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Author Topic: tennis elbows in kali  (Read 2119 times)
matinik
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Posts: 41


« on: May 16, 2009, 10:51:53 PM »

woof all

as you all know, swinging the stick (of various length and gauges) tends to give the
arms some wear and tear through out the years. one of those nagging aches are the
dreaded tennis elbows cry. any strenghtening/conditioning exercises you guys might want to
share would be great and a worthwhile topic imho. perhaps how to prevent this mishap from happening
in the first place would also be information widely appreciated, i'm sure smiley. i've seen some
exercises pertaining to this on some tennis sites. but the strokes in tennis doesn't exactly match
the strikes in kali, so i'm not sure if the exercises shown in these sites would cover most of
the issues involve in kali (abaniko, witik, V-de Kadena-V and so forth). it would be a boon to
have info directly from practitioners.

thanks

matinik
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JDN
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Posts: 2004


« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2009, 11:08:39 PM »

I played tennis for my school in college.  And a lot of squash later.
Sorry, but the best answer is rest.  And don't start up again until there is no pain.
Work on other aspects, foot work, or...

I'm sure you know far more about stick than I do.
As a side note however, often if the form is incorrect, the injury is aggravated.
So pay attention during practice.  And don't use pipes, weights, or anything to aggravate
the injury.
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Dog Robertlk808
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Posts: 544


« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2009, 12:06:47 PM »

There are some clips on youtube for exercises \ treatment, I have yet to try them as I was looking up the exercises last night.
Im sure taking some fish oil for the inflammation may help too.







« Last Edit: May 17, 2009, 12:09:57 PM by Robertlk808 » Logged

"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2009, 12:26:28 PM »

These look interesting too.







« Last Edit: May 17, 2009, 12:30:27 PM by Robertlk808 » Logged

"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
matinik
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Posts: 41


« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2009, 04:19:25 PM »

awesome, guys! thanks for the posts!
any tips on doing abanikos (proper angle of the wrist et al)?
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Crafty_Dog
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Posts: 31263


« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2009, 11:42:22 PM »

Well, the new agey guys snored me before I could get to the end, but the Doczac guy is dead on with one of what I believe to be the two principal patterns to look for.   Guro Inosanto taught me to to put a rubber band around my, pardon the expression, "crane's beak" and to high rep spread the fingers against the resistance of rubber band.  Doczac bring to my attention a point I had not appreciated previously-- adding the flexion of the wrist.  I will explore this.
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2009, 12:24:35 AM »

Quote
Well, the new agey guys snored me before I could get to the end, but the Doczac guy is dead on with one of what I believe to be the two principal patterns to look for.

Yeah.. I thought I would throw him into the mix.  There are a lot of clips on youtube.

This was interesting too but it looks to be addressed to someone specific.



This is the PDF file the guy in the video references, he provided more info within the comments section, it is an article "An exercise programme for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy" from the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1725102&blobtype=pdf



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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
grayson
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Posts: 12


« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2009, 09:40:12 AM »

awesome, guys! thanks for the posts!
any tips on doing abanikos (proper angle of the wrist et al)?

Abaniko is an elbow driven movement. The starting and ending position is the same if you were to thrust a 6 and 7.
Their should be no stress on the shoulder or wrist when doing abaniko.

As far as tennis elbow, the stick diameter you train with might need to be increased. If the stick is too thin, you put strain on the forearm
muscles by trying to keep a tight grip.
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DougMacG
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2009, 04:53:21 PM »

My experience with it also is from racquet sports.  I suffered for about 2 years and stubbornly played through it.  My logic was to not quit what I enjoy while still aggravating it in the more mundane tasks of life that I can't quit so easily.  Besides when I tried to quit sports I ate more and got more irritable to be around. sad I received advice from many sources.  My advice is do all of the above. Disclosure:  I am not a trained professional, just passing along what I think I've learned.

1) Ice it after use like you would a badly sprained ankle.  I was told it is a similar injury to a sprain although mine was mostly in the upper forearm more than in the joint.  Make ice by filling paper Dixie cups in the freezer.  Then break the cup to give an ice massage, pressing the cold past the skin deep into the tissue areas that hurt.

2) Rest, then rest and stretch carefully, then rest and stretch and strengthen carefully.  As you come back, try for lower impact and shorter periods of time.  Stop at the first sign of trouble if you can. With rest alone, the pain subsided for me and I felt healed, but the partial healing was brittle and re-injured instantly on the next impact.

3) Anti-inflammatories: People recommended ibuprofen which I take for other achs and pains, but for me nothing alleviated this pain.  Then from two different sources I received advice to take low levels of anti-inflammatories continuously over a period of time.  One was from an MD, but not of this specialty, and the other was from an athlete I thought least likely to put these poisons in his systems.  This was the remedy that seemed to work.  Run it past your trusted medical advisers first as I assume these can be bad for stomach, liver and kidneys.  I took a fraction of maximum dosage several times a day - something like 1 (or even 1/2) tablet ibuprofen at a time instead of 2 as over-the counter might suggest or 4 like pharmaceutical strength, and 1 Alleve (or a half) over night - longer lasting.  I don't remember for how long but the plan was something like 3 weeks, not completely continuous because I feared the other damages, but often. If you try this, make sure you keep up the other therapies, ice, rest, stretch and very carefully strengthen.

4) 'Elbow brace': The only that works in my experience is this, go here http://banditelbowbrace.com/  You can buy it in a large tennis store.  Basically it absorbs the shock before it goes into the elbow or protects whatever areas in the forearm/elbow that you choose.  You tighten down two pads but still allow blood flow.  Don't bother with the other styles IMO especially if tightening hard cuts off the flow and most don't really absorb the shock. Search the words 'bandit elbow brace' in google to get competitive prices online.  I use the white one and continue to use it for prevention.  The black one includes magnets for increasing blood flow.  Costs more and I haven't tried it.  I don't know about those claims.  If you are serious and willing to spend the money, buy 2 of each.  Maybe try the magnets without tightening for treatments when not training or competing.  I know chiropractors have treatments that stimulate blood flow for healing tennis elbow or at least to make you feel good enough to keep you coming back.  I think they use ultrasound(?).  For hockey I wear the elbow brace under the protective pads and for outdoor sports in colder seasons I wear it under the clothing.

Good luck and keep us posted. 
« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 05:24:23 PM by DougMacG » Logged
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