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Author Topic: Prisons  (Read 2727 times)
Crafty_Dog
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« on: June 24, 2009, 07:20:43 AM »

Woof All:

I wasn't sure whether to post this thread in this forum or the Politics and Religion forum.   Obviously I chose here.  This thread is for things that happen in prison.

Kicking this off is this from today's NY Times:

Rape in Prison
Published: June 23, 2009

Rape accompanied by savage violence has long been part of prison life. Congress finally confronted this horrendous problem by passing the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. In addition to bringing attention to a long overlooked problem, the new law created a commission that has put forth a broad set of rape-prevention standards that deserve to become mandatory in correctional agencies throughout the country.

The commission report, released earlier this week, should come as alarming news. It suggests, for example, that rapes carried out by corrections officers and inmates are widespread, but the actual rates of rape vary widely from place to place.

Drawing on a federal survey of more than 63,000 state and federal inmates, the commission said that about 4.5 percent reported being sexually abused at least once during the previous 12 months. Extrapolating from this data, the commissioners estimate that there were at least 60,000 rapes of prisoners nationally during this period.

Young people in custody are particularly vulnerable. In pilot study of nine youth facilities, nearly 1 in 5 respondents reported one nonconsensual sexual contact during the previous year.

Rape is not inevitable, however. Strong leaders who are committed to fighting the problem can minimize these savage and traumatic assaults. For starters, the commission recommends that all correctional agencies develop explicit, written zero-tolerance policies on this issue.

These agencies, which need to do a better job of screening corrections workers, should adopt the policy that employees who participate in sexual assaults or look the other way while they occur will be fired. Zero-tolerance policies should eventually be integrated into collective-bargaining agreements with unions.

Beyond that, corrections agencies need to make it easier for people in custody to report rape without facing reprisal. The reports need to be promptly and thoroughly investigated. The agencies need to keep publicly accessible records on the reports and investigations. And they need to develop plans for preventing any rape scenarios that continue to recur.

The report represents a strong first step in confronting this problem. The next step lies with Attorney General Eric Holder, who can approve the reportís recommendations and thereby make the standards mandatory for federal prisons and state prisons that accept federal money.
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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2009, 01:15:25 PM »

This article seems to suggest, that in recent past, correctional officers found to be involved in these kinds of activities were not fired on the spot and prosecuted in a court of law.  I find that disturbing.
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Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2009, 02:30:50 PM »

Well, its the NY Slimes, so caveat lector.  Bad dog on me for forgetting to point this out.
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Tom Stillman
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2009, 10:59:50 PM »

Well, its the NY Slimes, so caveat elector.  Bad dog on me for forgetting to point this out.
I was going to point that out, but I figured, you of all people should get a free pass. grin
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Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.  dalai lama
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2009, 11:27:20 PM »

CO friend texted me the following:
===========
 3 Way's 2 Stay out of Trouble in Prison:
 Don't Gamble.
Don't Do Drugs.
 Don't have a Bitch.
 This will keep U All out of 90% of All problems.
  Because some one else will want your Bitch.
 If U don't pay your Debts , U will Be a Bitch.
 & Stand Up 4 Yourself All  The Time.
 Or! get ready 2 get Hitched:(

 There's 30 of Us Staff Members  @ Work right Now.
 & 650 of Them. Do the Math.
 If you don't like the Hospitality,= don't come 2 Prison *
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2012, 12:34:29 PM »

Long article on a movement within prisons aware from solitary confinement on a mass scale.  Even though it comes from POTH, it makes sense to me  cheesy 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/us/rethinking-solitary-confinement.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120311
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bigdog
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 07:57:30 PM »

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-03-01/buying-prisons-require-high-occupancy/53402894/1

"At a time when states are struggling to reduce bloated prison populations and tight budgets, a private prison management company is offering to buy prisons in exchange for various considerations, including a controversial guarantee that the governments maintain a 90% occupancy rate for at least 20 years."
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G M
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2012, 09:15:11 PM »

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-03-01/buying-prisons-require-high-occupancy/53402894/1

"At a time when states are struggling to reduce bloated prison populations and tight budgets, a private prison management company is offering to buy prisons in exchange for various considerations, including a controversial guarantee that the governments maintain a 90% occupancy rate for at least 20 years."

There should be no such thing as private prisons, IMHO.
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Hello Kitty
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2012, 09:47:04 PM »

I'm a huge fan of solitary confinement. Work out all day doing isometrics, no-one bothers you with drama, what's not to like?
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G M
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2012, 09:49:33 PM »

I'm a huge fan of solitary confinement. Work out all day doing isometrics, no-one bothers you with drama, what's not to like?

Well, It depends on the individual, I guess. If it goes on too long, most seem to start decompensating badly as a result of the isolation.
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Hello Kitty
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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2012, 10:09:43 PM »

I know this will sound  bad, and it's been twenty years since I've been in trouble, but I used to go there on purpose.
Smash somebody and just go. There wad a reason for it. If you're in gp, that also means that you get caught up in all of the politics. I had a friend that was due to be released in two weeks. They wanted a guy killed and assigned it to him. When he refused, they stabbed him thirty timrs. So, he either risked catching another case with a life sentence or being killed. Savory options. No thanks. I'll never go back because I have changed my life over the years, but the hole is actually not that bad once you get used to mono diet.
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diesel_tke
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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2012, 09:55:06 AM »

All Disciplinary Confinements are not created equally.  Here in Florida you also have Close Management.  Short term confinement doesn't seem to have too bad of an impact on your mental health.  Long term CM, does.  You see all kinds of problems there.

You also have protective management for those who are scared on the compoung, but that is for people with legit reasons.  If you don't have those, or they can be solved by transfering inmates, you will be released from PM.

But I've seen inmates act up just to go to confinement for a few months, just because they didn't feel like working on the grounds crew, or they just wanted a brake from inmate drama for a while.
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It is not the destination, but the journey.
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