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Author Topic: DBMA Lacrosse Staff  (Read 1691 times)
Crafty_Dog
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« on: July 27, 2009, 09:58:58 PM »

Woof All:

My son has become involved with the sport of lacrosse.

FANTASTIC GAME!!!  I wish I had known about it when I was young and now that I am not I wish there were a league for old farts like me.

Dog Brother trivia:  Top Dog used to play a little bit of lacrosse and to my eye it was a subtle and important influence to the distinctive quality of his movement (as was his being a defensive end for Columbia University's football team for one season).

Here are some entries from the thread on DBMA Lacrosse Staff on the DBMA Association Forum:

Guro Crafty
=========================

Here are some of the rules for lacrosse regarding contact:

From Lacrosse, fundmentals for winning by David Urick

1: Slashing: Stirking an opponent anywhere other than the gloved hand on the stick;

2: Tripping: obstructing an opponent at or below the knees with the stick, hands, arms, feet, or legs;

3: illegal body checking:  BC'g from the rear, above the shoulders, below the knees, or when the opponent is not in possession of the ball or within 5 yards of a loose ball.

4: Cross checking:  checking with the part of the stick between the hands (this an interesting reason why the Kalimba staff grip intrigues Coach Brooks so much-- there is NO area between the hands!)

5) Unsportsmanlike conduct

, , , ,

A)  HOLDING:  Holding an opponent of stick.  A player may hold off an opp in possession of the ball or within 5 yardsw of a loose ball with either a closed gloved hand on the hand of his stick or with either forearm.  However both hand of the defender must be upon his stick.  When holding off, a player must only exert pressure equal to that of his opponent (THIS is where the techniques, tactics, strategies I am developing get close to crossing the line.  I believe these issues can be solved, but until we get referees to acknowledge it, it is just Coach Brooks and my opinion)

, , ,


Here is some conventional 1x1 defense thinking:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8bn6oTsnOU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWJuqldYbk8&feature=related






------------------

Many staff systems have lots of spinning moves as part of using the range potential of the weapon in the context of 360 degrees.  Obviously, not having to worry here about getting hit in the back or the head facilitates spin moves greatly.

One of the ideas I am working with here is to use the "thirds grip" (a major element of our 6' staff subsystem)  to have, in effect, an attack stick (i.e. the shorter stick middies and attackers use for both attack and defense) on each side of the defender.  This contrasts to current practice wherein the attack stick is only on one side-- middies and attackers do so because that is the nature of the length of their stick and defenders seek to use the reach advantage of the d-stick and to force the attacker to commit sooner whether he is going left or right.

Note here the use of theory and technique from the Merge Theory VL, as in the use of Kalimba type merges done on the uppercut line with each each end of the d-stick.

The thirds grip also allows a fluid transition to the grip of the Kalimba game for a shorter staff (4-5 foot typically)-- which also allows for checking the the third of the stick that is in front of me without breaking the rule against checking with the lenght of the stick between my hands!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHowi-6c5cI&feature=player_embedded
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2009, 10:43:26 PM »

That is an awesome clip!  It would be sweet if you can get some footage of the team using it in a game.
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2009, 07:03:16 AM »

A one handed version can be seen at 2:42 (I think) by the player in the green shirt:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PklCh7KPfm4

To get a bit more sense of the game:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlX0UUeohaQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6BjA_zjGBU&feature=fvw lousy music but really good attack stick

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8K3oyo9Tzw&feature=related

A fair amount of contact is allowed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9WSMxQ7uJw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQ1Rm4KaTns a bit grainier, but a lot of good hits
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2009, 11:45:20 AM »

That is some interesting moves \ checks in the game.  Ive never really watched a Lacrosse game.

I think there is a Lacrosse league here in Hawaii Adults and Children.  I think Ill check into that!
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2009, 04:16:38 PM »

" Barbara K. Adamski" barbadamski.com.

Lacrosse (excerpt) by Barb Adamski. The Canadian Encyclopedia. 2009 Historica Foundation of Canada
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004453 <http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004453>


Men's Field Lacrosse

Men's field lacrosse is played by two teams of 10 on an outdoor field. The most noticeable difference between field lacrosse and other forms is the use of much longer sticks by the three defencemen on each team. The World
Lacrosse Championships take place every four years. In 2006, Canada won its first championship in nearly three decades when it defeated the United States of America 15-10. Many players on Canada's national field lacrosse
team play box lacrosse as well.

Women's Field Lacrosse

Women's field lacrosse is a non-contact sport played with 12 players per team. Ball movement and effective stick handling are key elements of the sport, and the shallowness of the stick's pocket makes catching and maintaining control of the ball more challenging. The first game of women's field lacrosse took place in Scotland in 1890.

Box Lacrosse

Box lacrosse was developed in the 1930s as a way to take advantage of hockey arenas left vacant during the summer months. Boxla (as it is also known) is sometimes referred to as the fastest sport on two feet. Rebounds and checks off the boards make the game exciting to watch, and a 30-second shot clock that requires a team to either score in half a minute or relinquish the ball to their opponent leads to a high-scoring game. Box lacrosse is usually played on a cement surface.

Professional indoor lacrosse is similar to box lacrosse in many ways, including the number of players per side (6), its use of the 30-second clock and the existence of boards surrounding the playing surface. Professional indoor lacrosse is played on a turf carpet.

Inter-Crosse

Inter-crosse, the newest form of lacrosse, is a low-risk activity, designed for schools and recreation programs. The easy-to-play indoor game uses molded plastic sticks and a soft, lightweight ball, and teaches participants
the fundamentals of lacrosse: scooping, carrying, passing, and catching the ball.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 06:28:23 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2010, 11:25:04 PM »

Woof All:

I just received the following via Facebook

The Adventure continues!
CD
======================


My son (also an eskrima student) has put into practice the techniques that you demonstrated in your lacrosse vid on you tube. As a rather small high school freshman, he needed all the help he could get. It's working great for him! Thanks Guro Marc! .
 Marc Denny April 14 at 11:29am This is awesome. Please tell me more!

PS: What was the URL for that clip? .
 Brandon Katz April 14 at 12:02pm Report
Sir- One of our fellow students ran across it and thought of Logan. He's a 5' 7", 145 lb defenseman. Just a wee beastie for his position. He saw the vid of you checking with the d-pole and watched it a dozen times! Took it to practice and had the exact same result... angry attackmen!

Logan and I are both students of Guro Kim Satterfield at the Midwest School of Eskrima, here in Fort Wayne. (I don't feel the least bit bad about bragging on my son being the youngest student the Guro Kim has ever taken on. He started at 12!)

Thanks again Guro Marc!
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Stickgrappler
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"...grappling happens. It just does." - Top Dog


« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2010, 03:37:35 PM »

woof Guro,

very very cool!

Guro Kim Satterfield, i recall him... one of the mainstays of the now defunct Eskrima Digest.

~sg
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
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