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Author Topic: biofeedback  (Read 2446 times)
5RingsFitness
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« on: May 07, 2010, 06:52:25 PM »

has anyone caught wind of "the gym movement protocol" or its off shoots?
any one familiar with biofeedback in re:training methodology
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
selfcritical
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2010, 09:16:10 AM »

As far as I can  tell, it's an over-application of a test from z-health for determining if your CNS is showing signs of overtraining. A noteable weakness I think is that the approach doesn't really address any kind of metabolic/energy system work.
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Kaju Dog
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2010, 09:40:28 AM »

Im not up to speed on any protocol.  I am familiar with Biofeedback at the level we used it in physical therapy.  I also used it for my knee rehab. 

I may not be even on the same page as this topic, but interested in where the conversation goes.

Dean
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selfcritical
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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2010, 12:36:12 PM »

I'll post the videos in a little bit
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selfcritical
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2010, 11:43:27 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHc_i06QZx8&feature=related
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2010, 02:23:07 PM »

As far as I can  tell, it's an over-application of a test from z-health for determining if your CNS is showing signs of overtraining. A noteable weakness I think is that the approach doesn't really address any kind of metabolic/energy system work.

I agree to an extent
it seems to be a stripped down version of z and applied kinesiology with some antagonistic marketing ploys

somewhat ingrateful maybe to the folks that got those guys there

my question is more in has anyone used this theory to work with ma?

just curious

had a conversation with Frankie in which we discussed using it to test out different movement patterns in re bjj and that he had some success with it

dunno
interesting though

caveat

I am a lvl 2 z practitioner, FMS, and RKC, CICS so I have had some experience in the disciplines
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
selfcritical
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« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2010, 03:40:57 PM »

He's had some, but it's not like he's decimating the Dallas BJJ scene, which is kind of what you'd expect if everyone else is training wrong and he alone is doing things that don't hinder performance.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2010, 06:08:42 PM »

He's had some, but it's not like he's decimating the Dallas BJJ scene, which is kind of what you'd expect if everyone else is training wrong and he alone is doing things that don't hinder performance.

lol
yeah...
well
I am interested in the aspect of people moderating their exertion based on a simple biometric like rom

if one

A:knows how to move or perform a skill
B:can keep their practice germane to their goals

then it seems a decent tool to add to the box

they teach it to us in Z, but it is not the end of the road, not saying that is the end for the gm folks either, but they do seem to be leaving a lot out of the public stuff
the gnr dvds are better
I like Adam though, so maybe I am biased, he has the lion's heart thing going and honestly seems to want to make people better


back on topic

the idea of testing a ma movement or drill came up and I thought I would do some research outside of the dd and z community
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
selfcritical
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« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2010, 12:37:29 PM »

Adam's latest blog was.....a tad intense.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2010, 12:54:36 PM »

Adam's latest blog was.....a tad intense.

I do love Adam, he is a genuine individual all the way down to the core

this is I assume to what you refer
http://www.adamtglass.com/2010/07/15/gym-movement-karate-do-or-karate-dont/
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
stilljames
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« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2010, 04:30:57 PM »

Interesting blog entry.  I happen to agree with 95 percent of it.  The personal best for a given day mentality that I use has driven some of my more accounting-style gym partners to distraction over the years.

 The only thing I might halfway disagree with is in Point 7. Yes, at a certain point, we should all let go and just do things the way our body wants to do them naturally.  But we also need to periodically monitor ourselves to see if we're generating small tensions and problems in ourselves because some of them build up so gradually that it takes 6-8 weeks to notice the damage. 

A fascinating exposition, overall.  And something that I have noticed repeated all too often in life.  Very often, the majority will actually disagree with something but no one actually wants to say anything for one reason or another.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2010, 09:05:03 AM »

Interesting blog entry.  I happen to agree with 95 percent of it.  The personal best for a given day mentality that I use has driven some of my more accounting-style gym partners to distraction over the years.

 The only thing I might halfway disagree with is in Point 7. Yes, at a certain point, we should all let go and just do things the way our body wants to do them naturally.  But we also need to periodically monitor ourselves to see if we're generating small tensions and problems in ourselves because some of them build up so gradually that it takes 6-8 weeks to notice the damage. 

A fascinating exposition, overall.  And something that I have noticed repeated all too often in life.  Very often, the majority will actually disagree with something but no one actually wants to say anything for one reason or another.

a big part of that methodology, is that you do much of the work getting the system to function at a higher level on a very specific scale
using the test, assess, retest methodology for all constituent parts of the activity and sussing out where the highest level of threat response resides in the nervous system, then performing specific tasks to modulate that threat response

I like peripheral vision and closed eye one leg balance as a means of testing for response
vision is the first thing to respond to threat in the cns, so its an easy test

Selfcritical, watch your mailbox, should be there by next tues
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
stilljames
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2010, 06:48:47 AM »

I'm more of a BJJ dabbler than a true practitioner.  I spend 90 percent of my time doing other things and do just enough plus the occasional tournament to keep my hand in.  But a good friend of mine loves BJJ and trains it constantly.  He's a former Mr. Tennessee from years ago.  He also spent 6 years practicing Tai Chi along with me.  He finds that the self-analysis and internal feedback he learned in Tai Chi lets him take apart BJJ moves and figure out where he's got problems and work on fixing them.

Reading the biofeedback stuff made me realize that one of the main purposes of the Tai Chi form and also various Yoga routines was to calm the mind and quiet the body so one could listen to ones heart rate, respiration and feel the nervous system response and work to change it.  In effect, it functions as a form of biofeedback without the aid of modern devices.  Modern equipment certainly makes things easier and much more reliable, of course.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2010, 09:14:32 AM »

mindfullness is a giant leap for some
just paying attention lol

one of the things that made stick fighting shine so brightly for me

its honesty

you can not ignore or bs
you did or you did not
there are no half measures, no boasting, no bravado
the stick, like steel and lead, always tells the truth
and you will ignore it at your peril  grin
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
stilljames
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« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2010, 05:05:32 AM »

*laugh* I've said something similar for years about serious martial arts training:

I can BS my friends.  I can BS myself.  It is hard to BS an honest punch, kick or stick coming at me.  Either the technique works the way it should or it does not.  And I can fix either myself or the technique if it fails.  Unless I want to keep getting hit.

I find that I am learning to apply the same self-critical view to other things in my life, these days.  It may take years to adjust something but most things that are just habits can be reset over time.
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