will  do some research into this because it occurs to me that you don't get  reputation of being the baddest S.O.B. to ride the plains just by accident. they had to have some significant combat skills just to stay alive even.

One key element of the Lakota warrior societies that i think i should mention is the idea that when a Tohkala warrior was called up to defend his people or his land he became this powerful tool for destruction of the enemy. when he was home and not in a time of war he was to be a Ikce' wicasa or common man, it was his responsibility to conduct himself in a humble  and honorable manner.  In an age where Hype seems to be the way we conduct our business I think we could all do well to remember to be Be The Ikce' wicasa, when at home with our families and going to the grocery store or whatever we should have the humbleness of the warrior, " I bow down to no man but ask no man to bow to me"
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I am here to chew bubble gum and kick some ass and I'm all out of bubblegum
Chad
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2009, 06:56:41 PM »

That's cool. I always thought counting coup was a "I could have killed you right there- you only live by my will" kind of thing?
I've noticed this in some DB video clips where even when the fight is called the winner still mimes the killing blow. One in particular comes to mind but I can't remember where I seen it (might of been the NatGeo stuff). Anyway, I would like to hear more about the Tohkala if you have more info.

p.s. Richard check your email.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2009, 07:17:44 PM by Chad » Logged
Tom Stillman
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2009, 07:56:15 PM »

Chad, I think it was "Lonely Dog" on the national geographic pilot show @ 3:48 (good example) doing the striking gesture you mentioned.   Good Form   grin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6EZE_rmsQs&feature=related
« Last Edit: March 07, 2009, 05:59:42 PM by Tom Stillman » Logged

Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
Sebresos
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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2009, 08:01:41 PM »

The black guy who sidekicked the fat guy in the knife fight and knocked him down, does he still come around,fight at gatherings? I thought he had pretty good technique.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2009, 09:36:23 PM »

Allen Bridgeman.  The last time I spoke with him was a few years back and he said he was headed off to China to study.    I tried contacting him recently about the TV show but my contact info was not current.
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Chad
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« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2009, 10:25:27 PM »

Chad, I think it was "Lonely Dog" on the national geographic pilot show @ 3:48 (good example) doing the striking gesture you mentioned.   Good Form   grin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6EZE_rmsQs&feature=related

Nice find, Tom- that was the one that stuck in my mind thanks for finding it!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2009, 01:21:41 AM »

I supplied the footage to OP.  That particular fight appears in  , , , I think it was our DVD "Los Triques".
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Blackwolf_101
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2009, 07:22:37 AM »

Woof everyone,

To respond to Chad's comment;

you are right as well my friend, There is that element of, you live by my will alone in the application of counting coup. The act itself implies that very statement. it allows the warrior who performed the task to demonstrate his skill and bravery and to not have to take the life of his opponent/enemy.  In the Lakota culture all life is valued as it is in many cultures. when we talk about other people and even animals we use the term "Oyate" which means family we say the Tatanka oyate meaning the buffalo familyor the buffalo nation. we think of everything as being related because we all walk on this earth and must therefore share it.  So to a warrior counting Coup it meant he did not have to take that life because killing for any other purpose than for food was considered damaging to the circle of life that all things are part of. Often times when a war party came back from battle those that had taken a life wore black on their faces they would do this to hide their faces from "wakan tanka" the creator force and they would wear black until they had been through a ritual cleansing.  even with all this concern for life however, war is war and bravado and displays of skill in battle and bravery were important as well.  Like i have said before you don't get to be known as the baddest Mofo's on the plains without the skill to strike fear into your opponents.  another thing the Tohkala would do to demonstrate their bravery was to stake themselves out in battle a warrior would ride out into the middle of the battle field, and pound  stake into the ground. He would be lashed to the stake by a strong sinew rope. he would then stay there and fight until one of three things happened 1) he died 2) enemy were all killed or run off  3) another Tohkala  came and pulled his stake out freeing him to move about the battle field.

Imagine trying to fight at a gathering with your ankle lashed to a pole in the center of the fighting area with bout five feet of play in the rope. makes things a bit more exciting doesn't it? hehe
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I am here to chew bubble gum and kick some ass and I'm all out of bubblegum
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