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Author Topic: Eskrimadors in Jean LaFitte's pirate force?  (Read 2476 times)
Spadaccino
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Posts: 87


« on: November 05, 2003, 10:42:35 AM »

I've occasionally read that there were some Filipinos amongst the many nationalities in Jean LaFitte's band of pirates in New Orleans, and it has been claimed that they were eskrimadors.

Can anyone shed any more light on this?

Thanks,

TFS
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"And the rapier blades, being so narrow and of so small substance, and made of a very hard temper to fight in private frays... do presently break and so become unprofitable." --Sir John Smythe, 1590
Airyu
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Posts: 16


« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2003, 09:55:40 AM »

Hello TFS,

I wrote an article on this, sometime ago. I will try and find it and post the information, but here is something you may want to read.

The Filipino Americans (1763-Present): Their History, Culture, and Traditions by Veltisezar Bautista. Bookhaus Publishers. Hardcover, 8 1/2 x 11


"About 235 years ago, a settlement was established by Filipino deserters from Spanish ships at Saint Malo in the bayous of Louisiana, near the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The people who settled there were called Manilamen, who jumped ship during the galleon trade era off New Orleans, Louisiana, and Acapulco, Mexico, to escape Spanish brutalities. Known as Tagalas,* they spoke Spanish and a Malay dialect.** They lived together?governing themselves and living in peace and harmony?without the world knowing about their swamp existence.
Thus, they became the roots of Filipinos in America.
It was only after a journalist by the name of Lafcadio Hearn published an article in 1883 when their marshland existence was exposed to the American people. It was the first known written article about the Filipinos in the U.S.A."

Hearns article describes the village as well as the people in great detail.
The book is a good read and covers alot more early information on Filipinos in America.

Gumagalang
Guro Steve L.
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Spadaccino
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Posts: 87


« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2003, 07:32:41 AM »

Guro Steve!

How are you?

Thanks for the info--if you could find that article (at your convenience, of course) that would be great.

Peace,

Dave/TFS
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"And the rapier blades, being so narrow and of so small substance, and made of a very hard temper to fight in private frays... do presently break and so become unprofitable." --Sir John Smythe, 1590
Sun_Helmet
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Posts: 84


« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2003, 02:59:57 PM »

On a side note:

Here's a site that wants to list existing records of the Manila Galleons.

http://www.mrcstudios.com/bruce/

--Rafael--
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--Rafael--
"..awaken your consciousness of our past, already effaced from our memory, and to rectify what has been falsified and slandered."
Jose Rizal, from his 1889 essay, ' To The Filipinos '
Airyu
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Posts: 16


« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2003, 07:52:01 AM »

Hello David,

Sorry for the delay, I have been swamped with work! I hope you are doing well?? I can't seem to locate that article I had, but here is a few tidbits regarding information on Filipino immigration to the United States:

Approximately 1587 A Spanish galleon, the Nuestra Senora de Buena Esperanza, sent a shore party to explore what is now Morro Bay, California. This occurred on Sunday, Oct 18th 1587. Luzones Indios(Filipinos) were among the crew who landed. On Oct 20 there was a skirmish with local Indians and 1 Filipino was killed, they departed the coast on Oct 22nd.(This information is from Spanish Voyages to the Northwest Coast of America in the 16th century,pub.1929)

 Around 1595 The San Augustin, was shipwrecked near Point Reyes, San Francisco harbor. Filipino seamen were part of the crew.

1763 - The ?Manilla Men? established the village named St. Malo in the bayous outside of New Orleans.(Reported by Lafcadio Hearn, in Harper?s weekly March 31st, 1883.)

1789- 1865 ? Many Filipino crew members worked on Spanish exploration vessels, as well as Spanish Galeons. These vessels toured the west coast of the United States . In 1865 records from the New Bedford Whaling Museum identify whaling crewmembers in Alaska as ?Manilla Men?.

I hope this will offer some help in your search.

Gumagalang
Steve L.
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